The Veer Union – Decade

veer union _RingMaster Review

Named to mark the 10 year span between The Veer Unions’ debut album Time To Break The Spell and their new proposal, Decade is a riveting incitement of fiery melodic rock from the Canadians that simply leaves ears ringing in rousing sound and satisfaction. It is also the first encounter with the band’s latest line-up, one which seems to have lit another emotive and creative fire in the band’s belly.

The successor to the band’s successful 2012 album Divide The Blackened Sky, a well-received offering pushing the band to greater attention, Decade is a collection of ten stirring songs; five new and five unreleased tracks which were written before The Veer Union began and have been ‘brought back to life’ for the band’s new concept album. It makes for a release which takes the listener into the heart of the Vancouver based band’s journey from first breath to now, through their struggles overcoming adversity and the intimacy of vocalist/songwriter Crispin Earl’s own personal battles.

Veer Cover_RingMaster ReviewOpener and latest single Defying Gravity, deals with that inner turbulence, being lyrically inspired by Earl’s struggle with depression over the years. It opens with a slightly haunted sonic tempting before unleashing its demons through a hardened rhythmic trespass and irritably grouchy riffs, Earl emotively roaring from the heart of it. It is a striking entrance with a carnivorous snarl but relaxes a touch as melodies unite with kinder intensity as the lyrical sharing begins. Rawer backing provocation from the throat of bassist Amal Wijayanayake intimidates as harmonic tones from the voice of lead guitarist Dan Sittler courts Earl’s swiftly impressive delivery and expression, it all adding to the Three Days Grace/ Sick Puppies like spice blessing the glorious arousal of ears and emotions.

Watch You Lose ensures there is no dip from the heavyweight persuasion of its predecessor, it too slipping into ears with a seductively sinister and elegant sonic caress before enticing grooves wind menacingly around the rapier swings of drummer Tyler Reimer. Rhythm guitarist Ryan Ramsdell simultaneously adds a great nagging essence to the ratty air and nature of the song, his lures matched in more primal kind by Wijayanayake’s bass but sublimely tempered by the sonic enterprise of keys and Sittler’s touch, not forgetting the increasingly impressing and anthemic mix of vocals.

With a mellower climate comes a tempestuous character to the following You Can’t Have It All whilst I Said is a melancholic reflection wrapped in siren-esque ambience around an introspective heart, both tracks providing a gripping infectiousness and emotive drama to get greedy over. The first of the two is another feisty rousing incitement with a Sick Puppies like growl whilst its successor offers a dark serenade leaning more to a Nine Inch Nails like atmospheric immersion.

A strong electronic essence also colours the impassioned blaze of Make Believe, its energetic tempting merging with the predatory teeth of the guitars and pungently forceful rhythms. It is a unity of varied and contrasting textures masterfully woven and matched by the rich strains of the vocals linking up with Earl’s potent lead; a perpetually successful collusion as shown quickly after by both the volatile heart cry of We All Will and the similarly dynamic sonic clamour of I Don’t Care. Each feeds ears with individual emotional bellows aligned to thunderous yet carefully uncaged sounds, calms and catchy twists skilfully linked to boisterous and imposing expulsions to impressive results.

The Unwanted is another galvanic encounter bringing thick emotive drama and contagious bait together whilst captivating and firing up the senses, a quality emulated by Heart Attack but with a stronger leaning to virulent melodic catchiness and tantalising caresses than the vigorous confrontation of other tracks, though it too is no lightweight in intensity and passion. The same can be applied to closing song The Underrate, a meaty slice of pop rock with an angst driven pulse and prickly attitude inciting body and vocal chords with an anthemic bawl.

The track is a mighty end summing up the album in heart and creative dexterity. The Veer Union does not have the most original of sounds even if the designs to it are as fresh and inventive as you might wish for, but the band creates an emotive ‘call to arms’ which simply grabs attention as strongly as their thrilling sound treats ears. Here is to the next ten years of such pleasure.

Decade is available from January 29th through Pavement Entertainment.

Upcoming Tour Dates With Bobaflex, Bridge to Grace, and Artifas

FEB

2/18 — San Diego, Calif. — Brick by Brick

2/19 — Phoenix, Ariz. — Last Exit Live

2/25 — Lubbock, Texas — Blue Light Live

2/26 — Abilene, Texas — Legends Rock House

2/27 — Tyler, Texas — Clicks Live

March

3/2 — Shreveport, La. — Hangar 21

3/3 — Crowley, La. — Sam’s Place

3/5 — Madison, Ala. — 11th Frame

3/6 — Destin, Fla. — Club LA

3/9 — Tallahassee, Fla. — Pugs Live

3/10 — Jacksonville, Fla. — Free Birds Live (Save the Arts)

3/11 — Wilmington, N.C. — Cardinal

3/12 — Charlotte, N.C. — Amos Southend

3/19 — Hagarstown, Md. — Hard Times Cafe

3/25 — Kent, Ohio — The Outpost

https://www.facebook.com/theveerunion  http://www.theveerunion.com   http://www.twitter.com/theveerunion

Pete RingMaster 29/01/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com/

Astral Void – Blood from a Stone

astral-void-band2_RingMaster Review

The first thing which hits ears in the Blood from a Stone EP is the passion and at times fury driving the five boisterous tracks making up its body, that swiftly followed by the energy in the songwriting and music of UK rockers Astral Void. This is a band also unafraid to show echoes of some it’s inspirations in its strongly engaging sound; a proposition which could be described as Foo Fighters meets Sick Puppies meets Nirvana with a touch of Therapy? as a hint but one which invites attention as a fresh and thickly tenacious incitement.

From Norfolk, Astral Void’s seeds go back to 2007 and former Red Leaf front man Andy Martin who from performing solo wanted to put his ideas into a band format. After advertising online, Martin met and subsequently linked up with guitarist Chris Gedge (ex- Smoking Aces), the pair eventually finding further members to a band soon becoming a feature of the Norfolk and London live scene over the next couple of years before going on hiatus. That break ended in 2013, Martin and Gedge uniting again and pulling bassist Nathan Redgrave and drummer Liam Ramsker into the line-up. Soon new songs were forged as the band’s alternative/melodic rock fuelled enterprise began stirring things up again, the release of Blood from a Stone a potent poke on attention with its release a few weeks back.

The EP quickly entices ears and appetite with opener B.F.F, riffs almost stalking ears as rhythms rumble and grumble alongside. The harmonic vocals of Martin and Gedge soon after add an enticing temper to that confrontation, their presence in turn sparking fiery melodic enterprise from the guitar of Gedge; Martin’s craft on strings backing him as resourcefully as the former with his vocals for the latter. Emerging grooves have a Lost Prophets feel to their spiciness whilst the unpredictable twists and fluid changes within the landscape of the song simply captures the imagination to excite ears further.

It is a nature to the band’s songwriting which never misses a moment to impress, the following Bleed moving from an initial melodic caress accompanied by the great emotive tone in Martin’s voice and in turn warm harmonies, into a thicker proposal in sound and emotive weight as the band offer their bolder reflective essences. It never majorly breaks from its infectious croon, instead evolving it and giving it more fire in the belly with a touch of Jimmy Eat World coming to the fore. More of a grower than its predecessor, the song keeps a quickly bred appetite richly satisfied before the EP’s title track inflames it again with a similarly heated and angst lined proposal with a far more grungier heart, especially across its volatile chorus. The guitars border on flirtation throughout with their sonic craft and colour whilst rhythms make a moodier proposition matched by the instinctive snarl of Martin’s vocal delivery; all elements woven into an infectious canter and strain of temptation.

From one success to another as the excellent Dust soon establishes itself as a big favourite. Even from its first breath where a prowling bassline lures in discord equipped guitar teases and a vocal lure with a touch of the stalker to it too, the track has its claws into the passions, subsequently exploding into another grunge toned roar as its chorus demands full involvement. It’s galvanic success in turn seems to spark a feistier and more intensely energetic nature to the following verse and the gripping builds shaping the rest of the song’s contagion soaked blaze. Added joy within the tremendous encounter comes through the quirky slithers of guitar which get a major moment to shine just before the rousing finale, their Devo-esque revelry quite delicious.

There is no escaping the Nirvana like essence to the song either, a spice as enjoyable in closing track Pain for another big highlight of the release. A stirring blend of hard rock, grunge, and punk ‘n’ roll, the track reminds ears of fellow UK band Feud a little but is soon bawling at and stomping with the listener with its own raucousness, constantly inviting and receiving participation as shown by the office here.

It is a mighty end to a thoroughly satisfying and increasingly electrifying introduction to Astral Void. Having recently signed with Holier Than Thou Records, it is easy to expect good times in the future with a band that has all the attributes to impress and the imagination to be bigger and bolder ahead.

The Blood from a Stone EP is out now @ https://itunes.apple.com/gb/album/blood-from-a-stone-ep/id1009403772

https://www.facebook.com/AstralVoidBand   https://twitter.com/astralvoidband

Pete RingMaster 14/12/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com/

Murder FM – Happily Never After

murderfmcover_RingMaster Review

Murder FM is another band which over recent times has been the subject of enthusiastic talk, their live presence, EPs, and singles sparking increasing awareness on both sides of the Atlantic. Now the band is poised to release their debut album and show all what the fuss is all about. Happily Never After is a rousing proposition, a collection of skilfully crafted and creatively eventful songs that just seem to lure attention back time and time again. It is hard to say that the release constantly set a fire going in the passions or is going to send a major tremor through the metal/rock scene, but there is no escaping that Happily Never After leaves ripe enjoyment whilst making a potent springboard for future and bolder Murder FM adventures ahead.

Hailing from Dallas, the band has persistently enticed ears with their tenacious fusing of varied rock essences and industrial bred metal. Early singles alerted a great and increasing many to their presence, lures reinforced by a reputation gaining live presence and a host of impressive videos, all luring in fan and media appetites alike. Over time the band has supported and shared stages with the likes of Rob Zombie, Deftones, Five Finger Death Punch, Black Veil Brides, Korn, Sick Puppies, Lacuna Coil, Pop Evil and many more across the US and into Europe. More recently the quartet of Norman Matthew (vocals, guitar, programming), J6 (bass, backing vocals), Matt X3r0 (guitar, backing vocals), and Jason West (drums) signed with Famous Records Global for the world-wide uncaging of Happily Never After, easily the strongest step yet in the band’s continuing ascent.

MFMREVOLVER_RingMaster Review   The album opens with Legion, a track which is in no hurry to own ears but instantly springs a web of engaging rhythms and electro bait crowded with enticing vocal roars. It is a restrained yet compelling lure which is soon stirring up a nest of fuzzy riffs and electronic sizzling as vocals prowl and in turn launch the anthemic heart of the track. In no time the song has an air of Korn meets Dope to it but equally has a scent of artists like Marilyn Manson and Society 1 whilst creating what is not exactly unique but certainly an organic character of its own. It is a magnetic and blistering start to the album, a masterful trap which has ears and appetite on board ready for what is to follow.

We The Evil is the immediate proposition, it similarly brewing up an industrial seeded tempest of sound rife with sinew swung beats and grouchy riffs from bass and guitar. Vocally too, there is nothing but attitude as well as great diversity as the band, led by Matthew, all add their individual and eager tones. Even stronger Manson like colouring wraps the track as it stirs up the blood and imagination, powerfully backing up its predecessor without major surprises but plenty of tasty endeavours.

The bruising weight and carnivorous riffery of Last Breath captures ears next, the gnawing of guitar on senses swift infection which only increases as the band imaginatively slips into mellower melodic scenery. With vocals matching the slightly calmer waters, it is a tantalising twist which becomes part of a great revolving surge across the rest of the track through both textured extremes; its success emulated by the punk/alternative metal hued Machine Gun Kisses which again has a Korn-esque feel to its rapacious enterprise and contagious swing.

Four tracks in and Happily Never After is on a thick roll of adventure and persuasion, and as if it ‘knows’ full persuasion is in hand, from this point begins exploring far more boldly varied and unique pastures. Firstly Burn steps forward with a Deftones meets Cold like offering, to be followed by the grungier metal soaked Slaves, both increasing in sheer magnetism over time. The industrial nature of early songs is now a more distant whisper, as Murder FM shows more resourcefulness and imagination in songwriting and sound, it is still not game changing but brings a fresh unpredictability and spice to ears and release.

We get slithers of Black Veil Brides and My Chemical Romance in the classic/modern heavy rock shaped Lethal Lovers next, essences which just seem to work if adding open familiarity to proceedings, whilst Like Glass offers an electronic coaxing and evocative keys initially, before creating its own emotional and musical drama honed from the same kind of template as its predecessor. Neither track matches up to the songs before them but it would be unfair to say they left satisfaction and a want to hear more barren.

With Happily Neverafter and Rainy Day Parade, Murder FM again please without finding the key to stronger reactions, and for personal tastes Happily Never After plays like a release of two halves, the first a storming and irresistible anthem of sound and insatiable energy and the second though arguably the more creative theatre of invention and adventure on the album, after Slaves lacking the kick and incendiary elements to incite the same instincts and thus passions.

Completed by a corrosive remix of We The Evil by Tommy Lee, Happily Never After is nevertheless nothing but enjoyment from start to finish and easy to recommend all taking a good listen to at the very least. We can only think Murder FM will get bigger and bolder with every passing release as the potential in this first album is realised with fresh imagination and originality. A happy thought indeed.

Happily Never After is available from August 7th via Famous Records Global with worldwide distribution by Pavement Entertainment.

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Murder-FM-Official     http://www.murderfmmusic.com/

RingMaster 05/08/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Radiodrone-The Truth Syndicate Diaries

Radiodrone_RingMaster Review

They have a sound which more than backs up the punch and potency of their lyrical confrontation on the world today, and now US rockers Radiodrone have an album to really stir up attention. The Orange County quartet pulls no blows when it comes to unleashing their take on the social and political ills contaminating the landscape we all battle through and it is fair to say no quarter is given by their debut full-length. That is not to day it is all anger and violence though, The Truth Syndicate Diaries equipped with the thickest contagions, most virulent anthems, and a melodic prowess to give any band a run for its money. Is it the most original thing you will come across this year, probably not, but if looking for one massively invigorating and accomplished proposition, this is a done deal.

Radiodrone began early 2014 and quickly whipped up keen support and awareness for themselves through what has been called a “searing” live presence and tracks like Want it Back and NeverLoution, two early singles sparking acclaim and rich radio play. There is rebellion in the band’s rock ‘n’ roll and as suggested earlier in their lyrical stance, yet it is evolved into something which never gets predictable or is lacking in diversity. The band has been described as being “part schizoid Five Finger Death Punch on the heavy edge, part Foo Fighters rock with the commercial aspects and part hard grooves”, a valid hint which is quickly realised and more by album opener Game Change.

The album is top and tailed by intro skits /provocative commentaries, and every song split by the same, but the release really takes off once Game Change hits ears with rapping beats as its guitars brew up a tasty scrub of riffs. The track is soon into a welcoming feisty stride with the rhythms of drummer Danny Molgaard and bassist Stephen Appel continuing to offer threat and infectious tempting. A hard rock air and swing quickly hits the song as guitarist Ethan Hedayat lays a thick lure with his lead vocals, a strong presence assisted as potently in voice by fellow guitarist Randy Cash and Appel. It is a rousing stomp, stirring up the appetite with heavy rock ‘n’ roll hooks to hang your allegiance on and an anthemic might which easily diminishes any reason to moan the lack of major surprises.

cover_RingMaster Review   The following Want it Back is similarly textured and crafted but quickly filling out into its own antagonistic and commanding character. The bass of Appel is wonderfully grizzly whilst the swinging slaps of Molgaard just seem to get more intensive and effective with every passing rally of beats. The track is a predator yet tempered by again impressive vocal strengths and blends, as well as the magnetic enterprise of both guitarists. You can feel a touch of bands like Seether, Godsmack, and Shinedown to the track, such flavours woven into its own if not unique certainly individual incitement.

NeverLoution is a more even tempered and reserved proposal yet with another throaty bass lure amidst wiry strands of sonic grooving, it blossoms into a tenacious and rigorously persuasive offering. Its melodic side and underlying snarl reminds a touch of Sick Puppies whilst its metallic groaning has a whisper of Nonpoint, and combined both aspects only add to another swift nudge on enjoyment before the gripping Get Your Head Down emerges with an enticing sonic shimmer and melodic coaxing. Appel persistently gives the richest alluring shadows to songs, and here his bass is an entrapping resonance leading ears straight into an infectious tempest making up the body of the song, but a stormy muscular affair built on spicy grooves and melodic flames.

Both Showdown and Massive keep things seriously rocking, the first with dirty blues lined walls around jagged riffs and stabbing beats driven by, as now expected, mouth-watering enterprise from vocals and guitars, and the second through its dusty croon across a restrained yet fiery and unreservedly catchy landscape. In their individual ways, the pair of tracks incites another surge of pleasure whilst impressing more, as the album, with every listen. Despite that potency though, they still have to submit to the best track on the album, the raging roar of Battle Call. Instantly like an old friend back to stir up trouble and anarchy, the song enters ears with a sturdy stride and confrontational attitude. The vocals are an easy conscription to its call alone but backed by the sinew driven rhythms and scything hooks of the track, it is an invigorating storm embracing broader melodic escapades to its vivaciously resourceful and incendiary canvas. Quite simply this is the kind of song the word anthem was composed for.

We’re Alright is a slow burner of a song, its smoulder working away on ears and thoughts with an underlying and unrelenting persistence. It also takes a few listens to find the same level of greed for its creative adventure as other exploits upon the album. Like Pop Evil meets Stone Sour, the song leaves a good impression from the off nevertheless triggering a want to go back for more. That success is aggressively ripe within the compelling and bracing snarl of Double Think, just one more offer upon The Truth Syndicate Diaries to get keenly involved with.

The album comes to a close with Don’t Get Me Started, one final voraciously galvanic and superbly crafted inflaming of emotion and energy from release and listener. It perfectly sums up The Truth Syndicate Diaries, an album which might not flirt with startling originality but out rocks and outshines most contenders, and yes it just gets better and better over time to.

The Truth Syndicate Diaries is available now on ITunes, and Amazon.

http://radiodronemusic.com/   https://www.facebook.com/pages/Radiodrone/1462833703951662

RingMaster 14/07/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

 

Never A Hero – UnEvolution

Never A Hero 2

Bursting with variety, so much so that at times you are not sure where the band’s intention with their sound is going, it has to be said that UnEvolution is one rather enjoyable and memorable encounter. The second album from UK alternative rock band Never A Hero explores a much broader landscape of sounds and imagination than that tagging suggests. It does not always come off as potently in places as in others, and the album is soaked in a familiarity assumedly bred from inspirations, but still the release is one fun and highly appetising enjoyment.

Never A Hero emerged in 2009 when members from two bands came together to write and create new music well away from their usual styles. Debut EP Socially Awkward was recorded and unveiled in 2010, its re-release two years later awakening even greater attention. Between its outings though, the band were already finding radio airplay as well as TV coverage through debut single From Heroes To Angels, a success pushed on by second single Trippin’ On Speed and its video in 2011. Their first album Bleed Between The Lies was released at the end of 2012 to potent responses as subsequent singles taken from it like Burning Skies. Now they have just uncaged its successor UnEvolution, laying down rich bait for its arrival on a UK tour, and already it is making an open stir on the British rock scene.

The post hardcore like A Thousand Days Wasted opens things up, the track just glancing past one minute in length but in that turbulent time already hinting away that there may be much more lying in wait in the depths and invention of any song than revealed on its surface. This is soon evidenced by Mr Munchausen, an energetically striding slice of rock ‘n’ roll from its first breath and swiftly bringing metal and other heavy textures into play. Electronic tempting flirts away in the scenery of the evolving melodic rock encounter too, adding unpredictable and tantalising hues to the enjoyable roar of the song. Vocalist Phrixus has an excellent expression and quality to his voice and is just as strongly backed by the tones of guitarist Mickey Thin and bassist KB. As suggested there is a strong element of familiarity to songs on the album and rampant here but it only adds to the satisfaction. Sick Puppies and Fall Out Boy come to mind in varying ways, always good spices in a blaze of a song.

Never A Hero Artwork   A breaking storm and the drama of strings opens up Nightboy next, the track soon striding purposefully with feisty riffs and warm melodies, heading to a potent chorus which it maybe me but amazingly has a healthy feel of Bryan Adams to it. Never thought healthy and that name would escape these fingers together. The guitars of Thin and Kaji 2.0 recruit keen attention to the song alone but with the scything beats of drummer Daisy Lai and the ever alluring vocals of Phrixus, it is another easily accessible and pleasing proposition.

Not Too Cool To Dance takes another turn in the album, its electro punk like stomp almost Hollywood Undead like whilst the rapping vocals has a touch of bands like G.R.I.M and Hadouken to them . It is a stonking start which loses its allure a touch with the following melodic relaxation, strength soon regained as a mix of styles creates a reserved but tempestuous proposal. Again the song wins out and joins the opening pair in leaving ears and thoughts thoroughly contented before making way for the electro meets alternative rock exploits of It’s The Way. Hard rock textures and melodic flames add to the tempting, as do excellent female vocals leading to a touch of Forever Still to the encounter, but ultimately the track does not have the spark of those before it and feels a little safe to be honest. Nevertheless it keeps the album’s potency high as does the electro/hard rock mixed offering The Crow That Follows You Home, it too not sparking the same flame of emotion as the first trio of songs but leaving ears and appetite for the release more than happy.

The orchestral piece God Is Complex brings an interlude next though its epic and evocative presence which rather than allow a breath to be taken brings new theatre and anticipation to the imagination before it embraces the following Kramer. Electro rock with a whiff of Nintendo-core merges with melodic rock, a blend the band increasingly does well and makes strong persuasions with across UnEvolution it has to be said. The track proceeds to stomp and bellow as guitars stir up its canvas and the bass provides a great dark almost sinister attitude to the boiling vocal emotion. It is a great track re-igniting early pleasures whilst again making you wonder what is the prime Never A Hero sound or it starting point.

The more classic hard rock embrace of Falling Up is next and has ears aligned with ease before The Idiots Are Winning bounds around with its tempestuous and openly infectious revelry. Once again a wide twist of styles are tangled to create a recognisable but contagiously magnetic slice of pop rock, this the best way to generally describe the album maybe. The theatrical Succubus sees a clash of mature melodic rock with a more basic street punk narrative, but with guttural roars, grooved infestations, and psyche lit drama breaking out, the song is nothing but thrilling persuasion, especially when it breaks into a fiery swing at one point.

The album ends with the Time To Crucify, a song though individual feels like a reprise of all that came before in one final tapestry of sound and flavours. It is a good end to an increasingly enjoyable encounter. Bands with vast diversity are the most exciting and potentially important bands in music, and that part of Never A Hero makes a good album a great offering. UnEvolution might not be the best album to hit the year so far but it is one of the more enjoyable and that works for us.

UnEvolution is out later this year @ http://www.neverahero.net/shop

http://www.neverahero.net   https://www.facebook.com/neverahero/

RingMaster 17/04/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

 

Freaks Like Me – Philosophies For The Modern Ant

FLM - bandpic01

It is probably no surprise that there is a healthy essence of Kurt Cobain and co to the Freaks Like Me sound, considering its members also make up the world’s No.1 Nirvana tribute band Nervana, but that is only part of what is a rather compelling and enjoyable proposition on offer in the trio’s debut release. The Philosophies For The Modern Ant EP is a contagious and rigorously captivating encounter which has body and imagination leaping in tandem with its energetic and invigorating enterprise. As mentioned there is no escaping the rich familiarity of the band’s main inspiration across the songs but with its grunge sounds merged with punk ferocity and melodic rock tenacity, what emerges is an admittedly less than original but easily more than richly satisfying incitement. Think Nirvana meets Sick Puppies in the embrace of early Bush and you get a great hint of what is on offer.

Consisting of vocalist/guitarist Jon O’Connor, bassist Dave Eve, and drummer/backing vocalist Steve Kilroy, Freaks Like Me emerged when the threesome decided it was time to explore and offer something different and fresh from their highly successful and acclaimed Nervana presence which has been going since 2009. The seeds of their union go back much further though, Eve and Kilroy meeting in the early 2000s in London while recording an EP with Gods Little Joke. Playing together in Ireland in 2007, the pair met O’Connor in Dublin after a show, reconnecting with him later when looking for a vocalist for their new project. The rest is history, with a new turn and direction in its narrative coming with Freaks Like Me.

1. FLM EP - COVER_FRONT - FINAL   Recorded in London, Boston and Holland, Philosophies For The Modern Ant, on the back of successful shows in Europe and the US, instantly has ears and attention gripped as opener Better Off Blind sets things off. Hefty riffs and similarly intensive grooves encase ears initially before the song relaxes into a more familiar grunge bred tempting. Melodies and a snarl equipped bassline court the slightly grizzled tones of Jon O’Connor, his voice sharing the raw essence of again Cobain and similarly Gavin Rossdale, it all creating a restrained but open drama to the song. It is fair to say that the EP starts with a recognisable and unsurprising offering but equally a captivating one which like the warm up act to the main show, gets anticipation and appetite in the mood.

All In A Lie is a different beast of a proposition, its instant almost predatory splatter of riffs and sonic discord within a carnivorous assault of bass led rhythms, immediately irresistible. It is a riveting and thrilling entrance loaded with rugged hooks and ravenous grooves. Submission to its raw and imposing suggestiveness is swift, especially with the effect drizzled vocals which are soon riding the tempestuous and aggressive onslaught. Bearing down on the senses with seemingly increasing creative turmoil, urgency, and seduction, the intoxicating tempest is quite outstanding, sparking as its successor at times thoughts of UK based band Feud along the way.

If the bass exploits of Eve have already seduced the passions across the first two tracks, he steals them outright within Cynical. A dirty repetitious temptation from his manipulation of strings is simply irresistible as it provides the start and spine to the raucous and fiery encounter. It is an old school punk lure in many ways, a resonating simplicity which steers song and its creativity to striking endeavours. It again has many recognisable twists and aspects to its adventure but this time of a more post punk seeded comparison a la Gang of Four.

Both Down and Idol Fall keep EP and pleasure blazing, the first with virulently infectious expulsions masked as choruses. As in the previous song there are glimpses of a post punk flavouring, hints of Flesh For Lulu spicing the melodic radiance spilling from the heart of the otherwise thickly Nirvana-esque swamp of abrasive rock ‘n’ roll. The second of the two is again drenched in the flavours of the band’s other project, but it is spicery twisted and woven into fresh and inventive imagination which easily enthrals thoughts and ears, especially in its unexpected and transfixing psyche rock detour.

Closing song Poppies and Rain provides an absorbing croon to end on, but a shadow wrapped one with portentous rhythms and haunting sonic suggestiveness crowding its melodic and melancholic elegance. The song is a bewitching finale to an excellent debut from Freaks Like Me. Certainly there is little startling new about Philosophies For The Modern Ant but it is potently fresh and stirringly invigorating, and most of all thoroughly enjoyable. What more could anyone want?

Philosophies For The Modern Ant is available from April 7th via Pavement Entertainment through most online stores.

https://www.facebook.com/freakslikememusic

RingMaster 07/04/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://reputationradio.yooco.org/

Evenline – Dear Morpheus

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Hailing out of Paris, melodic metallers Evenline recently released their debut album and in the process made a rather potent impression. Richly enjoyable and impressively accomplished, Dear Morpheus is a sizeable persuasion of alternative rock and metal bound in the inspirations of bands such as Alter Bridge, Creed, Metallica, and Nickelback. It is a captivating proposition which lights a richly contented glow in ears and emotions whilst showing a potential of even greater things ahead as the band find their own distinctive sound and presence, which is not quite there on the album. It certainly makes for a pleasing companion, its familiarity to others a warm and easily accessible embrace to be fair, helping lead to a thoroughly satisfying engagement.

Formed in 2009, Evenline first made a mark in with their first release, The Coming Life EP the following year. The band continued to build an increasingly attentive support and attention with their shows, including supporting Alter Bridge in Luxembourg in 2011, before the quartet settled down to record their debut full-length with producer Jim Dewailly. Its arrival in the flavoursome shape of Dear Morpheus, suggests the band is on the brink of a much wider recognition, something the release which without setting new standards firmly deserves with its eleven melodically crafted and emotionally eventful songs.

The album makes a swift persuasion on ears and imagination, the evocative opening to Misunderstood, a melodic caress matched by the potent tones of vocalist Aarno Gueziec. There is an almost hazy glaze to his voice which adds to the expressive start of the first song, a coaxing which eventually roars with passion and intensity as riffs break out with raw energy. Imposing rhythms match this emerging sturdy incitement whilst vocally there is also a powerful evocative flame to the delivery which captivates ears. With a Seether meets Breaking Benjamin like feel to its creative potency and easily pleasing sound, the track makes a gripping beginning to the release, especially with the sonic flame of enterprise from guitarist Fabrice Tedaldi which erupts across the encounter.

Without You keeps the album flying high with its almost rabid gait and energy, choppy riffs and magnetic grooves winding masterfully around ears as the beats of Olivier Stefanelli provide an equally compelling frame. With a virulently Album Covercontagious chorus and similarly rampant urgency to its whole body, the song romps with a Sick Puppies bred swagger and suasion, one loaded with passion and occasional outpourings of caustic growls and sonic fury. It is an outstanding slice of melodic metal increasing the appetite ready for the following Letter to a Grave and Insomnia. The first of the pair is an emotionally charged stroll with an enjoyably enticing throaty call from the bass of Thomas Jaegle through a cascade of vocal harmonies and fiery riffs. Gueziec provides an emotive croon to the skilled web of invention in the song which from a slow start increasingly impresses. Its successor flexes its sinews for an agitated and tenacious exploit which like its predecessor does not quite match the opening two tracks but provides another satisfying turn to the album. It is hard to avoid comparisons to Alter Bridge, Three Days Grace and the like, but such the craft and prowess of songs and band from vocals to sound, it does not defuse the enjoyment offered by the different songs.

Both the resourcefully catchy Over & Over and the heavily emotive Already Gone leave ears and thoughts richly contented if not surprised before the excellent title track weaves its intriguing enterprise. From a haunting atmospheric opening, a sultry melody flirts with the imagination. It is aided by the equally suggestive mystique of the bass, both laying a warm canvas for the excellent vocal skill and strength of Gueziec to further colour. It is a transfixing offering, the most inventive and unpredictable song on the album with its inventive rhythms and sonic exploration, and the pinnacle of Dear Morpheus.

The aggressive Hard to Breathe ignites the senses next, pounding beats the forerunner to carnivorous riffs and cantankerous grooves which are tempered by infectious vocals and the anthemic ingenuity of the raucous exploit. It is a quick match to the heights of the previous song and those setting things off, but also another weighty twist in the character of the songwriting and presence of the release.

The next up Judgement Day is no slouch in inflaming ears and emotions either, though it lacks the spark and lingering potency of those before it, even with its imagination entwining grooves and suggestive melodies. The same applies to the enthralling power balladry of You Should Have Left Me, a perfectly crafted and melodically coloured proposition but one which despite all its impressive elements is an exciting proposal in its company but soon forgotten away from its charms. Nevertheless both only add to the potential of the band before the closing slow croon of Eternal Regrets provides a gentle and mesmeric conclusion to the album with its emotive strings and acoustic hues.

Dear Morpheus might not be ground-breaking in originality but with its inventively sculpted songs and the open skill and imagination of the band, it is a very enjoyable reason to check out Evenline and their journey to finding that distinctive presence.

Dear Morpheus is available now via Dooweet Records @ http://store.dooweet.org/en/home/133_evenline-dear-morpheus.html

http://www.evenline-music.com/

RingMaster 18/09/2014

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