Nasher – 432-1: Open The Vein

Taking the listener in a melodic hug whilst opening windows and spotlights upon lives, intimate and more politically social, the new album from Nasher is nothing less than captivation. 432-1: Open The Vein shares memories and reflections like the sun provides warmth and clarity through songs as compelling in their writing as in the melodies and harmonies bringing them to life. It is blessed with truly bewitching and memorable moments within a body which from start to finish has ears hungry for more as the imagination weaves away.

Nasher is Brian Nash, the guitarist for Frankie Goes to Hollywood. Before his part in their success, he had already linked up with drummer Peter Gill and vocalist Holly Johnson in Sons and Egypt, forming the outfit with the duo after playing in several other bands with varying styles. Sons and Egypt came to an end in 1980 when his colleagues left to join a new band in the shape of Frankie Goes to Hollywood. The departure of Gerard O’Toole from that band two years later saw Nash link up with his former band mates again, the band going on to have international triumphs of course with the likes of Relax and Two Tribes. After their demise in 1987 Nash collaborated with singer Grant Boult as Low and later again in Dr. Jolly’s Salvation Circus. Two solo albums in Ripe and Le Grande Fromage appeared in 1999 and 2002 respectively, Nash also creating his own Internet-based label, Babylon Pink, around that time upon which 432-1: Open The Vein now appears.

It opens up with Salt in Our Veins and the sound of water falling and lapping from presumably the Mersey of his hometown as its specific noises raise their heads. From within their evocative textures, Nash’s acoustic guitar strokes the senses, his following vocals similarly coaxing attention with their harmonic warmth. The emotional suggestion and plaintive insight of his words are just as magnetic, Nash seemingly sharing light on his move to the capitol and the retaining by Liverpool of his heart. The wonderful song is a sign of things to come, of the drama lining every note and syllable, of the infectiousness fuelling every ballad and livelier engagement with ears and thoughts.

The fine start continues through the folkish stroll of Still Can’t Find the One, a song embracing eighties pop hues more akin to the likes of Blancmange and Heaven 17 than his Frankie exploits, and the observational melancholic theatre of I Spy. Not for the last time upon the album, there is something of XTC to the songwriting or more the Colin Moulding side of the band, the song a pastoral reflection in sound and insight in word of modern life. Both tracks are instinctive magnetism, warm yet shadowy caresses matched in strength and beguilement by the sunny disposition and emotional sentiment of Whole.

Through the harmonic questioning of one of the bitter protagonists of today in Katies and the boisterous rock ‘n’ roll of Prostitutes and Cocaine, the album only adds to its riveting and skilled pleasuring of ears while Just Sounds Like Noise engagingly repeats words that people of a certain age share about Saturday afternoon and evening TV. It was better in our day is a staple claim of every generation and forever will be though not always with the charm given it by Nash.

The mellow hazed Pebbles to Dust seduces next; the increasingly bewitching song almost somnambulistic in gait and air as it melancholically smooches with the senses. Its darkly lit atmosphere flows into the equally sombre glide of Where Will the Kids Live? through the lively antics of youth. The track is gorgeous, once more drama seeping into every melodic sparkle and haunted glaze of sound and emotive shadow.

Both Nothing Homes and XO simply captivate; melodies and harmonic sighs to the fore with the second of the two slipping into an animated skip for its pop catchy incitement of feet and emotions. With a whiff of Pete Wylie to its contagious enterprise, the track has the listener physically and emotionally bouncing before Yesterday’s News closes things up with its Jam lit croon. More of a grower compare to the instant persuasion of earlier tracks, it emerges as a just as momentous and stirring proposition within 432-1: Open The Vein, an album which leaves the heart even more lustfully in love with music, especially if you hang on for its hidden Bowie inspired finale.

 432-1: Open The Vein is out now through Babylon Pink Recordings.

https://www.facebook.com/Nasher-105270312871476/

Pete RingMaster 05/07/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Scott Swain – Like Nothing Else

From the dark country drama and sultry intrigue of last year’s single Oil!, Scott Swain casts his imagination into even more deceptive corners with its successor Like Nothing Else. The song is a gentle yet brooding encounter; warm and seductive yet with darkness in its lining which as much blossoms into a provocatively mesmeric enticement as the melodic warmth within, .

Making use of the downtime from his bands How to Dress a Monster and Fire at Night to explore his personal writing and songs, Swain unveiled his solo project last year and released the irresistible single Oil!, a song showing hints of inspirations ranging from Elliot Smith and Mark Lanagan to cult cinema. As its predecessor, which was inspired by There Will be Blood, his new track was written about a movie, Event Horizon the spark for Like Nothing Else.

The opening caress of acoustic guitar is an earthy yet celestial lure, Swain’s warm vocals adding to the song’s elevating flight of melody and temptation. With rhythms laying shadows in close quarter to the radiance embracing vocal and lyrical reflection, the song swiftly becomes an easy transfixing of ears and imagination. Simmering with creative and suggestive theatre, the track slowly but openly builds in emotion and intensity from there, its journey into an understated but rousing crescendo a gripping realisation before a final kiss of melodic and harmonic sighing lies poetically on the senses as the song drifts away.

Throughout its evolution, Like Nothing Else is pure captivation and confirmation that Swain’s solo side is heading towards major attention.

Like Nothing Else is released 28th April.

Upcoming Live Dates:

23/04/2017 Craft Beer Company, Brixton, London.

26/04/2017 The Cellar, The Finborough, Earls Court, London.

08/05/2017 Spice of Life, Soho, London.

18/05/2017 The Bricklayers Arms, Hitchin.

28/05/2017 Opium Bar, Edinburgh.

http://scottswainmusic.com/    https://www.facebook.com/scottswainmusic   https://twitter.com/scottswainmusic

Pete RingMaster 19/04/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Little Lapin – Wake Up With The Sun

There are many obvious things which are evidence of being in the throes of a seductive summer, most you will need no reminding of but there is something else which equally has emotions wrapped up in the beauty of its warmth and that is a new release from British singer-songwriter Little Lapin. Just short of two years ago, the Cornwall based songstress entranced and impressed with debut album Remember The Highs, repeating the event a year later with its even more striking successor Holding Out For The Kicks. Their collection of heart bred, spirit stroking songs firmly imprinted their creator on the indie folk/ alt country scene. Now third album, Wake Up With The Sun, is a day or so away from living up to its title and sparking a new melodic summer for the senses and imagination to bask in.

Quite simply Wake Up With The Sun puts its predecessors in the shade; easily eclipsing both impressing releases as Little Lapin’s (Lucy Hill) reveals her most potent, accomplished, and creatively imaginative and elegant songs yet. She is no stranger to acclaim, those releases and surrounding singles as well as her live performances drawing eager praise and attention. From radio shows to the scribbles of music blogs and magazines, plaudits have gathered as too a worldwide fan base through her shows and tours across Britain and New Zealand as well as New York. Wake Up With The Sun is also the call to the rest of the world to take notice with its season of melodic seduction.

Initially and no doubt continued to be inspired by the likes of Regina Spektor, The Cranberries, Florence & The Machine, Laura Marling, PJ Harvey, The Cure, and The Pixies, Little Lapin has persistently nurtured her own character of sound and songwriting; its current pinnacle and uniqueness coming within Wake Up With The Sun. From its first breath, the album smiles and kisses ears; opener and album title track stroking ears with the tender touch of acoustic guitar. That in turn sparks a skip of eager guitar and bass, their perky stroll wrapped in the warm caress of LL’s ever captivating voice.  A slice of pop folk, the song proceeds to radiate like its namesake; rays of energy and senses inciting warmth infusing body and spirit.

My Complexion follows, swiftly sharing its own infectious gait and nature as LL courts ears and thoughts with her evocative words and enticing voice. Its unique spice adds a delicious tang to her melodic prowess, essences emulated in the blend of jaunty guitar and jazzy bass alongside.  An eruption of fiercely fragrant guitar only adds to the temptation, a one off moment not to be repeated but lingering as long as the song’s general spring and beam.

Just as potent in its reluctance to leave ears and thoughts is the delicious animated serenade of Isn’t Life for Living, a blossom of beauty simultaneously sharing a smouldering flame and frisky waltz as it ignites feet and hips as easily as a lustful appetite for its virulent pop.  As throughout the album, there is a sixties/seventies scent, a whisper but giving the song another endearing hue to get hooked on as it sublimely captivates with its keen and poetic vivacity before latest single Narrabeen adds its own catchy enterprise and bold imagination to the release. With the haze of harmonica and a suggestive rumble interrupting its tenacious country spiced swing, the track is a sultry and dusty Kiwi hued adventure and, as its predecessor, just riveting.

Through the delicate melancholy lit Luna and the reflective hug of A Song for Alex, the album lures the listener deeper into its majestic yet intimate arms while Need a Change of Scene has the body on its feet again shuffling round with tenacious versatility to the song’s wonderfully unpredictable invention and evolving landscape. Like a mix of Laura Marling and Imelda May, LL has ears and imagination enslaved whilst revealing another aspect to the diversity shaping Wake Up With The Sun.

LL simply bewitches once more within Radio Nocebo, her tang lined voice an appetite inflaming siren and storyteller within the sparkle of hearty and innocence spun melodies. Captivation is swift and inescapable as the song provides another peak to the loft range of the album; its triumph followed by the final wash of warmth and melodic intimacy provided by closing song I Told You So. It is a last kiss on the lips of pleasure as Wake Up With The Sun leaves the listener wistfully bound in the hug of creative grace.

It is probably fair to say that Little Lapin has yet to ignite the biggest spotlights so far but it is easy to suspect that global attention will be stirred, as the sun, by her new and quite simply gorgeous album.

Wake Up With The Sun is released April 14th across most online stores.

http://www.littlelapinmusic.com/    https://www.facebook.com/littlelapin/    https://twitter.com/1littlelapin   https://littlelapin.bandcamp.com

Pete RingMaster 13/04/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Chris Mullin – Myself Fooling Me

Better known as the bassist and co-songwriter of The Sums (ex-Smaller) and bassist for nineties band Hurricane #1 who have recently reformed, Chris Mullin is set to entice his own corner of attention with his debut solo EP, Myself Fooling Me. The Liverpool bred musician bares his creative and emotional heart with a six fingered handful of songs as distinct and different from his other endeavours as they are similar in the captivation of ears and imagination; simply a collection of tracks just demanding attention.

The first of a planned series of EPs exploring Mullin’s appetite for “more experimental styles of music”, Myself Fooling Me opens up with Hard Times. As keys stroke ears and thoughts, swiftly there is a Lennon-esque quality to the song and its lively grace, Mullin’s vocal expression a heart sharing proposal accentuated by the spring of strings rising over and caressing a quickly awoken appetite for the song’s melodic suggestiveness. Catchy with increasing warm hope lining its initial melancholic tinge, the song is a captivating start to the release and introduction to Mullin’s personal creative character.

Lost At Sea follows, acoustic guitar stroking ears as Mullin’s again vocally shares his reflections being subsequently surrounded by simmering and increasingly bold flames of strings courted by celestial keys. The song laps at the senses, suggestive light shimmering on its surface before the darker hues of Colour Of Pain compellingly slip through ears. With a bluesy edge to its melodic lure and shadow hugged emotion, the outstanding track is a haunted bewitchment, melancholy and sorrow its engaging suit as Mullins reveals yet another side to his ever broadening solo journey.

From the rousing beauty of a song shouting single, Mullins shows a folkish flare with No More; a gentle melody seducing act of defiance which just grows more infectious with every passing note and word while Who Took The Beat? shows another hue to the same instinctive intent with darker emotional shadows at work. Blossoming in texture and flavour with every move, a sixties musical air from his home city as well as broader cosmopolitan scents seeping from its body, the song is one evocative serenade.

The EP closes with its title track; a song written over 20 years ago and revived after a one on one jamming session with Paul McCartney a few years back. Featuring ex-band mate, Bren Moore (Smaller/The Sums/Ella Guru) and the backing vocals of Fiona Holt O’Sullivan, Myself Fooling Me is a melody woven glide into the imagination with lyrical and vocal expression as provocative and honest as the boisterous sounds around them.

With every listen the Myself Fooling Me EP offers a richer seduction whilst sharing further depth to songwriting already part of some memorable moments with The Sums. Mullin’s solo exploration is a very different proposal to his ‘day job’, but something fans of the band and melody honed music as a whole will enthusiastically embrace.

Myself Fooling Me is available now via Nowhere Music through all major download retailers and @ https://chrismullin.bandcamp.com/releases

http://chrismullin.net/   https://www.facebook.com/chrismully   https://twitter.com/chrismullin74

Pete RingMaster 29/03/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

To Bear Sir – Hold Yourself Tight

TBS_RingMasterReview

Hold Yourself Tight is the debut album of To Bear Sir, the solo project of someone who has already, like for so many others, made a major impact on our ears and passions. The creative provocateur constantly stirring up the imagination is Welsh songwriter/vocalist/musician Russell Toomey though you might know him better as the creator/frontman of My Red Cell, Innercity Pirates, and Denim Snakes; three bands which all made a striking impact on the UK underground scene with their individual sounds and characters, each deserving far more attention and success than found.

It is a height of recognition which just might be sparked by To Bear Sir. Each of Toomey’s bands has even with some strains of similarity been wholly unique propositions to each other and indeed any band around them but To Bear Sir is a gulf away from those before it and just as impressive.

Debut album, Hold Yourself Tight reveals bare intimacy not knowingly heard in its creator’s work before, the songs giving greater meaning and echo to the name of the project. The diverse array of tracks and styles breeding its songs come together to create one of the most haunting, emotionally open, and generally irresistible propositions heard. From its first breath, the release bewitches, its heart akin to the listener’s sharing melancholy and despairs mutually known and felt.

Produced by Todd Campbell, Hold Yourself Tight opens up with Mother I’m Sorry. As solemn strings rise to share emotive fingers on ears, that heartrending air is swiftly inescapable, only thickening as a lone guitar strum takes over with its own shadowed melody. Toomey’s distinctive tones soon follow bringing a dark blues haunting and seduction with it reflected in the sounds hugging his presence. Funereal in gait, compelling in regret and touch, the song is sheer melancholic beauty.

art_RingMasterReviewIt is a stunning start quickly matched by Medi-Monster, a slightly livelier affair in energy with brooding shadows to its wiry melodies. Vocals are a wonderfully dispirited incitement, magnetic and mournfully introspective but luring full participation with the song’s almost disturbingly catchy chorus. It is impossible not to get physically and emotionally involved with either of the first pair of proposals or with the albums title track which follows. Its rhythmic shuffle has a touch of Fatboy Slim to it making a kinetic canvas for the dark folk serenade of voice and melody. A blend of contrasting textures, the track seduces hips and thoughts with ease even if not quite matching up to the lofty heights of its predecessors.

The new single from To Bear Sir is next, a song which could not be a better teaser for project and album if it tried. The Begging Ends Here is superb, rhythmically shamanic whilst cinematically and indeed emotionally so dark that it throbs with drama. It’s predominantly minimalistic body is enriched by flames of guitar with Toomey’s earnest croon inciting greater intensity in the heart and raw rock ‘n’ roll of the song. People are rightfully drooling about the new ex-Reuben frontman Jamie Lenman’s new single Mississippi, a song actually in similar vein to The Begging Ends Here and just as stirring and thrilling is Toomey’s essential treat.

Strings again lay their suggestive hands on ears as the sorrowful, hope searching Too Late closes in next, its sentiment and sad grace raw potency. It is an essence intensified even more in Loves That One Thing, an emotional incitement of voice and piano trespassing on personal truth and fresh wounds.

The Walk has a low key country scented breath next, a flavour bring new hues to another increasingly alluring mourn and disquieting charm whose persuasive elements conjure 3 Years to similarly enjoyable heights with keys and voice once more an enticing union as darker hues cradle their engaging solemnity. Each of the two pulls ears and thoughts into their world before the bluesy dance of It’s Not Over Until I Say So makes its energetic play. It is a track which did not initially convince as fully as others within the album, though its bursts of scuzzy delta blues guitar quickly had the appetite licking its lips, but lingered maybe more than most to persistently tempt and subsequently seduce.

Hold Yourself Tight is closed by the rueful yet accepting and occasionally hopeful Dream, a captivation echoing the heart of the album in its brief absorbing minutes. There were certain expectations waiting for this album because of past triumphs and not one of them was fed. To Bear Sir is a whole new unique adventure from Russell Toomey, a bold and personal one which is really rather special and deserves your intrigue at the very least.

Hold Yourself Tight will be released the first week of May.

 

Upcoming live dates:

20th of April – Clwb Ifor Bach, Cardiff with Palace and Willie J Healey

3rd of May – Riverside Tavern, Newport

10th of May – The Monarch, Camden

https://www.facebook.com/tobearsir/

Pete RingMaster 04/03/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

John Thayer – Face To Face EP

JT_RingMasterReview

Recently singer songwriter John Thayer released new EP Face To Face, a handful of songs which instinctively captivate as warm and suggestive melodies unite with emotion fuelled lyrics and vocals. There is also an intimate drama to each song which often blossoms to broader heights even as Thayer keeps it personal with his introspective exploration and reflections. The result is a release which captures ears with swift success and only lights the imagination further with subsequent listens.

The brother of Tommy Thayer, the lead guitarist in Kiss, John creates a sound inspired by the likes of Yes, Emerson, Lake and Palmer, Steely Dan, The Beatles, Led Zeppelin, and The Who and based, as suggested by his latest offering, around ear seducing melodies. 2013 saw his indie/pop rock sound quickly grab ears and support through debut album Laurel Street, released as the new EP on EON Records.

Already stirring up eager attention, latest record Face to Face was co-produced by John and singer/songwriter producer Rob Daiker (Meredith Brooks, The Fame Riot) at Commune Studios in Portland Oregon and mixed by Greg Collins (U2, Matchbox Twenty, No Doubt). Straight away it seizes ears and imagination with its title track, the opener caressing both with gentle keys and ethereal harmonies initially. That earlier mentioned drama is just as swift in working its charm, coating the emerging orchestral bred keys and vocal expression of Thayer. Equally there is an instinctive catchiness which arises through the song, riffs and hooks mellow but potent as they add inescapable infectiousness to an affair which takes little time to seduce and involve the listener while providing an impressive start to the EP.

art_RingMasterReviewNot Afraid follows and quickly eclipses its predecessor as a thick wall of dramatic rhythmic and sonic energy hits ears. The song soon relaxes as Thayer’s vocals begin sharing melodic sighs and expression though the bass continues to bring dark shadows while prowling the calmer waters, lurking and waiting to join the frequent expulsions of that initial energy with erupt. It is gripping stuff reminding of British artist Johnny Wore Black, and with great unpredictability to its twists and dark hues to its emotion easily takes best song honours upon the EP.

In many ways the song sets a plateau the release never reaches again but enjoyment and creative imagination is still a potent proposal as firstly the melancholic stroll of Really Doesn’t Matter warms the senses to be followed by the evocative serenade of Angel. As the heart bred and felt tones of Thayer slip enjoyable through ears both songs are a flame of melodic enterprise within that ever dramatic air to richly satisfy.

The EP closes with Lonely Eyes and a tapestry of string bred shadows and guitar shaped intensity entangled with suggestive vocals and poetic melodies. There is something cinematic about the song too even as again Thayer ventures into the deepest emotions of the song’s heart. With a flame of a solo and the perpetual majesty of orchestral temptation, the track provides a striking end to an increasingly captivating release.

The Face To Face EP is our first moment shared with the songwriting and sound of John Thayer and like so many others we are sure, it will not be our last.

The Face To Face EP is out now via EON Records through most online stores.

https://www.facebook.com/johnthayermusic

http://www.johnthayermusic.com

Pete RingMaster 02/09/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

A Blue Flame – The Girl Inside of You

A Blue Flame_RingMasterReview

Adding to a host of recent singles which hint of potent times for their creators and the releases they are taken from is The Girl Inside of You, the new track from A Blue Flame. Plucked from their latest album What We’ve Become Is All That Now Remains, the single is a thumping slice of rousing songwriting and a melody thick sound with a Brit Pop meets folk rock flavouring and an encounter very easy to get seriously involved in.

A Blue Flame art_RingMasterReviewA Blue Flame is the project of Leicester based songwriter, Richard Stone and What We’ve Become Is All That Now Remains the successor to debut album Someone Else’s Dreams Will Fill Our Home which was released in 2013 under the name of Woodman Stone. With its lead song Does Madonna Dream of Ordinary People gaining strong airplay across the likes of BBC 6Music and BBC Leicester, Tom Robinson was one declaring their support, calling Stone’s music: “wonderful unashamed pop music that comes with an inbuilt English Pop sensibility running through to its very core“. The Girl Inside of You is destined to find the same success and more, with What We’ve Become Is All That Now Remains, which features some of Leicester’s best musicians including co-producer Adam Ellis on guitar and Tony Robinson from The Beautiful South on keys and brass, following suit.

The Girl Inside of You strolls in with bold hooks and rhythms aligned to an instant melodic lure. It’s commanding breath relaxes slightly as Stone’s lyrical and vocal prowess works on the imagination but the song’s potency never lessens as creative enterprise and punchy emotion fuelled imagination is added to its web of temptation.

As subsequent smart twists and turns ensure there is nothing predictable about the song, there is something of The Jam in their Setting Sons period spicing to the encounter which as you can imagine does it no harm either. The Girl Inside of You is one of those songs hard to get enough of; one all the while suggesting that a definite look at the album it graces (look out for our review soon) is in order.

The Girl Inside of You is out now with What We’ve Become Is All That Now Remains available 19th August @ https://itunes.apple.com/gb/artist/a-blue-flame/id1078425623 and http://www.cdbaby.com/Artist/ABlueFlame

https://www.facebook.com/ablueflame/

Pete RingMaster 19/08/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright