Sinnergod – Self Titled

sinnergod-online-promo-shot_RingMasterReview

For quite a while now and across a handful of releases, British alternative/gothic rockers Sinnergod has suggested they are in line to seize the British rock scene with their dramatic and ever growing sound. With their new self-titled offering the Manchester hailing outfit has come to that day, their second album a compelling and increasingly irresistible theatre of dark rock and metal announcing the band ready to help lead British rock.

Formed by twin brothers Mark and Chris Hampson in 2007, Sinnergod quickly grabbed attention and plaudits. Within months of hitting their stride live, the quintet earned a slot playing Bloodstock Open Air Festival. A trio of EPs followed, Two Thousand and Never in 2009, A World in Grey three years later with Behind Every Corner uncaged the following year. Each provided an ear and imagination pleasing proposal, each showing fresh evolution and adventure in the band’s sound leading up to the well-received and impressive debut album Seven Deadly Sinphonies in 2014, a release featuring special guests Bill Moseley (Devil’s Rejects, Texas Chainsaw Massacre) and Tobias Keast (Esoterica). Live too, the band has continued to establish themselves as one of Britain’s finest propositions, sharing stages with the likes of Misfits, Deathstars, Orgy, KMFDM, Sarah Jezebel Deva, Voodoo Six, and Blaze Bayley along the way.

This has now all been eclipsed by their self-titled offering. The new album is a monster of an adventure; a collection of songs which roar and resonate in ears and imagination. Sinnergod draw on the catchiest of eighties hooks and electronic seducing to light the darkest portrayals of emotion amidst an enjoyably invasive sound. It is music which at first appears familiar in some way but needs mere moments to reveal its own distinct and magnetic character.

It opens up with Dead Of The Night, its intro a shadowy and suggestive symphony drawing the listener into the subsequent and swiftly addictive mix of choppy riffs and melodic reflection. As the swiping beats of Chris Hampson land the guitars of Mark Hampson and Sam Saint collude with the keys of Paul Swindells to cast a transfixing weave of emotive sound. Mark’s impressive vocals soon share their heart; lying melancholically upon the blossoming landscape of enterprise as a dark edge is provided by James Dunn’s bass, its shadows in turn prowling the infectiousness of the track’s rousing chorus.

The impressive start is quickly outshone by Burn. The track is glorious, slipping in on the mist of keys as slightly deranged vocals tempt. Once in full heavy motion, riffs and rhythms march masterfully across the senses, vocals and steely melodies combining to further trap the listener. The song is a creative predator, challenging and seducing with every imaginative stride growing into something akin to Nine Inch Nails meets Poets Of The Fall but unique in its own skin.

As the last track is different to the first, The Endless with its symphonic hues offers yet another shade of adventure to the album. As unapologetically catchy as it is muscularly voracious, the song ebbs and flows like a sonic storm, moments of relative emotion packed calm instantly hit by surges of tempestuous energy and sound for another plateau of craft and enjoyment within the release, a success matched by the electronic stomp of I Never Had a Gun. Creating a tapestry of essences found in the likes of Abandon All Ships, Fear Factory, and Silent Descent, the track simmers and bubbles over as it strides relentlessly through ears and into the psyche before making way for the crystalline opening of 1000 Sins. Pretty soon though, its sinew swung rhythms and pulsating theatre of sounds swamps ears; eighties electronic flavouring hinting at bands such as Depeche Mode and Gene Loves Jezebel in tandem with Sinnergod’s own creative might. Addictive and fiercely persuasive, the listener will find themselves quickly emotionally and physically involved, certainly going by the effect song and album had on the office here.

sinnergod_album_cover_artwork-jpg_RingMasterReview There is also an element of early synthpop fuelled Ministry to the track, before Al Jourgensen dived head first into metal, and a flavouring which soaks the next up serenade of The Watched. Another which sonically simmers but with a liveliness which infects hips and feet, the song is a hug of melodic and harmonic expression and beauty.

Across the gothic electronic and keys shaped dance of Joshua’s Day and the engrossing darklight of Supernatural, a seducing with the open scent of Dave Gahan and co to it, band and album simply flow over the senses, like poetic fog laying heavy but welcomingly before We’ve Been Expecting You rises from a single evocative melody with gothic and orchestral majesty to stand god like over ears while casting its magnanimous musings. As with many songs, it feels like something you may already know yet every note and twist is a new and fresh exploration to album and the dark rock world Sinnergod are poised to take in their creative palms.

The thickly satisfying Johnny Sits Perfectly Still is arguably the least adventurous track upon the album yet needs little time to have ears and participation secured before We Don’t Have Anything looms from portentous shadows and erupts into a Korn/Machine Head spiced foray into ears and passions. The song epitomises the Sinnergod sound; meaty and dark, heavy and melodically aflame with an unrelenting intensity and energy to tempt and lift the spirit. It is an explosive and thrilling end to the album, though the minute long desolate and forlorn soundscape of instrumental XII actually brings the album to a close but it is its predecessor which leaves the last lingering imprint.

Sinnergod is a band on the march and heading to the frontline of British rock/metal, though to be honest their new album suggests they are already there.

The self-titled Sinnergod album is out now through all platforms.

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Pete RingMaster 15/09/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Subject Seven – Fall Of The Four

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UK metallers Subject Seven never fails to offer up an experience and release which plays with and ignites the senses, eventually working into the passions with generally incendiary results. New album Fall Of The Four is no exception, a release which comes at the listener with a varied expressive presence to captivate the imagination whilst feeding primal needs. It brings ten melodically flaming tracks with equally compelling sinews and muscular intensity veining to its multi-flavoured body and from start to finish leaves a more than healthy satisfaction.

Formed in 2010, the Preston quartet did not stand still waiting for acclaim and interest, taking a mere trio of weeks to record debut EP New Dawn and soon standing as one of the more enterprising and welcomed international touring act, the band playing over 250 shows in their first 2 years leading to their critically acclaimed debut album Seven Rising of 2012. Led by acclaimed Underground Horror Director (Creepsville, Slasher House)and vocalist MJ Dixon, and made up of members of Dennis Delight, Hockey Mask Heroes and Ocean Bend in the shape of guitarist Sam Saint, bassist Jim jam, and drummer Paul Swindells, Subject Seven has continued to earn respect and a devoted fan base through singles like Come Out Tonight, No Fate, and Search The Dark and their additional videos, and their fiery live performances which has seen them alongside bands such as AC/DC, Iced Earth, and TerrorVision. Passionately independent forming their own unique record label and production house Mycho Records which has seen them work with first class acts like Sinnergod, Better Left Alone, Promethium and Blaze Bayley (Iron Maiden/Wolfsbane), the band laid down the strongest temptation for their new release with the recent release of the single and video Heart Of Osiris.

It is a persuasion soon cemented by the album which opens with said single. The atmospheric opening drama of the song is pure Subject 7 covercinematic menace, its tantalising and sinister breath evolving into an electro metal taunting of the ear ripened further by the crisp and potent rhythms and knee staggering riff strikes. Alongside the formidable aggressive provocative the keys continue to wash the ear with evocative and warm caresses whilst the vocals similarly seduce rather than antagonise for a strong and expressive welcome. After listening to the album and in hindsight, the song is maybe not the track we would have chosen to lay an invitation down for the album but there is no denying its imaginative venture with symphonic whispers coating its rising flumes of melodic elegance.

The following You Heard It Here First snaps at the ear with a feistier beckoning whilst again coaxing with melodic invention for a mix of classic and groove metal with a distinct stamp of the band on its vibrant hide. The track is another rise to the album and as third song 14∑E (04U) lights up the ear the sense of it getting better and better as it progresses is strong and proven across its subsequent offerings. This track like its predecessors merges a pleasing electro teasing to its muscular craft and passion bringing essences of Killswitch Engage and Silent Descent into a more hard rock lilted melodically crafted endeavour.

Both Diablo and Celestion enthral with their distinct breaths, the first laying a folky breeze intriguingly upon its contagious and potent grooves and essence  developed further by the keys amongst the hungrier riffs and intensity whilst its successor is an enchanting soaking of emotive ambience and sonically kissed melodic beauty. It is a simmering piece of instrumental fire which showcases the impressive craft of the men behind the sound and their songwriting, which at times can be submerged within the infectious call of songs.

From the insatiable virulence of Never Let You Go the album lifts an even greater head of potency and temptress like persuasion, Iblis Trigger taking the lead with its rampant energy and senses caging riffs and rhythmic provocation. The song raises a more attitude driven passion but still allows the melodic strengths and addiction of band and song to have their declaration within its enslaving stature, the guitar laying a narrative of sonic heat within the heart of the track to secure greater attention.

Both To Deth We Ride and Thirteenth Hour stomp with another elevation in fervency, each ridiculously catchy and easy recruiters of listener assistance with invention veined with metallic spirals recalling the likes of Maiden and Dio, whilst closing song The Fall makes for a pleasing and visually inspiring conclusion though the fun hidden track Chinese Vampire has the last enterprising and mischievous say.

The only wish you could have for the release is maybe a more rabid snarl to its confrontation and elements, a growl which actually takes a bite across the length of Fall Of The Four rather than making just suggestions. Nevertheless the album is a richly satisfying and pleasing release which shows exactly why Subject Seven is constantly on the playlist of a great many melodic metal fans.

http://subjectseven.co.uk/

8/10

RingMaster 13/06/2013

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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