Vault 51 – Kid

It is never a bad thing to make a thumping good first impression and that is exactly what US quintet Vault 51 has done with their debut EP, Kid. Not that the band is exactly a new force to attention having been around a while now with a buzz soon brewing up around them and apparently they have been signed to Roadrunner Records at some point too. Kid though is their first meaty proposition for real focus following a clutch of magnetic singles, and a forcible reason to pay close attention to their rousing sound.

Roaring out of Atlanta, Vault 51 breed a sound which lies somewhere between alternative rock and melodic/post hardcore; a proposition embracing familiar essences with fresh invention to create an individual character which blossoms across the six tracks of Kid. Already earning comparisons to the likes of Red Jumpsuit Apparatus and Story Of The Year, the band gets straight down to persuasive business with the Drew Fulk (I Prevail, Motionless In White) produced and Lee Rouse mixed EP. Thirty Six gets things underway, it’s ticking suggestiveness soon submerged in a torrent of riffs and fiery sonic flames. That passing of time is still there working away as the song ebbs and flows, the bass of Alex Garmon a gnarly temptation and the jabbing beats of Joshua Landry a biting trespass as melodies and harmonies catch alight and soar. Frontman Landon Jones leads the way with his potent tones backed by the similarly alluring voice of guitarist Tom Jepson, whose strings simultaneously collude with those of Patrick Snyder in a web of enterprise which has ears gripped and an early appetite stoked in swift time.

It is a powerful start to the release, that mix of varied flavours and textures a tempestuous yet composed blaze which as suggested earlier merges recognisable essences with bolder exploits belonging to Vault 51; a success found again within the following We Don’t Care. The track quickly shows itself a predatory individual, riffs carrying a sinister and aggressive edge tempered by again impressing vocals. With rhythms bringing their own cantankerous almost inhospitable intent, the track still plunders the senses; a Spineshank meets Breaking Benjamin spicing grabbing keen attention as things flow through mellow and harsh scenery with craft and emotional intensity.

The first two striking tracks set the marker for the EP which arguably the subsequent songs miss matching yet as latest single Magnolia with its melodic graces and atmospheric caresses soon reveals, the adventurous ear pleasing nature and power of the release refuses to die down. A volatile encounter as calm and seductive as it is fiery and imposing, the third song breeds a virulent infectiousness as forceful as that cast by its predecessors and in next up Wildfire. A poppier incitement from the off but soon lighting a pyre of emotion and intensity, the song has something of Australians Voyager and Sick Puppies to it, a mix of the two in many ways at least which has the imagination soon caught up in its creative drama.

The magnetic reflective calm of Mourning View makes an engaging contrast soon after; the song a melodic serenade on the senses with a brooding rhythmic lining as keys cast their suggestive poetry.  It too has tempestuousness to its heart which flirts with rather than breaks in ears, adding an anxiousness which firmly appeals before Sincerely Me brings things to a ferocious conclusion with a blistering tempest abound with melodic beauty and emotional drama. Maybe taking longer to initially convince than other tracks within Kid, it blossoms into one of the highlight of the release with its cyclonic breath and rousing ingenuity.

Kid makes an increasingly compelling and impressive statement through every listen, sparking the lift off of Vault 51 into the grasp of real attention but more importantly a certain new wave of hungry fans.

The Kid EP is out now on Spotify, through other stores and @ https://www.vault51.net/merch/kid

https://www.vault51.net/    https://www.facebook.com/Vault51official/    https://twitter.com/vault51official

 Pete RingMaster 25/07/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Zedi Forder – Self Titled

Some bands and artists just click with ears and imagination from their introduction and for us one was definitely UK trio Zedi Forder. Maybe it is more accurate to say the creative force behind the band crafted the connection because previous adventures for the duo of vocalist/drummer/primary songwriter Chris Kerley and guitarist Mark Carstairs have equalled seriously enticed and stoked the passions. They are also the creators of Tricore, An Entire Legion, and Rind Skank; all distinctly individual bands releasing some of the most exciting and imaginative adventures in recent years though each being sadly missed or ignored by a tide of major attention. Zedi Forder is their latest project, with bassist Richard Tomsett alongside, creating a bold and multi-flavoured mix of alternative metal and voracious rock ‘n’ roll which fuels a self-titled debut album that quite simply deserves greed driven recognition.

In some ways because of previous seductions of our passions, Zedi Forder get a head start in a want, or should that be need, to hear its exploits and an assumption of having some level of appetite for what may be on offer. Equally though, it makes expectations much more demanding and triggers the question of can the band create something unique and fresh enough to be truly new from past endeavours as much as those around them. Many bands or musicians struggle in one guise but across a few it is a rare success. The release of an also self-titled EP in 2015 suggested the Woking hailing outfit could and would, their first album now a striking confirmation going well beyond simply bearing out that proposal though understandably it also gives delicious slithers teasing at earlier explorations which adds to rather than defuses the originality.

The Zedi Forder bio says it is a band with a split personality. “One side is driven by the musical aim of being bold and ever hopeful. The other side is fearless and judgmental, with music that reflects this.” The album certainly reflects this suggestion, its songs, sometimes within themselves, twisting from creatively free-swinging and swashbuckling to imaginatively mischievous on to proposals forceful and emotionally edgy and cutting but all crafted with an instinct for rousing sounds, manipulative rhythms, and daring diversity.

The album opens up with Killakarta and instantly consumes ears with rapacious riffs and jabbing beats as a bass growl courts a thick wiry groove. Kerley’s distinctive and ever magnetic vocals are soon in the heart of the mix, steering the song’s muscular stroll with expression and flair. That initial groove, carrying a growl far more vocal in the bass of Tomsett, winds around the imagination; it trespass enjoyably toxic and addictively refreshing. A slip into a mellow climate is just as tempting, accentuating the song’s unpredictability before being overwhelmed by a more primal expulsion of sound and intensity, reclaiming its moment as a great jazzy lilt infests the bass.

Seductive and predatory in equal measure, the track is a glorious start to an emprise of imagination and craft backed by the arguably less mercurial Machines though it is no slouch in raising its temperature and dynamics across a persistently eventful body. Kerley’s beats bite as Carstairs’ melodies spin a web of suggestion; his trap of enterprise further ignited by possibly the most virulent and catchy hook lined groove you will hear this year.

Dark Mook is a kaleidoscope of sound and texture, its opening noisy glaze slipping into a funky pop tinged stroll of melody and harmony before grungier flames escape guitars and bass as Kerley consistently croons with his never wavering melodic dexterity before I’m the one offers its own individual tempting for an already aroused and on the brink of lustful appetite. The fourth track also opens with a bracing surge of raw sound but is soon entangling the listener in a flirtatiously earthy bassline with funk in its genes and as quickly catchy vocals and beats with a sense of devilry in their gait. Carstairs’ weave of melodic teasing is a riveting net to get caught up in, ensnaring the senses before things get dirty and feisty though Kerley is still keeping the instinctive catchiness flowing in touch as the track to re-establishes its unbridled virulence. The song is another early pinnacle; an irresistible treat with a great 12 Stone Toddler meets KingBathmat scent to its revelry.

Darker shadows wrap the melodic beauty and volatile turbulence of next up My Moon, the song drawing on electronic tenacity to colour its variable and perpetually alluring atmosphere above a rugged terrain of invention. Across its roar, thoughts pluck at comparisons to the likes of Sick Puppies, Voyager, and Soundgarden; all slightly inaccurate but potent hints to the great track.

The grin loaded Nachoman comes next, the song a compelling tongue in cheek but earnest tease of social commentary. It has voice and hips hooked within its opening Red Hot Chili Peppers smoked swerve and only proceeds to tighten its vice like grip through heavier spices and inventive condiments of sound while Open Wide grabs attention with a bullish tirade of sound before flirtatiously dancing in ears with its Jane’s Addiction like funk metal meets System Of A Down seeded versatility. Melodies and emotions fluctuate in character and intensity across the song, as too vocals and rhythms with the latter an evolving torrent of enticement and aggression.

They love it more is a cyclone of sound and energy within an oasis of reflection and melody, never truly settling but always in control of its volcanic fusion of rock and metal while successor Smooch is a predator of hips and imagination with its boisterous shuffle courted by barbarous rhythms and emerging sonic hostility again spurned on by the spiky beats of Kerley and the irritable tone of Tomsett’s bass. With an infection loaded and at times psychotic groove sharing lures with an inherent catchiness, the track as its predecessor hits the spot dead centre, burrowing deeper with every listen, as quite simply does the album.

The growling Time after time leaves no stone of temptation unturned, its grunge/metal snarl maybe the most creatively untwisted track on the release but as bold and naturally infectious as any others such as the following On the run, a slab of classic metal and heavy rock with a nod to the likes of Zeppelin and Sabbath in its heart infused with the progressive and melody conjuring imagination of Zedi Forder.

Though not the actual final song, Lonely One closes things off with its melodically haunting, sonically searing, and rhythmically imposing blaze which alone shares all you need to know to hear why its creators warrant unbridled attention.

With a bonus quartet of mesmeric acoustic tracks which alone prove why we rate Kerley as a vocalist so much, each also unveiling a new drama and shade to the original’s aspects, the album is manna for body and soul and a real bargain as it seems it is being released as a name your own price download. Covering their first EP we said “it would be rude not to go off and discover its majesty “, for the album substitute ‘rude’ for ‘stupid’ because you will surely not hear anything more gripping and exciting than what Zedi Forder have in lying wait.

The Zedi Forder album is released June 10th wit pre-ordering available now @ https://tricore.bandcamp.com/album/zedi-forder-the-album-out-10th-june-pre-order-to-get-4-tracks-entire-flame-wiz-album-now

http://www.zediforder.com/     https://www.facebook.com/zediforder/   https://twitter.com/ZediForder

Pete RingMaster 02/06/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Backtrack Lane – In Fine

Four years after the release of their well-received debut album Black Truth & White Lies, French rockers   Backtrack Lane return with new EP, In Fine. Offering six creatively robust and impassioned tracks, the EP revels in a new energy and flair of enterprise in the Paris quartet’s sound; it a mix of the familiar and the captivatingly fresh sparking rich enjoyment with ease.

Formed in 2009, Backtrack Lane has played hundreds of gigs across their homeland, moving from small local stages to some of the most prestigious venues whilst playing alongside the likes of Black Star Riders, Gotthard, and numerous more. 2011 saw the release of first EP, It’s Not Like…, the national attention stoking Black Truth & White Lies album appearing two years later. The multi-flavoured alternative rock of In Fine is Backtrack Lane poking even bigger and broader spotlights while being for many a potent introduction to a band which knows how to rock ‘n’ roll.

With its lack of real uniqueness more than countered by the passion and energy at its enterprising heart, In Fine is a magnet in the speakers swiftly grabbing ears with opener Fifteen Minutes. Straight away the steely riffs of Adrien Crestey and Stefan Gatti spark the appetite, the heavier dark throb of vocalist Raphael Gatti’s bass zoning in on the instincts for predatory sound. Their collusion is instantly joined by the latter’s vocal prowess; his energy in delivery matched in the sounds blossoming up around him. With keys melodically shimmering behind the forceful yet invitational web created by the foursome, Gui O’Crest’s rapier like beats are like a punctuation to each strand of temptation. The song continually expands and grows note by note, blues filtered grooves only adding to the creative prowess working on body and imagination while familiar hues, with a suggestion of Sick Puppies/3 Days Grace to them, simply accentuate the lure and adventure of the encounter.

Underground is no less of a temptation with a vine like groove instantly wrapping around ears as desert rock seeded melodic enticement brews around another great vocal beckon from Raphael Gatti. A definite Josh Homme air creeps across the songwriting and character of the track, its slightly tempestuous climate and energy as irresistible as its sonic dexterity and spicy melodies with Crestey’s lead enticement teasing with a Billy Idol hue. As its predecessor, the song might be missing majorly unique surprises as feet and spirit are keenly manipulated yet expectations are left empty by its adventure and fresh breath, qualities just as rampant within next up Perfect Motion. Though there is more restraint in its first touch than those before, its zeal to stomp is soon in charge and throwing rapacious grooves and boisterous rhythms at ears as vocals add their own catchy exploits. Once more Queens Of The Stone Age is an inescapable clue to the bold and potent sound inciting something which simply is a thick pleasure.

Breaking the Rules has a broader hard/alternative rock landscape to its sound, Stefan Gatti and Adrien Crestey blending their hook littered designs with infectious prowess as rhythms stroll and vocals roar. Ultimately the song misses matching the lofty peaks of those before it but thorough enjoyment and involvement is a given as with the blues lined inevitably catchy prowl of the following Stray. An energetic slice of pop rock with a broad smile in its air and nature plus a snarling bassline to get greedy over, the song saunters without distractions into eager ears and spirit with its lively romp.

The EP is closed off by After the Rain, another song with a sizzling blues rock nurtured spicing and instinctive contagiousness in its creative veins. Once more things are familiar yet full of an adventure with a seduction and craft hard to not be taken by. In Fine delivers rock ‘n’ roll which feeds all the wants; fun, energy, and passion all served with something extra driven by imagination.

In Fine is available now.

http://www.backtracklane.com/    https://www.facebook.com/Backtrack-Lane-143002764878/    https://twitter.com/backtracklane

Pete RingMaster 30/05/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Elasea – Lesson Learnt

Having impressed in sound and potential with their debut EP two years back, British alternative rockers Elasea have just unveiled its successor Lesson Learnt. With a new addition to the Reading hailing band’s ranks, the EP quickly shows a new maturity and creative elegance in their songwriting and music. It is a magnetic affair for ears with plenty of reasons to suggest that Elasea are going places within the UK rock scene.

Emerging in 2013, Elasea potently poked attention with the Where I Belong EP, the release swiftly drawing praise the way of the quartet. Their growing reputation was also supported by a live presence seeing the band share stages with the likes of Funeral For A Friend, AllUsOnDrugs, Veridian, and Echoic. That time between releases has seen Elasea’s four strong line-up extended to five with the incoming Braydie Haskell adding prowess on keys. It is a notable essence certainly going some way to sparking the new rounded and inventive growth in the band’s sound but across all members, individual craft and imagination has openly blossomed.

Lesson Learnt opens up with Breathe, a sombre yet bright melody caressed by wistful keys initially coaxing ears, leading them into the waiting tide of rapacious riffs and rhythms. Their controlled but obvious urgency is accompanied by an emotive intensity which is even bolder in the strong vocal presence and expression of rhythm guitarist Andy Bradford. With bassist Liv Jones adding plenty of captivating vocal presence too, along with the muscular strains of sound, there is a Sick Puppies like essence to the song which only accentuates its appeal and imaginative character. On top, the keys are a well of emotive suggestion, a poetic glaze to the rawer texture of guitar and the meaty rhythms shaping the excellent track.

The following Time Stops is a similar fusion of metallic strength and melodic beauty; keys and the melody courting guitar of Calum Radmore weaving melancholic grace and sentiment as the lively beats of Ashley Haskell probe and incite the senses. With Jones’ bass grumble emotionally vocal, the track is a croon of shadow and open hearted yearning led by the vocal potency of Bradford again magnetically supported by Jones.

The more skittish air and intensive weight of On My Own shows another aspect to EP and the Elasea sound, the song more akin to the likes of You Me At Six and Bring Me The Horizon though still that early hint of the aforementioned Australian rockers prevails at times. They are flavours though adding to the growing uniqueness in Elasea’s music rather than shaping it, and enjoyable hues in the irritable character and tempestuous adventure of the third richly enjoyable song.

These Secrets is an instrumental interlude evocatively drifting over the imagination, its atmospheric presence maybe more pleasurable padding then essential to Walls, the final song adding infectious bounce and plaintive heart to the already impressing release. The electronic shimmer of synths cradles another great vocal union between rhythms guitarist and bassist, their harmonic contrasts and unity accentuated by the fiery ear charming nature of the sounds around them.

Elasea have made a big step in moving away from the crowd with Lesson learnt, the growth in their sound highly appetising. There is still room for true uniqueness to evolve and that is as exciting a prospect as the EP is for ears right now.

Lesson Learnt is out now through all platforms and @ https://elasea.bandcamp.com/album/lesson-learnt-ep or http://www.elasea.bigcartel.com/

https://www.facebook.com/elaseauk   https://twitter.com/elaseauk

Pete RingMaster 22/03/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

The Simpletone – Angels’ Share

the-simpletone-band-pic_RingMasterReview

There are some releases which just demand success. Whether they get it in the increasingly fickle attention of the modern music fan is never a given but Angels’ Share, the new album from British rockers The Simpletone, does all the right things to make that commanding statement.

There is little we can share about the 2010 formed band other than its line-up is made up of John Davison, Craig Seymour, Glenn Eastoe, and Tom Cahill, it hails from St Neots in Cambridgshire, and has previously released the albums, Rampenny in 2012 and Dark Matter two years later, both seemingly well-received propositions. A UK tour with New Model Army in 2014 has been one of many live highlights for the band built on their stirring fusion of heavy and melodic rock with grunge, stoner and numerous other essences. It is a mix of flavours making for a striking proposition and imaginative proposal in Angels’ Share and songs which just roar with anthemic majesty and fiery enterprise.

The first of the ten cuts gripping ears and an early appetite for the band’s invigorating rock ‘n’ roll is Outta Control. Instantly a spicy groove winds around ears, leaning in closer as tenacious rhythms and riffs join its opening bait. Effect coated vocals equally lures keen ears as the song swaggers along with steady but rapacious grooves and a suggestive melody. The restraint stopping the track from exploding as it hints it might throughout is an inspired move, the song teasing and almost taunting along its enterprise shaped body. The heavier throb of bass and flames of harmonies only add to the lure of the song with guitar craft similarly as magnetic.

The following Love Street (Modern Mystery) keeps the rich enticement going with its punk folk lined stroll, simple but potent riffs colluding with swinging beats as vocals paint a suggestive picture. Its catchiness is a swift persuasion rapidly backed by the boisterous antics of the guitars as the track carries on the great variety already showing in the band’s sound, diversity more than confirmed by their mighty new single Storm Chaser. At over eleven minutes it is an epic persuasion which serenades the senses with melodic and harmonic caresses initially before building a bolder energy amidst an addictive rhythmic prowess. Weaving strands of space and progressive rock among other textures into its ever evolving adventure, the song is a kaleidoscope of melody heavy rock drawing on an array of decades while creating its own fresh, individual, and ever changing landscape of imagination. Like a mix of Skyscraper (the nineties UK band), Life of Agony, and Voyager, the track barely feels like its length and relentlessly has the listener compelled.

angels-share-cover_RingMasterReviewThe fact that next up Black Box still manages to eclipse it slightly shows the quality of its own exceptional design. A spirit stoking beast from its first touch, the song canters with muscular tenacity and fiery invention bred to virulent proportions as its mix of hard and heavy rock consumes ears and imagination. The track is exceptional, as punk in many ways as it is feisty rock ‘n’ roll with a drama of character and craft that demands attention and involvement.

Fire in the Sky steps up next with a growl in its basslines and a contagious swing in its rhythms, guitars and vocals dancing within their addictive tempting as soulful blues lined grooves bring an incendiary heat to the proposal. Like a seventies inspired union of Therapy? and Reuben, to try and offer a comparison, the song forcibly hits the spot before making way for the slower stoner-esque prowl of Nehemiah, an incitement pulling sludgy textures into its increasingly exotic and suggestive theatre. It is seriously compelling stuff, another song blossoming through an array of twists and flavours as it grows in ears.

The melodic charm of Day by Day is a similarly riveting proposition, the graceful yet sinewy instrumental finding a place between XTC and Tool as it seduces the imagination, setting it up for electrified air and nature of As Above so Below. Courting ears with a rapaciously formidable core in its raw riffs and bold rhythmic, the track wraps it in a melodic spiciness and mellower harmonic seducing which echoes elements of bands like Bush, Alice In Chains, and Sick Puppies yet sounds little like any.

If we tell you that Easy Come lacks the same galvanic sparks of its predecessors do not mistake it for a weak link within Angels’ Share; the song a highly persuasive slice of rock ‘n’ roll with guitar craft which shines like a beacon as the bass uncages a funk inspired personality. The fact the track is outshone by others is down to their might, a strength revelled in again by album closer Hunters. Whether by coincidence or design, there is a Horslips feel to the song certainly early on, and of fellow Brits KingBathmat but as across the album, things are soon woven into an addiction of sound and creative hooks roaring The Simpletone.

It is a glorious end to one treat of a release which deserves all the praise and attention it should and surely will get. Angels’ Share is another rousing encounter to add to our lustful favourites of 2016 list and no keener a recommendation we can offer.

Angels’ Share is out now across most online stores and on iTunes @ https://itunes.apple.com/album/id1169473074?ls=1&app=itunes

http://www.thesimpletone.com/    https://www.facebook.com/thesimpletoneband/

Pete RingMaster 16/11/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Uncaging the roar: in interview with Fivefold

fivefold_RingMasterReview

Formed in 2007, St Louis, Missouri hailing Fivefold has earned a strong reputation for their melody thick and emotionally rousing rock ‘n’ roll. Taking in a quartet of albums and a host of shared stages with the likes of The Offspring, Buckcherry, Redlight King, 10 Years, Switchfoot, Sick Puppies, Greek Fire, The Urge, Shamans Harvest, Broadway, Red Jumpsuit Apparatus, Memphis May Fire, Jamies Elsewhere, HURT, Cavo, among many others, the quintet is one of the fresh breaths on the current music scene. We talk to the band to get a feel of their passion and invention…

Can you introduce the band and tell us to how it all started; what brought you all together?

Ryan Cheney – vocals

Matt Amelung – guitar, vocals

Matt Benne – guitar, vocals

Coco – bass

Derrick Huskey – drums

Derrick (drums) and Matt Benne (guitar) met through our late guitar player Jesse. Derrick met Ryan (vocals) at a church camp they were both attending. After a few line-up changes, Derrick, Matt Benne and Ryan met Coco (bass) from playing shows with his Hold On.

Have you been/are involved in other bands before? If so has that had any impact on what you are doing now?

Most of us have played in local St. Louis bands before Fivefold. I think we’ve each taken elements from previous projects and applied them to what we do in Fivefold.

What inspired the band name?

At first we did what every other band does…we looked through dictionaries. Haha! But really, we decided on Fivefold because it essentially means five different units/things that come together to accomplish one goal.

Was there any specific idea behind the forming of the band and also in what you wanted it and your sound to offer?

We just wanted to be “good”…and to promote positivity.

fivefold4_RingMasterReviewHow would you say your sound has evolved over time?

We’ve tried to push ourselves to continually refine our sound. In our case, I think that has meant approaching our music with more pop sensibility.

Has it been more of an organic movement of sound you deliberately setting out to try new things?

A blend of both.

Presumably across the band there is a wide range of inspirations; are there any in particular which have impacted on the band’s music and your personal approach to creating and playing music?

I don’t think anything one element impacts itself into our music. Rather, all of our inspirations impact our music.

Is there a process to the songwriting which generally guides the writing of songs?

Most of the time we just start jamming on a riff and take it from there.

Where do you, find inspirations to the lyrical side of your songs?

Honestly, our lyrics have no bounds. They are about anything and everything, whether it’s something one of us has been through personally or something greater than all of us.

Can you give us some background to your latest release?

Our latest release is Open Letter. We released it in December of last year and it’s the first batch of songs written with Matt Amelung on guitar.

What about its themes and premise.

Open Letter is our response/interpretation of the world around us.

Do you go into the studio with songs pretty much in their final state or have looser ideas to develop as you record?

We’ve done both over the course of our 4 albums. Both have their strengths and weaknesses.

Tell us about the live side to the band, presumably the favourite aspect of the band?

I think it’s definitely our favorite aspect. We like to make every show bigger and better than the last.

It is not easy for any new band to make an impact regionally let alone nationally and further afield. How have you found it your neck of the woods?Fivefold2

To be honest, we don’t know the answer. We just continue to work extremely hard and push ourselves and our band.

How has the internet and social media impacted on the band to date?

The internet has enabled us to delve deeper into the life of Bruce Willis.

Find out more about Fivefold @ https://www.facebook.com/FivefoldOfficial and http://www.fivefoldband.com/

https://twitter.com/fivefoldrock

Pete RingMaster

The RingMaster Review 19/08/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Dead Man’s Hand – Till Karma Forgets

DMH_RingMasterReview

Not to be confused with seemingly many other bands with the same moniker, Dead Man’s Hand is a band bred in the Seattle music scene but it is fair to say really hit their stride once its founders relocated to Kansas City. Now they are poised to release their new album Till Karma Forgets, a twelve song strong slice of raw rock ‘n’ roll which maybe does not leave ears awestruck but certainly provides them with a thoroughly enjoyable time.

Formed in 2012 by vocalist/guitarist Kasey McGrew when he teamed up with guitarist Bret Palmer, Dead Man’s Hand struggled with finding the right line-up initially; that was until the pair moved to Kansas City the following year where they found bassist Jeffery Kent and drummer James Aguiar. Soon the band found itself sharing stages with the likes of HURT, PopEvil, and The Dreaming at venues such as The Voodoo Lounge and Granada. 2014 saw Dead Man’s Hand touring with Burning and win Best New Artist in the Midwest Music Awards. Last year saw a second tour for the quartet, plenty of radio play, and more nominations at the 2015 Midwest Music Awards. Now following up an earlier demo EP with the same name, the band is poking at broader awareness for their accomplished and fiery rock ‘n’ roll with The Pavement Entertainment released Til Karma Forgets.

The album opens with the groove bound Hangman, a track making a controlled entrance before sauntering into the imagination with mellow lures entangled in more incendiary strikes of guitar. The vocals of McGrew, potently backed by Palmer’s strong tones, emulate the sound around them, crooning at certain moments and roaring with thick emotion in the songs eruptions of intensity. Easily revealing the unmistakable craft and skills of the band whilst pleasing ears, it is a great start to Til Karma Forgets backed as powerfully by the excellent Lock & Key. Grungier hues crowd the hard and melodic rock body of the song, all magnetic spicing adding to a great stock in grooves and rhythmic enticement around another catchy chorus. Whilst eclipsing its predecessor, a touch of southern goodness also comes out with the song overall reminding a touch of fellow US rockers Resin.

DMHart_RingMasterReviewPaint A Picture is a calmer emotive proposition next, vocals and melodies wrapping ears as feistier flames occasionally rise up around them whilst So What offers a grittier tempting of blues and hard rock which prowls ears with expressive guitar and vocals taking the lead. Its snarl only increases in its rousing chorus where the irritability, which seems to fuel bass and riffs throughout, adds more oil to the blaze.

Through the spicy grooving of Veto and the attractive intimidation of Wash Away, band and album keeps pleasure and appetite as keen as ever. The first of the pair is an especially unpredictable and magnetic affair as at ease aggressively growling at the senses as it is seducing them. Its successor evolves from a seriously coaxing lure from Aguiar into a predator with hungry riffs, and the still boldly rolling bait of beats, courting a less imposing vocal delivery. It is a great mix with the dark shadows and the song’s natural predation alone whipping up the passion as it steals best song honours on Til Karma Forgets.

Its title track comes next and it too marks a particularly memorable peak in the landscape of the album, carrying a slight Life Of Agony feel to particularly its more emotive and restrained moments. Despite its grouchiness and aggressive elements, there still feels like there is beast still trying to escape, and if there is any moan about the album it is that it does not fulfil the great and open potential to unleash this instinctive ferocity. Nevertheless, the track rocks like a disturbed bear before a milder but no less resourceful stroll with Slide Of Hand leaves ears thickly satisfied; guitars especially spicy and flavoursome within the encounter.

Another inviting strain of blues rock colours the swiftly infectious Beneath The Dirt next, where whiffs of Nirvana and Sick Puppies tempt thoughts. The track is yet another addictive episode in the album; a track, which like Til Karma Forgets as a whole, might not be venturing into unique pastures or setting the world on fire but without doubt leaves the listener gripped and hungry for more of its unbridled rock ‘n’ roll.

Through the scorching blaze of Masquerade and the emotively melodic Broken Ground, things continue to richly entice and firmly please; the first of the two another notable proposition, with Not For Nothing closing up the album in fine style too with its captivating, impassioned, and tempestuous balladry.

Though the album is missing that last spark or bite of intensity to really ignite the passions, it is not too hard to expect Dead Man’s Hand finding a host of new fans and plaudits with Till Karma Forgets, a release which offers honest rock ‘n’ roll with heart and quality.

Till Karma Forgets is released April 29th via Pavement Entertainment through most online stores.

https://www.facebook.com/DMHMUSIC

Pete RingMaster 29/04/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com