Bullets And Octane – Waking Up Dead

Though a name familiar to a great many, attention on the UK side of The Pond did not particularly have Bullets And Octane as a concentrated spot on its radar despite some ear grabbing, appetising inciting releases since the band emerged in 2003. That was until the LA based outfit played a venue ripping tour over here last year with our own fine middle finger raising rockers Hung Like Jack supporting. It has sparked fresh interest and in turn real anticipation for the US rockers’ new album Waking Up Dead which we seriously expect to be embracing rigorous attention upon release. It is a beast of an album, rock ‘n’ roll in its most rapacious and rousing form and without doubt Bullets And Octane in their finest moment.

From the release of their debut EP, One Night Stand Rock N Roll Band in 2003, the St. Louis originating quartet has been on a hungry ride towards acclaim and attention. Their Gilby Clark of Guns And Roses produced first album, The Revelry started the growing appetite for their emergence, each of their subsequent seven albums escalating the temptation, including breakthrough album In The Mouth Of The Young, alongside a live presence which has seen the sharing of stages at shows and festivals with the likes of Avenged Sevenfold, Korn, Stone Sour, Flyleaf, Deftones, Unwritten Law, Gunfire 76, Social Distortion, Eagles Of Death Metal and many more over the years. Now we would suggest they are facing their biggest year and time yet with the release of the Brent Clawson (Wednesday 13, Hell or Highwater, The Knives) produced, recorded, mixed and mastered Waking Up Dead, a slab of devilry declaring that hard rock spun rock ‘n’ roll has never been healthier or more fun.

As soon as Bad Mother Fucker launches its attitude loaded stomp off of a warning siren, it has to said, ears and appetite were swiftly gripped; a hold tightening as the track almost stalks ears with riffs and grooves whilst stirring up the spirit with its contagious roar. Vocalist Gene Louis hollers at its heart with energy and contempt, the band’s united calls supporting his incitement as the swinging beats of Jonny Udell punch and Zachary Kibbee’s bass magnetically grumbles.

A raucously irresistible start to the album aflame with the wiry tendrils of Felipe Rodrigo’s guitar, the track sets the anthemic template for things to come and is quickly embraced by the album’s following title track. Guitar and mass incitement instantly draws ears into the almost as immediate blaze of the song, its pulsating stroll and fiery sonic flames surging straight to the instincts to rock out. There is a devious craft and imagination to the song though, predacious twists and tenacious clamours uniting in its spirit rousing exploits.

The calmer but no less lusty When We Were Young has the body bouncing again, it’s gripping hard rock nurtured canter almost poppy but all raw bustle and bite while Burning at Both Wicks jabs and snaps at the senses from its first touch, takes the listener on a bold hard rock infested ride thereon in. As the whole of the album, the songs blend the familiar with the boldly fresh in their individual escapades, each nagging to get under the skin riff by hook and hitting their target in swift time. It really was impossible not to offer up one’s own vocal and physical participation across the whole of Waking Up Dead as proven yet again by the simply captivating Fires. As its predecessor, there is a touch of Fall Out Boy meets Grumpynators to the track with a whiff of Turbonegro, a spicing which slipped through our ears like nectar.

All the same, every song within the album is stamped Bullets And Octane through to the core, the likes of the melodically aflame Fuck You Song and Murder Me Baby with its predatory prowl and salacious swing diverse proof. Neither track quite hit the personal spot as those around them actually but the fact they had us rocking and pressing replay with perpetually fresh lust shows the might of the rest of the album.

The final trio of tracks keep the stomping and thick enjoyment flying, Rolling Stone casting a ‘mellow’, in comparison to other songs, incitement which only needed a clutch of seconds to bypass inhibitions before Hostage seduced the body into a subservient sway. Even with its relative composure, the song is an insatiable rocker increasing its boisterousness and the listener’s involvement by the minute.

Heart Attack completes the release, the track maybe the best of the lot though it is hard to choose. Hooks and grooves ensnare as rhythms jab, vocals stoking up devilment and alone further involvement; the four prong rock ‘n’ roll attack as manipulative as it is simply balls swinging revelry. A great album deserves a thunderous end and Waking Up Dead certainly gets that though its whole body is a galvanic storm of rock ‘n’ roll; a tempest of pleasure we can only suggest, wherever you are, you should unleash your rocker instincts upon.

Waking Up Dead is released May 25th through Bad MoFo Records/Cargo Records.

https://www.bulletsmusic.com/   https://www.facebook.com/bulletsandoctane

Pete RingMaster 23/05/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Yorkshire Rats – Self Titled EP

It is fair to say that since returning from an extended hiatus, UK punks Yorkshire Rats have blossomed into one persistently rousing and creatively tenacious proposition. It is not as if their early years were barren from success and plaudits let alone ear exciting sounds but as their new self-titled EP shows, maturity and a new creative drive has seen them become one of the essential melodic punk encounters on the British if not global scene.

Formed in Pontefract by vocalist/guitarist Don Mercy (ex-Abrasive Wheels, ex-Billy No Mates) in 2004, Yorkshire Rats released a well received 7” and EP in their two years capped by supporting Rancid in 2006. Then the band took that hiatus before returning around a decade after first stepping forward and subsequently released their swiftly acclaimed debut album, Sea of Souls in 2015 via Indelirium Records. It was a release embracing the band’s earlier sound whilst welcoming a broader punk canvas and that new energy, all subsequently pushed again by the Trouble City EP last year and now their new four track offering.

Again the new release sees the band drawing on the seeds of punk rock across the decades and from both sides of the North Atlantic, infusing all into their own individual hook strapped, melody shaped songs. The EP opens up with the irresistible Alone Together, a track “all about the strains of relationships whether that be romantic or political.” It opens up with a delicious old school hook, raw bait surely nurtured from a Ramones/Stiff Little Fingers like inspiration. Soon rhythms are jabbing at the persistent lure, in turn the potent vocals of Mercy flirting with ears and matching the infectious strength of the sounds around him. The melodic boisterousness and craft of lead guitarist Matt Lee only adds richer colour to a song already gripping the imagination and body with its chopping riffs and rousing rhythms.

The following Where Do I Sign? brings a more US styled stroll to ears; its lively body and melodic enterprise akin to Green Day though soon developing its own unique character as the firm beats of drummer Chris Furness and the dark swing of Josh Clarke’s bass unite with the fiery veins infused by Lee. Though slightly more restrained in energy compared to its predecessor it is an equal in catchiness and uncaging lusty hooks as too next up No Way Out. There is more of a Social Distortion spicing to the third track, it again a bold and flirtatious proposal with an addictive chorus impossible to resist. With a bassline to drool over and an enslaving sing-a-long vocal temptation further in, the song hits the spot dead centre.

Final track, Better Days Will Come, is an energetic croon with a Joe Jackson like riff and Elvis Costello scented melodic suggestiveness, all wrapped up in Yorkshire Rats creative theatre. It is a fine end to an outstanding release with Mercy a vocal magnet even as hooks and melodies intensify their weight and  temptation.

The EP is the most rounded and relentlessly contagious offering from Yorkshire Rats yet, its songs relishing the inevitable increase in as suggested songwriting maturity and individual let alone united craft. A must have for melodic punk fans? We think so!

The Yorkshire Rats EP is out now on Northern Ruff Records @ http://yorkshirerats.com/store/ and other online stores.

http://yorkshirerats.com/    https://www.facebook.com/yorkshirerats    https://twitter.com/yorkshire_rats

Pete RingMaster 21/06/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

The Bricks – Here We Come

CD Cover for Print

     Here We Come is an album which might not be stretching existing boundaries or ideas of invention, indeed you would suggest it is not even trying to, but it is an encounter which introduces us to a potential soaked band with a sound which simply leaves satisfaction and enjoyment full. The release comes from Nebraska punks The Bricks and is receiving its broader unveiling courtesy of Raven Faith Records this month. Consisting of ten memorable if a little formulaic punk anthems, it is a proposition which leaves ears and attention wanting more of its old school punk rock.

Consisting of vocalist/guitarist Jimmy Hobbs, lead guitarist Chris Smith, bassist Kelly Turney, and drummer Mathew Lewis, The Bricks as mentioned has an old school feel to their raw rock ‘n’ roll but equally and in varying degrees infuse essences of oi, hardcore, and Street Punk amongst many spices, into its rebellious nature and sound. It is a faith based proposition which is not backwards in coming forward with the band’s personal emotions and praising but equally does not make it a focal point. This results in an offering from the Omaha quartet which will easily appeal to all punk fans and leave them with an appetite for more.

Recorded at Two Bird Dog Studio in Sioux City, Iowa, Here We Come opens up with an immediately delicious hook within the first few seconds of Just Like You. It has a ring of The Ramones to it which only adds to the instantly attentive hunger of ears and emotions. It is a familiarity which captivates with ease, continuing its potent lure as rhythms thump on the senses and the raw tones of Hobbs, backed by group shouts of the band, bellow engagingly. Like all good punk songs it is an easily accessible stomp for the listener’s body and voice, no demands or surprises being launched just magnetic punk revelry.

The strong start continues with the excellent Punk’s Not Dead, a song which stands toe to toe with ears like a mix of The Lurkers and Dead Kennedys given a healthy dose of US oi. Again the listener is enlisted within seconds to its boisterous persuasion, something all songs achieve with little defiance coming their way to be honest, and shown again straight after by Same Old Story. Not quite having the same spark as the first two, its character a little more dour, the track still provides an infectious and captivating proposal. Its midway slip into a more restrained and melodically aflame passage also reveals a stronger twist of invention adding to the enjoyable incitement.

Yahweh has a pop punk contagion to its otherwise simple and addictively persuasive offering, again a familiar tone soaking hook and riffs but once more leaving only highly satisfied ears and a greedier appetite. Whether in their next release or further down the line we will have the same feeling of satisfaction at being offered recognisable influences and flavours we will see, but right now it works a treat with its nostalgic charm. Proof again coming in the punchy Revolt and the masterfully anthemic Omaha Punks which follows. The first of the pair brings a more metallic essence to its riffs whilst vocals and rhythms lay down a great confrontation of punk persuasion, whilst its successor dips into the essences of The Clash and Angelic Upstarts for a predatory and gripping call to arms.

We Live flirts with whispers of ska and street punk next for an inescapably catchy coaxing of Rancid meets Social Distortion like tempting. As the last track, it easily has ears and feet engaged, and emotions basking in its old school and anthemically alluring intimacy. The same can be said about the Ramones bred Red White and True which strides resourcefully in next. Early touches have a more Clash feel but as the song hits its stride and chorus, it all courted by a great rhythmic antagonism and scything riffs, the NYC legends come to mind

The final pair of tracks ensures the listener is left energised and wanting more. Small Few is a middle finger defiance, driven by crisply jabbing beats aligned to a moody baseline and belligerent backing vocal calls, and inescapable addictive whilst the closing Some Day with less rigour lights ears with abrasing energy and inviting enterprise. More of a slow burner in persuasion compared to earlier songs, it still triggers pleasure fuelled reactions and brings a thoroughly enjoyable album to a strong close.

The Bricks openly wear their influences and passions in their music and it only rubs off on the listener. There are few new things to devour but plenty to provide one highly enjoyable encounter.

Here We Come is available now via http://www.ravenfaithrecords.com/#!product/prd1/3580537951/the-bricks-here-we-come

https://www.facebook.com/TheBricksOmaha

RingMaster 17/03/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://reputationradio.yooco.org/

Epic Problem – Lines EP

Epic Problem Photo Courtesy of Chalkmanvid

Epic Problem Photo Courtesy of Chalkmanvid

    Feisty, commanding, and seriously contagious, the Lines EP from UK band Epic Problem provides another excuse to claim that the finest punk rock comes from this side of the pond. Ok that is a big debate which can never truly be resolved but the quartet from New Mills, Derbyshire with their latest slab of ferocious and raw anthemic rock ‘n’ roll only add to the evidence. The fact that their sound is seeded in the melodically spawned ‘Gainesville’ punk sound does not deter that declaration either, as Epic Problem simply twist it with further inciting genre additives into something not necessarily unique but openly distinct to themselves. Consisting of four tracks the EP is an adrenaline fuelled stomp which captivates, ignites, and bruises the passions, though not always in that order.

     The band formed in 2010 when guitarist Neil ‘Mackie’ Mclennan (from eighties punks Blitz) linked up with vocalist/guitarist Jake McCullough (Dangerfields, Dead Subverts) to sing on songs the former had written. Soon after bassist Tony Morrisson and drummer Greg Boulton joined up and the band worked on writing more songs and preparing their outbreak into the country. Their live debut came supporting The Business in the December of 2011, with the following year starting off a constant flow of shows to now which has seen Epic Problem sharing stages with bands such as Argy Bargy, Subhumans, Dead To Me, Nothington, and The Blacklist Royals. Recordings wise, The Lines EP is the successor to the six track mini album All Broken, a well-received and acclaimed release which the new record is sure to emulate.

     The title track kicks things off, riffs and rhythms a caustic force from the start matched by the great abrasive gravelly vocals. It is OB-GD17D.pdfnot long before a delicious tempting of anthemic melodic enterprise and group calls with Mackie and Boulton supplying a rich grazing support to McCullough, breaks out. Thoughts of Leatherface and Dillinger Four make a suggestion though equally the band triggers comparisons to Social Distortion and in some ways fellow Brits, The Vox Dolomites. Truthfully though song and sound whilst offering familiarities forge a presence which is distinct to the band; guitars and vocals a compelling inventive provocation driven by the voracious energy and antagonistic passion of the rhythms.

    The following Deny snarls and rips out an urgent pace from its opening second which is as predatory as its predecessor but with a slightly more belligerent gait, or certainly with a different twang to its voice and intensity. The track also lacks the incisive hook of the first song but has no lack of infectiousness to its vocal squall and rhythmic punctuation to its expressive riffs and lyrical croon, a bait elevated by the outstanding Sink, a rowdy anthemic charge of a song taking the best essences of the previous tracks and turning them into another potently addictive brawl of punk rock. The best track on the release, though seriously challenged with each play by the opener, the song alone with its rhythmic taunting and sonic mischief around a virulently catchy hook loaded with a wealth of melodic barbs and an old school fire enhancing its triumph, reinforces the stature of band and genre.

   The release is completed by Weak, a cover of The Beltones track. It is an accomplished and passionate offering revealing more of the band’s craft and adventure but as good as it openly is just does not match up to the other tracks. Nevertheless it makes a fine and pleasing end to an excellent release. It might be greedy to want a full-length assault from Epic Problem so soon after the release of the EP but that is the kind of hunger it inspires. Along with many other bands, this explosive treat shows that British punk continues to lead the way for our maybe slightly based thoughts.

The Lines EP is released digitally and via Longshot Music and Rebel Sound Music in the USA, and Rebellion Records in Europe with 100 on Black vinyl, 150 on White vinyl (exclusive to Rebel Sound), 150 on Blue vinyl (exclusive to Rebellion) and 200 on Splatter vinyl (exclusive to Longshot) available.

Check out the video for Lines directed by Chalkman Video @ http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7zf0i9i3As0&feature=youtu.be

https://www.facebook.com/epicproblemuk

http://epicproblem2.bandcamp.com/album/lines-7

8.5/10

RingMaster 05/02/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Miss Vincent – Creepy

Miss Vincent pic

After getting over the disappointment that Miss Vincent was not a psychobilly band, their debut EP’s cover and title as well as the band name all the clues adding up to that deceitful assumption, the UK pop goth punk band turned out to be a rather enjoyable proposition which in Creepy they have a release which is more than a decent ride of melodic persuasion and feisty energy. Emerging as a hybrid of Alkaline Trio and Fall Out Boy with some healthy genes of NOFX, AFI, and Social Distortion spliced in for extra flavour, the Guildford quartet have introduced themselves with a release which without lighting fires leaves  a wash of satisfaction and promise behind which cannot be ignored.

Formed in 2012, the foursome of vocalist/guitarist Alex Marshall, guitarist Lawrie Pattison, bassist Owain Mainwaring, and drummer Jack Donnelly has earned themselves a solid reputation and potent fan base around the southeast of the country. The Creepy EP has all the charm and infectious persuasion to send the band into passions much further afield. It will not be lighting new pyres of adventure for pop punk certainly but should place Miss Vincent in the watch closely column of the media and future fans alike.

The release opens with Deadlock, a firm and well-crafted invitation but one which leaves the passions a little underwhelmed. From the 998130_579896398741788_2057771635_nstrong vocals to incisive web of riffs and sonic invention, the song makes an appealing companion with hints of unique imagination whispering from within, but ultimately it lacks the spark to ignite anything more than a passing interest and respect for its predictable but accomplished offering. The following I Don’t Want This has no such problem, the temptation from its opening charge of jagged riffs and contagious groove is an instant awakening for ear and thoughts. True there is little new to devour but the song has the fuse and fuel to grip full attention and breed an equally keen appetite. With a strong whisper of Green Day and slighter spice of Against Me! to its stomp, the encounter is a vibrant and energetic persuasion, the bass of Mainwaring a prowling throaty shadow which seduces whilst the great harmonies of the bassist and Pattison make a great backdrop to the delivery of Marshall.

Planning To Fail, with the rhythms of Donnelly crafting out a sinew framed cage for the song to wrap around, lies somewhere between the opening pair, at times leaving a lack of fulfilment on the taste buds and in other moments showing an invention and imagination which adds a hearty confidence to their promise and future creativity. It has more than enough to light a deeper intrigue over their horizons though as does its successor Carry On, a track which surges from the start with a magnetic fire of riffs merging into virulently infectious melodies and hooks. It is an excellent romp which takes best track honours on Creepy and leaves the emotions keener and greedier than before.

The closing Testing Times is bred from the same seed box as its predecessor, the opening riot of rapacious melodic flames and taunting riffs veined by crisp rhythms is irresistible as it leads the ears into the again impressive vocals of Marshall. There is a sense of Billy Talent to the construction of the song, hooks and sonic barbs littering its passage to ensure no one escapes the song’s addictive claws and adventurous enterprise, which actually leaves the previous tracks seem lacking. It is a great conclusion to a release which sets down an opening marker for Miss Vincent that should see them as they evolve take to loftier plateaus and recognition.

It may not provide anything to get your teeth of originality into but as the ground floor of something with all the possibilities of major things rising from within, Creepy is well worth a slice of your time and enjoyment.

Grab the Creepy EP as a buy now name your price release at www.missvincent.bandcamp.com

https://www.facebook.com/missvincentband

7.5/10

RingMaster 25/09/2013

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Slumlord Radio – Tokyo Roadhouse Sonic Sex Castle

Tokyo-Road-House-Cover-for-

Just as likely to steal the final thrusts of your sexual exploits as they are your passions, US band Slumlord Radio show with their Tokyo Roadhouse Sonic Sex Castle EP that they know how to create magnetic brawls of dirty rock ‘n’ roll and abrasive provocation, songs which serve up a diet of irrepressible and thrilling sonic fire which exploit and taunt the senses and psyche. The five track release is a greedy and unruly confrontation but one that hunger was bred for. Raw and unafraid to rile up its listener just as gleefully as it pleasures them, the release is a raucous treat offering salacious pleasure and unmistakable promise.

Based in Grand Rapids/Flint, the trio of vocalist/guitarist Tommy Erickson, bassist Mike Todd, and drummer David Flynn, came together in 2010. Their scuzzed up, filth caked form of rock ‘n’ roll soon had attention locally as the band merged garage rock with sludge like essences whilst other whispers like hardcore, metal, and hard rock made their contribution, a sound best described as unbridled punk ‘n’ roll. It is an encounter which arguably is employing existing sounds and invention but turns it with their invidious alchemy into a distinct devilry of their own. The new release follows the well-received The Cats Pajamas EP and shows the band is moving very much in the right direction to earn themselves a potent place in current garage rock circles. Released via Silver Maple Kills Records earlier this year, it has already awakened a great many to the band, which is no surprise as the release stirs up the senses to give satisfaction a full meal.

Fort Knox opens things up with tall attention seeking fire spawned hooks soon accompanied by greedy riffs, probing rhythms, and squalling vocals. The slightly insidious nature of those early rising sonic flames is a delicious niggling temptation throughout the song and never meanders from their spicy temptation whilst around them the song flexes sinews and rapacious energy to engage the rest of the senses and thoughts. At times there is a mix of Kyuss and My Red Cell launching its suggestiveness within thoughts whilst a breath of Mudhoney is not far away either. It is an excellent start with Call Me Chief soon by its side, the song another caustic haze of punk intensity and garage rock fuzzy veined by a throaty bass croon which smells as predacious as it sounds. Its mix of slow stomps and frenetic bursts is pure contagion, the smouldering tease of the ear and outright sonic turbulence a riveting and pleasing union which leaves the appetite drooling for more.

Up next Old Zilwaukee walks in with a mesmeric shimmering to its air and hoarse breath to its core, vocally and in the scarring riffing once the track is in full stride. The gait switches from reflective musing to expressive tempest across the track and though it arguably takes longer to seize the emotions compared to its predecessors, the wilfully creative confrontation emerges just as vital and impressive, the guitar solo especially inflammatory.

As Second Hand Tank takes its time to scorch the ear there is a Psychedelic Furs lilt to the caress, especially vocally and through the bass suggestion, though once into its almost corrosive blues kissed sonic storm suasion you are more in the MC5 and Social Distortion territory. Without quite sparking the heights and success of the previous tracks, it still leaves you appreciating and enjoying the grunginess and carefree attitude of its charm.

The title track brings things to a roguish conclusion with infectious enterprise and variation. The most inventive of the tracks on Tokyo Roadhouse Sonic Sex Castle but again not as irresistible as the opening triplet of bruises, it nevertheless has a pull which has feet and voice playing their part in the fun.

Slumlord Radio is a band still finding its unique sound and stance one suspects but if the release is a portent of things to come; they will be a force we will be hearing plenty of. For promising emerging garage rock with a layer of dirt you just hanker for, Slumlord Radio is well worth taking a listen to.

https://www.facebook.com/SlumlordRadioMI

8/10

RingMaster 09/09/2013

 

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Grumpynators – 666 Rpm

grumpynators pic

What do you get if you merge psychobilly, hard rock, and hungry metal into one bruising riot? Whatever it is called Danish band Grumpynators is probably the best at it, certainly on the evidence of their latest EP 666 Rpm. Rife with rousing and aggressive rock ‘n’ roll or what they call Danish Motorbilly, the five track release is a thrilling muscular storm which unleashes all the primal pleasures inside with hungry energy and rapacious devilment.

Formed in Copenhagen in the January of 2011 by ex-members and crew of Taggy Tones and Volbeat, Grumpynators made their live debut at the Danish underground festival Barnyard Rumble in the August of the same year going on to build a big reputation for their performances which has also seen them tour with Magtens Korridorer in 2012 and Volbeat earlier this year. Musically the quartet of vocalist/guitarist Emil Øelund, guitarist Christian Nørgaard, double bassist Jakob Øelund, and drummer Per Fisker create a presence and confrontation which is like being accosted by the joint animosity of Motorhead and Nekromantix wrapped in the shadowed intent of Johnny Cash, Resurex, Social Distortion, and Volbeat. Equally the band has a distinct flavour which sets them apart from the rest, first shown with their first demo EP late 2011 and evolved into real brute force with 666 Rpm. The new EP is an instigator for limbs and instinctive passions to raise a storm and enjoy rock ‘n ‘roll at its riveting best.

As soon as the rampaging hypnotic beats of Fisker open up first track No Monsters In My Bed, an instantaneous connection Grumpynators+30827045331seeded in a personal love of psychobilly erupts, the spine of the impending song spawned from the same passion. The choppy riffs and potent bass slaps confirm the stance and poised around the Lemmy like growls of Oelund makes for a formidable and infectious lure to which defences crumble immediately. Stomping across the senses like a gang of lustful rockabillies on a Saturday night cruise, the track punches and prods the ear potently with rhythmic provocation and guitar lashes which coursing with sonic flames which leaves the passions alight. Virulent in its addictiveness and merciless in its ability to have limbs and voice joining in its charge, the song is incendiary glory which steals top honours on the release straight away though it is seriously challenged as the other songs state their declarations.

The following Paranormal Heads equally has sinews and aggressive breath unleashed from its opening seconds before sculpting an epidemic of infectiousness which is impossible to resist. Its presence has a more heavy metal/rock intention and body which merges essences of The Meteors into the more dominant demands of again Motorhead and the likes of Anthrax and The Wildhearts. Once again it is a track which recruits the listener into its dirty honest sounds with ease and leaves lungs and senses gasping for breath once it takes its leave.

1985 has a swagger and blues lilt to its slower crawling gait aligned to a southern psychobilly call which swings and lures the senses and body into a teasing hard rock waltz. As it progresses the song expands and opens up sonic flumes of enterprise and melodic rock flames which sizzle on the flesh before that confident croon of the track returns to command further physical union from its recipients.

The release is completed by the stalking Miss You and then Grumpynator. The first song again brings essences of cowpunk and rockabilly into a feisty metallic boil of sound and invention which erupts to singe the senses and feed the now fully evolved hunger for the release. With a Volbeat meets Mad Sin and Tiger Army with strong whispers of Metallica and Flogging Molly to its seduction, the song brings ardour into another pinnacle of lustful submission whilst the final song is unrelenting heavy metal/hard rock  you can only compare to Motorhead in sound and quality.

It all makes for an exciting and impossibly satisfying release which marks Grumpynators as a band set to ignite and push rock music on with striking power and efficiency in the near future. Volbeat now has a real rival as Denmark’s best metal/rock band, though to be honest every rock ‘n’ roll band in the world had better watch out as Grumpynators is coming to challenge their status and they do not accept no as a response.

http://www.grumpynators.dk/

10/10

RingMaster 22/07/2013

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