A Parade of Goodness

The past month going into the next has seen our friends at SaN PR send over a host of artists with new singles to tempt and rouse the senses. o we thought we would club the best together and give you the heads up on their striking propositions.

First up and coinciding with their next tour of the US, is British punksters Ghouls who have just uncaged their new single Be. An irrepressible slice of the raucously infectious and boisterous punk rock the Londoners are becoming keenly renowned for, the track just bounds through ears taking the spirit with it on a rousing stomp. Yet equally its heart and words reveal shadows and emotions to hook and captivate thoughts and imagination.

Formed in 2013, the quintet has earned a potent reputation and an increasingly growing and dedicated fan base through their songs and a praise wrapping live presence which has seen the band play numerous UK and international festivals and share stages with bands such as Less Than Jake, Slaves, The Skints, The Ataris, Sonic Boom Six, Random Hand, OPM, and ROAM. It is hard not to hear why the increasing attention on the band when hearing Be and also a handful of months back its predecessor, the similarly bold and compelling Internet Famous.

Be is an immediate blast of catchy sound driven by swinging rhythms and rapacious guitars. Just as swiftly though it is a bloom of imagination and unpredictability, calms and crescendos plus brass flames adding fun and adventure to its dynamic punk funk antics and though seemingly over before its time, the track is as arousing and manipulative as anything heard this year; simply a real gem of a song.

Next up is Dead Ground, an alternative rock trio from Exeter consisting of Ollie Harris, Edward Tucker, Jake Friese-Greene who has just released their new single, We All Feel The Same, another song rather hard to ignore.

Emerging in 2015, the British trio has earned plaudits through shows with the likes of Idles and Black Foxxes and are sure to again through their latest offering. It is a song which echoes inspirations which include Muse, Black Peaks, and Radiohead though it is the former which most comes to mind across the magnetic track. Even so, from its first breath and the strong lure of voice and guitar, We All Feel The Same shows the band’s music has its own unmistakable identity. The track is a calm yet eventful piece of melodic rock which never seems over busy or creates a tide of sound but is as rich in enterprise and aural intimation as a full on tempest.

With smart twists and little turns within its magnetic body, the track is another seriously enticing offering from Dead Ground and a potent invitation to newcomers.

The wait is over, British punks Eight Days have returned from their eighteen month hiatus and roared back with a major holler of a track.

Stray barracks and harries the senses like it is making up for lost time yet has an imagination in its creation which revels in the time taken to breed its angst bursting outcry. Equally is has a fresh breath to it which echoes the potency and character of the band’s very well-received 2016 EP More To Life but reveals a whole new thrust of energy, invention, and potential, maybe no surprise as Eight Days returns with new members offering new ideas and essences in creativity.

A fusion of punk, hardcore and alternative rock in varying degrees, the track immediately had ears on board as its opening lure of hook loaded riffs beckoned. It proved the prelude or rather lead into a tempest of ferocity and sonic tension but an emotion loaded storm ripe with swinging grooves, tenacious rhythms and subsequently unsettled calms and post hardcore-esque intimation.

The track is a fine return by the band and hopefully a hint of big things to come.

With their debut album of this year, Face Value, still luring new fans and plaudits, UK hardcore outfit Of Legions are poised to unleash their new single Vision Of Misery. A brand new track, it is a beast of a trespass, a cauldron of the band’s fusion of hardcore, punk, and metal which not so much warrants attention but orders it.

From Stoke, the quartet has steadily risen up the hardcore ranks since emerging in 2015. Embracing inspirations from artists such as Black Flag, Slipknot, and Parkway Drive, Of Legions has honed their individual sound across two EPs and that recently their highly praised album and earned a potent reputation for a live presence taking in shows with Silent Screams, Liferuiner, Martyr Defiled, Continents, Brokencyde, Sikth, and Loathe among many others.

Intimating a new wind of adventure in the band’s sound, Vision Of Misery prowls the senses initially, riffs a scowling predator against a rhythmic rumbling. A melodic tendril though lights its advance calming the intensity a touch before the shackles are off and the track invades. There is still somewhat of a restraint to its attack but that only accentuates its power and animosity.

Continuing to bawl and punish with its hardcore bred, metal infested confrontation, a contagious mix despite its punishing tempest, the track is a thick indisputable declaration of a band heading the way of major attention.

Be from Ghouls is out now.

https://www.facebook.com/ghoulsuk/    https://twitter.com/ghoulsuk

Dead Ground has We All Feel The Same on the loose now.

https://www.facebook.com/deadgroundmu/

Eight Days has Stray available now.

https://www.facebook.com/EightDaysUK/   https://twitter.com/eightdaysuk

Of Legions unleash Vision Of Misery November 9th.

https://www.facebook.com/OfLegions/     https://www.instagram.com/of_legions_uk/

Pete RingMaster 24/10/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Frauds – With Morning Toast & Jam & Juice

It cannot be just coincidence that year on year December brings some of the relevant year’s best and often most dramatic releases. Maybe it is just that they generally come within a concentrated two week burst with the year’s final pair of weeks more likely to be party time for all so that it is more noticeable than in other equally productive months but there does seem to be a real gathering of striking encounters  as the year makes its departure. The debut album from UK duo Frauds simply adds to the evidence, With Morning Toast & Jam & Juice a glorious cacophony of noise bred rock ‘n’ roll infested with post punk and post hardcore rapacity.

Formed in late 2012, Croydon hailing Frauds consists of Chris Francombe (drum/vocals) and Mikey Alvarez (guitar/vocals), a musical partnership which seems to hail from well before their latest venture burst into life. Inspired by the likes of Nick Cave, Tom Waits, Sonic Youth, Fugazi, Mclusky, Hot Snakes, and Drive Like Jehu, the pair initially began jamming together again with the intent of only playing covers. Soon though their own imagination and creativity took over and new songs emerged. Since then the band has become a potent presence on the capital’s live scene sharing stages with the likes of Idles, Life, HMLTD, Tigercub, Demob Happy, Kagoule, USA Nails, Slaves, Blacklisters, Queen Kwong and site favs The St. Pierre Snake Invasion along the way. Fresh from tour dates alongside ex-Reuben front man Jamie Lenman, Frauds are poised to nag national attention with Morning Toast & Jam & Juice, a niggling hard to see failing such its raw majesty.

Let’s Find Out kicks things off, a riveting tendril of guitar winding around ears and soon joined by the thump of Francombe’s beats. Second by second the web expands, Alvarez’s guitar creating a clamorous jangle with post punk hues to its sharp spice. Vocals equally have a caustic edge, courting the repetitious magnetism of the encounter with punk attitude and ferocity. Sonic shimmers and distortions only add to the virulent nagging, the track as much an intro as a complete offering luring ears and instinctive attention into the waiting depths of the album.

Next up, Smooth instantly twists and turns around the senses, its post punk/alternative rock antics as invasive as they are seductive. Like the spawn of a union between The Three Johns, The Droppers Neck, and Mclusky, the song swings along drawing the listener deeper into its feral majesty before The Feeding Frenzy envelops ears with its noir clad atmospheric drama. Sonic smog devours as vocals provoke, the underlying volatility brewing a ravenous toxic drone as flirtatious as it is debilitating.

From its virulent inhospitality, the mischievous exploits of Sandwiches emerge, the song a rash of hooks and rhythms around brash vocals; all carrying a liquor of humour and captivating causticity. Again there is an eighties post punk discordance in allegiance with modern creative antipathy and again everything uniting in a corrosion of punk irritability which simply sparks ears and an instinctive appetite for noise rock. As it evolves with increasing imagination, the track feeds ears with a delicious groan of bassoon-esque guitar; its barracuda tone pure manna for these senses and matched in addictiveness by the duo’s vocal lures. There are numerous major moments within the album but this is the pinnacle with ease.

The psychotic rock ‘n’ roll of Just Come Of Age comes next to be a strong rival though, beats a kinetic psychosis matched by the wandering tendrils of guitar and vocal theatre. The Eighties Matchbox B-Line Disaster easily comes to mind as the song plays with the imagination, crawling over the senses with predacious glee and tenacity.

Suck Jobs keeps the thrills high with its senses scathing sonic enticements and vocal abrasions, the song mercurial in air and relentless in infectious dynamics while Doom prowls and seeps through the body with grievous intent. Its suffocating tones devour mood and thoughts, dragging attention by the throat into a finale which is pure punk ferocity. The track is one of the least easily accessible trespasses provided by the album but joining all in leaving pleasure brimming.

With Morning Toast & Jam & Juice concludes with firstly Could’ve, Should’ve, Would’ve, another carnally tart and compelling stroll with an Engerica hue to its visceral contagion, and finally through the transfixing saunter of Give In. Rhythmically hypnotic and melodically haunting with a just as appetising acrid edge, the song slowly entangles the senses, its own individual drone like bait viral persuasion becoming more chafing and disturbing second by second.

With a hidden scar of punk as its actual final breath, With Morning Toast & Jam & Juice leaves pleasure high and anticipation for their next move lustful. As earlier mentioned there have been numerous really stirring propositions this year yet it is hard to remember many as glorious as the debut from Frauds.

With Morning Toast & Jam & Juice is available now through Till Deaf Do Us Party Records and available @ https://fraudsfraudsfrauds.bandcamp.com/album/with-morning-toast-jam-juice

https://www.facebook.com/fraudsfraudsfrauds/

Pete RingMaster 19/12/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Skies In Motion – Life Lessons

It is probably fair to say that there are a couple of metal bred flavours we are finding ourselves uninspired by at The RR right now, metalcore being one. There are plenty of good and enjoyable bands emerging within the genre but few which truly break from the familiar and creatively routine. UK outfit Skies In Motion is one which defies that thought especially with their new debut album Life Lessons now leading their persuasion.  It is a ferocious magnetic collection of songs as irritable and aggressive as they are creatively and melodically captivating. Certainly plenty of its appeal is down to striking potential but equally there is an imagination and enterprise at play which only excites.

Hailing from Derby, Skies In Motion stepped forward in 2012 and has increased their reputation year on year  with their live presence alone which has seen them share stages with the likes of Killswitch Engage, Devil Wears Prada, August Burns Red, While She Sleeps, Unearth, Slaves , Skindred, Don Broco, Our Hollow Our Home, Gnarwolves and many more. Their initial sound was more hardcore driven though still embracing melodic strains. Life Lessons merges those flavours with its metalcore instincts, resulting in an assault which at times maybe embraces familiar essences but is a relentlessly fresh and intriguing proposition.

The press release for the album suggests bands such as While She Sleeps and Architects are good comparisons and it is not too hard going along with that as opener Architect bites. It initial melodic invitation is a deceit giving no suggestion of the creative carnage to follow though it is not long before an invasion of riffs and rhythms accompany enticing throat raw vocals. Intrigue is quickly gripped and fed as the track evolves into successor Cascades where djent spice predation is followed by hardcore causticity and metal antagonism, vocalist Adam Connor tenaciously riding the tempest. It is a stirring mix which welcomingly infests ears and appetite, the rhythms of bassist Dan Wheeler and drummer Sam Gaines continuing the predatory invasion as guitarists Dave Stewart and Andy Shaw weave a carnal tempest of craft and temptation. Connor is as striking as the sounds around him, the diversity of his attack thoroughly enjoyable and as potently backed by those around him.  There is also infectiousness to the track which borders on poppy, a catchiness which never undermines the ferocity.

The following Realizationship is similarly woven if even more irritable and too a web of seduction and sonic violence which never stops twisting and turning within its storm. The song lacks the final striking essences of its predecessor yet with teasing grooves and fury loaded flames of melody it masterfully hits the spot and an imagination already submissive to the inventively evolving landscapes the band shares within songs.

Another plateau is breached by next up Happy Families, its stabbing riffs and wiry tendrils an instant trap to fall into which only tightens as steely grooves and rabid riffs join rapacious rhythms and a virulence of contagious antics. Connor impressively leads into and drives the chorus of vocal spirit, sound relaxing a touch to embrace the infectious roar though that moment of unity is surrounded by a compelling net of discord and unpredictability. The track is superb and another reason to suggest Skies in Motion is a real force in the making.

Learn The Hard Way is next, its grooved body a fiery cauldron of sound and emotion with some of the most delicious melodic and harmonic lures heard in a fair time while the following Ugly lives up to its name in tone though it too has a swing and exhaustive rigour which simultaneously incites and devours the body. Both songs reveal more of the bands craft in writing and performance, the latter simply a beast of cyclonic contagion to become increasingly greedy for even before Finding Myself Lost has the chance to stamp its intense authority over the senses. It is fair to say that some tracks, like this one, needs time to truly appreciate; to explore and discover its deep qualities beneath a surface which pleasures if not overwhelms though truthfully every song has a wealth of adventure ready to share with increasing listens.

Both the carnivorous Sword Swallower and the emotively conjured Gonvena provide a mercurial adventure of sound and imagination, the first a savage turbulence which flows into an emotionally acute oasis of calm while the second goes from poetic beauty and melodic reflection to blistering intensity. The second is especially bewitching, Connor further impressing with his melodic prowess and the band with its fluidity through extremely contrasting climates.

When Home Feels Distant (And Distance Feels Like Home) lacks some of the captivation and adventure of the previous two but still has ears gripped and pleasure lit with its Avenged Sevenfold spiced tapestry, next up Five Years finding the same success with its own heart bred tempest of sound and raw aggression. It too misses some of the keen ingredients of earlier encounters but leaves satisfaction full and a want for more, hungrier.

Concluding with Hopebringer, another track which needs time to blossom into a fascinating and invasive fury of sound and potential, Life Lessons needs no help in luring ears and attention back again and indeed again. It is a debut which more than suggests, actually declares Skies In Motion as a band able to bring a fresh breath to the hardcore/metalcore scene. Whether they can live up to its potential time will tell but we would not bet against it.

Life Lessons is out now @ http://skiesinmotionuk.bigcartel.com/product/pre-order-life-lessons-albumu

http://www.skiesinmotion.com/    https://www.facebook.com/skiesinmotion    https://twitter.com/skiesinmotion

Pete RingMaster 14/09/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Gravves – Rattle

gravves-promo-shot_RingMasterReview

There is no foreplay involved with Rattle the debut EP of British noise inciters Gravves. It is a release which, certainly for us, careered straight to lustful instincts from its very first roar of breath and sound, thereon in proceeding to entwine us around its little creative finger. Having an already well-established love for The Eighties Matchbox B-Line Disaster, an open inspiration to the North West hailing trio, certainly helped its persuasion but the four tracks making up Rattle soon established the band and its sound as something individual, unique, and quite irresistible.

Since forming, the threesome of bassist/vocalist Adam Hughes, guitarist/vocalist Dave Thomas, and drummer Tom Williams have persistently lured attention and a fine reputation with a stage show seeing Gravves play with bands such as Slaves, Nothing But Thieves, DZ Deathrays, God Damn, Heck, and Misty Miller, as well as impress with festival appearances at the likes of Focus Wales, Tramlines, and Threshold Festival. Radio has also eagerly embraced the band and its striking sound, a success easy to see expanding as Rattle takes the band towards a new broad tide of ears and fans.

gravves-cover-artwork_RingMasterReviewRecorded with Michael Whalley (Mums, Kong, Bipolar Sunshine), Rattle simply explodes on the senses as opener My Pet Rihanna unleashes its sonic tirade. Within the clamour though, a virulent groove is forming, escaping and driving the song from thereon in as vocals clash and collude in noisy emotion while guitars and bass flare up and seductively groan respectively alongside each other. There is an inner calm in the turbulence too, a magnetic lure which breeds monotone vocals alongside the established outcry in a reflection of the dark touch of bass. There is no escaping the air of the previously mention Brighton band and at times there is a touch of fellow Brit up ‘n’ comers like The Droppers Neck and The St Pierre Snake Invasion too, but the track swiftly breeds its own identity.

Heartbeats is just as impressive as it reveals another aspect to the Gravves character. It has a controlled hand on its tempest of noise; still offering a fuzzy infestation of ears but with a dark composed gait echoed in the vocals and rhythms. Thomas’ guitar certainly sears air and flesh, its scorching touch infused with sharp hooks and abrasive grooves which trap the passions with their intrusive infection. There is a slight scent of The Birthday Party to the song and of Mclusky too in some ways while Future of the Left also comes to mind but again as its predecessor what emerges is all Gravves.

From its opening rhythmic enticement aligned to melodic acidity which has a bit of early U2 to it, Tribes storms the barricades next; subsequently sonically and vocally raging around that persistently infectious first hook and another great blend of vocal persuasion. It is a virulent blaze as catchy and imposing as anything around right now, manna for hungry senses and appetites as too the following Hollow Bones.

The closing track also has a more stable energy and storm to its heart, its body prowling almost stalking the listener as melodic vocals and keys entwine with harsher textures. Though it hints at fiercer eruptions, the song retains its control to fine effect, providing a thrilling end to a stunning release.

Rattle is an introduction to stir things up and Gravves one of those propositions which quite simply re-ignites a lust for music.

Rattle is out now across most stores through Loner Noise Records.

http://facebook.com/gravvesgravvesgravves    https://twitter.com/gravvesgravves

Pete RingMaster 21/02/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

The Bluebook Project – Pockets of Dirty Change

The Bluebook Project_RingMasterReview

With appetites and bodies still rocking to their Take Me Away EP and the feistily rousing singles taken from it, UK rockers The Bluebook Project reinforce their growing reputation with Pockets of Dirty Change. As their previously powerful Hurricane Blues, the new single is one of the attention grabbing encounters within the latest EP, and as the other songs found within, a proposal which grips within seconds.

The Bluebook Project art_RingMasterReviewThe Bluebook Project hails from Bedfordshire and draw on inspirations from the likes of Iggy Pop, The Who, The Ramones, and Oasis. Formed in 2013, the quartet has gone from strength to strength as a live proposition and with releases, beginning with the 2014 unveiled debut EP Out of the Blue. Its ear pleasing introduction to the band was backed by a perpetual flow of live shows which included support slots with the likes of Slaves and Coasts before the foursome of vocalist/bassist Dan Thorn, guitarists Dan Watson and Jordan Smith, and drummer Benn Davis set about recording the Take Me Away EP. Its success is history but sure to be emulated with the unleashing of Pockets of Dirty Change.

The track is fuelled by the punk infested rock ‘n’ roll the band is becoming forcibly renowned for, guitars straight way creating a fiery wall of temptation before rhythms swing along in alignment with the infectiously bolshie delivery of Thorn’s vocals. The song becomes inescapably addictive in no time, a contagious flirtation of hard rock toned punk ‘n’ roll equipped with ear friendly yet cantankerous grooves and a pulsating rhythmic rousing of ear and spirit.

The Bluebook Project bring an edge and excitement to their sound which sets them apart from the crowd, Pockets of Dirty Change further evidence, and it is hard not to be a touch impatient to hear their next step whilst stomping around to their current treat.

Pockets of Dirty Change is available now.

https://www.facebook.com/thebluebookproject   https://twitter.com/TheBluebookBand

https://instagram.com/thebluebookproject/

Pete RingMaster 03/08/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

A Time To Hope – Full of Doubts

ATTH_RingMaster Review

    A Time To Hope is a French post hardcore band loaded with thick potential going by debut EP Full of Doubts, an encounter wearing familiar genre colours but equally offering a fresh creative confrontation that warrants attention. It is a sonically roaring introduction to their potent sound, a strong and tasty first glimpse of the Montpellier quintet and a strong base for them to leap on from.

Since forming towards the rear of 2014, A Time To Hope has earned praise and a healthy reputation through a live presence which has seen them play with bands such as POLAR, Light Your Anchors, and Zephyr 21 amongst many. Their first music video for the song Sweet T has also lured good attention which is now being increasingly courted by the Full of Doubts EP.

ATTH_ARTWORK_RingMaster Review   Influences to the band are said to include the likes of Dance Gavin Dance, Emarosa, Architects, and Slaves; many you can sense across the EP starting with RosaRosa. A lone guitar teases initially as skittish beats surround its distant tempting, that bait soon full in ears as its enterprise swiftly expands. Vocalist Franck.D quickly makes a strong impression with his emotively varied tones whilst the guitars of Vincent.P and Anthony.C dance with sonic suggestiveness on the imagination. It is a highly pleasing start which only strengthens as band and song weave recognisable post hardcore textures into their own adventure.

The following Sweet T picks up the pace and invention next, the song from its initial web of guitar an agitated yet welcoming proposition on a more aggressive skeleton of beats from Guillaume.B. Diversity of voice again works well within the heated maelstrom of sound, it all grounded by the great earthy tone of Shango.W’s bass amidst the spidery resourcefulness of guitar. It is easy to see why it made a strong impact with its video release, the enjoyably busy and at times sonically muggy track growing in drama and persuasion with each passing minute before making way for the instrumental suggestiveness of VII. Melancholically draped in the sense of loneliness, it also warms ears and imagination with its poetic charm and melodic heat, setting up the listener for the similarly toned Lemon Cupcake. It too has a sorrowful air to its melodic caress, though it soon bursts into a tempestuous climate of raw emotion and sound. Alluringly more volatile and antagonistic over time, the track is a mighty trespass on the senses and treat for the ears with a steel and metallic snarl that is less forceful elsewhere on the EP.

Ending with the emotional volatility and sonic ferocity of Catfish, a bracing track featuring Robin Renard, Full of Doubts provides a powerful and highly enjoyable first incitement from A Time To Hope. Major originality is still to come with the band’s sound but already the promise is there in the way they sculpt and unleash their ideas meaning we can only look forward to their next offering with eagerness.

The Full of Doubts EP is out now and available via https://atimetohope.bandcamp.com/releases or http://atimetohope.bigcartel.com/

https://www.facebook.com/atimetohope

Pete RingMaster 06/01/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Networks – Enough To Save Us EP

Networks_RingMaster Review

There is a bit of a buzz brewing up around UK metalcore band Networks and though we are not ready to yet add majorly enthused voices to the rising roar, intrigue and attention for the Portsmouth band has certainly been sparked thanks to their debut EP Enough To Save Us. It is a tempest of sound and ire fuelled emotion which sits easily within expectations of the genre inspiring it but dig deeper and there is an underbelly of invention and imagination which incites closer inspection and a want to know more.

Formed in 2014, Networks was soon stirring up ears and support across shows and a handful of festivals like Redfest, Edgefest and Messtival. From there opportunities to share stages with the likes of The Blackout, Slaves, and Astroid Boys have arisen, 2015 being a thick nudge of broader attention by the band. Seeing a couple of personnel changes early on this year, they set about writing new songs whilst playing with artists such as Palm Reader, Zoax, and When We Were Wolves and at the Crossroads Stage at Butserfest with HECK, Fathoms, and Shields. Now they attempt to whip up more of us with Enough To Save Us, a try easy to imagine leading the band to some potent success.

Networks ETSU EP Front Cover_RingMaster Review   Wires gets things off and running, its opening a worldly bred flavouring infused with samples and a brewing turbulence which soon drives the heart of the raw fury and enticing sonic tempting gripping the track. In no time the guitar of Joe Soar builds a web of engaging grooves and sonic enterprise, they a less hostile tempering to the heavy growling vocal antagonism of Sean Kelly and the hefty swipes of drummer Harry Fielder. The main body of the track is potent and persuasive if without springing any surprises but it is the twists of sound and imagination, at times only in slithers, which turn a good track into a keenly appetising one.

A melodic caress opens up the following End Of An Era, though soon jagged exploits from the guitar step forward in tandem with the dark menace of Josh Slade’s bass. Within a few more breaths, the track is stomping with energy and irritable emotion, though again things evolve as all the creative tendrils and facets of the excellent track collude and entwine. Once more it is fair to say that Networks are not breaking free from established metalcore scenery and hues, but with bright imagination and a good level of unpredictability, the track provides an increasingly enjoyable incitement.

The rugged and challenging Darker Truth steps up next, vocals a rasping provocation against barbarous rhythms. As the lure littered sonic weave spun by Soar breaches ears, the bass brings a great bestial voracity to the song’s tone, it all uniting in an appealing trespass on the senses with again surprises low but enjoyment thick.

The EP is completed by its title track, a proposal carrying a similar and satisfying template to its predecessor. There is an open degree of similarity across all songs in varying ways, the admittedly strong and pleasing vocals of Kelly one such area which might blossom further with a touch more diversity. More than most, the final provocation suggests this closeness but nevertheless it still enlivens the appetite whilst confirming the prowess and potency of Networks in songwriting through to sound.

Enough To Save Us suggests there is plenty of potential and quality which will see Networks emerge from the crowd in time and coax strong attention and support along the way. Fair to say that the band’s opening gambit is a strong and fiercely solid introduction providing ears with a potently enjoyable slab of confrontation, a sign of things to come we suspect.

The Enough To Save Us EP is available via on Viper Trail Records, digitally now from most online stores and as a physical copy from December 3rd when it will be launched at the EP’s release show at The Edge Of The Wedge in Portsmouth.

https://www.facebook.com/networksband        https://twitter.com/networksband

Pete RingMaster 30/11/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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