The Lumes – Envy

The creative world of Dutch outfit The Lumes has just got corrosive, become dark and raw, and boy is it one exciting place to be caught in. The trio has emerged from their previous captivating shoegaze inspired atmospheric explorations bare skinned in sound, stark and skeletal in emotion and through new mini album Envy unleashed a whole new compelling realm.

Somewhat like a fusion of Joy Division, The Gaa Gaas, and The Horrors on day one, The Lumes create a pulsating drone of post punk and noise rock immersed in the already established magnetic attributes of the band’s imagination and sound. It is a nagging affair still unafraid to embrace more melodically sonic suggestion and exploration; a proposition sucking on the psyche as it closes claustrophobically in on the senses and quite irresistible.

The release opens up with Anguish and instantly presses in on the senses with its imposing cloud of invigorating discord. A nagging hook emerges from the midst, guitarist Maxime Prins casting inescapable bait as his vocals vent. The bass of Lennard van der Voort groans with similar striking temptation, its riff a transfixing drone across which the swings of drummer Mitchell Quitz dance and bite. It is an outstanding track, the kind of invitation which ensures unbridled attention and in turn lust is established before moving on to the next equally hypnotic proposal coming in to nag and play.

Slow has an even more invasive air; a less defined climate maybe but with a perfectly woven suffocating breath which lingers even as the initial wash of sound parts for vocal and melodic disharmony before crowding back in on ears and emotions.  The rhythmic union of van der Voort and Quitz has a less venomous feel this time but shows no mercy in getting as much under the skin as Prins’ vocal dissension and the sonic description of his strings.

The following Discharge throbs with a dulled yet kinetic clang as Gang of Four-esque rhythms pounce. Sonically, an Artery meets The Gaa Gaas clamour seduces and enslaves as the bass and drums probe and transfix with almost carnal persistence, all finally consumed by a swamp of searing noise before Feign brings its own chilled manna to ears. The guitar is a resonating cauldron of tone and causticity, the rhythms a web of deceitful temptation and all webbed in off-kilter melodic friction which equally infests Prins’ as ever riveting vocals. With a chorus which haunts the senses as much as vocal chords, the track is the most gorgeous noise bred ugly discordancy.

The invasive muggy swamp of Compulsion is next, an avalanche of tonal discord which relaxes its controlled but unrestrained sonic howl a touch around vocals to then re-ignite its winds in between the ‘calm’.  The track is almost shamanic in its repetitious lures and senses twisting canter, constantly impressing on and drawing subservience to its noise tunnel.

The Lumes complete Envy with a cover of the Space Siren track Who makes me try? A punk infused tempest ebbing and flowing with ferocity as corroded melodies collude round another simply hypnotic bassline, it is a fine end, if not quite matching what comes before, to an outstanding release.

Across the landscape of Envy, with all the inhospitable yet seductive discord, you never feel like The Lumes are out to spoil and wither but rather laying down an impossible to resist invitation into their emotional anarchy and new so much more irresistible realm.

Envy is out now through Crazysane Records digitally, on CD, and 12” vinyl, limited to 200 hand-numbered black and 100 mint-green vinyl copies on @ https://crazysanerecords.bandcamp.com/album/envy

http://thelumes.com/    https://www.facebook.com/thelumes/

Pete RingMaster 11/10/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Harlots – Chinese Carpet Factory

harlots_RingMaster Review

Creating infectious alternative rock ‘n’ roll with a healthy power pop tenacity and rigour to it, UK quartet Harlots release their debut album to end the year with a potent nudge on national recognition. Eleven tracks of virulent pop rock, Chinese Carpet Factory is a boisterous romp littered with flowing melodies, persuasive harmonies, and hooks with an instinctive vice like grip. Add bold rhythms alongside rousing choruses and Harlots have provided one rather enjoyable proposition.

The London based foursome recorded Chinese Carpet Factory with producer Rory Attwell (Palma Violets/Vaccines) on a boat on the bands of the Thames, and straight away it laps ears with feisty persuasion through opener Wicked Tongue. Building from a scene setting sample, the song is soon sauntering along with lively rhythms and just as eager vocals as guitars crash and scythe with spicy enterprise. The bass too is a pulsating slice of bait, it all uniting with accomplished and catchy effect. The song pretty much sets the tone of the album; the individual characters of songs all bred from this kind of rousing combination or certainly carrying a rich vein of it through their varied bodies.

Gotta Get By is quick evidence, the second track swinging in with its own hue of infectious zeal and inventive vibrancy. Part shoegaze, part power pop, and all flavoursome temptation, it bounces along whipping up eager involvement in feet and hips, and even though the song is a slither at less than two minutes in length, it shows that Harlots can be as effective on the dance-floor as in more intimate unions with listeners.

If The Ramones were The Beach Boys, House of Love became Birdland; they just might sound like Harlots on the seductive Seen A Girl whilst the outstanding Every Little Thing merges that with a further touch of indie/Brit pop imagination. The track is an addiction in the making, from vocals to melodies, rhythms to riveting hooks, revelry of pop ‘n’ roll to get greedy over.

Through Work Work Work and Up Away, the album reveals even more variety, the first a web of virulence seeded in sixties Beatles whilst its successor is an alluring croon of acoustic guitar and reflective voice with a chorus as enslaving as any within the bolder, bigger boned offerings within Chinese Carpet Factory. Both songs leave ears smiling and pleasure high before Rush jumps in, off the back of the album’s twenty two second title track, to cast a My Bloody Valentine/Verve like incitement which just seems to get more persuasive with every listen.

There are some tracks within Chinese Carpet Factory which really leap out, Every Little Thing and Gotta Get By a couple and next up You Got Me soon there by their side. Laying a jangle of guitar as its first touch, rolling out anthemic rhythms almost as swiftly, the track bounds around and bounces off ears with voracious revelry, its sixties/eighties pop breath entwined with modern indie ingenuity quite irresistible.

The album finishes with firstly the rawer aired and just as gripping drama of The Colour & The Noise, shoegaze, pop, and noise rock blurring their boundaries in another big highlight, and finally Days Are Done. The Beatle-esque balladry of the final song ensures the album comes to an engaging end, its embrace not as pungent as elsewhere within Chinese Carpet Factory but still a potent end to a fine release.

Chinese Carpet Factory is a great introduction to Harlots, a release easy to spend plenty of time with for perpetual enjoyment. This is a band still growing and evolving their sound you sense too, so real potential of big times ahead we suggest.

Chinese Carpet Factory is out on NOV 28th.

http://www.theharlotsmusic.com   https://www.facebook.com/theharlotsmusic

Pete RingMaster 27/11/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Walleater – Self Titled

walleater

The debut self-titled EP from UK band Walleater may not stop you in your tracks and demand immediate attention but there is an inescapable captivation to its presence which puts the shoegaze/alternative rock band firmly on the radar. Consisting of four reserved yet vibrantly enveloping melodic flights through immersive ambiences, the release potently presents a band rich in striking promise and worthy of anticipation for their near horizons.

Hailing from Leeds, the quartet of vocalist/guitarist Rob Dell, guitarist Alex Finney, bassist Liam Hemingway, and drummer Lyndarn Harrison, Walleater take the raw potential and sound of their previous two track demo, A Masking Aura, to stronger accomplished and atmospherically pungent heights. Recorded with producer Bob Cooper, their first EP provides a proposition which combines the essences of bands like Pavement and My Bloody Valentine with the lighter embraces of House Of Love and the darker metallic incitement of Static Plan. It results in a brooding encounter which can swing from lively enticement to imposing shadows with ease.

The release opens with Give In To Me, a track already unveiled last month to eager reactions. It is not hard to see why as the song coaxes Artworkinstant attention and appetite with its spicy electro resonance and guitar sculpted sonic lures from the very first second. It is a thick and consuming, senses frisking sound which sparks the imagination just as swiftly. Relaxing into a more temperate melody driven climate for the joining of the vocals from Dell, the song enchants before expelling further intensely passionate bursts of energy and guitar led rapaciousness with more than a sense of the Jesus and Mary Chain to it. It is an absorbing and unpredictable immersion with an open infectiousness which cannot be resisted by ears and passions.

The following Just A Boy strokes the ears in a more restrained coaxing from the start; the guitars a gentle sway and temptation skirted by equally toned down beats and the dark throaty tone of the bass. The stance is completed by the vocal shimmer of Dell, his tones magnetic in a delivery which harmoniously drones at times whilst seemingly holding angst coated disinterest. It is a riveting delivery which never loses its appeal and potency even within the squalling ambience which tempestuously chills the narrative and song. It is hard not to offer a suggestion of Deftones to the flavoursome sound of the track but as with all thoughts it is a mere spice to the evocative recipe.

Glow comes next, the track an enterprising instrumental exploration which smoulders and flares up with controlled but intensive emotion across its simultaneously harsh and mesmeric landscape. With flames of noise and progressive rock to its demanding and commanding maelstrom, the piece provides further evidence to the invention and expression of Walleater’s songwriting and sound.

The release is completed by What Do You Know?, a melodic breeze of a caress which almost glances over the senses until the stronger sinews within the rhythms of Harrison take hold of the reins ensuring the song imposes just that little bit more. It is a whisper compared to the louder calls of other songs on the release though none roar with full lungs it is fair to say, and impressively adds another colour to the band’s creativity and presence. At times the track also sparks thoughts of China Crisis with its slightly celestial elegance as it finishes off a fine debut enjoyably.

It is probably fair to say that Walleater is yet to discover their unique voice, which is not surprising this being their first invitation to the world, but already there is a potency and breath to their music which pushes them out into an attention asking spotlight which only brings expectations for impressive things ahead from and for the four piece.

The Walleater EP will be released digitally on April 21st through Bandcamp for £1.99 while physically the EP will be spread across two 7” with ‘Part One: Give In To Me / Just A Boy’ being released also on April 21st via Close To Home Records with ‘Part Two: Glow / What Do You Know?’ scheduled for later this year.

http://walleater.bandcamp.com/

https://www.facebook.com/walleaterbanduk?ref=ts&fref=ts

8.5/10

RingMaster 11/04/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Boyfrndz – Breeder

BOYFRNDZ selects (4 of 5)

Mere days after having van, cargo trailer, and all their equipment stolen in San Francisco midst their extensive  North America tour, Texas band Boyfrndz can at least give themselves and us a big boost with the release of new album Breeder on the first day of April. The release is an absorbing flight through unique climates and smouldering adventures employing a sound as ever distinct to the band and evocations which simply envelop and seduce the imagination. Breeder is a new innovative beast from previous band unveilings but still has that certain Boyfrndz voice as it stirs passions and sculpts captivating landscapes. Whereas previous releases blend a punchy indie craft to an intensive bite, the new album explores soaring melodies aligned to equally mesmeric vocals and expansive sonic exploration across provocative sceneries. It is a riveting encounter which draws thoughts and emotions in deeply with each traverse of its soundscapes, and more importantly a thoroughly compelling triumph.

Hailing from Austin, the band has earned acclaim and a rich fanbase through sound, shows, and their impressive releases. As mentioned Breeder is a different move in their inventive investigation, taking the essences which made the likes of their debut album All Day Pass of 2012 and last year’s Natures EP such formidable and satisfying propositions. Self-produced and engineered/mixed by Erik Wofford (Maserati, The Black Angels, White Denim), Breeder is a warm haven, like a beach of romantic seduction leading into varied melodically cast, often shadow kissed lands. Boyfrndz and their sound have always been defiant to labelling and certainly make it no easier for those who wish to add that tags with the new album. We can suggest though if the epic emotive potency of a Mars Volta or a Disappears catches your attention than this is an album which deserves your appetite.

Released via Brutal Panda Records, Breeder opens with an ambient intro which is haunting and yet coaxing in its sinister breath, keys boyfrndz_breeder_frontcovershaping thoughts and emotion with a dark menacing design. It is a heavy intensive opening which evolves without losing intent or weight into Each Others, a song which submerges senses in an invasive and heftily rewarding embrace. The vocals of Scott Martin and his guitar enterprise side by side with that of Jesse Moore immediately enslave, drawing thoughts deeper into the cavernous but equally intimate surroundings and depths of the narrative whilst the unpredictable rhythmic enticement built by drummer Aaron Perez aligned to the shadowed voice of Joseph Raines’ bass add keener textures and intrigue to the whole scenario.

The gripping unveiling of the album as its creative full height bears down on an awoken appetite, is swiftly reinforced by the dramatic breath and air of All At Once. The song is a range of subtle crescendos, emotive respites interspersed with powerful passion bred surges of sound and energy with every aspect a bewitching entwining of the imagination and the increasingly greedy hunger rising for the release. Its success is soon surpassed by the outstanding Shape Shifter, another song which brews a drama from its first emerging suasion which itself gives home to provocative shadows. The rhythmic juggling of Perez is instant magnetic bait which keeps the listener wrong footed as the smouldering air of the track through the guitars and the keys crafting of Moore, soaks pores and synapses. The entry of the celestial tones of Martin only accentuate the already Muse like feel to the song even though in truth his style is nearer to Cedric Bixler-Zavala if anyone. It is a temptress of a song, but one which lays a seducing touch around the body with fingers and a lure you just know is dangerous and only telling half the truth.

That Mars Volta suggestiveness comes back with stronger potency in Dark Braining though any reference is mere spicing to the unique Boyfrndz recipe. The song ebbs and flows across the senses, coating them in a thick melodic endeavour which is equally elegance and infectious, it’s often acidic and always charming ingenuity bordering toxic in its seducing and capture of the soul. The song is as fascinating in its progressively infused ingenuity as it is in its bordering on shoegaze rapture. It pushes limits with ease but in an easily accessible way, something which is achieved in a more testing way by the following Design with similarly impressive results. It opens with a celestial tempting which glances over the ear as the vocals glide with the first breath of its narrative. The peace is soon broken by a sonic surge of sound and energy which from there, shares air and space with its predecessor in a fluid ride of swirling melodies strapped to inciting rhythms and shimmering vocals. The course and depth of the song continues to enlist senses and imagination with resourceful aural contemplation making a provocation which takes longer than a great many to explore but lingers longer than most.

Both the muscular stance of Make Believe and the riotous causticity of Burn Through It, steal a fair chunk of the already ardour soaked passions, the first simply melody enriched alchemy within sinew built rhythmic walls and intensive sonic flames which tower over the agitated simmering and dramatic heart of the song. It is a glorious blaze matched by its successor, an encounter which from the first note is abrasing the senses with a blistered glaze to guitars and keys which fires up the exhaustive voracity of the song. Martin again opens up distinct avenues within the intent of the track; his harmonious tones a scintillating conflict and antagonist to the snarl of the great song.

The closing Big Faces provides a seemingly surf rock seeded melodic toxicity to its irresistible web of mystery and intrigue crossing a similarly magnetic pull of psychedelically enhanced persuasion. It is a stunning end to a sensational release. Boyfrndz has impressed before without really lighting fires in our thoughts  but with Breeder the band has set themselves as one of the essential investigations all should partake in whilst stealing a march on most with a definite album of the year contender.

To get yourself a copy of Breeder whilst helping the band regroup and complete as much of their tour as possible, check out their website http://www.Boyfrndz.com.

https://www.facebook.com/boyfrndz

https://www.boyfrndz.bandcamp.com

9/10

RingMaster 01/04/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Passenger Peru- Self Titled

     Passenger Peru

    Startlingly immersive with the craft and ability to turn the listener into a castaway lost in an expansive seduction of suggestive pop majesty within a dreamy soundscape in its rawest breath, the debut album from Passenger Peru is an experience you cannot help licking your lips over before each and every encounter. It is a mouthwatering collection of warm and elegant persuasions bred in an exploration which is bold and bravely adventurous. The self-titled album is as mentioned pop in its rawest most potent form but with an inspiring scourge of creative devilry and melodic mesmerism twisted into a hypnotic and at times wonderfully demonic dance.

    Passenger Peru comes from the creative minds and passions of Justin Stivers (vocals, guitar, bass, synth, drums, drum machines) and Justin Gonzales (vocals, guitar, synth, piano, samples), the former one time bassist with The Antlers for their Hospice album. The seeds for the Brooklyn based project are said to have started four years ago when the two musicians met and evolved into the Stivers led band Pet Ghost Project. A year in preparation, Passenger Peru is mouthwatering sonic scenery composed into something unique from essences of garage rock and shoegaze, psychedelic, alternative rock and more. With plenty of peaks and very minimal lows, if any at all, the lo-fi, hi-quality flight is raucous spellbinding pop brought in its most primal and beauteous magnificence.

     The album immediately takes the listener to a scintillating pinnacle with its opening pair of songs, a height the album never passperucoverquite emulates again though it thrills consistently trying. First song Your Hunger emerges from a cinematic melodic swoon and following studio doodling launches one of the most exciting and impressively tempting starts to a song heard in a long time. Guitar and bass instantly secure the fullest attention as they virtually gnaw on the ears with the latter offering an almost carnivorous tone to its dark enticement. With mutually attractive rhythmic teasing alongside, the rapacious sound conjured by the pair continue to coax and lure in the strongest lustful reaction and hunger, a post punk essence bringing thoughts of Joy Division and Gang Of Four to mind prowling the imagination whilst framing the excellent mellow and soothing vocals. It is delicious mix with sinister spirals of cold sound amid glorious flames of melodic tenderness colliding and uniting for a quite stunning provocation. Complete with an irresistible repetitious gait to bass and rhythms alongside a quite saucy groove which also hardly veers from its prime intent, the song sets the highest plateau for the album to keep up.

    In the Absence of Snow steps up next to stroll that pedestal with ease, its opening acoustically sculpted guitar tantalising and the again snarling throaty bass tempting exceptionally addictive and successful in igniting even greater rapture in the imagination and emotions. Best described as the Jesus and Mary Chain meets House Of Love whilst the revelry of Ok Go! is at play, the bait laid down for the ears and emotions to partake in, is again virulently impossible to refuse or not find a greedy need for. Rock pop at its finest with a fiery solo and another spine of repetition kissed captivation, the track continues the album’s unassailable submission of the passions. With an impressive lyrical craft and insight also at work, which admittedly comes second best to the sound in attention taking over the first couple of plays, Passenger Peru at this point has already ignited an ardour which only a total car crash of a remaining body of songs could deflate.

    Pollen Season takes no time in showing no such disaster is on the cards though as mentioned before, the album never treads the same lofty levels again. To put that into context though the following tracks prey on and build their own benchmark which most bands would swap their grannies for, the third song on the release a beguiling proposition of organic beauty around once more a bass treat you can only enthuse over with a tendency to drool, and a percussive enterprise which does not steal focus but would leave a major whole with its absence. Seriously magnetic, the song departs the now raging appetite for the album for the epidemically engaging pop absorptions of Tiger Lilly and Heavy Drugs to take over. The first of the two has a swagger and melodic grin which teases and charms but an equally solicitous sonic and rhythmic bruising to its latter swing whilst the second is a sultry summer breeze of radiant melodies within an increasingly dark and unsettling premise.

     The second half of the album starts with Weak Numbers, again a track which ensnares thoughts and appreciation but marks a slightly less potent stretch for the album. The front five tracks leave the latter quintet in their shadow though once more in a context where Passenger Peru is on another realm with their artistry at the start of the album and a still immensely impressive level thereafter. A gentle and smouldering embrace, the song is a melancholic incitement with celestial elegance aligned to a tempestuous but contained emotive brawl. It is a transfixing companion immediately supported by the exotically imagined Memory Garden and the enthralling, intensive fascination of Health System, a song which merges heavy and light melodic and intimidating textures into a weave of emotion entangling beauty with XTC like alchemy.

     The new single from the album Dirt Nap comes next, emerging with a slight Celtic lilt to its sonic beckoning before a predominately acoustic caressing ensues with a sense of The Wonder Stuff to its snare. Initially thoughts were not over excited by the song but over time it works its way under the skin to seduce though personally not the right choice as the single to lure people into the outstanding album, a record holding back another major treat for its closing offering. Life and Death of a Band is a rowdy and antagonistic romp but equally a ridiculously endearing and alluring temptress from a maelstrom of invention and creative intrigue and a quite brilliant finale to a breath-taking slab of pop excellence.

    Passenger Peru will be massive at some point with all the evidence resting and burning away in their debut, a journey as unique and awe inspiring as their name hints at.

http://www.passengerperuband.com/

http://passengerperu.bandcamp.com/

9/10

RingMaster 05/02/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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Skyline Pigeons: House of Mysteries

With a kaleidoscope of touching emotions, sensual textures, and warm hauntingly enveloping atmospheres the debut album House of Mysteries from US band Skyline Pigeons is truly one of the most mesmeric releases heard in a long time. Bringing a blend of shoegaze rock psych-pop with flushes of folk, post-punk, and psychedelic-rock the release is an inescapable immersive wrap around the senses. Within the distinct unique weave of sound that is Skyline Pigeons the additional elements of country and garage rock all combining to create a sound which cuts across the decades bringing a vibrant yet dark breath to the release.

The band is made up of two sisters from Santa Barbara/Los Angeles, Roxanne and Caroline Teti. The duo crafted House of Mysteries with inspiration raging from not only their personal musical influences but emotionally from the experience of losing their home and possessions to the Santa Barbara wildfires and the process of starting again. The tracks within the release are part of an emotional journey for the girls translated perfectly for the listener to absorb and feel with each song exploring and challenging the scars and fears borne from the devastating event. With the band completed by Andrew Harrison, Ben Potter, and Orly Gal and the album recorded with and produced by Ryan Hadlock (Blonde Redhead, Ra Ra Riot, The Black Heart Procession, The Gossip) at Bear Creek Studio in Seattle, the album is a remarkable pop rock entry.

From the moment first song The Cycle weaves its melodic way around the ear there is a sense of something special emerging to send tingles through the spine. Once the beauty of the vocals and emotive Wurlitzer keys wrap themselves around the beckoning bass, firm beats and endearing guitar strokes, the track slowly envelops the senses and thoughts building to a plateau of emotive warmth and stirring energy tinged with a soulful country rock lilt.

Off of this impressive start the following Get Up raises the bar even higher. The anthemic badgering from the song is deeply infectious as the song confronts the wrong kind of personal acceptance with a stunning mix of Breeders and Belly like grace and melodic imagination. The song is glorious and brings a deep sigh of disappointment when it ends.

    House of Mysteries is pleasingly eclectic throughout bringing diversity to fit the varied emotive thoughts and heartfelt issues dealt with lyrically. Songs like the reflective slightly haunting Together and the rougher textured pop enchantment that is Tennessee are as openly diverse and equally wondrous as the songs before them. Within the latter of the two the infectious pull is especially immense and unavoidable but to be honest every song no matter the heart and breath it expands from is as captivating as another.

The golden ballad whisper of Lucid finds the band in further hypnotic lush emotive fields, its balance and poise the strongest aural siren to find the ear and further evidence of the astounding songwriting and its realisation upon the album. As much as the sounds, lyrical inventiveness and the amazing voices of the girls, it is the seamless fit and thought brought to all aspects within the pulsating soundscapes which impresses as deeply. The alto and soprano ranges of Roxanne and Caroline belong within any myth spun by sailors dashed upon rocks, their beauty that full and far reaching but it is as much their organic mix and blend with the other instruments and skills which ignites their fullest majesty.

Tracks such as Alright and High bring more sultry irresistible splendour but the brightest sun on the album comes with Fire She Blues, a blistering piece of sixties psychedelic toned post punk ingenuity. The track is a primal trigger with continual insistent rhythms and fiery melodic imagination. As the song explores its path the energy rises and flares with scorched sonic and blues dripping explosions. Almost like a pop version of Blood Ceremony the band opens up every note and chord with a raw yet compulsive intensity to engineer the most inventive and impressive song on the album.

House of Mysteries is a masterpiece and the declaration that Skyline Pigeons and their unique talent will be bringing even greater rewards for years to come with what is real pop music.

RingMaster 07/06/2012

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