Seething Akira – Sleepy Skeletor

Since emerging back in 2011 within the sea faring surroundings of Portsmouth, British crossover outfit Seething Akira has been teasing away at rich attention with increasing success. We suggest though that it has been a mere nagging compared to the hunger the band can and should expect with the release of debut album Sleepy Skeletor. It is a web of alternative metal and electro rock imagination with plenty more to entice and ensnare. It is a sleepless affair rousing body and spirit which even in its calmer moments has the body bouncing and imagination feasting.

Created by Charlie Bowes (songwriter/keyboardist/vocalist) and Kit Conrad (lead vocalist), the band has leap from local success to national recognition through their sounds and a dynamic live presence which over the years has seen them shares stages with the likes of Skindred, The Qemists, Hacktivist, Senser, Don Broco, and Pop Will Eat Itself as well as play Bloodstock Festival, Victorious Festival, Breakout Festival, Mammothfest amongst others. This year the band was chosen as one of five upcoming bands, alongside, Saint Apache, Damn Dice, The Rocket Dolls and The Sixpounder, to support Pitchshifter on their first UK tour in ten years. The Incoming Transmission EP of 2012 was when our fascination with Seething Akira began, it becoming so much keener as for so many others through their acclaimed 2015 single Airstrike, a song frequently eclipsed and more than matched by the offerings within Sleepy Skeletor.

Walking a fine balance between alternative metal, industrial rock, and electro punk; never fully committing to any but always entangling the richest traits of all and more, Sleepy Skeletor opens properly with The Monster from Brussels. Instantly the synths of Bowes provide an infectious pulse, the guitar of Harvey Ware swiftly adding its lure before the rest of the band jump in with fevered energy to create a Senser like confrontation. Thick and imposing, it is a captivating wall of temptation creating a grooved stroll alongside a Beastie Boys inspired vocal arousal rather easy to become addicted to, its tenacity interrupted by melodic washes of intimation and seduction.

It is an outstanding start quickly matched by recent single Matching Poles of Magnets. With steelier textures to its electro metal predation, bands like Axis Mundi and Silent Descent coming to mind, the track twists and turns with instinctive and rapacious adventure before Half Empty brings a warm calm to the senses. Immediately vocals echo this mellow breath with their melodic unity but equally a rising discontent in the heart of the song brews as things become more intense and irritable. It never reaches an aggressive state though, revolving through melancholic elegance and emotive exposure as a weave of rich enterprise wraps vocal reflection.

I Am The Devil, another single released earlier this year follows, instantly infests ears with its electro metal rumble and a hook which needs meres seconds to have us lustfully wanting more. Something akin to G.R.I.M meets dirt encrusted Pop Will Eat with the rousing catchiness of Hadouken, the track throbs and snarls as the rhythmic prowess and incitement of bassist Richard Ellis Speaight and drummer Stu Radcliffe manipulate.

Featuring Olly Simmons from Brighton band The Qemists, Backlash is next up and similarly merges heavy almost dissonant attitude and sound with electronic trespass as it prowls the senses. It is a predacious edge which never dissipates across the track’s mercurial but persistently invasive landscape. Another of the songs released prior to the album as a single in 2018 ensuring its anticipation was heightened; the absorbing encounter passes over attention to the outstanding Pack Animals. It too has a whiff of Senser to its emotionally and lyrically charged incitement; synth and guitar weaving an intimation of intrigue and danger around the threat of the rhythms as once again vocals irrepressible entice.

The character of successor Paralysed is similarly natured and conjured but swiftly evolving into a melodic croon and seduction which inspired even greater participation before the cycle repeats with greater volatility but equally greater elegance in its respective moments.

The album ends with firstly Even Angels Break Hearts which sees Dani Uziel guesting and finally Disconnect. The first of the two is a fluid blend of sonic antagonism and melodic beauty with Uziel’s tones simply beguiling, she almost like a siren luring ears into Conrad’s feral attack and the song’s tempestuous depths. The second provides three and a half minutes of electro punk metal thick in attitude and malcontent but equally rich in rousing energy and adventurous imagination.

Major attention upon Seething Akira has been a little overdue to our mind; Sleepy Skeletor should remedy that, arousing a whole new tide of fans to their insatiably and dramatically potent sound.

Sleepy Skeletor is out now; available on all major streaming platforms.

Upcoming shows:

Sleepy Skele-tour:

July 6th – Anvil, Bournemouth (Album release show)

July 7th – The 27 Club, Liverpool

July 8th – Mulberry Tavern, Sheffield

July 9th – Satan’s Hollow, Manchester

July 10th – The Underground, Plymouth

July 11th – Fat Lil’s Bar, Witney

July 12th – The Unicorn, Camden

July 13th – The Junction, Ashford

July 14th – The Sussex Arms, Tunbridge Wells

July 15th – The Joiners, Southampton

———————————————–

August 25th – Electrowerkz London supporting CUBANATE

August 26th – BYLINE FESTIVAL, Pippingford Park, Ashdown Forest with Pussy Riot, Badly Drawn Boy, The Vapors, The Blow Monkeys, John Cleese, Hugh Grant, Alexie Sayle…

November 19th – Wedgewood Rooms, Portsmouth supporting PITCHSHIFTER

http://www.seethingakira.com/   https://www.facebook.com/seethingakira   https://twitter.com/SEETHINGAKIRA

Pete RingMaster 03/07/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Fathoms – Counter Culture

Since the release of their first EP, Transitions back in 2012, the Fathoms sound has evolved as its line-up has equally changed and been revitalised. What has not changed is their ability to grab ears and attention and stir fresh new appetites for their inventive sound. New album Counter Culture is testament to that, its nine tracks a blazing roar and creative aggravation which captivates and gets the blood rushing through aggression pulsing veins.

The UK outfit soon sparked keen local attention with their melodic hardcore sound upon emerging in 2010 and quickly found themselves touring the UK and sharing stages with the likes of Legend, Set Your Goals, Polar, Dividing The Silence, Final Crisis, and Napoleon. Acclaim did not exactly hang around either especially once Transitions assaulted ears with their reputation taking another spurt with its successor Cold Youth in 2013. Both were bold and viciously imposing with a growing potential which blossomed within their Artery Recordings released debut album Lives Lived two years later. Hitting the USA, China, South Korea and Japan among regular jaunts across Britain and Europe, the Brighton hailing quintet has become a potent element in the UK hardcore scene.

Hindsight suggests the hints and clues were already there, certainly within the last album, but Fathoms’ sound has embraced greater metalcore traits over the past couple of years, the band straddling both styles with their punk metal furnace, and as Counter Culture reveals there is plenty more to that blend also. It opens up with Hate Preach, making a composed introduction as vocalist Max Campbell hits ears with his rap before the guitars of James Munn and Sam Rigden cast a persistent tide of abrasive riffs. It is a great start which only continues as the song merges nu and rap metal exploits with hardcore antagonism framed by the biting beats of drummer Lui Sarabia.

The potent starts quickly has ears keenly attentive, recent single Counter Culture stirring their appetites further with its metal bred imagination and punk infused quarrel. Melodic twists and clean vocal union with the rawer snarling tones of Campbell brings richer intrigue and captivation, the bass of Steve Cogden prowling it all with a brooding menace as the song grows an increasingly compelling web of flavours and imagination.

Latest video single B.E.L.I.E.V.E quickly follows; its body a heavier, dirtier, and more tempestuous proposal but just as content and skilled in contrasting its dark hues with melodic flames and harmonic enterprise. For personal tastes, it does not quite catch the imagination as its predecessor or other tracks within the album yet there is no denying its lures, especially its inescapably magnetic melodic.

Counter Culture is an album which seems to get bigger and bolder song by song, definitely each subsequent song made a greater thrilling impression on our appetites; the process continued at this point by the surly metal nurtured, ill-natured Fated. Its nu and rap metal dexterity gets right under the skin but equally its synth rock and punk spicing teases more impressed reactions before I’ve Been Trying To Leave exposes the band’s similarly adept progressive inclinations within its cantankerous character and imposing touch. It also has catchiness in its lighter side which is pop kissed but never more than a warm wash upon the instinctive ruggedness and spiky imagination of the band’s sound.

The calmer waters of Slip Away provides a new beguiling turn within the release, its presence like a more belligerent Silent Descent but with passages of pure melodic beauty around more volatile instincts and endeavour. It is just one more captivating moment within the album but soon eclipsed by the outstanding assault of The Spaces In Between. A trap of nu-metal design, the song twists and turns with dervish like mania and pugnacious attitude, the guitars dancing venomously on ears as the bass and vocals growl. In the midst of that inventive confrontation though, a spring of melodic and harmonic adventure flows, again Fathoms showing the new adventure in their sound and freshness in their imagination.

Next up No Compromise is an even moodier proposal; to be honest a truculent trespass of a song but one coloured with atmospheric grace as melodic suggestion weaves its bait for ears and imagination to embrace. With every passing second and unpredictable idea, the song grows in strength and impressiveness; pleasure joining the ascent until it departs to allow You Ain’t On What We On to bring things to a close.

The final track is a surge of punk dispute; an eye to eye combat which has the body bouncing and spirit raising its middle finger to the world. It is a fine end to an encounter which grows with every listen. Fathoms have maybe still to realise all that early potential but instead they have explored a whole new sphere of ideas and as Counter Culture proves, they are on a journey still easy to anticipate and enjoy.

Counter Culture is released December 1st.

https://www.facebook.com/fathomsuk/    https://www.instagram.com/fathomsuk/    https://twitter.com/fathomsuk

Pete RingMaster 30/11/2017

One Morning Left – Metalcore Superstars

OML promo_RingMaster Review

Metalcore Superstars is the new album from Finnish melodic metalcore band One Morning Left, and our introduction to a sound which quickly you get the marmite factor feeling about in, it breeding love or eager dislike with little in between. As the eleven rousing tracks of the encounter run riot through ears with their bedlamic burst of styles and flavours, we quickly fell into the former opinion and keenly embraced its ferocious mayhem.

It has been three years since the quintet released their seemingly well-received second album Our Sceneration; it’s uncaging in 2013 quickly followed by the band increasing their live presence and hitting stages alongside the likes of like Adept, F*ckface Unstoppable (Bam Margera), Protest The Hero, and We Butter The Bread With Butter and more across Europe. 2014 saw the band begin working on Metalcore Superstars, its creation an extensive affair as the band honed their new ideas into its slightly psychotic character until arriving at the seriously eventful confrontation grabbing ears today.

Maybe the best way to generalise the One Morning Left sound is ravenous metalcore with the punk contagion of Billy Talent, the techno adventure of Silent Descent, and the mischievous prowess of Hollywood Undead; it coming with a hardcore/avant-garde surge of attitude. The result is a full-on and enjoyably unpredictable protagonist, even if one that flirts with a loss of control at times.

art_RingMaster ReviewOpener OML_KVLT sees the band announcing themselves in anthemic style, the vocals of Mika Lahti a busy and tenacious mix backed by those of guitarist Leevi Luoto. Checking out tracks from previous releases, there seems a lighter tone to the creative devilment of One Morning Left this time around with Metalcore Superstars but equally a more rabid snarl to their sonic and lyrical warfare amidst bolder drama to their imagination. The first track continues to stir ears and appetite with its fiery nature and pungent tapestry of flavours, subsequently creating a virulently infectious incitement that chews on the senses.

The following Heavy Metal Finland flirts with nintendocore like bait initially, it’s tempting aligned to vicious growling and broody dynamics which erupt further within the emergence of the tempestuous proposition. Without the constant spark of its predecessor, the track pleases as it toys vocally with heavy and death metal spices as well as similarly varied textures musically; enjoyably backing up the strong start without quite making the same impact.

The guitars of Luoto and Ari Levola aggressively dance with sonic attitude within ¡Derailed! next, but also they are unafraid to unleash some funk seeded flirtation whilst keys engage in a kaleidoscope of electro flavours and atmospheric suggestiveness. All the time moving towards a bruising confrontation, the track provides a galvanic finale within a formidable rhythmic web cast by drummer Niko Hyttinen before the outstanding You’re Dead! Let’s Disco! has body and energies fully involved in thumping aural devilry. Like Hadouken! meets The Browning, the track is a chest beating slab of sonic and vocal defiance again lit by the off-kilter imagination of keys and programming from Veli-Matti Kananen and bracingly driven by his bass lines and the swinging scythes of Hyttinen. Careering on the precipice of psychotic chaos, the track leaves body and emotions bursting with lust, a success matched by The Recipe, it a more controlled but no less forcibly resourceful and deranged web of concussive textures and fascinating theatre.

Kings and Queens throbs and pulsates straight after, its opening a haunted cascade of electronic splatters leading to a warmer toned but more punk bred aggressor as melodically engaging as it is infectiously cantankerous. That Billy Talent air is at its strongest here in a song with an inventive weave maybe less exploratory than others on the album but is still sculpted from a heftily flavoursome torrent of ideas. Its lean take on that thick diversity elsewhere works a treat, providing one more major highlight.

A muggy collage of metal and punk ‘n’ roll colours Fast and Furious 6.66 next, its electronic calms only bringing more intrigue loaded variety to ultimately an enraged bluster of the song whilst Devil’s Nest rumbles and grumbles from a sinister melodic entrance into an exotically hued adventure with duelling contrasts against aligning radiances and hostilities. A dogged but invitingly invigorating swamp of noise and flavour, the track grips attention and eager involvement with its theatre of enterprise leaving the album’s title track to bully and harry senses next, though it too is unafraid to seduce with the beckoning fingers of melodies and harmonies.

A great carnival-esque air comes with the riveting Eternity; the penultimate treat playing with a My Chemical Romance meets AFI hand within its just as potent murderous traits to ingeniously nag and thrill ears before making way for the closing turbulence of Sticks and Stones. Like being rabidly assaulted by a seductive temptress bound with irritable intent and wrapped in orchestral grandeur, the track is one enthralling end to an inescapably magnetic release.

For some, the creative turmoil and bordering on insatiable imagination of Metalcore Superstars may not hit the spot for ears or desires, but it only left us exhaustively wanting more. So be brave and take on the adventure One Morning Left offers with their latest proposal we suggest; it just might ignite your day.

Metalcore Superstars is out now in Finland via Inverse Records with full release from February 22nd in central Europe through Bleeding Nose Records, and across America and Oceania on Imminence Records.

http://www.onemorningleft.com/   https://www.facebook.com/Onemorningleft   https://twitter.com/onemorningleft

Pete RingMaster 25/01/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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The Order of Elijah – War At Heart

TOOE_RingMaster Review

In sound and word there is a real bite to War At Heart, the new album from US Christian metallers The Order of Elijah, which makes you pay attention. It is an unpredictable cauldron of varied metal bred flavours which savage and confront the senses as potently as the lyrical side incites thought with its bold and uncompromising exploration of all sides and shades of faith and life. Predominantly though, it is one rigorously enjoyable incitement which impressed on first listening and only grows more potent and compelling with each subsequent involvement.

Formed in 2009 by vocalist Shannon Low and guitarist Bryan Cox, the Joplin, Missouri quintet have only grown in sound and determination since the release of debut album Dethrone of 2013. According to the press release with the album, The Order Of Elijah have found themselves “being shunned by many peers, churches, and religious communities for the message they bring,” reactions to the band’s look and accusation at the “over-obvious corruption that many churches and cultures have adapted to the words of Jesus Christ.War At Heart shows that the band has only used any opposition as more fuel to their creative and emotional fire. The release is a tempest of anger, confrontation, and hope with a sound which alone leaves no doubts about the intensity and passion within The Order Of Elijah imagination and heart.

the order of elijah album art_RingMaster ReviewOpening with the dark vocal introduction of Heresy, band and album swiftly move to involve ears and imagination with its title track. War at Heart opens with a mesh of wiry guitar and attitude loaded rhythms, they soon joined by clean vocals which quickly reveal their raw and grouchy side. That fluid ability to swiftly change attack and character is echoed across the whole album in sound and invention, the metalcore meets heavy groove metal and electro resourcefulness of the song expectation defeating, even with its use of familiar textures at times.

The excellent track is matched in potency by Tyler Durden, where the guitars of Bryan Cox and Myk Lee Fodor create a gripping splattering of choppy bait initially as the voice of Low again swings from tone to texture with inventive ease. Like Slipknot meets Cryptopsy with a slither of Emmure involved too, the song is an impressive intrusion, those essences twisted into something maybe not dramatically unique but certainly distinct to The Order of Elijah.

The scything beats of drummer Josh Newlon open up God’s Unwanted Children next, his enticing assault wrapped in an electronic breeze which as expected soon erupts into a more volatile and tempestuous environment. The electronic smoulder of the song lends itself to thoughts of Silent Descent but again with Low in the throes of vocal adventure, things quickly take on a personality of their own which only invites deeper attention. Like a bear awoken from hibernation, the track roars and spits with unbridled antagonism, leaving ears ringing with content as the melodic calm of From the Dusk washes gently over the senses. The brief instrumental allows a breath to be taken though the excellent presence of James Copley’s bass ensures shadows are still courting thoughts and emotions before From the Dawn emerges from its beauty to inflame air and the senses again with a fiery and anthemic tempest. Vocal harmonies contrast grizzly tones and melodic suggestiveness tempers violent rabidity as the track blossoms into another crushing highlight of the release. Once more very passing minute brings a new twist to be caught unawares by and fully enjoy; electro spices alone colluding deviously with the primal metal resources fuelling the encounter to offer a whisper of The Browning in certain moments.

All American Plague lurches and invades next, throwing its elements around like a dervish but with a control which ensures no twist or texture is wasted, whilst Jennifer Mckenzie vs The Vampire Slayer straight after is a punk infested animus of fierce sound and agitated attitude. Featuring Zachary Scott of It Lies Within, the slightly Korn/Betraying The Martyrs like track is a ravenous contagion, which only sparks more greed in the appetite for the album, a hunger given more to happily chew on by both the hellacious onslaught of Haunted and The Art of Forgiveness. Admittedly neither track quite sparks the same thickness of excitement as their predecessors but each easily fattens up satisfaction before leaving the reflective intensity of Beautiful to bring things to a close.

If asked after the first couple of listens or so, War at Heart would have been labelled as impressive with the ability to lure attention back, but over time it has emerged as one fiercely delicious enjoyment which is seriously hard to leave alone. Not all will be as taken with it obviously but every metal fan should seriously think about giving the new creative bellow from The Order Of Elijah deserved attention.

War At Heart is available via Luxor Records from 8th January @ http://www.victorymerch.com/merch/label/luxorrecords

http://theorderofelijah.com/   https://www.facebook.com/theorderofelijah   https://twitter.com/orderofelijah

Pete RingMaster 07/01/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Unforseen Prophecy – Burn The Skies

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Opening up the 2015 with a reboot of their second EP Burn The Skies, UK metallers Unforseen Prophecy are seemingly poised to awaken a greedy spotlight on their rather flavoursome sound. The three track encounter, without quite managing to find a striking uniqueness, leaves ears hungry and satisfaction full as it brews up a raw and potent blend of inspirations from the likes of Devildriver, Lamb Of God, and Malefice with a Lacuna Coil like melody and harmony rich temptation. Burn The Skies does not quite set the heart racing it is fair to say but certainly it sparks an increasingly eager appetite to thoroughly explore the Kent quintet and their accomplished invention.

Formed in 2010, Unforseen Prophecy has earned a strong live reputation, taking in shows with the likes of Malefice, Exit Ten, Silent Descent, Beholder, Bull Riff Stampede, Evil Scarecrow, and Seven Deadly along the way. Equally their five track debut EP Without Consequence stirred up keen support and attention from its release in 2012 whilst last year saw the band win the Kent Metal 2 the Masses competition which led to a successful appearance at Bloodstock. Burn The Skies revealed upon its initial release a potent step forward in the band’s imaginative songwriting and resourceful sound and its nationwide unveiling this month has the potential to open the strongest awareness of the exciting band yet.

New single and the EPs title track opens up the encounter and instantly has ears ringing and anticipation aflame as a vocal roar from Paul Wells is matched in intensity and appeal by a cover_240stamping stride of angry riffs and threatening rhythms. Bound in an equally addictive grooving it is an empowering and thrilling entrance to Burn The Skies which dips slightly when it relaxes for the entrance of the alluring melodic voice of rhythm guitarist Charis Pattison, though Wells is still there challenging with his great abrasing tones. The song is soon back in control of senses and imagination as the excellent creative swings of drummer Russ Edwards are courted by thick enticements from the guitar of Aaron Jones and bass shadows provided by Paul Gills. The song continues to flirt and intimidate with anthemic persuasion and enthralling enterprise. As the EP, arguably the song is not offering anything strikingly new but for technical craft and untainted enjoyment it leaves no doubts.

The following groove laden stroll of The Placebo Effect keeps things on a high, though it takes a little longer to grip compared to the more instant success of its predecessor. Wells is soon raging across its stirring canvas of aggressive sound and resourcefulness, the guitars a busy harrying of ears whilst rhythms are as predacious as the grooves are virulent. Unrelenting in its examination and stalking of senses and thoughts, the track emerges as our favourite confrontation upon Burn The Skies though the opening melodic charm of Oblivion soon makes a seductive argument. With the vocals of Pattison ebbing in potency at times though, and the fury of the track missing the spark of the other two incitements upon the EP, the song pleases without raising the same excitement and ardour. Technically the song is as riveting and impressive as ever though, revealing more of the band’s tenacious and imaginative enterprise ensuring the release ends on a strong if not dramatic high.

Whether Burn The Skies will open up the doorway to the major awareness it is easy to feel the band is destined to walk through of course only time will tell but it does mark Unforeseen Prophecy down as a band UK metal will be eagerly embracing sooner rather than later.

The Burn The Skies EP is released nationwide on January 5th through all digital platforms.

https://www.facebook.com/unforeseenprophecy

RingMaster 03/01/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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GraViL – Thoughts Of A Rising Sun

Gravil1

Having already raised a certain appetite for their immense and imaginative sound through previous EPs and the single Enemy Within, UK metallers GraViL have raised the bar for themselves and arguably extreme/melodic metal with the release of their strikingly impressive debut album Thoughts Of A Rising Sun. The self-released brute of enterprise and invention ignites if not a new realm for intense and evocative metal it certainly pushes and sculpts new corners and roads within the existing boundaries.

Having already found awareness through the pages of Kerrang, Terrorizer and Rock Sound, and potent radio play, the London quintet have risen to yet another plateau with Thoughts Of A Rising Sun. Recorded in the closing weeks of last year with acclaimed producer Dan Abela (Gallows, Bleed From Within, Voices, Silent Descent), the album infuses the widest range of metal flavours and essences to their melodic deathcore spine, emerging as unpredictable and as diverse a ravishing of the senses as you could wish for.

The first couple of tracks alone leave no doubt that the album is an immense and startling proposition, as well as suggesting that 3there is still plenty of depths for the band to explore ahead, a frightening and threatening thought to get excited about. Structurally Unsound steps forward on a lone melodic breeze, the bright inviting beckoning a devious lure as it leads the ear into the immediately exploding maelstrom of sound and intensity. The track roars with venom and cavernous strength before gnawing and chewing viciously upon the senses with rabid riffs, crisp rhythms and scowling vocal squalls from Grant Stacey. As the knees buckle under the extreme assault, the band breaks into a breath-taking melodic aside with clean vocal harmonies to lap up with greed. The progressive toned tease is a mere breath in the control regaining fury but then reappears again with the guitars of Tony Dando and Andy Slade parading a skilled and expressive fire of sonic and melodic enslavement for the passions. Throughout the drums of Conor Harkness cage and punish the senses without diminishing the potency of the seduction also at play whilst the bass of Nathan Lamb prowls within its own shadows to add further depth, even if its presence is a little lost in the production and needing concentrated focus to fully feel its compelling breath.

The following Enemy Within, the first single form the album, opens with a rain of electro rock and industrial enticement as its stretches its sinews to their fullest limits, their final positioning the canvas for a technical ear plundering carved from heavy sabre like persistent strokes and a brewing carnivorous intensity. As its exposes more of its inciting landscape there is a merger of sounds which plays like a storm of The Browning, In Flames, and Meshuggah yet stands alone from all three and any other reference you care to throw at it.

The stunning start to the album is easily continued through the offensive savagery of Beyond Reprieve, a track which even with its bestial hunger is not short of irresistible grooves, addictive riffs, and blistering caustic vocals to capture the imagination. Again the sonic intrigue and invention of the guitars is magnetic and the bass finding better clarity in the mix a rapacious intimidation alongside the outstanding stick abuse of Harkness.

The next up treat, The Wanderer unveils an exhausting soundscape of rabid energy and malevolence all matched and tempered by the thrilling vocal harmonies backing up the richly pleasing harsh lead vocals. As upon every song the fusion and thought of the contrasting aspects is inspired and outstandingly realised, their mutual qualities and temptations given full rein to flow and make the most dramatic persuasions whilst working perfectly alongside every other stirring intense facet.

From Something Worth Chasing with its great key led intro, through the violently emotive title track and the barbarous song The Struggle, to the enthralling Bottle Of Shadows with is constantly shifting battle lines, Thoughts Of A Rising Sun charges up the passions and pulse rate with intensive creativity and explosive imagination. Though arguably the first part of the album outshines the latter, the last of the songs just mentioned easily makes a scintillating and demanding claim for best song.

With the epic and excellent riff driving March Of The Titans closing up the album, it is impossible not to drool over GraViL and their future. On the evidence of Thoughts Of A Rising Sun expect a real classic from the band in the future whilst right now they have given up a possible contender for best of 2013.

http://www.gravilmetal.com.

9/10

RingMaster 02/05/2013

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Toxic Grind Machine: Embryonic Emission

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Though it came out a four months ago, Embryonic Emission from Dutch industrial metallers Toxic Grind Machine is one big thrill which has to be shared. Firstly we have to give thanks to Ray Westland from Ghost Cult webzine for pointing us in the direction of what is a stirring and impressively dynamic album, a release which ignites a full ardour for its imaginative and compelling sounds.

Even with determined research little can be found out about Toxic Grind Machine except that it consists of Robert Slump (songwriter, guitars, keyboard, and programming) and Trevor Marks (vocals, synths, lyrics), merges the essential essences of electro, industrial, and metal in to a blaze of infectious invention, and takes inspiration from the likes of Sybreed, Fear Factory, Strapping Young Lad, In Flames and many more. Not that you need to know any background to enjoy the results of the inventive creativity spawning the album, the eight songs within do all the telling and persuasion needed to be enthralled with the band and release.

The album opens with emerging mechanical whispers and cyber teases as Burn Bright, Wry Jackal comes into view. From the shadows it soon bursts into a glorious confrontation of vocal squalls, thunderous rhythms and rabid riffs. Then it throws the first surprise by slipping into a melodic wash of clean vocals and emotive synth caresses. The subsequent combination of the two is a striking and accomplished union which favours neither but excels in allowing both extremes their full and compelling voice. The track is a vibrant mix of Silent Descent, Fear Factory, and Left Spine Down with elements of Pitchshifter to its sinewy depths, and a stunning start to an album which only gets better and better.

Next Amphetamines in Ghost City rampages from a kiss of electro effected vocal harmonies into a torrent of ravenous riffs and spiteful rhythms driven by an intensity which smothers the senses with near malice. Again the unpredictable might of the band takes us into a melodic room as the bruising energy outside brews up its storm to unleash soon after and entwining itself with the warm electro wash. Sybreed and Scar Symmetry comes to mind whilst the song reveals more imagination, though this or any song on the album is uniquely Toxic Grind Machine. There is also an antagonism to the lyrics and some of their delivery which like the sounds is an exciting contrast to the smooth soothing tones elsewhere.

The whispering ambience which introduces AphidHaze is another emotive example of the thought and ingenuity within the album and though the track cannot resist unleashing a full and rampant force the song offers a less intensive storm to fall before, instead inviting a willing immersion into its still immense and formidable breath. This slight mercy is soon dismissed by Cell 600, a track which rips the senses asunder with a gleeful brutality before stomping them into dust with a rhythmic violation and riff driven annihilation that would make the likes of Meshuggah and The Browning sweat. Again from the impressive vocals, violent and caressing, and mesmeric synth expression to the voracious riffs and barbaric rhythms, the song is outstanding, just like Embryonic Emission itself.

As the even tempered Hymnlock, though it too cannot restrain its sonic rages at times, and the fascinating Judah, Let’s End lay their intriguing cards on the table the album becomes even more engrossing and intoxicating. The latter of the pair especially has a constant shadow over its expanse to hide where it is going and offer mystery to its intent. It only draws thoughts and emotions in deeper despite its wonderful ‘deceit’ as each and every unexpected twist opens up new avenues to explore.

The album departs upon firstly the brawling excellence of Morphia, a riotous grapple which leaves one pumped up in a frenzy of energy and passion, and the instrumental Enther. The final track is a piece of music which would have made the perfect beginning to the album, its brewing epic feel and dawning dramatic expanse an electrifying experience suited as a delicious introduction and personally feeling wasted as the admittedly rousing climax. The bottom line is Toxic Grind Machine in Embryonic Emission has created an album which with each listen reveals something new such its depth of layers and imagination whilst offering nothing less than unbridled pleasure at all times.

http://www.facebook.com/ToxicGrindMachine

http://toxicgrindmachine.bandcamp.com/

RingMaster 29/01/2013

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright