Calling All Astronauts – Anti-Social Network

Calling All Astronauts Promo Picture_RingMasterReview

It is easy to have an on-going appetite for a band but not always as simple to keep the fervour of the enthusiasm for their work burning just as brightly, especially as they evolve and move away from the things which first beguiled ears and imagination. With British electro rockers Calling All Astronauts no such problem has existed to date; with each release as they have grown and experimented, they seem to have sparked even more vivacious praise and greed; a success which will only continue with their new album Anti-Social Network.

The eleven track incitement is the CAA sound at its most rounded and mature yet and equally at its most adventurous and diverse. Recently talking about Anti-Social Network, band vocalist and album producer David Bury revealed, “We wanted to make an album we would buy ourselves, that pays homage to our heroes and many influences whilst still sounding like us. I think we’ve just about got there” Get there they did with tracks with harken back to seventies/eighties gothic and electro pop influences whilst uncaging a modern snarl of rock ‘n’ roll with a political and emotional bite as forceful as the virulence which ensures feet and hips are as eager and voracious as ears.

The successor to heavily acclaimed debut album Post Modern Conspiracy, and in turn the singles and EP which followed it, the band’s eagerly awaited second album is the outcome of “20 months of insane creativity that saw the guys locked in their studio for days on end as they wrote, engineered and produced an album that stretched their creativity like never before.” Straight away it makes a potent impact, Living the Dream bringing the album to ears with a poppy yet shadow kissed invitation. Within it, the dark bass lure cast by Paul McCrudden almost prowls ears as a melodic and infectious swing brightly entices around the distinctive stony vocals of Bury. Feet are tapping within the first round of electronic beats whilst hips soon get involved with J Browning’s spicy grooves, the body seduced by the lively contagion which is slightly reminiscent of bands like Modern English and B-Movie.

art_RingMasterReviewIt is a great start quickly eclipsed by the even more addictive Empire. Released as a greedily devoured single towards the end of last year, it immediately runs its tempting fingers across the senses with the moody bait of McCrudden bass and the mouth-watering hooks of Browning, all within an equally captivating electronic climate. Punkish with an alluring irritability to its twists and a scent of aggravation to Bury’s expressive vocals, Empire beguiles body and thoughts, inciting thick involvement from each before making way for the spiky electro punk defiance of Time to Fight Back. With the additional agitated tenacity to spark any dance-floor, the song has the body bouncing as emotions raise a middle-finger to surrounding ills, a touch of Sigue Sigue Sputnik meets Pop Will Eat Itself doing its successful persuasion no harm.

The already familiar Hands Up Who Wants To Die? is the provider of more energetic and contagious exploits, ripe hooks and flaming guitar enterprise lighting ears as rhythms back the punch of vocals and words with skittish boisterousness. It too has an imposing charm and vivacious resourcefulness hard to resist, as too Life as We Know It which follows with a mellower but no less fascinating and arresting romancing of hips and ears. CAA might take swipes at establishments and worldly corruptions but barely a song goes by without the trio leading the listener into physical collusion with its inescapable dance-ability.

Through the heavier air and rock ‘n’ roll of The American Dream, a track which gives a hint to what Iggy Pop would sound like it he went down the electro/industrial route, and the fiery God Is Dead with its bubbly scathing, attention and thick enjoyment is again firmly taken care of, even if neither quite live up to those before them, whilst Always Be True hugs ears with a synth pop laced reflection. It too might miss the last spark of other tracks for our ears but with Bury adding a great Tom Waits like texture to his enticing tones as the electronic atmospherics of the song come loaded with their own suggestiveness, the Fad Gadget tinged track is a compelling and increasingly potent proposal.

The outstanding Look in Your Eye has ardour blazing again with its conspicuous gothic punk and post punk imagination. Touches of bands like Play Dead and March Violets emerge across the thrilling encounter, but as everywhere, familiar essences and textures are mere strands in something unmistakably Calling All Astronauts. As mentioned earlier, the band wanted to pay homage to their inspirations without losing their own individuality, this track on its own proving their success.

Anti-Social Network is completed by firstly the predacious and again insatiably alluring Black World where a Sister Of Mercy/The Mission like courtship of ears and imagination instantly beguiles and only becomes more intoxicating over time. Finally the band unleashes Divisive upon the passions; its attitude loaded presence spawned from electro punk/metal irritability and infested with devious and rebellious strains of funk and electronic devilment.

It is a mighty close to another powerful and galvanic release from Calling all Astronauts, and the sign that the band is ready to step out of the underground scene and stir up the biggest attention.

Anti-Social Network is released March 11th via Supersonic Media across most online stores.

http://www.callingallastronauts.com   https://www.facebook.com/CallingAllAstronauts/    https://twitter.com/CAA_Official

Pete RingMaster 11/03/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Isolated Antagonist – Affirmation of Entropy

Isolated Antagonist - cover bluntforce_RingMaster Review

Our ears were first stirred up by Massachusetts duo Isolated Antagonist, through their offering to the excellent compilation album 27 Tons of Metal New England, which came out last year on Bluntface Records. Their song was undoubtedly a standout proposal in, to be fair, nothing but attention grabbing artists and offerings. Now the band unleashes their new album Affirmation of Entropy; a striking proposition showing that their track on the earlier release was just an impressive scratch on the surface of the band and their sound’s depth and imagination.

Isolated Antagonist is the creative union of vocalist/lyricist Glen Mitchell and multi-instrumentalist/vocalist Nate Exx Gradowski. Its seeds began with Mitchell in the blazing heat of Middle East deserts with his unit where at the urging of Gradowski, who began creating the musical landscape soon after back in the US, he began writing the background story to what would become the band’s debut album. Officially formed in 2014, Isolated Antagonist released their first EP, Engineered Audi Hallucinations the following year and also debut album, The Isolated and The Antagonist. Now pushed further in their new incitement on ears and imagination, the band’s sound is a provocative fusion of industrial metal and death metal with progressive/electronic suggestiveness; it further invigorated by the evocative entangling of raw and clean vocals.

Affirmation of Entropy continues the tale of the first album and its story concerning the last man on Earth, the lead up to that situation, and the battle for survival “on a planet that has turned against him so thoroughly that the dirt beneath his feet was even a danger.” A creative emprise from Mitchell’s own imagination rich Sci-Fi universe, it is further blossomed and broadened, as the band’s creativity and music, within the new encounter and fair to say that from the stunning artwork through to the clarity of note and emotion, the album grips ears and attention.

The scene is set with the muggy and intimidating ambience of Into the Dark. It casts the image of a hostile place with the lost ghosts of the past nagging from the background, yet it has a raw beauty bred in the sonic invention of Gradowski. A compelling and unsettling start, the instrumental piece seeps away for Void to engulf ears with its equally restraint yet portentous air. Swiftly though, it is a smothering trespass of sound around the potent growls of Mitchell but raw intensity that blossoms celestial keys and zealously prowling riffs and rhythms within its storm. Carrying a death metal like animus in sound and voice, the track menaces the senses but also opens up an oasis of shadowy elegance as clean vocals from Gradowski are cradled by charming melodies and ear warming keys. At times Numan-esque and in others Godflesh like, there is no escaping the dark majesty posing as a song working on body and psyche.

The following Trapped similarly merges predatory animosity and invasive atmospheric grace whilst again the already impressive craft and imagination of Gradowski’s sound is enhanced by the entwining extremes of the pair’s respective vocal styles. Again Gary Numan is a spice that springs out, but a scent which as all across the album, is transformed into something individual to Isolated Antagonist, and repeated swiftly in Receptor and its thrilling Cryptopsy meets Nine Inch Nails like antagonism. As in previous songs, destructive textures begets sonic calm, melodic and atmospheric tempting begets industrial volatility; it all to enthralling effect.

New Light Now Made is a sinister treat, its Fear Factory inspired stalking of ears coming with a Die Krupps like infection. It is a predator; a primal yet virulently catchy offering which grows in strength and persuasion minute by minute with exotic hues and tempestuous energies as exciting company before making way for The Archetype Defined. If its predecessor hunted the senses, this song instantly tears into the listener, infesting body and thoughts straight away with its fierce drama and volcanic sound. Of course, as shown by those before it, the song is a maelstrom of contrasting energies and sonic colours that is gloriously unpredictable and increasingly fascinating.

The spatial aired yet simultaneously intimately invasive Dark Nomad surrounds ears next, its magnetic presence soon outshone though by The Infernos Son and its emotionally gothic and sonically vampiric proposal. The song sucks adventures out of the imagination, its Type O Negative meets Sister of Mercy breath feeding on the dark emotions at its and the listener’s heart to leave the senses exhausted and emotions blissful.

The following Words Beyond Time just fails to match up to the ingenuity of its predecessor but with its rapacious character and persistent nagging of metal cultured riffs and rhythms, it only leaves thick pleasure in its wake before The Protagonist Denied hits another pinnacle for the album. Bordering on carnal in its first assault, seductive in its Celtic bagpiped exploits next, the track is irresistible, especially when merging both for progressive/industrial metal at its most instinctive and suggestive best.

The album’s title track is like a momentary summing up next. It is an atmospheric oasis giving thoughts the moment to recap in the arms of calm vocals and the acoustic prowess of guitar as a storm wells up in the background, a tempest which hungrily brews further within The Last Death. The song’s haunting ambience is the vessel for the poaching of the senses by carnivorous riffs and hooks as vocals trap ears and imagination in their suggestive cage. As compelling as it is though, the track only becomes stronger and more engrossing as synth breezes bring immersive melodies to wrap and entice ears.

Synth pop meets industrial insidiousness is the best way to describe Gather The Past, the track gnawing on the senses at one moment and flirting with them through a contagion of irresistible hooks and infection soaked melodies next. As mentioned earlier, there is a great unpredictability and bold uniting of extremes across the songs of Affirmation of Entropy, and arguably nowhere better than on this exceptional incitement, though the closing pair of Prototype for Babylon and Celestial gives a fair showing with almost matching success. The first is thrash/death metal meets eighties electro/industrial psychosis in a venomous but again often fiercely catchy intrusion whilst the closing song explores a soundscape echoing its title, if one also equipped with rabid rhythmic traps and vicious sonic hostility.

It is a magnificent end to what is quite simply an impressive and dramatically stimulating album from a band which feels as if it is still evolving; still realising their potential and not yet the band and sound they are surely destined to be. That is no bad thing as it means that Isolated Antagonist, already one exciting fresh presence within the industrial metal scene, will have plenty more major treats in store for us ahead.

Affirmation of Entropy is available from February 16th via Bluntface Records @ https://isolatedantagonist.bandcamp.com/album/affirmation-of-entropy or http://www.bluntfacerecords.com/

https://www.facebook.com/isolatedantagonist   https://twitter.com/isolantagonist

Pete RingMaster 14/02/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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The House Of Capricorn – Morning Star Rise

Photo Credit Cerulean Empire

If the horned one has a house warming party the day he moves in and consumes the world, there are plenty of candidates to provide the musical incitement; a list sure to have The House Of Capricorn near the top. The New Zealand devil rock trio release their new album Morning Star Rise this week and it is a proposition which wears the apocalypse as a smouldering seduction, a tantalising glaze to the band’s rock ‘n’ roll tapestry of doom, gothic and stoner rock. The release is a masterful protagonist for dark deeds and blackened hearts, a bewitching evocative hex sounding like the son of a satanic union between Type O Negative, Dommin, Babylon Whores, and Sisters Of Mercy. Even that description does not touch the black hearted toxicity which coats every note and syllable but it does suggest the melodic and deceptive satanic alchemy fuelling the outstanding encounter, the album radiantly inviting as its sound and intent feeds on the soul.

Formed in 2001 and hailing from Auckland, The House of Capricorn set free the self-released The Rivers And The Rain EP in 2006 as their first temptation, but it was with first album Sign Of The Cloven Hoof four years later that the band stirred real attention within a wider spotlight. It was followed the next year by In The Devil’s Days, the album reinforcing the increasingly darker explorations began with its predecessor. Now the threesome of vocalist Marko Pavlovic, guitarist Scott Blomfield, and drummer Michael Rothwell have cast their most riveting collection of satanic hymns yet for one of the most thrilling possessions of the year.

The Road to Hell is Marked makes the first enticement of ears and psyche, the track bounding in on swinging beats and a carnivorously snarling bassline entwined with an instantly engaging if acidic groove. It is a magnet for the imagination, the opening intimidation swiftly bursting into a creative punk like brawl as Pavlovic roars from within a tenaciously aggressive sonic confrontation. An element of Volbeat plays with thoughts but only as whispers behind the outstanding Pete Steele like dark harmonies the vocals grace the lyrical infestation with. Anthemic and contagious, the opener is a salacious but controlled stomp teasing with a scorching solo and that ever grumbling bass sound which enslaves appetite and emotion.

The brilliant start is matched swiftly by the fire and brimstone of In Light of Lucifer, the track stepping down a gear in attack but increasing the dosage of toxic grooves and vocal tempting. The 143228track prowls and taunts with its gait and hypnotic sounds, an imposing resonance leaking from every pore whilst the guitars cast a web of virulent hooks and grooves within the thick doom loaded smog. As the previous songs and those to follow, there is a diversity of sound and textures making up the offering but whatever the spices the song, as the album, is simply rock ‘n’ roll at its voracious best.

Our Shrouded King is another bellow of sound and demonic intent, riffs and rhythms an uncompromising confrontation tempered by the sultry temptation of grooves and expressive vocals. Hints of Misfits/Samhain flirt with thoughts as do more loudly those of Type O Negative but there is no escaping the rich and imposing tones of seventies classic metal kicking up a storm within the swamp of enterprise and incendiary emotion squalling within the track. Its invitingly corrosive maelstrom makes way for the slower predation of Ashlands, it an initially agitated intimidation which emerges as a broad and funereal examination of imagination and emotions. The track is a glorious dark seducing, a drone kissed croon in sound and voice which consumes the senses with a post punk haunting and gothic rock elegance before making its way to angst soaked expulsions of raw vocals and blacker sonic depths. The song is as meditative as it is emotionally toxic, and quite riveting.

Both The Only Star in the Sky and Ivory Crown continue the exhilarating infestation, the album remaining on its lofty plateau of persuasion with consummate ease. The first of the two has an essence of The Mission to its melodic tempting whilst rhythmically and in the growling bass lures, a tinge of early Killing Joke. Again they are mere whispers in the fascinating creative embrace of an inescapable contagion. If this is an infectious suasion its successor is primal seducing with its Sisters of Mercy like chorus and blackened glamour, though overall as the song blossoms and tempts with melodic and female harmonies inflaming ears and passions, it enthrals more like a distant cousin of The Mission’s track Severina, a plus in anyone’s book.

The hazier climate and sonic colour of Watching Angels Fall comes next, the song as magnetic strolling relentlessly or welling up with tsunami like energy for impassioned dark crescendos. Its adventurous instinct leads the listener into a noir lit plane of sonic enterprise and provocative ruffled calm at one point, an almost wrong-footing turn before re-establishing its authority with the returning tide of torrential tiffs and rhythms. A slow burner compared to others on the album but soon another peak, it is followed by the atmospheric instrumental Covenants Ark, an intriguing and thought provoking piece of stark wasteland bred ambience leading to final epic emprise Dragon of Revelations. Over nine minutes long, the track is a cavernous journey into a dark unknown and destructive malevolence but lit with the transfixing smouldering tones of Pavlovic and a reflective streaming of sonic colour from Blomfield. It is a doom drenched exploration, oppressive and enchanting simultaneously and a sublime end to an exceptional release.

Morning Star Rise is majestic, colossally gloomy and fearsome but equally captivatingly infectious and spellbinding. When the apocalypse comes The House of Capricorn will have no fears, they will riding to the fore with wide grins and instruments sound-tracking the end of days.

Morning Star Rise is available now via Svart Records on vinyl @ http://svartrecords.com/shoppe/home/2738-the-house-of-capricorn-morning-star-rise-cd.html, on CD @ http://svartrecords.com/shoppe/home/2737-the-house-of-capricorn-morning-star-rise-cd.html or digitally @ http://thehouseofcapricorn.bandcamp.com/

https://www.facebook.com/thehouseofcapricorn

RingMaster 02/12/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Wayne Hussey – Songs Of Candlelight And Razorblades

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Since coming across Wayne Hussey with Dead Or Alive, it is fair to say his musical journey has persistently left impacting and lingering marks on our personal musical travelogue, and of rock music itself. Whether it has been the dark compelling beginning through to the pop agitated revelry of the Pete Burns led band, the caustically elegant gothic drama of Sisters Of Mercy, or the melodic adventure and emotive beauty of The Mission, he has been there inciting and inspiring, like for so many, our passions. His adventures have not worked for all, drawing mixed responses at times towards his creativity, but it is fair to say that for us, especially with the last of those bands, he has been a distinctive musical presence with his various band-mates to find constant joy in.

So is was with relish and intrigue that we approached his new solo album Songs Of Candlelight And Razorblades, thirty years plus after first striking a bond with his creative presence. To be fair it is hard to go into a Wayne Hussey involved release without some expectations, and maybe hopes of hearing essences of former glories. It was the same with the new album and those wishes were pleasingly fed, much because of the unique vocals of the man, but what also emerged was an album which unveiled a glorious landscape of diverse melodic and emotive adventure with an intimacy, which as so many of the songs in his past, found a personal connection. Already covered in acclaim for The Mission’s last album The Brightest Light of last year, Mr Hussey is due another heavy dose of eager praise and recognition for what is an album of the year contender.

The successor to his previous album Bare, a release seeing Hussey present various Mission songs and other covers, Songs Of Candlelight & Razorblades is the personal creative craft and heart of the Sao Paulo based musician on display alone for arguably the first time. It makes for a riveting proposition, one merging impassioned folk, resonating melodic rock, and emotional shadows into a startling and thrilling portrait of an artist still discovering and exploring new corners and depths. Released on his own Eyes Wide Shut Recordings, the crowd funded album opens with Madam G, a noir kissed slice of melancholic yet radiant melodic moodiness. The gentle caress of its sultry embrace is a weave of 71XaDXdPBKL._SL1500_expression soaked strings and poetic piano around the welcomingly familiar tones of Hussey. It is a bold way to open the release, not a punchy and openly infectious lure as most albums would begin with, but a jazz kissed smouldering which slowly and successfully draws the imagination right into the album.

The following Nothing Left Between Us opens on a bloom of folk tinged guitar melodies and the gravelled tones of Hussey. It is a warm and inviting beginning soon broadening with backing harmonies and a deliciously throaty bassline, light and dark essences entwining for a riveting and reserved but keen stroll which increases in passion and intensity the deeper into the song’s vibrant croon it goes. Its catchy potency is matched by the more exotic breath of JK Angel of Death (1928-2011), electro jabs linking up with sonic enterprise for its own individual evocative call of sound and expression. As its predecessor, the track washes the senses in a provocative climate of melodic colour enriched with emotive hues, further confirming that in writing and vocal strength alone Hussey has lost none of his compelling strengths.

Both Swan Song (Lament) and You Are Not Alone keep the album’s fine persuasion soaring, the first another slice of impassioned balladry aligned to a gentle catchiness brought by creative hooks and vocal prowess, whilst its successor explores the kind of melodic twang and tenacious imagination which has never been far from the pinnacles within the perpetual success of The Mission. It is not a song which fully erupts into areas hinted at across its bewitching presence, but certainly leaves plenty for thoughts and emotions to feed greedily upon before Wasting Away [Reprise] braces ears. With Hussey finding an almost Bowie like tone initially to his vocals within a tender caress of the music, it is a track which does not seize the imagination like those before but worms under the skin for a just as lingering enjoyment.

The album hits its most impressive peak at this point, the pungent charm and emotional elegance of The Bouquets and the Bows making the first roaring temptation. From another warm and reserved stroking of ears and imagination, the track increasingly grows and brews up a climactic passion and energy to cast a finale which simultaneously burns and seduces the senses, bass and keys especially potent in the latter of the two sides alongside the vocals. Its success is soon surpassed by the scintillating Wither on the Vine, the best track on the album. Straight away it shimmers with a melodic rock resonance which in turn is veined with a quite delicious sonic hook coursing with irresistible melodic blood. Again it is hard to ignore strong flavouring of The Mission but also there are elements sparking thoughts of Modern English, both rich spices accentuating the ridiculously infectious smile and magnetic invention of the track. It is prime Wayne Hussey songwriting and ingenuity, and quite outstanding.

   No Earthly Cure is not backward in igniting the passions either, the song a summery canvas which blooms and flourishes in voice and enticing harmonies to increasingly involve and spark the imagination. Its melodic scenery is enthralling, an electronic shimmering radiating through the expansive colour of melodic and harmonic beauty. The song again walks the highest plateau of the album, a level not quite emulated by ‘Til the End of Time but matched by Devil’s Kind. The first almost marches with folk bred festivity and endearing melodic invocation whilst the second brings caustic country rock breath to its captivating and raw again folk seeded persuasion. With thumping beats poking throughout the contagious devilry, the track is rock ‘n’ roll in its barest dressing and rigorously thrilling.

From the orchestral croon and lure of When I Drift Too Far from Shore, a song which soothes and seduces ears with a relatively subdued yet open theatrical appetite, the album begins its conclusion by provocatively exploring classical and dramatic textures through the gentle tempest of Next Station before ending on the challenging intrigue of Aporia. The first two of the trio only confirm the still impressing strength and heart bred expression of Hussey’s voice, as well as his stirring songwriting, whilst the closer sees him providing a spoken narrative across a haunting and engrossing flight of sonic exploration. Though the slower suasion of all three songs cannot rival what came before them, they still combine to ensure The Songs Of Candlelight & Razorblades ends with a memorable and invigorating conclusion.

It is probably right to assume that fans of Hussey and The Mission will find a swifter and easier impassioned connection with the album, but that does not detract from the fact that The Songs Of Candlelight & Razorblades is a breath-taking and stunning release. Listening to it you also feel that Wayne Hussey has only scratched the surface of his individual adventure which only increases the hunger for more.

The Songs Of Candlelight & Razorblades is available via Eyes Wide Shut Recordings now.

https://www.facebook.com/themissionuk

RingMaster 20/10/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Calling All Astronauts: Winter Of Discontent

After the success and acclaim for their debut single London based socio-political band Calling All Astronauts return with their new track Winter Of Discontent, a dark brewing storm of malcontent. Once more the band have harvested seeds of social and political dissatisfaction into an inciteful and charged piece of songwriting and music. The trio of vocalist/programmer David B, guitarist JJ Browning, and bassist Kristi Bury, this time have intensified the dark electro energy which invaded through their first release Someone Like You into a heavily shadowed and deeply rooted provocation. It is immense, a resonating heart spawn soundtrack for today.

Released June 24th through MKM Records, Winter Of Discontent follows up what has been a productive time between releases with the band receiving consistent airplay across sixty radio stations and on shows like BBC 6 Music Introducing with Tom Robinson. Ireland’s RTE Culture Café, and The Bone Orchard from The Reputation Radio Show. They were also featured on the cover mount of Big Cheese Magazine and supported A Place to Bury Strangers and Pop Will Eat Itself amongst their own successful headlining shows. The new release is the next accelerated step for the band, its blackened seduction simply irresistible and unforgettable.

The song immediately consumes the ear from the start with agitated electro sparks and a wonderful throbbing pulsating cello/bass groan from Kristi Bury which is unrelenting and insistent through the length of the song. It is like a primal call, an anthem for dark times and shadows and mesmeric within its resonating drone atmosphere. Around it the guitars of JJ Browning spark and enthral whilst excited beats light up the growing intensity behind the emotive vocals of David B, his plaintive tones a fluid link between the dark and light of the song. As with their debut there is a heavy Sister Of Mercy breath which pervades the senses and at times as the song plays their track Alice comes to mind, its flavour a formidable and invigorating spice to the thrilling sounds and reinforced by the Andrew Eldritch like vocals of David B. Imagine the pop craft of The Cure and the atmospheric shadows created by Bauhaus in addition and you get the essence of the sound within the single, though Calling All Astronauts expand into textures and soundscapes uniquely their own.

Winter Of Discontent is outstanding and destined to eclipse its predecessor in success and acclaim. Calling All Astronauts are one of the most exciting alternative rock bands in the UK right now, maybe the best.

Grab a free download of the single @  http://callingallastronauts1.bandcamp.com/track/winter-of-discontent and listen out for the track on The Reputation Radio Show @ http://www.reputationradioshow.com/.

http://www.callingallastronauts.com/

RingMaster 16/06/2012

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