Bardus – Stella Porta

bardus_2016_RingMasterReview

Fresh from a US tour with Grizzlor and on the first step of another American tour, this time with The Glorious Rebellion in celebration of their new album Euphoric, Philadelphia hailing Bardus have their own slice of sonic delight being uncaged courtesy of Solar Flare Records. Released the April 1st, the opening date of the tour, Stella Porta is a rich and uncompromising seven track maelstrom of sludge, grunge, noise, and psych rock forcibly showing exactly why so many people are making vocal fuss about the trio.

Formed in 2011, Bardus quickly showed that their sound and songs was never going to settle into one style or predictable design. Their self-released debut album Solus in 2013 proved that; its well-received uncaging the spark to a growing reputation built and pushed by the band’s DIY intent and live presence which has seen them regularly tour and share stages with numerous national acts. As Stella Porta infests the senses, it feels like it just might be the wake-up all to those yet to be challenged and persuaded by the band’s vociferously intrusive sound. If that is not to be, it is certainly a potent and impressive step to grow that success from.

The album starts with the voraciously compelling Smoke Bath, a track which instantly grips ears and appetite with the controlled stroll of Kyle Pierce’s beats and the grouchily infectious growl of Ari Rosenberg’s bass. Soon it is awash with the caustic strokes and sonic animosity of guitar, Justin Tuck casting an invasive web of discord fuelled drama matched by his raw throated vocal squalls and angst. It is a gripping start to the release, noise and punk drenched rock ‘n’ roll with thick anthemic prowess stirring up imagination and passions ready for the equally rousing exploits of Monolith. As with the first song, there is a touch of label stable mates Sofy Major and the likes of Unsane to the track but every impacting swing and raw sonic trespass only reveals a voice and character unique to Bardus; those essences of familiarity merging with fascinatingly fresh and beguiling imagination.

SLF022 - hi-res cover_RingMasterReviewSky King backs that up with its opening sonic mist offering a recognisable air but soon igniting into a furious punk ‘n’ roll tango with flirtatious rhythms and an addictive hook alongside a senses scarring vocal attack within a noise infested tempest of blistering intensity and ever shifting enterprise. Irresistible in its unbridled rampage and evocatively intrusive in its calmer inhospitality, the song incites fresh urges of  hunger in an already eager appetite before the thicker doomy atmospherics of Transcendence wrap a sludgy, bordering on funereal, canvas of suggestiveness. There is venomous vitriol and intimidating portentousness to its enveloping animus though which incites a lively almost rancorous energy to the track.

Living up to its name, Haze provides an opening raw embrace which sonically drifts and evocatively lies on ears, enveloping the listener as clean vocals align with an infectiously inviting and melodically distorted passage of calmer flirtation. As expected it is soon ablaze though, ferocious vocal discontent and sonic dissonance drenching song and recipient before rotating between the two extremes for another keenly favourite moment of Stella Porta to which the Melvin-esque Oracle creates a matching pinnacle with its own abrasive rock ‘n’ roll with ire stained vocals and an insatiable virulence in hooks and spicy grooves. As everywhere upon the album, there is theatre to the songwriting and its inventive portrayal which fuels a web of intrigue and imagination which right here is unafraid to involve surf and psych rock seducing in a tempest of belligerent noise and intent.

Clandestine brings the release to a jaundiced yet inescapably bewitching grudge of a close, guitars and voice the corrosive roar around the more controlled but no less impacting rhythmic predation offered. Though maybe not quite igniting the passions as many of its predecessors, it is a fine to an excellent intrusion on body and emotions.

Like so many albums recently, Stella Porta takes its time to rise to its full creative height but as many, each play only enhances its qualities and irresistible persuasion to show why Bardus is becoming a favourite challenging flavour for a great many.

Stella Porta is released April 1st via Solar Flare Records @ http://shop.solarflarerds.com/products/567534-preorder-bardus-stella-porta-cd-digital

https://www.facebook.com/BardusMusic   http://bardus.bandcamp.com

Pete RingMaster 01/04/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com/

Sofy Major – Waste

Sofy_Major_pic2015_RingMaster Review

After the merciless conditions which opposed the band when recording their acclaimed second album Idolize, including hurricane, flooding, loss of equipment for the band and the studio they were recording at, we assume the recording of its successor was an easier time for French rockers Sofy Major in comparison. What we can be certain of is that the time since the 2013 release and the unveiling of Waste has seen the band grow in presence and sound to hit another lofty peak with their new proposition. Waste is a glorious slab of rock ‘n’ roll; a storming proposal retaining the raw energy and uncompromising snarl of previous releases but also revealing a more melodic and composed touch to the wonderful volatility that persistently sets the Sofy Major sound as something to get excited over. Also as the last album, the Clermont-Ferrand trio has offered another essential slab of rock adventure to devour greedily, a temptation hard to see many refusing.

Produced by Dave Curran (Unsane, Pigs, Big Business), mixed by Andrew Schneider (Pigs, Julie Christmas, Unsane), and mastered by Carl Saff, Waste opens with its title track and an instantly intimidating and magnetic growl of noise and punk rock driven by heavy rock grooves and grizzly bass riffs. The vocals of bassist Mathieu Moulin roar with intensity yet equally an inviting tone, luring attention as a host of spicy grooves and tempting hooks add matching appeal within the increasingly carnivorous maelstrom of energy brewing across the track. It is a gripping and potent start to the release backed up in kind by We See Fire and a quickly emerging big hook of a slim but irresistible chorus. Twisting and turning with each breath, the song captivates like a fusion of The Great Sabatini, The Fat Dukes Of Fuck, and UK band The St Pierre Snake Invasion, great vocals from Moulin and drummer Mathieu Desternes around the increasingly enthralling guitar enterprise of Sébastien Fournet enslaving ears and imagination.

sofy_major_cover_RingMaster Review   Turning Point is just as adept and creative at raising the passions, its irritable bass bait inescapable addictiveness matched in success by the swinging gait of the song and its casting of contagious and psyche infesting grooves. There is a familiarity to this and the songs before it, but of Sofy Major only and taken to richer and more virulent levels, proof again coming with the bearish textures and roar of Slow Everywhere, it a bruising captivation as sonically antagonistic as it is roguishly captivating with the bass especially fiendish in its grumbling tone.

Variety is another returning aspect to the Sofy Major songwriting and ingenuity, the classic rock hook of Infinite Pill Case a wrong-footing tease from which the song tenaciously explores a weave of rhythmic agitation and guitar bred imagination impressively led by the ever alluring vocal delivery of Moulin. With unpredictability another constant throughout the rock ‘n’ roll bellow of the album, the song has body and emotions quickly involved, leaving an exhausted and full appetite in its wake for Black and Table to keep thoroughly satisfied through its slower wrapping of ears with sinister intent and stalking magnetism.

An essence of post punk flavours Iron Butt next, a spicing lacing the web spun by Fournet’s fingers whilst Devotion Man brings a more grungy essence to its enticing brew of noise and punkish confrontation. Both tracks get the blood racing in different ways as they inflame the air, the first with a more urgent tempest and its successor through a controlled yet predatory canter which uses every breath to create an infectious coaxing.

The album concludes with an excellent cover of the Les Thugs song As Happy As, Sofy Major taking the track to darker and again more post punk depths whilst increasing its virulence. Rarely does a cover match an original but the closing song on Waste is more than a thrilling match for its inspiration.

Fair to say a soft spot for Sofy Major through their previous albums, Idolise especially, has become much more lustful thanks to Waste. Rock ‘n’ roll does not get much more carnivorously attractive and exhilarating than this so get those ears and pennies ready

Waste will be released via Solar Flare Records on October 30th on 12″ vinyl, CD, and digitally. Preordering available @ http://shop.solarflarerds.com/categories/pre-orders

Pigs/Sofy Major European Tour Dates:

15.10.15 : London @ Power Lunches

16.10.15 : Paris @ Le Picolo

17.10.15 : Liège @ La Zone

18.10.15 : Vesoul @ Café Français

21.10.15 : Cologne @ Sonic Ballroom

22.10.15 : Lille @ La Péniche

23.10.15 : Rotterdam @ Poppodium Baroe

24.10.15 : Bruxelles @ Magasin 4

25.10.15 : Genève @ L’Usine

26.10.15 : Prague @ Exit Us

27.10.15 : Vienne @ Fluc

28.10.15 : Bologne @ Freakout Club

29.10.15 : Rome @ Init

30.10.15 : Savona@ Raindogs House

31.10.15 : Milan @ Lo Fi + Mutoid Man

04.11.15 : Montpellier @ Black Sheep

05.11.15 : Lyon @ Grrrd Zero

07.11.15 : Bergerac @ Gare Mondiale

09.11.15 : Clermont-Ferrand @ La Coopérative de Mai

10.11.15 : Bordeaux @ Iboat

11.11.15 : Toulouse @ Pavillons Sauvages

12.11.15 : Poitiers @ Grand Café

13.11.15 : Rouen @ Kalif

http://www.sofymajor.com   https://www.facebook.com/sofymajor

Pete RingMaster 13/10/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com/

Pigs – Wronger

pigs_2015_RingMaster Review

If you are looking for a noise rock treat to end the impending year’s end on a high, we have the new Pigs album to suggest. Equally if you are looking for a ferocious punk rock tempest, or an uncompromising rock ‘n’ roll confrontation, Wronger fits the bill perfectly too. The new album from the New York City trio of Dave Curran from Unsane, Jim Paradise of Player’s Club and Freshkills, and Andrew Schneider (renowned producer with the likes of Cave In, Converge, Made Out of Babies, Unsane, and Keelhaul on his CV), is a brawl you will only get increasingly excited to be swallowed up by. It is a blaze of scarring imagination as virulently addictive as it is mercilessly abrasive, and indeed bracing. Pigs made a mighty debut with first album You Ruin Everything in 2012, cemented and pushed their refreshing presence with the Gaffe EP the following year, but Wronger is a whole new caustic bitch slap of pleasure and aggressive adventure to get fired up by.

It opens with the sonic infestation of A Great Blight, a diseased web of noise hypnotically living up to the creeping invasiveness of its title. The instrumental piece crawls over the senses and into the psyche, eroding defences with its repetitious whilst The Life In Pink waits in the wings to fill its departing void. The second track though rather than quickly assaulting ears weaves in on a flirtatious hook cast by Curran’s guitar, its successful lure shaking under the impact of Paradise’s composed and resonating beats. In no time the bass of Schneider growls with a predacious passion whilst the riffs and vocals of Curran add grizzled attitude and prowess to the song’s emerging heavy stroll. It is a raw and thickly enticing bluster, tempestuous rock ‘n’ roll which ensures an inescapable persuasion, especially with the re-occurring delicious hook which sets things rolling.

pigs_wronger_cover_RingMaster Review     The following Bet It All On Black leaps in with a punk swagger and impossible to resist rhythmic devilry, willing feet and hips recruited as rapidly as ears and imagination through another delicious hook which this time has a whiff of post punk addictiveness to it. Schneider swings an equally magnetic and infectious groove through his ever bestial toned bass, another spice to the gripping drama and threat of the track, an intimidation emulated in Amateur Hour In Dick City though it pursues a more hard rock flavouring to its noise rock volatility. As in all songs, things evolve though, turn in on themselves and bring new twists and exploits to contemplate. Without quite matching its predecessors, there is only an infection to the eventful song which flows eagerly before Mope descends on the listener with its scuzz woven tapestry of meandering grooves, intoxicating hooks, and predatory rhythms. A smothering cloud of raw noise is the best description, this veined by virulent temptations and, within certain brief partings of its worrisome clouds, melodic toxicity for major addictiveness.

     Wrap It Up is the same, its hostile climate and abusive physical invention increasingly persuasive with every sonic lancing and rally of rhythmic bullying colluding in something quite bewitching as it corrodes the senses. Imagine Joy Division meets Unsane and you get a sense of part of the excellent encounter, though again it is a proposition shifting tact and character minute by minute.

The Cajun twang of Mouth Dump and its thumping beats around a trio of spoken vocals spark thoughts next, its short insight a respite yet provocateur in a way setting up the scathing roar of Make Sure To Forget, another sonically cancerous slice of punk/noise agitation with its own tasty Buzzcocks scented hook. As seriously pleasing as it is, it does not rival in success other songs around it, emphasizing their might, and is unlucky to be followed by the majorly outstanding Bug Boy, a song which makes you forget the past three or so minutes as soon as it scurries under the skin. Featuring guest vocals from ex-Made Out of Babies/Battle of Mice front woman Julie Christmas, the track is a ravenous tempest once again entwining imagination infesting grooves and hooks, barbarous rhythms, and a vocal bedlam to get greedy over.

Wronger is brought to a close by firstly its physically cantankerous title track and lastly the extensive bellow of Donnybrook. Both songs grip forcibly as they abrase and tempt, the first hitting its sweet spot around midway when it dips into a haunting melodic aside still walled by raw shadows and waiting to bellow sonic animosity. Its eight minute successor prowls and lurches through ears with doomy breath and volatile temperament, becoming more unpredictable and magnetic as a warm calm emerges from its erosive landscape and in turn brews its own dark imposing atmosphere which becomes the dominate wind of fascination. A slow burner compared to some, the track is undoubtedly a mighty end to a thoroughly enjoyable trespass.

The album is easily Pigs finest moment to date, but you get the feeling still just a step to bigger and bolder things from the band. As Christmas lists are being drawn up, Wronger is one to place at the top for all violent rock ‘n’ roll fans with no regrets found through this thrilling beast

Wronger is out now via Solar Flare Records on 12” vinyl, CD, and digitally @ http://music.solarflarerds.com/album/wronger

http://www.pigsnyc.com     https://www.facebook.com/pigsnyc

Pete RingMaster 13/10/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com/

Fashion Week – Prêt-à-Porter

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US noise breeders Fashion Week have a sound which is as scathing as it is caustic yet treats the listener like a king with regal melodies and provocative nuances within the ferocious encounters they call songs. As proven by new album Prêt-à-Porter, it is a striking and intimidating proposition but one that ears and emotions, certainly with the band’s fresh provocation, find hard to get enough of. The NYC trio prey on the senses, torment the psyche, and persistently inflame the imagination, whilst through Prêt-à-Porter provide one of the year’s most compelling releases so far.

Fashion Week consists of guitarist/vocalist Josh Lozano (Inswarm, Jarboe, Cobalt, Family), drummer Carl Eklof (Victory at Sea, Lidia Stone, Inswarm), and bassist Oscar Albis Rodriguez (A Great Big World, No Way, Nakatomi Plaza), and began its sonic explorations, if you go by the band’s bio, supposedly around the late 1980s. Three albums have been tucked under the band’s belts, though we can only find evidence beyond their words of the excellent EPs, Applicator (2011) and Coextinction #11 (2013), whilst and similarly again according to their bio, 1994 saw the death of Lozano, though this tragedy has been apparently followed by his ghost ripping up sounds and invention in bands like Family and Inswarm. There is a ripe confusion and humour to the band which certainly in the case of the latter, spreads to the music in many ways and adds to the fun of digging and exploring deep into debut album Prêt-à-Porter to reap all their inventive twists which come with the choicest rewards.

Opener Fendi Bender instantly treats ears to a sonic smooch before expelling a flavoursome blast of agitated rhythms and spicy riffs aligned to a delicious growl of a bass presence. A respite is in place as the clean tones of Lozano open up the lyrical narrative over those still highly tempting beats, a moment carrying a definite Nirvana-esque whiff to it. It is soon immersed in a wall of sonic hostility and vocal ferocity but gains a foothold again as the raw wave ebbs back readying itself for another intensive return. It is a captivating slice of diversely flavoured noise rock which swiftly has ears and appetite enlisted in the album’s potential and soon to be revealed addictive adventure.

Chorusace is the first to reinforce and feed that promise; its vocal sufferance an angst driven squall over transfixing rhythms and seductive grooves, both courted by just as magnetic shards of Pret_a_Portersonic ingenuity. Thoughts of Converge and Melvins come to mind during the track’s brief tenure, but also suggestions of the inventiveness of bands such as At the Drive In and Coilguns. It is the same with the excellent Meek is Miznabble which follows, the song’s beats and sonic tenacity, a maelstrom of unpredictable and furiously agitated ideation, though it too embraces a calmer and more relaxed passage of clean vocals and winey grooving.

The slow enticing of Summer Line keeps the fire of album and enjoyment burning next. The carnivorous tone of the bass is a thick instigator of the song’s prowling gait and oppressive shadows whilst Lozano’s guitar winds melodically around them with seductive tendencies. Again the eye of the storm moments of the provocation has a Cobain and co spicing whilst the tempestuous roar and corrosive brawl of the track is all Fashion Week designing.

The swinging sticks of Eklof provide a contagious trap as Fur Free Friday leaps into ears next, his inventive enticing an infectious lead into the melodic intrigue and creative maze of the song. Its sinews and bellow is not far from the surface though, expelling ire and antagonism within the magnetic landscape of the outstanding encounter.

The piano led Klosstrophobia explores a web of sound straight after; post and noise rock colluding with elements of death and post hardcore for an enthralling and intensive examination of songwriting and listener. It takes time to fully reveal its strengths, casting a slower persuasion compared to other songs but finding powerful success ultimately, which is not quite the same for “FASHION”=~S/(\$)/COLLAPSE/GSO. A patchwork of vocal samples over a mist of sonic distortion, the track is more an intro to the closing Haute Topic, though if not meant that way its intent was missed by our understanding. It is ok but easy to pass over after a couple of runs of the album foiled by the urge to dive into the triumph of Haute Topic. Grunge, noise, and melodic escapades all twist around each other for a thrilling and explosive conclusion to the album. It is the pinnacle of the release, helped further by the incendiary mixes of vocal delivery, sonic styles, and simply warped imagination, and almost alone gives the reason why Fashion Week should be on the catwalk of your attention.

     Prêt-à-Porter is a treat which might take time to steal your ardour but eventually will become one of the year’s favourite events.

Prêt-à-Porter is available now digitally, Cd, and 12” vinyl via Solar Flare Records @ http://music.solarflarerds.com/album/pr-t-porter

https://www.facebook.com/FashionWeekBand

RingMaster 25/02/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @  http://www.thereputationlabel.today

 

American Heritage – Prolapse

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With the departure of vocalist/guitarist Adam Norden following its recording, Prolapse from American Heritage might be the last thing heard from the Chicago band, but if this is so what a way to go out. It is a beast of a proposition, a tsunami of controlling grooves, belligerently aggressive rhythms, and a primal force of voice and breath. It is bullying mass of provocation and passion, a lingering statement from what will be a sorely missed band if there is to be no more.

Consisting of six new tracks and three covers brought in the fusion of thick sludge metal, imagination binding mathcore, and abrasing noise rock/hardcore ferocity the quartet is renowned for, the successor to acclaimed 2011 album Sedentary, uncages a caustic savaging which rivals anything they have unleashed before. Recorded with Sanford Parker and released through Solar Flare Records, sixth album Prolapse quite simply brings the band’s presence since 1996 to an incendiary and exhilarating end.

From the first sonic blast of opener Eastward Cast the Entrails, band and album has ears and attention severely grasped, the punishing initial touch leading into a bruising maelstrom of ferocious rhythms, corrosive riffs, and brawling vocals. Within the tempest though grooves raucously flirt and technical prowess seduces, the track increasingly expanding and flourishing in the imagination and emotions. Equally as it grows contagiousness coats the tenacity and enterprise of the guitars and rhythmic antagonism, the provocation becoming as seductive as it is hostile ensuring an insatiable and explosive start to the album swiftly matched by its successor.

Anxious Bedwetter roars and assaults with the entwined charm of Corrosion of Conformity, Mastodon, and Agnostic Front, it swiftly buffeting and igniting emotions with a torrential american_heritage_prolapseonslaught of raw riffery and rhythmic violence cast by drummer Mike Duffy. Again though there is a virulent temptation from scorching melodies and spicy grooves at work, all as uncompromising as the heart of the encounter but spreading irresistible magnetic toxicity. Vocally Norden leaves no syllable and emotion untainted by venom and anger whilst his and fellow guitarist Scott Shellhamer’s sonic temptation is simply bracing.

The pair of Obliviocrity and Constant and Consuming Fear of Death and Dying make no compromises on the senses, the first from another debilitating sonic squall and with nostrils flared, rampaging through ears on a breath-taking sonic turbulence and rhythmic inhospitality. To the destructiveness though again grooves are enflamed with a melodically brewed acidity and creative spice which invigorates and sears the senses. Its quick hellacious ravishment is contrasted by the prowling presence of the second of the pair. Reaped from the predatory essences of doom and sludge, the song crawls provocatively over the listener, imposing and oppressing in its air whilst exploring a brighter terrain of engaging melodies and radiant invention. There is still a menace to its raw beauty though, the band finding the same kind of dark allurement which has blessed the music of Killing Joke over the decades, bassist Erik Bocek, a constant primal enticement across the whole release, bringing forceful heavy seduction to the body of the song.

The hardcore severity always lurking within American Heritage is given full rein in the outstanding Mask of Lies next, the track a furnace of spite and rage with flesh flailing rhythms and riffery to match. It is a savaging you can only embrace and invite back time and time again, much as the next up Blackbird, it a hellacious forging of hardcore, punk, and noise rock rancor with psyche twisting invention. The track is a glorious predator and the pinnacle of the album, a relentless creative scourge which just has you drooling for more and ears and emotions exhausted.

The departure of the triumph is the start of the trio of covers on the album, starting with the outstanding take of the Descendents track Hürtin’ Crüe. It is an erosive swamp of sonic and vocal intensity, a merciless blaze with the charm of a public flogging and quite irresistible. It is followed by the Black Flag track Thirsty and Miserable, American Heritage treating it to their own kind of barbarous enterprise and stormily inventive bad blood before moving on to Bulletproof Cupid, the Girls Against Boys encounter. Openly salacious from its first vocal caress and fiercely imposing as soon as its first note preys on ears, the song is a delicious sinister seduction and dare one say even more potent than the original.

The track brings another unmissable offering from American Heritage to a fine close. What will be missed is the band’s presence, that realisation reinforced by Prolapse as it scars the senses whilst sparking a big tinge of sadness. Things move on and you just feel further raw adventures will be ahead in some guise from the members of the band, something very easy to breed an excited anticipation for, especially after this grand finale.

Prolapse is available now digitally and as CD and vinyl versions via Solar Flare Records @ http://music.solarflarerds.com/album/prolapse or http://americanheritage.bandcamp.com

https://www.facebook.com/americanheritageband

RingMaster26/11/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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Pord – Wild

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Employing a cauldron of hostile noise rock soaked in sonic causticity, Wild is a proposition which simply lights up ears and passions as it numbs and abuses the senses. The new album from French band Pord, the release is an exhilarating and at times gorgeous violation of sonic ingenuity which inspires a deep hunger for more. Their sound is not going to be for everyone but if the likes of Keelhaul, Melt Banana, or Craw tick all the right boxes then Wild is a must investigation.

Formed in 2001, Pord hail from Lozère and through line-up changes evolved with a raw and imposing sound which was not the initial intention of the band on its emergence according to the new album’s press release. Thankfully the band has taken, whether organically or intentionally, a corrosive and raucous route with their sound which has increasingly garnered potent attention and following. Their well-received debut album Valparaiso three years ago drew acclaim towards the trio yet it is easy to feel that Wild will brew a much more vocal and aggressive attention once its uncompromising claws dig in.

Recorded with Serge Morattel (Knut, Tantrum, Ventura, Basement) at Rec Studio in Geneva and released via Solar Flare Records, the album instantly lights up ears and thoughts with Staring Into Space. The first thing igniting the pord_wildpassions is the bass, its presence from the first second offering more primal testosterone than a pair of rutting stags and never losing its carnivorous snarl and beauty across the whole release. Its bestial predation and animal magnetism is soon joined by scythes of guitar, their sonic swipes no less attractive and spiteful on the senses. Drums as swiftly add their antagonistic punches whilst vocal squalls roar with an element of restraint within the storming mix. It is a riveting mix, the repetitive bass lures irresistible whilst the guitar casts scorched tendrils of enterprise which almost crawl in the songs slower sludgier moments and charge with a melodic tailwind when the song opens up a cauldron of energy.

The song is a tremendous start, hooks and grooves lethally delicious, and swiftly matched by I’m Swimming Home. The second song is like a mix of KEN Mode and the now demised Kabul Golf Club, its caustic melodies and abrasing textures simultaneously threatening and seductive, not forgetting ridiculously addictive. Vocals are submerged in the tempest of sound but still a potent protagonist in the contagion of noise and bullying enterprise. As with most of the tracks, there is a swagger and array of barbed creative hooks which are virulent in their persuasion to slightly temper and often accentuate the hostile tenacity. It is formidable romance of noise which is contrasted impressively by My Bloody Galantine. Whereas the previous song has an endearing side, the third track is a predator of the psyche, crawling over the senses with a sinister gait and intimidating ferocity honed into a primal stalking loaded with sludge thick intensity. It is a carnal beast of a track and no less compelling than it’s, shall we say ‘lighter’ companions on the album.

The short fury of Laguiole Bull’s Balls is outstanding. It just exceeds a minute and digs up old school hostility to its sonic furnace and an ever debilitating bass enticing which recalls early Killing Joke in many ways. The devastating statement is followed by the scarring qualities of What Are Tuesdays For? which from a menacing and ear splitting entrance, unleashes a rhythmic agitation and sonic maelstrom which blisters every surface it touches whilst sparking another epidemic of seductive infectiousness. The track has a real swing to its bones as it launches its own insatiable and senses scorching web of sound and ultimately leaving ears blissfully ringing by the time of its departure.

Pools’n’Chicks is another sparking thoughts of earlier eras. Its raging intent and creative wall of sonic temptation proceeds to evolve through a post punk like cold snap and predation before developing a rhythmic addictiveness and discord driven expanse of noise aligned to a raw aggravation. It is an incitement which reminds of The Fire Engines and The Fall as it uncages its mouth-watering tide of sound, living up to the album title whilst sculpting its own addiction forging glory.

The album ends with On The Couch, a final and individual furnace of sonic oppression and rhythmic ferocity which inescapably thrills as it bludgeons ears, body and. soul. It is a last exhausting vindictive suasion, an eleven minute plus violent, corrosive dance within a haunting and menacing atmosphere, and quite brilliant.

As mentioned Wild may not be for all but with a body and soul which lives up to its name, it is one of the physically unhealthy and emotionally invigorating triumphs of2014.

Wild is available via Solar Flare Records now @ http://music.solarflarerds.com/album/wild

https://www.facebook.com/pordnoise

9/10

RingMaster 08/09/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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Conjuring Noise: The Great Sabatini Interview

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Having inflamed like so many others, our passions with their blistering intensive and thrilling album Matterhorn, Canadian noise metallers The Great Sabatini returned earlier this year with an even greater mouthwatering proposition. Third album Dog Years is a masterful tempest exuding virulently destructive and invasive sonic devilry; an enthralling examination and manipulation of the senses. Not needing to be asked twice, we rifled questions at Sean from the band to discover the depths of The Great Sabatini, talking about origins, lyrical intimacy, musical magick and much more…

Hey Sean good to meet you and thanks for giving over some of your time to chat with us.

Tell us about the birth of The Great Sabatini and the time leading up to the uncaging of the band in 2007?

Hey, nice to meet you too. It’s our pleasure to talk a bit about our dumb selves. All of us came together when bands we were previously in collapsed. We all decided to start moving away from the kind of things each of us had been doing with past efforts, musically. It seemed to come together easily, naturally. We just kind of went with the flow.

How did the four Sabatini’s meet?

Rob and I have been playing music together since we were 15 or so. We’ve played in bands together since that time. We knew Joey from other bands around town, and even shared a jam room together years before we started playing together. We met Steve in Sudbury, 2004 at a really crappy weekend fest that both of our bands at the time were playing. We became fast friends, and the rest is history.

Did the band start out with a specific intent and is that still the same driving force now or has it evolved with your music?

I think the only intent really was to move away from our previous musical comfort zones. Rob and I were used to writing more technical metal things in standard tuning, so there was a focused effort to distance ourselves from that. We bought baritone guitars and started slowing things down naturally, due to the nature of the much lower tuning and feel of the instruments. You can’t be as busy sometimes when you’re playing in a lower register, so riffs start slowing down for clarity’s sake. In regards to intent, it’s the same as it was from day one; keep challenging ourselves to create music that subverts our own comfort zones as artists. It might not be a huge leap from record to record, but there is movement, and growth, with every new project we take on

You sound is a unique brew of noise, sludge, doom, progressive rock…and plenty more. How would you describe it to simplify things?

As a kind of inside joke, we refer to our sound as “swamp trench arithmetic”. Maybe it hints at a sludgy math-rock vibe… Usually I describe us as a sludge band, because for all the variety rolled into our songs, all of it is pretty grimy or sludge-based. The end result is sort of wrapped up in this sludgy package.

We discovered you through your second album Matterhorn, a startling and riveting treat to our ears. How would you say your music and 1964881_815898598424769_284230856_ncreativity has changed and evolved from your first days, through that great album and onto the just released Dog Years?

I think that, as songwriters, we focus on making things simpler; communicating ideas in a simpler way. Part of that is recognising our strengths, and reining them in. We want to include a myriad of ideas and influences into our sound but feed them through our creative process in a way that results in more a more cohesive end result. I suppose one might call it “nuance”… Not something that most folks associate with brutal, loud music, but I feel that there’s more and more depth and nuance to our songs as we go. Matterhorn was the first time I really felt like we’d accomplished a certain level of that in our music. The songs are relatively simple in structure and riffing, and seem straight forward production-wise, but there’s a subtle balance of feels and ideas stitched together throughout. I think Dog Years employs this much better. Taken at face value, it’s a loud, raw, angry record, but there’s a lot going on in the songs, in a way that isn’t like an overt genre mash-up kind of thing.

We feel the brilliant Dog Years, and it is, is less cruel and destructive than its predecessor but has a more intensive and precise examination of the psyche which makes it just as exhilarating and threatening. Is that something you would agree with?

I do agree. Matterhorn was about cruelty and violence and the harshness of life, ‘cos that’s what I felt when I heard the music we were writing. Dog Years, musically and lyrically, is kind of exploring the things that drove us to play music initially. It has some throwback moments with the punkier parts, and maybe it rocks out a little easier. I still feel like it’s a punishing, loud, angry record but maybe you picked up on the focus of the record. It’s hard to tell sometimes, as the creators of the music, how much of what we’re saying is obvious and how much is completely buried in the end result, but Dog Years is more of a look inside OUR heads and our history, to some extent.

Did you approach the writing and recording of your third album in any way differently to the previous release?

Well, we usually do a lot of writing together in the jam room but a few small bits were demoed separately and sent out via email to the guys, and then tweaked and moulded by each of us on our own time. The songs are totally malleable… they can change easily before we hit the studio. In the past, a lot of our material, especially the Matterhorn stuff, was played on the road a lot before it was recorded, so the songs adapted and changed a bit more, but almost all of the Dog Years material was written and then quickly recorded with less time to mutate. Maybe that gave it a bit more immediacy, or urgency.

I guess the studio and recording process is something always bringing new lessons and discoveries which can be used or avoided next time. Was there anything from Matterhorn which had that inspiration and any new things learned with Dog Years?

There’s always a learning curve. We’re always learning things and trying to apply them the next time around. I can’t think of any major things that happened with Matterhorn that wound up shaping Dog Years in an obvious way… we’ve always strived to make things sound more raw, natural or live-sounding on our records and Matterhorn was a nice step in that direction, but Dog Years, I feel, has a bit more of that raw thing going on.

How long was the new album in the making?

We started writing in earnest at the start of 2013. We spent a lot less time on the road that year and really just focused on writing. By December 2013 we were in the studio and by February of this year the record was mastered. It was a pretty quick turnover, for us.

Like a great many bands do you have to struggle and deal with obstacles of everyday life when it comes to creating and certainly recording a record?

Obstacles are always present. But we’ve been a band for almost 7 years and we deal with things together, in a focused manner, quite efficiently. Making records is something we’re always trying to get better at, but we’ve all been doing it for over ten years and our collective experience is constantly being employed to overcome any obstacle. Thankfully, we’re all really good friends, so we’re good at working together to accomplish our goals

There seems an intimacy at times to the lyrical side of your music which suggests inspirations often come from things close to home and personal experiences. Give us some idea of stories or situations to songs upon Dog Years.

Some of the songs relate to people or things in our personal history. Pitchfork Pete is about a guy Rob and I knew many years ago. Some of the songs deal with our rituals, our perception of our lives as romantic black-magick purveyors of the Almighty Riff. When the reality of being a penniless touring musician sets in, the thing that keeps us going is the magic. Music is total magic and we have fun projecting some kind of cartoonish self-importance onto the band. It’s much more fun to think of ourselves as traveling Riff-Warlocks spreading the unholy gospel of Satan through amplified guitar riffs than it is to see ourselves as the jaded, ageing heshers that we ACTUALLY are. We’re following our dreams. Dog Years is a glimpse into that world, we hope. Lyrically it’s all about that… the world we’ve created for ourselves, full of feral beasts, oracles, war-cries, Viking battle-lust and strange visions. But sometimes this kind of fantasy shit collides with the naked truth of our choices in life, and that’s where the “Dog Years” thing comes in. One day, maybe, we’ll be old men looking back on these times as our Dog Years, all that time we spent hammering away at our dreams.

487212_598817973466167_250606339_nHow does the creation of songs more often than not transpire in the band?

More often than not, Rob and I write riffs or ideas in our own time, and then, when we get together, the ideas are presented and everyone puts forth their own takes on the riffs and we arrange the structures together. There isn’t any one mastermind. Everyone’s fingerprints are on the end result.

Is there a particular moment or twist in Dog Years which gives you an extra inner tingle of pride or just satisfaction?

I think each of us probably has his own moment like that, but for me, Akela was one of those. I wasn’t thinking that would be on the record, but the guys heard my demo, and wanted it to be there. It’s a pretty naked thing, for me, to have a song like that on there. There isn’t any wall of noise to hide behind. I recorded that in my room at home and everyone agreed that to re-record it might ruin it. So, I feel pretty happy that Akela is on the final cut.

Tell us about the great ‘scary’ album cover.

We wanted the cover to reflect our childhood in some weird way. We were aiming for an image that looked borrowed, from another time, not from 2014. I made the puppet, and he represents a certain aspect of our collective personality. Rather than actually steal an old image that may have worked just as well, we opted to create this thing ourselves and hopefully imbue that aspect into it in a subtle way. Really, I want people to see it, react to it, and fill it in with whatever feeling they think is best.

The album has been released on the great Solar Flare Records. How did that come about and is it true that the equally brilliant Sofy Major has some inspirational input?

We met Sofy Major first in North America when they came here to make a record and tour a bit and then later when we played with them in France. Sofy Major/Solar Flare are the raddest dudes on the planet, so their interest in Dog Years is incredibly flattering. Those dudes have been through a lot and suffered it all with a smile on their faces so that alone is a huge inspiration to us. Their music is incredible… I don’t wanna butter them up too much, but getting to work within that particular family is a huge privilege.

What is the Montreal metal and rock scene like right now and specifically in regard to your style of creative mayhem?

Montreal is always a hotbed of awesome music. In recent years, more of the sludge, doom, noise-rock and stoner rock stuff has been surfacing, which is nice, but I feel like everyone here is reacting to their surroundings, in a nice way… nobody is trying to sound like anyone else, I feel. Everyone that I know kind of does his or her own thing and tries to blaze their own trail. Sometimes it’s hard to be heard among all the amazing bands and artists, but we have our niche.

What comes next for The Great Sabatini across the rest of 2014?

We’re just about to get home from the first stretch of touring. We’ll probably do a few small things this summer but in the fall we head out again to do some touring in the U.S and then get ready to hit Europe in the spring of 2015.

Once again big thanks for sitting down with us; any final words for us to contemplate?

Thank you for your interest and support. Final words? Ummmmmmmmmmmmm……

And lastly give us an idea of the biggest inspirations on you musically and individually.

Take your basic 80’s/90’s generation stuff, all the grunge, punk, metal and hardcore, and throw our dad’s old Beatles, Zeppelin, Sabbath, and King Crimson records in there too. We’re all just disciples of this great tome of Rock. Finding a nice balance is the hardest part when starting a band, but ALL of that stuff is in our music, and album covers, lyrics etc. You could get real specific and say things like Melvins, Today Is The Day, Helmet, Jesus Lizard, Napalm Death, King Crimson, or what have you, but there’s just too huge a range of stuff influencing us to make for an easy answer.

http://www.thegreatsabatini.com

Read our review of Dog Years @ https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2014/06/02/the-great-sabatini-dog-years/

Pete RingMaster

The RingMaster Review 21/06/2014

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