Khaidian – Penumbra

The release of the debut album from UK metallers Khaidian has been long time coming, seemingly expected and all geared up to be unleashed in 2016. But as ears and the passions are finally being infested, those patient many will feel it has been more than worth the wait and can assume they will soon be joined by tides of new hungrily impressed and lustful hearts. Penumbra is quite simply superb; a cauldron of imagination and intensity wrapped in a rainbow of melodic enterprise amidst a tempest of technical and multi-flavoured dexterity.

Listening to Penumbra, there is no surprise at the rising reputation and stature of the London based outfit; both recently given boost by a trio of lead tracks to the album. Weaving a web of rich intrigue and thick persuasion bred from a fusion of progressive and technical metal, the band’s sound is just as inventive and tempting with its alignment to eager strains of electronic cunning. It is something akin to a fusion of the voracious flavours and touch of Gojira, Sikth and The Browning with the ravenous/melodic adventuring of Tricore/An Entire Legion; even so Khaidian pull it all to a proposition which is as unapologetically unique as it is greedily captivating as Penumbra forcibly proves.

Founded in 2010 by guitarist/programmer John Tyrell (ex-Interlock), Khaidian found its first few years as much a difficult journey to find the right mix and line-up of people as an adventure in nurturing and breeding their vision and sound. In fact, the perfect mix of personnel only really appeared once drummer Paul Fowler (ex Dragnerve) was enlisted to join Tyrell, vocalist Andy Hutton (ex-Stoopi/Dragnerve), and bassist Joseph Perumal (Mortad/ex-Almamorta). It was Fowlers departure leading up to the original release date of Penumbra which he plays upon which played a big part in its delay it seems but the band has since found the equally striking and agile percussionist in Kris Perrin (Gravil, ex-One Fell Down, Faux Fighters), he completing the current line-up last year.

Now with everything firmly in place Penumbra has been unveiled and we for one can only suggest it is the first leap in a massive and surely certain ascent for the band into the broadest spotlights. The album opens with Pearls Before Swine and immediately had ears pricked and appetite keenly intrigued as sonic and electronic enticement colluded with already stirring rhythmic lures. Just as swiftly the equally potent and enticing vocals of Hutton step forward; his clean, calm yet emotive tones an alluring bridge between the band’s sides of physical trespass and suggestive melody, their indeed their technical hunger and electronic intimation. The track continues to stomp and dance with the senses, a mix of the familiar and boldly fresh creating a whole new vehicle for ears and imagination to ride with.

The striking start is only reinforced by the band’s outstanding new video/single Dominion. Its entrance is even more rapacious but almost instantly wears a portentous calm before its predacious instincts unite with inventive and somatic catchiness. Pure persuasion with increasing enslavement of the senses, the track embraces further hues resembling those cast by Voyager and Fear Factory as it twists and turns with relish but never breaking its fluidity or charm carrying rapacity.

The following Trigger The Landslide glides in on electronic shadows around a slim but copious melodic insinuation; all the while its air brewing an intensity and threat which turns into a senses harrying stroll. Still the menace is part anger, part seduction; the song never choosing sides even as its body and imagination boils across another devilish landscape of thought, emotion, and craft. As with all tracks some kind of participation is inevitable with the increasingly blossoming and thrilling encounter, a manipulation just as potent within next up Thrive and in turn Sense Of The Spherical. A Korn-esque scent pervades the first of the outstanding two, its carnivorous breath colluding with the skittish flirtation and bite of rhythms and the tantalising yet voracious almost rabid lures of guitars. Hutton again is a matching magnet in its midst as the track creatively and vocally writhes while its successor similarly draws dark and esurient strains of sound and intent with melodic and flirtatious enterprise to tempt, seduce, and infest ears and imagination in tandem with the body.

The album concludes with the pair of Evasion and Dramatic Professions Of Martyrdom, the band getting under the skin with relish in the first where again whiffs of Korn meets Fear Factory share its own inescapable  individuality, and through the second’s musical irritability, melodic and electronic espionage, and simply unique prowess. Both tracks enslaved as heartily and strenuously as those before, the bounce of bodies enough to suggest eager submission, the following lust unbridled confirmation.

No release is going to win over all but with its thick mix of flavours including at times spices of grunge, alternative metal and more alongside sheer invention, Penumbra is one which is going to conquer far more than most and with ease we suggest. Though in theory three years late it is one of the freshest most thrilling things heard here in a long time and Khaidian one of the most exciting propositions.

Penumbra is out now through Armalyte Industries; available @ https://armalyte.bandcamp.com/album/khaidian-penumbra

http://www.khaidian.com/   https://www.facebook.com/khaidianmusic/   https://twitter.com/khaidian

Pete RingMaster 30/01/2019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Chasing Dragons – Faction

There is no doubt there has been plenty of eager anticipation for the debut album from British rockers Chasing Dragons, especially since the release of their last EP, Faction: Prologue, a couple years back. It was a kind of teaser for the band’s first full-length, unsurprisingly called Faction, which built on their earlier offerings and successes whilst peering into a whole new landscape of sound and imagination, indeed intimation now fully explored and expanded within the new encounter where we would suggest, the Chasing Dragons sound has come of age.

The time since the last EP has also seen the Leeds outfit truly establish themselves on the UK live scene with a big reputation to match, Chasing Dragons sharing tours and stages with the likes of Stone Broken, The Qemists, Skid Row, SikTh, InMe, Diamond Head, Aaron Buchanan and The Cult Classics, Courage My Love, Skarlett Riot, Theia and many more. Featuring nine new songs along with re-recorded versions of the three tracks from the Faction: Prologue EP, the album swiftly ignites attention and imagination with opener Factionless. Part intro part full intimation, the track stretches up from its initial arousal on the ever striking tones of vocalist Tank. Like a flame within unsettled atmospherics, her potent presence is a rich lure and spark for the outstanding piece’s subsequent shadow bound predacious stroll. Portentous yet virally inviting, the track masterfully erupts before making way for the melodically inflamed How The World Went Black. Guitarist Adam quickly spins a web of metallic temptation woven with melodic rock enterprise whilst the track bites through the determined beats of Katie, they courted by the dark rumble from Murf’s bass. Progressive hues emerge as the song evolves, technical craft lining its invention as all the while Tank radiates with her powerful and impressive delivery.

Amongst the band’s influences stand artists such as Halestorm, Avenged Sevenfold, and Bullet For My Valentine, all open spices to the band’s individual recipe as proven again by the melodically vociferous roar that is Parasite and the dramatic exploits of Like Gravity. The latter is a tempest of textures and flavours carrying a volatility which accentuates its warmth and elegance rather than devours them. As many tracks, it is a proposition which grows by the minute through new twists and avenues, all unpredictable and each an imaginative turn along the track’s magnetic journey.

 Through the equally tense Bareknuckle Lover, the mercurial attack of the track as alluring as it is resourceful, and the lively emotive roar of For Kingdom For Glory, Chasing Dragons continue to add fresh adventure to their release. The second of the two in some ways promises more than it delivers, certain inventive moments not exploited as much as personal tastes wished yet is still a gripping snare of sound.

The calmer climate and croon of This Time Is Ours allowed a breath as it simply enthralled though it too has a sprightly nature which eventually catches fire with Adam casting another striking blaze veined with mazy temptation before the riveting Devil In Her Eyes wound eager attention around its tantalisingly creative fingers and in turn The Connection takes ears on a saunter through gothic lined shadows and emotionally suggestive caresses before subsequently erupting into a furnace of muscular sonic theatre. The second of the trio is especially irresistible, every moment a clever thread into the next unexpected and virulent turn of the song though then pretty much matched in glory by its successor.

As the classic seeds of the similarly impressing I’m No Devil (I’m Just A Girl) catch fire within its metal/heavy rock drama and Whitehorse teases and fascinates, the album continues to reveal new aspects in sound and craft; the latter’s haunting opening passage an especially mouth-watering incitement for ears and imagination which hints at new corners and corridors for the band to explore ahead.

We Are The Wall concludes the release, the track a ravenous onslaught of sound and intent driven by rapacious rhythms and coloured by wiry grooves and rich melodies as Tank for a final time powerfully incites thoughts as she potently roars.

It is a fine end to an equally ear-catching album which as suggested declares Chasing Dragons at a new level in songwriting, sound, and performance, a plateau teasy to suspect the metal/rock world will be unable to ignore.

Faction is available now across most online stores.

Chasing Dragons November 2018 Faction Headline Tour

 2nd – Manchester – Satan’s Hollow – support Ward XVI, Soul Desire, Fear Me December

3rd – Croydon – Croydon Rocks Fest

4th – Southampton – Joiners – support Novacrow + TBC

6th – Norwich – Brickmakers  – support The Killing Culture + TBC

7th – Birmingham – Hammer & Anvil – support Novacrow + TBC

8th – Nuneaton – Queens Hall – support Novacrow + Simai + Fleer

9th – Stamford – Mama Liz’s – support Synthetic + Black Hawk Down

10th – Wakefield – Black Mass – support Novacrow + The Sourheads + Seas Of Scarlet

https://www.chasingdragons.co.uk/   https://www.facebook.com/chasingdragonsuk/   https://twitter.com/xchasingdragons

Pete RingMaster 18/10/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Kinasis – Pariah

Though formed in 2010, UK metallers Kinasis maybe a proposition, like for us, which has escaped your close attention up till now. That is surely going to change with the release of their new EP, a ferociously striking and aggressive incitement loaded with hungry unpredictability and a technical prowess which simply inflames the fascination and pleasure. The four track insurgency is Pariah, a proposition which embraces an array of metal bred flavours in a cauldron of ravenous imagination and rabid dexterity.

Since emerging seven years ago and drawing strongly favourable responses with a debut demo the same year, Kinasis has grown into the British metal scene with increasing individuality and potency. Recent years their reputation earning live presence has seen the Bridgwater quintet shares stages with the likes of Sepultura, Malefice, Flayed Disciple, Sworn Amongst, Abadden, and Tacoma Narrows Bridge Disaster among many as well as venture into Italy alongside S.H.I.N.E. The release of Pariah feels like and should be the moment when Kinasis step from the shadows and stamps their creative authority and individual sound upon the extreme metal landscape.

Produced by Justin Hill (ex-Sikth) and wrapped in the artwork of Andy Pilkington of Very Metal Art, Pariah instantly goes for the jugular with opener Red Earth. Riffs surge through ears with a rapacious nagging whilst rhythms purge their animosity straight onto the senses. With every passing second the intensity rises but with a virulence and infectiousness which has the body bouncing to the ferociousness. A Korn-esque essence emerges as clean vocals invite nu-metal nuances, an industrial dexterity reminding of Static-X joining in as the track fluidly twists and turns through its inventive drama further embracing melodic and atmospheric suggestiveness. It is sheer magnetism, the track a mighty persuasion and alone the declaration of the coming of age of a new force to take notice of.

The following Black Dog creeps up and prowls the listener with predacious riffs and stabbing beats, then once sizing things up vocally and musically plundering the imagination with vocal tenacity embracing both raw and clean throated enterprise as death and technical metal tendencies dance which each other in barbarous intent.  As nu and groove metal elements get involved, things only become more precise rather than muddled, Kinasis showing their adeptness at weaving diverse and seriously enticing trespasses. For personal tastes the track never quite lives up to its three companions but certainly leaves no element of dissatisfaction in its wake.

Kindred similarly stalks ears if with a less obvious enmity as melodic strands entwine its initial proposal. Even stronger Korn like essences emerge to pleasing effect across the song and around a death/grindcore merging which has hints of Cryptopsy in its own infectious savagery. Clean vocals interchange with barbarous expulsions to further enhance the adventure, the band musically as bold and expert in switching through a kaleidoscope of styles and flavours without disturbing the song’s carnal nature and heart.

The release concludes with Incipient, an instant maelstrom of voice and sound colliding nu-and industrial metal psychosis with the harsher antagonism of variety woven extreme metal  before luring in just as appetising melodic and groove metal imagination. It is seriously arousing stuff, the type of sonic manna addiction is spawned from right here. As throughout Pariah, every twist brings a fresh incitement to chew over but mere seconds to consume before the next steals attention and increasing ardour.

It is the final throe of a quite simply stunning encounter from a band which will surely now get the attention their craft and imagination deserves. There have been a few bands coming to the fore as the British metal scene heads into new horizons and Kinasis have just made it known their intent to be there on the frontline.

Pariah is released September 29th and will be digitally available at most online stores with physical copies sold through http://kinasis.bigcartel.com/ and at shows.

https://www.facebook.com/Kinasis

Pete RingMaster 26/09/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Cute Cute Death – Vessels

Cute Cute Death Promo Shot_RingMasterReview

With a name which certainly sparks intrigue, Cute Cute Death back it up with a sound just as attention grabbing and now an album which climbs over the senses, trespasses their boundaries, and leaves fierce satisfaction in its wake. Vessels though is a slightly curious affair for personal tastes, an album which for its first third certainly pleases yet without sparking much more whilst its remainder is a different type of protagonist sparking real excitement about itself and the band’s future.

The seeds of Cute Cute Death began in 2008 when drummer Wayne Kopman and guitarist Johnny Correia relocated from their home city of Johannesburg, South Africa to the UK. Settling in London, the pair met and subsequently linked up with vocalist Niko Forster. After a few line-up changes, guitarist Ricky Gurung and bassist Robert Pipe were enlisted, at which point the band properly emerged, initially under the name Set The Air On Fire. They were soon lighting up stages with their American Metal/hardcore influenced post hardcore endeavours, taking to their growing sound inspirations from the likes of Lower Definition, Alexisonfire, Gallows, Finch, Refused, Deftones, and Glass Jaw, who especially come to mind at times listening to Vessels. The subsequent time since starting has seen the band play across the UK with bands such as Broadway, Atlantis, Flood of Red, They Say Fall, Confessions of a Traitor, and Rival State, all the time adding to their potent reputation which is now pushed again by their debut album.

Produced by Joseph Grouse with Justin Hill (Sikth) mixing, mastering, and co-producing, Vessels opens up with its title track; a song needing little time to get a firm hand on ears and attention. The guitar prowess of Correia and Gurung quickly casts a web of enterprise that lures the imagination, their sonic touch soon wrapping the impressive clean tones of Forster. Straightaway he impresses, increasingly so as his delivery springs rawer, dirtier, and grouchier roars to equally fine success. As the rhythms rumble and prowl the resourceful landscape of the song, there is no escaping the lure and vibrancy of the encounter yet, and we emphasize for personal ears and tastes, it never quite taps into something which really stirs up the passions.

Cute Cute Death Cover Artwork_RingMasterReviewAll the same it is a powerful and dramatic start to Vessels continued by the Sikth meets Incubus personality of Alarm. Once again, the guitars dance with invention and craft as rhythms crowd the senses with their hungry shadows, all colluding to burn fiercely around the equally inflamed and rousing tones of Forster. The track enjoyably blisters on the ear before seamlessly evolving into the rawer antipathy of Pockets. Sonic tendrils and band shouts bring fresh drama to the album whilst the bass of Pipe borders on predatory as it robustly swings through the web of unpredictable and intoxication grooves and scything hooks. There is something extra about the track, if indefinable, which its predecessors lacked, an essence which and hints at the adventure waiting to escape the album further on.

Red Lights makes a calmer entrance next, though walls of bruising rhythms led by the tenacious swings of Kopman amidst intimidating riffs are soon descending on the senses before the song grows into another skilled and magnetic blend of contrasting textures and intensity, as ever echoed in the vocal enterprise of Forster. From its success the brief instrumental of Interlude looms upon ears with electronic suggestiveness on board, it drawing the listener into the awaiting revelry of DMT. It is from here that Vessels suddenly triggers a lustier reaction, though again it is hard to say exactly why, the major differences between the qualities and invention of songs before and after the melodic break not an open reason. With persistently twisting grooves and unpredictable rhythms aligned to writhing tendrils of sonic imagination adding to its temptation, there is no denying that the song simply enthrals and sparks a new breed of pleasure.

There is certainly greater diversity across the songs from hereon in on the album, starting with the warm caress of Statues. The song is an emotive melodic hug and vocal croon with the guitars spellbinding and Forster bordering on majestic with his again wonderfully varied tones. Taking best song honours, the track almost alone tells you all you need to know about the potential and already established invention of Cute Cute Death and that is without sharing any invasive trespass, which they have already proven to be equally adept at.

Leave This City follows and quickly holds courts as its web of spidery grooves and melodic acidity lies magnetically upon the rapier like thrusts of Kopman and another darkly juicy bassline from Pipe. There is a theatre to the hooks and the lively invention which grips the imagination as forcibly as the song’s underlying rhythmic rumble and fiery catchiness takes the body. It is an almost imposingly persuasive proposal matched by that of the enjoyably volatile and often irritable Glass Eyes and eclipsed by the closing might of Dinosaur. The final track is a tempest of anthemic hardcore, rebellious punk rock, and psyche infesting noise rock persistently involved with progressive and melodic ingenuity. The song is rebel rousing, a spirit igniting finale to the album offering a creative call to arms for the impressive invention and presence of Cut Cute Death.

Vessels is an excellent first full-length from the band; one which, even with that odd impact initially, left us thrilled and eager to recommend all fans check out what is a fresh breath in the post and hardcore scene.

Vessels is out now through all outlets on Friday 13th May.

http://www.cutecutedeath.com   https://www.facebook.com/cutecutedeath/     https://twitter.com/cutecutedeath

Pete RingMaster 13/05/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com

Aliases – Derangeable

Aliases_RingMasterReview

Obviously, it is too early to suggest what will be the best of 2016 but amongst album contenders we suggest you can expect to see Derangeable flirting with the top spot. The new and second album from British progressive tech-metallers Aliases is simply majestic, inescapably irresistible, and a proposition more than living up, in sound and imagination, to its title.

The brain-child of former SikTh guitarist Pin and fellow six-string maestro Leah Woodward, Aliases quickly whipped up attention and eager appetites from the first steps of its emergence in 2010. The band’s first year saw ear exciting single We Never Should Have Met create a potent buzz; an introduction quickly backed by the band making their live debut at Euroblast Festival in Germany and subsequently signing with Basick Records. Highly acclaimed debut album, Safer Than Reality, was uncaged in 2011 to swiftly make the band a potent presence and protagonist within tech metal and suggest the potential to rise to the stature of Pin’s former band. With a new vocalist and drummer bringing their prowess to events, Aliases easily live up to that promise and indeed have more than matched, and arguably surpassed, anything previous exploits have offered with Derangeable.

The album is a non-stop, often exhausting kaleidoscope of sound and invention; a release as technically beguiling as it is infectiously compelling and creatively mouth-watering. It is also an openly individual and unique proposal which at times borders on the loco in its dance of craft and imagination. It all starts with Find Where You Hide, a track which leaps at ears with a wall of imposing rhythms and spiky guitar coaxing as new vocalist Joe Rosser springs with equal attention grabbing zeal. From his initial dirty tones, he swiftly gives a glimpse of his melodic and harmonic diversity which increasingly shines across song and especially album. If ever a voice was perfect for an unpredictable and fluidly eventful sound, Rosser’s is it; his delivery and invention seeming to flow and prowl the inventive discord and flirtation lining every twist and turn in sound with their own striking adventure. The song itself continues to seduce and incite; the sultry addition of sax, antagonistic beats, and finally classical keys, just a few strands in the enthralling tapestry of the song.

art_RingMasterReviewEverything Is Upon Us is soon dazzling ears and thoughts with its instant busy weave. Entangling varied metal bred lures with funk, avant-garde, and nu-metal devilment, the track enslaves in seconds. The guitars of Pin and Woodward simply dance with almost schizophrenic invention whilst Joe Heaton’s bass prowls through it all like a predator equipped with resonating groans and salacious grooving. As with all songs, it is impossible to reflect the emprise of senses twisting and psyche captivating exploration going on, every second seemingly a new cascade of adventure as shown again in the beefier and equally melodically alluring Back To The Start. Shaped by the crafty swings and beats of Jof Walsh and coloured by the impressive vocal exploits of Rosser, the song emerges like a mix of The Kennedy Soundtrack, KingBathmat, and maybe unsurprisingly SikTh on the way to being something distinct to Aliases.

The pair of Smile All You Like and Deep Sea Avenue keeps attention tight and the imagination stirred; the first with its intricately woven exotic bedlam of guitar and rhythmic ingenuity ridden by the great vocal resources of Rosser and band. It is a fascination of sound and imagination emulated in an even more strikingly unbalanced way by its successor, a track that growls and leers at the listener whilst taking them through its sonic psychosis. It is an outstanding and virulent treat of sound and temptation pretty much matched in success by the lighter yet just as frenzied tango of Uncontrollable Desires. There is a touch of Korn and System Of A Down to the song; spices which simply add to the irresistible web of creative alchemy infesting body and spirit.

The commandingly intensive and barbarously engrossing Callous comes next; it a merger of contrasting shades of aggression and intent bound together by the band’s ever riveting casting of unhinged innovation in sound and idea. It completes a quartet of unmissable favourites at the centre of Derangeable, though through the agitated maze of Face For Lust, where the bass is instinctively flirtatious, and the similarly dynamic and left-field bearing Seen It All, the album and pleasure are locked closer together than ever.

The album comes to a mighty close with the grooved beauty and psyche bending resourcefulness of the wonderful Untangled Mind and finally the warm harmonic charm and mischievous eccentricity of Above The Sky. The pair provides a quite glorious and lingering conclusion to not only one of the year’s major triumphs so far but one of the most enjoyable and impressive adventures in the history of tech and progressive metal. Derangeable is one of those releases which are destined to become an inspiration to others and the best friend to ears and imagination; the tag of genius is already on the lips in reference to their glorious triumph.

Derangeable is out now via Basick Records with buying options @ http://www.basickrecords.com/releases/derangeable

https://www.facebook.com/aliasesband   http://www.twitter.com/aliasesband

Pete Ringmaster 18/04/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com/

Pryti – Bitter Pill

Pryti Promo Shot _RingMasterReview

Like intoxicating liquor, some flavours simply grown stronger and more compelling with age, and that is the same with Bitter Pill, the new video single from British independent rock artist Pryti. The song comes from the Birmingham singer songwriter transfixing and mightily impressive debut album Tales Of A Melancholic, which was released on her own label, Welcome To Pariahville early last year. Within the collection of dramatic and imposing landscapes of emotions and dark shadows, Bitter Pill certainly captivated and infested the imagination with its “bracing vocals and melodies caught on a passionate sonic wind”. Fair to say, as the album, it just grew with every listen from there but it is now on its own, and for whatever reason, the song really seems to have gained its biggest blossom as one seriously enthralling moment.

Inspired by the likes of Deftones and Paramore, both audible spices in Bitter Pill, Pryti is quite simply a sonic force all on her own. On the single and album, she was the sole source of songs, vocals, guitar and bass; a resourcefulness and strength which goes with the DIY ethic of her label and presence. It is a talent which only impresses when hearing her Justin Hill (Sikth, Heart of a Coward, Yashin, Bury Tomorrow) produced and majorly acclaimed first album, Tales Of A Melancholic and only does so again with Bitter Pill.

Pryti Cover Artwork _RingMasterReviewThe song instantly grips ears with its dark ambience and portentous beats, the lone lure of guitar as melancholic as the sounds around it are imposing. Pryti’s vocals equally have a solemn resonance to their intimate emotion and beauty, only flaming with greater inviting hues as the song equally rises in intensity and suggestive drama. That Deftones influence is an open colour, adding to the almost invasive air and tempestuous nature of the song. It is simply intoxicating stuff, a beguiling and haunting incitement of ears and imagination which shows no lessening of its potency even as lighter breezes dare to creep in on the compelling act.

Equally the video for Bitter Pill is as invasively mesmeric; Pryti alone in a shadow washed forest an evocative visual melancholy only reinforced by the elegant moves of the masked dancer which seem to add  to the song’s heart spawned solemnity. Directed by Marcus Maschwitz, the film is a captivating piece which draws rather than distracts attention to the actual song and its open heart.

The press release for the Bitter Pill suggests that, “There is little doubt that 2016 is going to be colossal for Pryti.” We for one will not argue.

The Bitter Pill video/single is released Friday 8th April.

https://www.facebook.com/prytigatgemusic   https://twitter.com/prytigatge

Pete RingMaster 06/04/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com/

Heel – The Parts We Save

Heel_RingMasterReview

Amongst many eagerly anticipated offerings this year has to be the debut album from UK alternative rock quartet Heel. Having impressed with their first EP and even more so with subsequent releases as well as a striking stage presence, Heel has been one of the bands enveloped by increasing acclaim over recent times. It has put some strong expectations of The Parts We Save upon them which the London band has appeased with ease. Maybe at times the album does not quite fulfil all the potential within it but for rousing, imagination sculpted rock/pop contagiousness, the album persistently hits the spot with adventure and charm.

Formed in the winter of 2011 from guitarist Daniel and vocalist Margarita’s songwriting sessions, Heel quickly began working on their first EP once its line-up was completed by bassist Fred and drummer Nick. Produced by Justin Hill (Sikth), their opening release quickly grabbed attention and praise. Its success was subsequently pushed further by its successor Stranger Just The Same in 2014, an encounter also recorded with Hill. With video/singles luring play on the likes of Scuzz TV and Kerrang, the band set about working on an album, flying out to Japan`s legendary Geimori studio in Sapporo to record The Parts We Save with Daniel and Margarita producing.

Mixed by Ben Grosse and Paul Pavao (Marilyn Manson, Disturbed, Depeche Mode, Ben Folds, Thirty Seconds to Mars, etc.) and mastered by Tom Baker (Beastie Boys, Deftones, David Bowie, B.B. King), the album swiftly shows the growth in the band’s magnetic sound and its maturity in songwriting as opener An Apology sets to work stirring up ears. The first single from the release when uncaged last December, the song immediately consumes the senses in a sonic lure from which a bass led swagger within sultry caresses of guitar bounds. Its catchiness is instant and only strengthened by Margarita’s alluring vocals. Carrying thick drama to its rhythmic design and exotically seductive grooves, the track also develops an infectious No Doubt like charm which lies agreeably upon Heel’s own web of melody and imagination fuelled tenacity.

'The Parts We Save' Cover Artwork_RingMasterReviewThe excellent opening to the album continues with Selfish Burn which again has that Gwen Stefani and co spicing to its feisty pop ‘n’ roll. Throaty funk infused bait from Fred’s bass provides a potent spine to the song, an agitated smoulder of sonic and melodic resourcefulness laying upon it whilst Margarita’s tones again add a lusty freshness with a tinge of mischief to the temptation. Though seemingly crafted from the same template as the first and next up Yellow & Bliss, each song reveals its own individual and forcibly enticing character. The third track, and the band’s brand new video/single, is a lively shuffle with skittish rhythms and an animated gallop of chords and hooks beneath a breeze of warm harmonies and psych rock tinged enterprise, and quite irresistible.

Nothing New strolls in next with a melodic smile on its face and a devilish bassline at its heart for another inviting slice of impassioned pop rock whilst Shatter is a tender flirtation initially, which brews up into a spirited canter of jangling guitar and animated vocals aligned to mesmeric harmonies. By its close, the gentleness of the song is a near on surge of energy and passion, and increasingly bewitching.

The mellow croon of Cool allows body and emotions to settle; well at first as soon it also raises its enthusiastic agility and creative zeal to lead feet and hips on a merry dance egged on by virulent rhythms. A vibrant and catchy mix of textures and energies, the song has pleasure flowing, running right into the path of the outstanding Keep Running Back To Me. A tapestry of dynamic rock ‘n’ roll as punkish as it is bluesy, as feverishly tenacious as it is rapaciously heavy; the track is like a mix of My Baby and Spinnerette with a touch of Throwing Muses to it and quickly ignites appetite and emotions.

The dark drama of Live This Forever takes over, the track also a heavier proposal with a punk/grunge breeding to its invention and a fiery attitude to its emotive heart. It prowls, almost stalks ears as it unveils its shadow rich theatre, again grabbing eager involvement in its proposal before Fake Love twists and turns with its pop punk infused 4 Non Blondes like rock ‘n’ roll to great success.

Finishing with the tantalising melodic breeze of Streets Full Of You, a final harmonic and emotive kiss on ears with its own line in imaginative shadows, The Parts We Save is an encounter with plenty of eagerly lingering moments. Some songs are a more instant and imposing arousal than others, but each only provides rich enjoyment and an appetite for more from a band still growing into its skin of originality but establishing itself as one of Britain’s brightest propositions.

The Parts We Save is released March 4th via iTunes and Amazon.

http://www.heelband.com/   https://www.facebook.com/Heellondon   https://twitter.com/heellondon

Pete RingMaster 04/03/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com/