Dead Man’s Hand – Till Karma Forgets

DMH_RingMasterReview

Not to be confused with seemingly many other bands with the same moniker, Dead Man’s Hand is a band bred in the Seattle music scene but it is fair to say really hit their stride once its founders relocated to Kansas City. Now they are poised to release their new album Till Karma Forgets, a twelve song strong slice of raw rock ‘n’ roll which maybe does not leave ears awestruck but certainly provides them with a thoroughly enjoyable time.

Formed in 2012 by vocalist/guitarist Kasey McGrew when he teamed up with guitarist Bret Palmer, Dead Man’s Hand struggled with finding the right line-up initially; that was until the pair moved to Kansas City the following year where they found bassist Jeffery Kent and drummer James Aguiar. Soon the band found itself sharing stages with the likes of HURT, PopEvil, and The Dreaming at venues such as The Voodoo Lounge and Granada. 2014 saw Dead Man’s Hand touring with Burning and win Best New Artist in the Midwest Music Awards. Last year saw a second tour for the quartet, plenty of radio play, and more nominations at the 2015 Midwest Music Awards. Now following up an earlier demo EP with the same name, the band is poking at broader awareness for their accomplished and fiery rock ‘n’ roll with The Pavement Entertainment released Til Karma Forgets.

The album opens with the groove bound Hangman, a track making a controlled entrance before sauntering into the imagination with mellow lures entangled in more incendiary strikes of guitar. The vocals of McGrew, potently backed by Palmer’s strong tones, emulate the sound around them, crooning at certain moments and roaring with thick emotion in the songs eruptions of intensity. Easily revealing the unmistakable craft and skills of the band whilst pleasing ears, it is a great start to Til Karma Forgets backed as powerfully by the excellent Lock & Key. Grungier hues crowd the hard and melodic rock body of the song, all magnetic spicing adding to a great stock in grooves and rhythmic enticement around another catchy chorus. Whilst eclipsing its predecessor, a touch of southern goodness also comes out with the song overall reminding a touch of fellow US rockers Resin.

DMHart_RingMasterReviewPaint A Picture is a calmer emotive proposition next, vocals and melodies wrapping ears as feistier flames occasionally rise up around them whilst So What offers a grittier tempting of blues and hard rock which prowls ears with expressive guitar and vocals taking the lead. Its snarl only increases in its rousing chorus where the irritability, which seems to fuel bass and riffs throughout, adds more oil to the blaze.

Through the spicy grooving of Veto and the attractive intimidation of Wash Away, band and album keeps pleasure and appetite as keen as ever. The first of the pair is an especially unpredictable and magnetic affair as at ease aggressively growling at the senses as it is seducing them. Its successor evolves from a seriously coaxing lure from Aguiar into a predator with hungry riffs, and the still boldly rolling bait of beats, courting a less imposing vocal delivery. It is a great mix with the dark shadows and the song’s natural predation alone whipping up the passion as it steals best song honours on Til Karma Forgets.

Its title track comes next and it too marks a particularly memorable peak in the landscape of the album, carrying a slight Life Of Agony feel to particularly its more emotive and restrained moments. Despite its grouchiness and aggressive elements, there still feels like there is beast still trying to escape, and if there is any moan about the album it is that it does not fulfil the great and open potential to unleash this instinctive ferocity. Nevertheless, the track rocks like a disturbed bear before a milder but no less resourceful stroll with Slide Of Hand leaves ears thickly satisfied; guitars especially spicy and flavoursome within the encounter.

Another inviting strain of blues rock colours the swiftly infectious Beneath The Dirt next, where whiffs of Nirvana and Sick Puppies tempt thoughts. The track is yet another addictive episode in the album; a track, which like Til Karma Forgets as a whole, might not be venturing into unique pastures or setting the world on fire but without doubt leaves the listener gripped and hungry for more of its unbridled rock ‘n’ roll.

Through the scorching blaze of Masquerade and the emotively melodic Broken Ground, things continue to richly entice and firmly please; the first of the two another notable proposition, with Not For Nothing closing up the album in fine style too with its captivating, impassioned, and tempestuous balladry.

Though the album is missing that last spark or bite of intensity to really ignite the passions, it is not too hard to expect Dead Man’s Hand finding a host of new fans and plaudits with Till Karma Forgets, a release which offers honest rock ‘n’ roll with heart and quality.

Till Karma Forgets is released April 29th via Pavement Entertainment through most online stores.

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Pete RingMaster 29/04/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Cilver – Not The End Of The World

Cliver_RingMasterReview

Some bands and their sound just seem to naturally spark attention and so it is with US based hard rockers Cilver. Over the past three years, the quartet has drawn a wave of increasing interest and support with their sound, success backed by an equally ascending live presence. Now the band is looking at waking up a broader expanse or ears and spotlights with debut album Not The End Of The World. As their sound in general, it is a rousing roar of familiar and distinctly fresh essences and textures creating a commandingly contagious spirit sparking proposition very easy to find a greedy appetite for.

Formed by Romanian born vocalist Uliana Preotu and guitarist Leon Lyazidi, a pair who had already been part of MeTalkPretty, Cilver began in New York in 2013. Within months they linked up with Ron “Bumblefoot” Thal (Guns N’ Roses, Art Of Anarchy) and released debut single In My Head. It and a subsequent EP of the same name the following year, quickly caught the attention of fans and media alike; inspiring eOne to sign them and now release the band’s first album. 2014 also saw Cilver land a spot on Revolver magazine’s Hottest Chicks in Hard Rock Tour alongside bands like Sick Puppies, Lacuna Coil, and Eyes Set to Kill. With a line-up completed by bassist Josh Pillbox and guitarist Ramsey Modiri, Cilver is now poised to spark their busiest and most successful year yet with Not The End Of The World, and a collection of songs seemingly as much inspired by the founding duo’s experiences of being first-generation immigrants and life in the last days of communist rule in Romania as well as the hard journey to the point they are at now.

The album opens with Break Free and quickly has ears and intrigue involved as an opening vine of guitar is swiftly joined by crispy beats and the effect laced vocals of Preotu. A few more eager seconds sees the song in clear view and enticing limbs and imagination with its wall of imposing riffs and thumping rhythms. That initial hook still beckons within the now tempestuous climate and roar of the song with Preotu only impressing more and more with every syllable shared. Major surprises maybe less noticeable within the song but it has the body and spirit bouncing with infectious ease whilst blowing hard with a fresh breath of energy and sound.

Cilver_NTEOTW_Cover_RingMasterReviewThe great start continues with I’m America, the first single from and teaser for the album released at the tail of last year. From the off, the song has a gentle but devilish swagger accentuated by Preotu’s voice, a swing which really catches alight within a handful of seconds as grooves entwine the catchy rhythmic enticement badgering ears. Again there is something thickly recognisable about the track yet an element which seems to only add to the bluesy groove fest of anthemic dexterity and creative tenacity. The song simply beguiles ears and appetite, using the listener’s body like a puppeteer though it is soon outshine by the excellent Headstone, a song with toxic grooves which just seduce the imagination. There is a touch of Sick Puppies to the song but of the three so far, it is the most unique and in turn striking proposal so far with Preotu’s vocals glorious and again almost stealing all the limelight from the superb sonic and rhythmic craft on offer.

Razorblade romps in with creative and physical energy to the fore, a zeal just as open in the darker prowling moments that frequent this ear gripping proposition. With its predacious rock ‘n’ roll lit by a host of fiery hooks and a wonderfully unpredictable invention, the track marks another pinnacle in the lofty creative landscape of the album;  a success emulated by the less invasive and irritable but just as dramatic and compelling Afterlife. Arguably the most lyrically evocative proposal yet on the release with Lyazidi’s keys bringing a haunting and vivacious beauty to the emerging sonic blaze, the song captivates as it reveals more of the diversity in the band’s songwriting and hard rock bred sound.

Rich melancholic strings and poetic keys open up the following power ballad Frozen, Preotu’s presence almost siren-esque in her range of vocal expression and emotive theatre, whilst its successor, It’s My Life, is a growling incitement of defiance and attitude carrying punk irritability to its chest thumping rock ‘n’ roll. Both tracks increasingly incite with every listen, as does the album, though each time they get eclipsed by the soaring roar of Bleed For You. Vocally and atmospherically, the track is a fire of temptation, emotionally crackling as rhythms snap and sonic enterprise flame around the heart bred outpouring of Preotu.

In My Head has the air boiling next, the track as powerful and irresistible as the first time it tempted ears three years back. It’s infectiousness is virulent and confrontation bracing, whilst the imagination fuelling it is rarely surpassed within Not The End Of The World, or indeed other similarly styled releases in recent times.

The album is concluded by the galvanic adventures of firstly Behind These Eyes and finally Not Afraid. The first of the two is a more expectations satisfying encounter but heftily pleasing whilst the closer is as much punk as it is hard rock and a fierce and memorable stomp to close things up on.

Not The End Of The World is an album which leaves you alive with energy and spirit; it might not be the most unique but for a rousing, breathless, and thrilling experience, it and Cilver stand as an unreserved recommendation.

Not The End Of The World is released April 29th via eOne; physically @ http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=dp_byline_sr_music_1?ie=UTF8&field-artist=Cilver&search-alias=music and digitally @ https://cilver.lnk.to/NotTheEndOfTheWorld

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Pete RingMaster 27/04/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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H2NY – Tremor

H2NY-Press-Photo_RingMasterReview

It has been almost four years since Halfway To New York made an impressive introduction to themselves with the Treading Water EP; a highly enjoyable encounter which only grew in stature and persuasion over time. Since then, apart from the occasional listen of the release, the band has been lost to the shadows of thoughts as a swarm of other encounters have stolen attention.  The band now returns to reclaim ears with first album Tremor and having shortened the name to H2NY, the British quartet show the time between offerings has been well spent breeding new maturity and adventure in their melodic rock.

Formed as 2012 opened its eyes, H2NY have backed up the success of the acclaimed Treading Water EP over time with tours across the UK and performances at the Hard Rock Calling Festival in Hyde Park and headlining Trafalgar Square as part of the Closing Paralympic Celebrations. The band has successfully invaded the US too; supporting Fuel and then Alien Ant Farm whilst playing shows in 38 US States involving the covering of more than 24,000 miles in the process. As mentioned the past couple of years have seen the band slip from focus and personal radar somewhat but fair to say, they have reappeared with a bang with Tremor.

The album opens with the first single taken from it, Bleed. Straight away a muscular wall of riffs and rhythms encase ears, H2NY swiftly showing the power in their sound and equally the harmonic prowess of vocalist Sam Burkey. It is a magnetic entrance only blossoming further as the melodic and sonic enterprise of guitarist Scott De Jongh courts the darker rumbling tones of Daniel Mount’s bass. The great undemanding yet potent band harmonies simply bring richer colour to the captivation; mischievous hooks and a rousing tenacity similarly as persuasive as band and release get off to a masterful start.

art_RingMasterReviewOn the Run follows with its own sinewy strength and presence, and like its predecessor an infectious swagger and imagination which steers every groove and hook straight into a waiting greedy appetite. With the jabbing beats of Martin Griffith framing its resourceful blaze, the track recalls the great essences which made the first EP an easy draw on ears whilst revealing the new dynamics and bold creativity shaping album and songs like Little Piece of Everything which comes next. The band’s latest single makes a less forceful entrance but soon brews its own anthemically nurtured and energetic tempting which has feet and voice in eager participation with its rousing endeavour. Emotively hued with seamless variation in its cry and intensity, the song keeps the spirit already stirred up by the first pair, in full swing.

The melodic croon of Love Behind You firmly engages ears and thoughts with another side to the band’s sound where pulsating beats align with a melancholic caress of guitar as Burkey’s voice shines with emotive expression. There is an underlying tempestuousness led by the great prowling throb of bass to the song too, a volatility which threatens to erupt and at times almost breaks through but always finds itself reined in by the reflective heart of song and word; a design equally soaking Slide By straight after. Elegant and sombre, the track is a serenade of acoustic and melodic flames which also builds more aurally dramatic points in its contemplation.

Both songs keep ears eager and enjoyment ripe but swiftly find them eclipsed by the outstanding pair of Every Inch a King and Caught in the Middle. The first of the two begins as a brooding tempting with dark rhythms and sultry melodic suggestiveness prowling and veining song and ears respectively before uncaging a virulent contagion posing as a chorus. It is glorious stuff, vocals a gripping protagonist as strong and persuasive as the climactic air and sonic invention at work. As its breath dissipates, the track slips into the thicker shadows of its successor. Simultaneously emotionally dark and addictively catchy, the song is a thrilling emotional maze of bold vocals and fiery textures around an almost predatory rhythmic spine. The track is majestic, an ingenious blend of textures and emotive shades taking best song honours.

The following Blue Eyes has a thankless task backing up two major pinnacles of the release yet with its melancholy lined character and body of alternative/melodic rock it has ears and satisfaction on side with ease. Carrying a tinge of Sick Puppies meets Adelitas Way, the outstanding song beguiles before making way for the explosive dynamics of Over and Out which soon has body and soul keenly bouncing. As many of the songs, it has an old friend familiarity and like most uses it as an easily engaging spice to the unpredictability and anthem like vivacity of its unique character.

More Yesterdays Than Tomorrows lays a strongly alluring and feverishly tenacious hand on ears next before the album’s title track soothes, by this point, an admittedly exhausted body and imagination with its heart bred hug and melodic romancing subsequently leading to its own particular blaze of sound and emotion. Each entices and heavily pleases before leaving Counting Sheep to bring Tremor to a fine end with its intimate balladry sculpted on folkish melodies, mesmeric harmonies, and impassioned emotion.

Tremor is a superb ‘return’ from H2NY; an attention and spotlight grabbing proposal which, whilst igniting ears and pleasure, reminds that the prime thought after Treading Water, that the band had a big future ahead of them, is still the undeniable case.

Tremor is released April 15th via iTunes and other stores.

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Pete RingMaster 14/04/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Smile Empty Soul – Shapeshifter

smile empty soul shapeshifter album photo_RingMasterReview

April 1st sees the release of a new Smile Empty Soul EP; a release revealing some new encounters and also returning songs feeding the wants of fans. Released in 2003, the Californian rock band’s self-titled debut album is now unobtainable, tied up in “red tape” these past years much to the disappointment of an increasing number wanting to have their own copy. With persistent enquiries about it coming their way, the LA trio were inspired to re-record their three biggest singles from the album and combine them with a similar number of brand new tracks for the Shapeshifter EP which is accompanied by a DVD that includes a music video, a short documentary style film from the making of the EP, and a behind-the-scenes video covering years of touring, studio sessions, music video shoots, and more.

With six albums under their belt, the Smile Empty Soul sound is an established proposition and fair to say Shapeshifter offers no major surprises but the new songs have the freshness and tenacity expected by any offerings from the band whilst the re-worked other songs are simply rousing treats never too hard to enjoy however they are dressed.

All in My Head is the first track on the EP, slipping in on a reserved step with a gentle melody holding court before the recognisable tones of vocalist/guitarist Sean Danielsen and a net of restrained rhythms. It is a suggestive slow stroll which momentarily erupts into an impassioned and sonically fiery flame around the darkly lit lure of Ryan Martin’s bass. The pattern is set for the rest of the track even as its air and energy becomes more volatile as a Sick Puppies like agitation hits voice and sound.

art_RingMasterReviewA great start continues as Running out of Something takes over, it too making a less than imposing entrance but building into a feisty and dramatic proposal as the forceful beats of Jake Kimer collude with rawer sonic rapacity. What seems like electronic beats alongside the drummer’s inventive swings does irritate a touch but cannot defuse the overall roar and creative potency of a song as familiar as it is freshly inventive.

Kimer has ears and appetite on board within seconds of his opening anthemic rally as Just One Place takes attention in hand next; a potent initial coaxing which continues to incite as guitars and vocals cast their expressive energy and enterprise around another pulsating bassline. As its predecessors, the track is as contagious and compelling as it is emotively dramatic, and as the other pair, reveals great signs for things to come from the band ahead.

New tracks completed, that threesome of well-known and spirit rousing singles from the band’s acclaimed first album step forward to thickly please and satisfy, Silhouettes leading the way with Nowhere Kids and Bottom of a Bottle in close attention. As one also not having a copy of their debut, memory suggests the band has not strayed far from the originals but with richer textures and arguably keener creative energy involved, the first seems to have new tension to its character and the second rawer attitude whilst Bottom of a Bottle simply stirs body, emotions, and imagination as virulently as it always does.

Shapeshifter is a release which makes no major demands and uncages no real surprises but leaves no one short of thick enjoyment and a re-ignited eager appetite for the Smile Empty Soul adventure. With that DVD in tow too, the EP is destined to be one greedily devoured proposition.

The Shapeshifter EP is available April 1st via Pavement Entertainment.

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Pete Ringmaster 01/04/2016

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Clone Age – Fuse

CA_RingMasterReview

Though inspirations are unknown, it feels a safe bet to suggest that Queens Of The Stone Age and especially Foo Fighters is among them going by Fuse, the highly enjoyable debut album from alternative rock band Clone Age. Ten tracks fuelled by energetically dynamic and melodically thick rock ‘n’ roll, the release is an impressive introduction to a Croatian quartet which, on this evidence, has the potential to break into much broader spotlights.

Formed in 2002, Clone Age has gone through line-up changes and creative breaks over the years whilst also earning a fine reputation across gigs and festivals for their live show, wining numerous regional awards into the bargain too. It was 2014 which saw the present union of vocalist/bassist Robert Kriković, guitarists Adrijano Valpatić and Nenad Rešetar, and drummer Marko Lajtman come together; a moment in time which seemed to spark a new creative energy and chemistry in the band leading to the writing and recording of a host of new songs which make up first album Fuse.

Recently released via Croatian label Dallas Records, Fuse gets straight to work on ears and imagination with opener Give Yourself To Me. A lure of guitar entices first, it quickly joined by the potent tones of Kriković, which in turn soon welcomes the beefy beats of Lajtman amidst a thicker sonic roar. That initial nagging hook enjoyably continues as the track breaks out big melodies and rousing vocals; it all courted by one tempestuously throbbing bassline. As quickly as the song’s sounds blossom so too does the Dave Grohl and co scent, a flavouring never dissipating in song and album yet at no point does Clone Age or Fuse become replicas without their own imaginative ideas and creative characters.

The feisty and quickly satisfying start moves aside for the following Should I Care and the continuation of the album’s attention grabbing prowess. Less imposing than the first, its melodies smouldering on the ear, the track still unveils a potent catchiness which colludes with a seductive landscape of imaginative and sultry textures aligned to stylish sounds. At times more hard rock than alternative rock sculpted and in latter moments a bluesy proposal, the song simply hits the spot with increasing ease before passing its triumph over to We’ll Make It to try and emulate. That it does with its rhythmic shuffle and vocal tempting within an anthemic bellow which again is as familiar as it is fresh and greedily devoured. In sound and voice, Clone Age has the knack of inviting and involving the listener in body and emotion, a continuing success across Fuse which maybe is at its height in this rip-roaring protagonist of the spirit.

art_RingMasterReviewAddition shares its own spicy hook and groove laced bait next, its swaggering body and reflective blues laced nature carrying a touch of Alter Bridge and Sick Puppies to it to great effect. The guitar craft and imagination of Valpatić and Rešetar enthrals and excites throughout, the former also providing some great backing vocals to reinforce the emotive potency of Kriković.

A calmer time comes with the southern laced and lively balladry of My Little Miracle, its gentler embracing coming with maybe the most tenacious and bold rhythmic proposal from Lajtman on the album whilst Wake Me Up whips up the body and passions with its bouncing gait and instant hook lined flirtation. There is a whiff of nineties indie rock to the song, but equally a disarming post grunge/alternative rock pop magnetism which has hips swaying and the imagination gripped with consummate ease.

From one pinnacle to another and the mightily addictive Never Enough. From its opening thick and grouchy bassline, the song is in command, writhing spice rich grooves quickly adding to the fascination. Relaxing a touch as it hits its mischievous stride, a pulsating spotting of fifties seeded keys start their seduction, popping in and out of the sinew spun and vivaciously hungry flames of heavy rock ‘n’ roll. Like Squeeze meets Bush meets QOTSA, the track is glorious; rock ‘n’ roll manna for the senses and passions which almost alone provides one of many imposing reasons for checking out album and band.

Save Me might have a less unpredictable and dramatic air and character to it next, but the song is an appealing tapestry of harmonic vocals and fiery guitar enterprise around a steelier rumble of bass and kinetic beats. It lets no one down in pleasure and anthemic potency before What’s My Name offers up its own restrained but infectious smoulder of melodic suggestiveness and emotive reflection. Hinting at further nineties grunge influences without being pinned down; the track is as intriguing as it is compelling.

Alone completes Fuse with a fusion of power pop and again grunge inspired alternative rock. Taking ears on a heady and contagious ride of sound and energy, it sums up the invention and recognisable but commandingly fresh sound and exploits of Clone Age perfectly; and tells you all you need to know about the band’s ability to write songs which almost demand physical and emotional involvement.

Clone Age will most likely be strangers in name and sound to you right now but it is something you should amend with Fuse. The reward is an adventure of rock ‘n’ roll to improve any day.

Fuse is out now via Dallas Records across many online stores.

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Pete RingMaster 16/03/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Adelitas Way – Getaway

AW_RingMasterReview

Adelitas Way has persistently shown themselves capable of writing and creating anthemic roars that instinctively ignite the spirit and adrenaline. From their self-titled debut album and tracks like Invincible, the US band has early on uncaged impassioned and dynamically persuasive proposals. With new album Getaway though, they have hit a new peak. From start to finish, it is a conveyor belt of rousing proposals, as sturdy and aggressive as they are melodically contagious. It is probably fair to say that the Adelitas Way sound has never been one close to re-inventing the wheel, but they and certainly these ears have no issue when body and spirit is relentlessly given a shot of the band’s fresh and anthemic virulence.

Getaway is the fourth album from the 2006 band, and as suggested another in a line of highly persuasive and captivating releases. Whether they have hit the personal sweet spot or not, all have gone to establish the Las Vegas quartet as one eagerly devoured proposition on record and indeed live where they have shared stages with the likes of Guns N’ Roses, Shinedown, Creed, Alter Bridge, Three Days Grace, Chevelle, Theory of a Deadman, Breaking Benjamin, The Pretty Reckless, Godsmack, Staind, Flyleaf and many more.

The successor to Stuck of 2013, the Johnny K (Disturbed, Staind) produced Getaway sees the foursome of Rick DeJesus, Tre Stafford, Robert Zakaryan, and Andrew Cushing in no mood to hold back on their emotive intensity and sonic dexterity. The evidence is immediate as the band’s new single Bad Reputation, and first taken from the album, launches at ears with infectious bait. Choppy riffs and similarly tempting rhythms immediately press suggestively upon the senses as the always welcome tones of vocalist DeJesus step forward. Inspired by his own feelings about a reputation he has earned over the past few years, his reflections come entangled in a web of spicy melodies and snapping hooks within a climate of sound which builds small but effective crescendos of energy and intensity.

COVER_RingMasterReviewIt is a great start which barely waivers over the next stretch of songs starting with the album’s title track. The band’s hard rock bred sound is in feisty mood from its first breath, almost irritable in its sonic jangle backed by attitude lined rhythms. Increasingly fiery yet equally catchy, especially around its sizzling chorus, the track has feet and emotions quickly involved and in time exhausted, though they get a chance to relax with the sultry smoulder of Good Die Young. The fiercely energetic tracks always emerge as personal favourites across an Adelitas Way encounter but as proven here, the band is very accomplished at creating emotively and sonically incisive balladry. Expectantly it does come with a raw edge and dramatic intensity which only helps it make a potent impact as enjoyment flies high.

Low brings a great grouchiness to its riffs and nature next, guitars almost carnivorous in tone as a Sick Puppies like flame of melodic and harmonic energy emerges from within the song’s growl. As many tracks, ears feel like they are meeting up with an old friend, being enveloped in a recognisable infectiousness which adds colour to the band’s blaze of heavily pleasing and fresh enterprise. By the end of the first minute, vocal participation is inevitable, a temptation most tracks are equipped with as shown by the volatile roar of Put You in Place with its web of spidery steely grooves and the mercilessly contagious I Get Around. A resonating bassline invitingly groans from the heart of the second of the pair, its dark hues a gripping tempering and spark to the tempestuous and boisterous roar around it. Not alone in showering the senses in serious infectiousness, the song epitomises the power, attitude, and rousing ferocity of the band’s sound, and equally its rock pop prowess.

Across the tenaciously excitable Filthy Heart with its blues spiced sonic winery and the mellower coaxing of Harbor the Fugitive, band and album, maybe without matching earlier heights, has ears and firmly attentive whilst Sometimes You’re Meant to Get Used really stirs things up again with its tantalising blend of rapaciously snarling textures and melodic revelry bound in emphatically infectious imagination.

The album concludes with firstly the blues rock flavoured Shame, an enticing flame of enterprise which again might not create the same lustful reactions as others but with a whiff of Bowie-esque toning to parts of the vocals, only holds attention firm before Deserve This twists and turns with robust rhythms and crunchy riffery leading its fractious yet anthemically layered tapestry of striking sound and endeavour.

It is a fine end to a thoroughly enjoyable release where major surprises are low but invigorating rock ‘n’ roll is nonstop incitement. Getaway is the most rounded and fertile release from Adelitas Way, and for us, the most fiercely enjoyable so far.

Getaway is out now via most online stores and @ http://adelitaswayshop.bigcartel.com/category/cd

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Pete RingMaster 07/03/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Normandie – Inguz

normandie_promo_RingMaster Review

Rock ‘n’ roll is all about arousing people; igniting their spirit and emotions in tandem with their physical presence and there is no doubting that Sweden hailing Normandie do that with debut album Inguz. It might not be a release that carries total uniqueness in breath and sound but there is no escaping its anthemic might and virulent impact.

Formed in 2013, Normandie initially emerged with a rawer sound but with the departure of their heavier co-vocalist, the Örebro hailing quartet began honing in on the rousing melodic side of their invention. This has led to the stadium rock like roar and the anthemic fuel igniting within Inguz and understandable comparisons to the likes of 30 Seconds To Mars and Bring Me The Horizon.

The album opens with Fight and an instant incitement of firm beats and handclaps which just as swiftly are joined by a heavily coaxing chorus of voices surrounded by spirals of sonic tempting. The song holds back a touch as the quickly impressing tones of frontman Philip Strand emerge, waiting for the moment to erupt into fiery life around the seriously infectious chorus and drama of the song. In no time ears and appetite are gripped by its invasive roar, even more so as Håkan Almbladh’s guitar spins an incendiary web within a familiar yet robustly fresh sound.

With energy and emotions racing in tandem with those of the song, the superb opener makes way for Awakening and it’s mellower but no less catchy endeavour. Strings scythe majestically across the sky of the song, joined by another dose of potent vocals as the darker prowling presence of John Löfgren’s bass provides a provocative temper aside the thick beats of Jesper Malmberg. Riffs and keys almost duel with rapacious zeal as they further shape the explosive encounter, a potent essence equally colouring successor Collide. With a carnivorous tone to the bass as the song expels a blood pumping bellow of sound and emotion, the scent of bands like Poets Of The Fall and Allele crossing thoughts as ears become enveloped in a masterful melodic tempest.

inguz-cover_RingMaster ReviewRecent single Believe quickly hugs and pressures with its own seemingly recognisable if indefinable character and roar, emotive radiance and atmosphere angst uniting before Loop Hole shares electronic agitation and tenacious rock ‘n’ roll in its Muse meets Sick Puppies like tempest. The track just raises the album’s roof, its aggressive and volatile character as gripping as its searing blaze of melodies and vocals are fiercely seductive.

Through the darker charm of The Deep Cold, a 30 Seconds To Mars meets The Veer Union like encounter, and the wonderfully tempestuous Calling, band and album set a fuse to greedier reactions in appetite and emotions. The second of the pair is especially invigorating and inescapably galvanic, giving yet another striking peak to the landscape of the increasingly impressing release.

The pop spiced rock ‘n’ roll of Starting New leaves satisfaction full, especially with the devilish dark tone of Löfgren’s bass alongside another great vocal display from Strand and band. It was only ever going to pale a little against the might of its predecessor though, but nevertheless pleasure is kept high and reinforced by the bold melodic flames that shape The Storm and finally the reflective smoulder of Epilogue.

All three provide a richly tempting close to an album which from start to finish has the listener rigorously involved and eager to share their own emotive roar. Certainly Normandie is yet to find their truly unique sound though very few will be complaining as Inguz takes them on a ride few will surpass this year.

Inguz is available from March 4th via the band’s own Normandie Records @ http://normandie.bigcartel.com/product/normandie-inguz-album-digipak-cd

http://www.normandieofficial.com/    https://www.facebook.com/normandieofficial   https://twitter.com/WeAreNormandie

Pete RingMaster 19/02/2016

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