Of Allies – Night Sky

As release by release they have realised and pushed on the promise which came with their first steps into the UK rock scene, Of Allies has similarly step by step grown into one of the most riveting and exciting prospects within its grasp. Because of the potential and craft shared through their previous EPs, and enjoyment found, anticipation for their first album has been patient and increasingly eager with the reward being one rather wonderful encounter going by the name of Night Sky.

Emerging in 2013, Of Allies soon had intrigue and pleasure stoked with the release of their first EP, Tempers the following year. It was a beyond solid and skilfully accomplished introduction which suggested bigger and bolder things to come, that suggestion part realised and supported by its successor, the Fragments EP in 2015. Everything has now come together within Night Sky, all the promise and craft uniting with adventurous enterprise for a kaleidoscope of sound and imagination where you know there is still a tease of even bigger, bolder things to come.

Night Sky opens with its title track, an atmospheric invitation cast by the guitars of Tom Hewson and Rich Nichols against an electronic fizz. The latter’s ever impressive vocals soon intensify the lure; a Voyager meets An Entire Legion like hue soaking the blossoming encounter. Soon the vigorous muscle and stroll of the song takes hold, a rich grip of sound never quite let of the leash and all the more impacting because of it.

It is a striking start swiftly rivalled by the following 17, its calm equally as magnetic and subsequently fevered as the energies and emotions boiling up around the swinging rhythms of drummer Danny Barrick and the alluring groan of Nick Tyldsley’s bass. Controlled yet tempestuous, the song is a rising infectious blaze of invention and captivation before making way for the equally compelling presence of Collapse. Its grumble is heavier, more rapacious, but superbly tempered by its melodic dexterity and the instinctive catchiness which runs through the Of Allies sound. Like Breaking Benjamin meets Shattered Skies, attention and appetite are quickly enslaved.

The haunting beauty and melancholic grace of brief instrumental Apparition leads the imagination into the waiting harmonic drama of Run. As guitars spin a beguiling web, Nichols croons with organic temptation being just as potently backed by the vocal chords of Hewson as the song flows evocatively through ears. It is a caress of aural sunlight with emotive shadowing which only draws the listener deeper into the heart and emotion of the album; a prowess as deftly conjured within the celestially warm and increasingly volcanic Waiting For You where progressive and melodic textures collude with metallic trespasses. With a capricious character and mercurial climate, the track is nothing less than thick enticement for ears and plaudits.

The steelier Lost Not Found has a firm grasp on rock pop boisterousness in its similarly skittish gait and eventful body while the lapping waves of scenic seduction and undercurrents of gloom clad aural thoughts within the suggestive slither that is Drifting leads the imagination into the spatial and immersive fineness and deceptive calm of Open Sea. It too has a dark edge and underlining predaciousness which perfectly aligns with the heated drama of voice and sonic enterprise.

The warm atmospheric succour of Solace lifts emotions up from those darker hues, the instrumental piece as provocative as it is manipulative before passing an open imagination over to easily the best track within Night Sky. The open ingenuity of all songs frames the sheer magnificence of CMD-Q. Straight away post punk instincts are gnawing on the passions, guitars and bass linking up in agitated discord and melodic trespass as beats scythe across their glory and vocals skilfully wrap their addictive throes. The track is just majestic but so frustrating when it just leaves lust hanging at two minutes.

It is a hunger soon satisfied though by the robust but graceful exploits of Glass House, Of Allies showing how inventive and artful they at aligning contrasting elements. It is a quality never far from the surface of their music even the slim moments of atmospheric instrumental haunting as shown once again in Stranded.

The album finishes with In Low Light, an echo of all the diversity and craft across the release in its own individual theatre of adventure and imagination with a bite to its nature and dynamic drama to its breath.

Night Sky is superb, easily one of the most captivating propositions this year and most importantly, one of the most enjoyable; both aspects only increasing listen by listen.

Night Sky is out now on iTunes.

 http://ofallies.com/    https://www.facebook.com/OfAllies/    https://twitter.com/weareofallies

Pete RingMaster 30/11/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Figures – Self Titled EP

Figures_RingMasterReview

Melbourne is one of those cities persistently producing exciting new musical proposals and another to strongly add to the long list is Figures. Firmly established and acclaimed in the Australian rock scene, the quintet now have their sights on much broader attention with their self-titled debut EP leading the way. Offering four tracks of melodic/alternative metal with numerous other strains of rock involved, the release is a striking and seriously accomplished encounter with a sound very easy to find a healthy appetite for.

Formed in 2014, Figures has shared stages with the likes of Caligula’s Horse, Twelve Foot Ninja, Superheist and many others since then, luring heavy praise along the way. Their first single Filter equally courted acclaim and attention the way of the band, it taking them across to the US to perform at MUSEXPO’s Global Rock Summit in Los Angeles. Taken from the EP it made for an attention poking lead and gets the release off to a mighty start.

The song’s first touch is a gentle melodic caress, Filter coaxing ears as the guitars of Paul Callow and Simon Edgell wind up their energy and enterprise for the subsequent fire of riffs and grooves. Quickly the swiftly impressive vocals of Mark Tronson shine in their midst as the similarly enticing groan of Jen Fletcher’s bass and the swinging prowess of drummer Josh Sforzin add darker depth and texture to the already compelling blaze. The band has been compared to the likes of Incubus and Karnivool and in some ways you can suggest Circles, Voyager, and to a lesser extent Shattered Skies too though Figures quickly establish their own character in song and release.

cover_RingMasterReviewEqually fiercely robust and enticingly elegant, the song is a formidable introduction strongly backed by its companions starting with Desolate. Quickly the second song sounds very familiar though we cannot remember hearing it prior to the EP yet it cannot stop the fiery serenade of the track seducing ears and passions. Its melodies and harmonies caress the senses, its snarling riffs and boisterous rhythms raising the spirit and though it takes a touch longer to tempt as its predecessor, it blossoms into its equal.

Again making initial contact with a warm lure, Vice soon looms over ears with a web of wiry grooves and intrusive hooks as raw riffs and rapacious rhythms court the ever impressing mix of vocals and harmonies. There is aggression fuelled attitude at the heart of the song, giving it great underlying irritability as its mellower textures spread their charm, a blend sublimely igniting all four songs in varying ways with the closing Emoticonic no exception.

It gets straight down to offering growling confrontation though it is quickly interrupted and thereon in interspersed by washes of melodically inflamed imagination. The spiral of metallic tendrils really hits the spot though from start to finish, the whole song only feeds an already hungry appetite bred by the EP for what Figures have on offer right now and anticipation for their continuing growth.

Already 2017 is proving to be an exciting and impressive surge of emerging bands tempting bigger spotlights with Figures right there on the frontline.

The Figures EP is out now and available @ https://figuresbandofficial.bandcamp.com/releases

http://www.figuresband.com/   https://www.facebook.com/figuresbandofficial

Pete RingMaster 01/03/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Incendiary Arousals: Twenty one Metal/Noise/Rock releases which lit up The RingMaster Review in 2015

2015 was a year of creative savagery and rousing, anthemic glories within metal, rock, and noise driven genres. The RingMaster Review picks out those EPs/albums covered by the site which especially sparked ears and passions.

 

OMNISCIENT_FC_RingMaster Review

Desert Storm – Omniscient
https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2015/01/22/desert-storm-omniscient/

Skindred – Volume
https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2015/10/29/skindred-volume/

William English – Basic Human Error
https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2015/07/01/william-english-basic-human-error/

Arcade Messiah – II
https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2015/11/23/arcade-messiah-ii/

Arcade-Messiah-II-Cover_RingMaster Review

Tirades – Lifetime of Wars
https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2016/01/08/tirades-lifetime-of-wars/

Raketkanon – Rktkn#2
https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2015/04/15/raketkanon-rktkn2/

Show of Bedlam – Roont
https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2015/05/08/show-of-bedlam-roont/

XII Boar – Pitworthy
https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2015/03/10/xii-boar-pitworthy/

Cover_RingMaster Review

Jess & The Ancient Ones – Second Psychedelic Coming: The Aquarius Tapes
https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2015/12/08/jess-the-ancient-ones-second-psychedelic-coming-the-aquarius-tapes/

Shevils – The White Sea
https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2015/11/04/shevils-the-white-sea/

Shattered Skies – The World We Used To Know
https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2015/01/15/shattered-skies-the-world-we-used-to-know/

Possessor – Stay Dead
https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2015/04/02/possessor-stay-dead/

cover_RingMaster Review

Grumpynators – Wonderland
https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2015/05/21/grumpynators-wonderland/

Shaving The Werewolf – The Pissing Link
https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2015/12/09/shaving-the-werewolf-the-pissing-link/

Sofy Major – Waste
https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2015/10/14/sofy-major-waste/

6:33 – Deadly Scenes
https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2015/01/12/633-deadly-scenes/

art6:33_RingMaster Review

Murdock – Dead Lung
https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2015/04/17/murdock-dead-lung/

Grenouer – Unwanted Today
https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2015/03/20/grenouer-unwanted-today/

Markradonn – The Serpentine Deception
https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2015/12/15/markradonn-the-serpentine-deception/

We’ll Go Machete – Smile Club
https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2015/08/27/well-go-machete-smile-club/

 

cover_RingMaster Review

TesseracT – Polaris

https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2015/09/27/tesseract-polaris/

The RingMaster Review 01/01/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com/

Future Talk – The Path That Sadness Paved

FT_RingMaster Review

Managing to bring potent scents of styles like post hardcore/rock into their familiar yet undeniably fresh and captivating tapestry of alternative rock, UK band Future Talk uncage a powerful introduction to themselves with their The Path That Sadness Paved EP. Seriously engaging on first listen and increasingly compelling with every subsequent involvement in its four emotionally ripe songs, the release offers swift suggestion of a potentially impressive force in the making. The EP does not blaze with striking originality yet again there is the hint that the possibility is also in the breeding as it leaves ears and appetite thoroughly satisfied in the now.

Hailing from Gloucester and emerging in 2014 from the previous projects of its members, Future Talk has been earning a strong reputation for their live presence over the past year which in turn has inspired keen anticipation for their first release. References to bands such as Emarosa, Mallory Knox, and Underoath have been offered against the band’s sound, easy to understand suggestions when listening to The Path That Sadness Paved though in other ways Shattered Skies and Circle of Reason also occasionally nudge thoughts across the quartet of captivating songs.

Cover_RingMaster Review     The Path That Sadness Paved opens with new single/video Sleeping Pills, immediately covering ears in a wave of melodic enticement and sonic coaxing punctuated by firm handed rhythms. The rich tones of vocalist Alex Taylor make an equally potent impact on first impression, flourishing in the embrace of the song’s resourceful drama and imaginative enterprise whilst the track seems to only blossom further with his melodically honed impassioned roars. It is a fiercely magnetic start to the release, as suggested not a song breaking down boundaries but, as the EP, powerfully leaving ears and appetite hungry for more; a success in anyone’s book.

The following Shadow Poet builds from a gentler lure into a tempest of emotion sculpted by great individual craft across the band. The moody bassline nicely contrasts the more fiery elements of the song whilst the vocals add their own catchy nature to a web of jabbing beats, sparkling hooks, and a persistently eventful design in songwriting and sound. Over time, even outshining the excellent opener, the song tells you all you need to know about the invention, potential, and instinctive power of the band and their rousing music.

The Cliffs As A Reminder reveals another fluid and involved weave of guitar and key, it wrapping rolling rhythms in a tantalising blend which is only enhanced by the ever robustly flamed vocals and their lyrical and emotional theatre. Equipped with a dark almost cantankerous tone through the bass, the track ignites ears full pleasure before making way for the closing elegance and emotional croon of Fear Life. Without quite matching the heights of the first trio of songs, it alternately bellows and hauntingly smoulders with open craft and enthralling endeavour to still leave EP and ears on a notable high.

As mentioned Future Talk are not at a point where their distinct identity shines through their already impressing creativity and exciting sound but guitarists Jay McQuilkin and Jack Cadenhead, drummer Max Elderfield, bassist Mitch Potts, and Taylor seem on course to find that uniqueness at some point, whilst providing as here rather enjoyable times along the way.

The Path That Sadness Paved EP is available from August 24th digitally and on CD.

RingMaster 24/08/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Faces Of Eve – The Story So Far

Faces Of Eve Promo Shot_RingMaster Review

It may intensely fascinate more than it explosively thrills but The Story So Far, the debut EP from UK metallers Faces Of Eve, is a thoroughly enjoyable introduction to a potential drenched band. Across six compelling tracks, they create a tapestry of diverse sounds which at any given moment can be as progressive metal as they are alternative rock, as tech metal as they are experimental. It makes for a seriously enticing proposal keeping ears and imagination rigorously keen and though many songs just lack the final essence to ignite the biggest reactions, an ingrained appetite for more is a swiftly done deal.

The Hertfordshire quartet emerged towards the end of 2013, Faces Of Eve emerging from the ashes of Brave The Moment, Shields, Trophies Of Dahmer, and Olympus Must Fall. A potent following to their impressive live presence quickly grew and now fresh off a UK tour with Oaths, the band is turning up the heat on a national recognition with The Story So Far.

It all starts with For My Fallen Heroes and an enticing coaxing from guitars and a harmonic ambience. The strings of Dan Sloane gently dance with ears as the melodic tones of vocalist Benjamin Fordham Black add their caresses to the magnetic persuasion. The air of the song has an increasingly imposing texture, not intimidating but carrying open shadows enhanced by the heavily wiry tones of bass. It does all unite in a richer and thicker tempting, though that is for mere moments as the song suddenly stops. It is a strong opening but the abruptness of the track without being instantly replaced by its successor, or bleeding straight into it, feels slightly odd. It is a minor thing though and soon forgotten as Feed emerges from the distance with a tangy groove around punchy rhythms. Full in the face, the track is soon a thrilling web of spidery grooves and sonic tendrils wrapped in more strong vocals and contagious hooks. An increasing unpredictability almost as quickly erupts too, a weapon the band use to great effect over the release and here emerges in jagged riffs and barbarous snarls from the bass of Alistair Hines which strikingly flirt with the superbly crafted mesh of flavours and technical imagination. It is like a festival of sound, a collusion of textures hinting at bands like Circles, Muse, Alexisonfire, and Shattered Skies, and at its heart just an irresistible rocker.

Faces Of Eve Cover Art_RingMaster Review   The following Crime Of Passion opens with a sombre atmosphere, vocally and musically, as scythes of guitar court the imagination with the vocals in a melancholic yet charming invitation. The steely funk bait of Hine’s bass stirs the song’s air soon after as the blend of falsetto and emotive vocals entangle, the track eventually shrugging off its reserve as the potent beats of Oliver Jones incite a voracious and snarling tango of metal bred sound. As its predecessor, the song is soon evolving and weaving in various styles with every passing grouping of seconds and similarly gripping ears and thoughts through its bold adventure.

Temporal Rotunda also has a morose toned start, voices and sounds cloaked in a cloudy ambience which eventually sparks into a composed but fiery stroll littered with jabbing beats and gnarly riffs bound in spicy grooves and melodic incitement. The track prowls at certain points, imposing its weight and alluring intensity whilst veining its trespass with attention pulling slithers and twists of melodic and off kilter imagination. By its end the dark side of the track is a riveting enticement, leaving a lingering pleasure which One Man Show runs with through its own vivacious and agitated qualities. The technical growl and nagging of song and sound is a persistent beckoning but the band inventively send it spinning with swift flashes of avant-garde and progressive ingenuity, matched by resourceful vocals. It is an outstanding track which epitomises everything good about The Story So Far and how it just misses the mark. It is inventive and fiercely imaginative but never pushes its promise to the limits hoped, never quite finding the spark which tips a great song into a show stopper.

It is nevertheless inescapable evidence of the songwriting and technical qualities of Faces Of Eve and their infectious sound which is confirmed on final time by Dwellers. The closing song is another which is a born rocker at heart, its aggressive alternative rock core encased in a spiral of tenacious grooves, their union twisting into an increasingly dramatic and ferocious blaze. Things continue to move into new textures and scenery as the track increasingly lure ears and enjoyment, always returning to its creative spine but always providing new highly satisfying endeavours off of it.

Faces Of Eve is a name to make a note of and The Story So Far a release to seriously think about checking out. Both are destined to promote thoughts that here is a band with a very successful future before them if they want it.

The Story So Far EP is available from Monday 29th June through all digital platforms and as a name your price download @ http://facesofeveuk.bandcamp.com/album/the-story-so-far

https://www.facebook.com/facesofeveuk     https://twitter.com/F_O_E_UK

RingMaster 29/06/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

 

Shattered Skies – The World We Used To Know

Shattered Skies low res

With their acclaimed first EP having escaped our radar when it came out around three years ago, The World We Used To Know is our introduction to Ireland  bred progressive metallers Shattered Skies, and have we been missing out. The band’s debut album is an enthralling and thrilling creative emprise which avoids all the self-indulgences and over blown excesses the genre can at times coax out of a band. Instead it creates an epic drama of passion and invention with a technical adventure and skill to match, leaving jaws dropped in awe and passions lustfully inflamed.

Formed in the earlier moments of 2011, the now London based band swiftly gripped attention and critical praise with the Reanimation EP that same year. The time between releases has been filled with a host of reputation growing shows alongside the likes of Machine Head, Dimmu Borgir, Alice Cooper, TesseracT, Scar Symmetry, SikTh, Animals as Leaders, Twelve Foot Ninja, The Algorithm, After the Burial and many more, as well as performances at festivals such as Holland’s ProgPower and Bloodstock in the UK, two appearances at Britain’s Techfest and a trio of visits to Euroblast in Germany. The World We Used To Know will be the biggest lure to the world from the band yet and like for us, it is hard to imagine many genre fans and beyond resisting the fiery imagination and seriously accomplished sounds tempting from within the album’s fascinating walls.

As aflame with inescapable hooks and grooves as it is with breath-taking exploration, the release opens with the short and emotive temptation of Collapse Of Man. A provocative caress of Albumcoverpiano, the instrumental piece draws ears and thoughts into the release with a sense of drama which simply explodes in the following The End And The Rebirth. The band’s new single too, the song dances on the senses with a vibrant electro smile before ruggedly spicy grooves and matching crunchy riffs join the vivacious tempest. Instantly enticing whispers of TesseracT and Circles, the track casts its own uniqueness as it expands and glows with enterprise and invention. The striking melodic vocals of Sean Murphy are an instant treat, his ability and expression as dynamic as the sounds and ideation around him. It makes for a scintillating kaleidoscope of adventure spun on the skills of guitarist/keyboardist Ian Rockett and the simultaneously savage and addictive rhythms of drummer Ross McMahon and bassist Jim Hughes, quite simply it is a stunning start.

Things only explode with greater potency and ingenuity when 15 Minutes takes over, vocals and melodies again a sure seduction against the slightly carnivorous breath of the djent inspired guitar predation and rhythmic stalking. As mentioned before, each track has an inventive and sonic theatre to its songwriting and sound, one which over the first song and especially this has a feel of early My Chemical Romance to it. The track is sensational, a cantankerous croon of an incitement within a whirlpool of unpredictable and fluidly flowing experimentation.

Both the gripping enticement of Haunted and the inflamed serenade of Elegance And Grace keep album and ears burning brightly. The first is an angst fuelled weave of acidic grooves and stabbing riffs aligned to ever mesmeric vocals and harmonies. Its rhythms equally impose their strengths with ease, intimidating rather than coaxing the same plaudits in thoughts and emotions. Its successor is a smouldering romance of charm loaded keys and impassioned vocal expression in comparison. The song simmers and boils across a climactic canvas of riveting Muse meets Dioramic like endeavour, and as the last song engrossing ears and imagination with increasing strength and drama.

The guitars are back snarling and abrasing the pleasures in the following Show’s Over, though as discovered in all always Shattered Skies songs, they only provide one moment in evolving landscapes. Their bait and Meshuggah like growl is never far from the frontline of the song though, just in a constant and seamless flux of fresh sound and inventiveness. The track is an inescapable contagion, so much so that it is hard to think of many progressive metal bands which can rock body and passions with such catchiness to their enormous technical prowess as Shattered Skies.

As The Sea Divides is a tempestuous turbulence of sound next, its blustery guitar bred climate and inhospitable rhythmic trap the scenery for siren-esque keys and the soaring tones of Murphy to poetically and magnificently colour. A little longer to draw similar lustful responses as other songs, it grows to new heights with every listen, though it still misses the top step found by the last song and the outstanding Flipside which follows. Almost bestial in its prowling gait and sonic tempting, the track manages to be savage and impossibly infectious with a melodic bloom of voice and sound to put any crooner and pop band to shame. The song is quite delicious, a must be second single to our minds and another irrepressible reason why Shattered Skies will take the progressive metal world by storm, well this and ten other great reasons on The World We Used To Know.

     The pair of Aesthetics and Saviours seduce senses and emotions next, the first exploring the scent of bands like Tool and The HAARP Machine in a magnetic tapestry of emotion soaked expression and soaring harmonics. Unafraid to have a raw edge too, the song is also ridiculously catchy, something emulated by the darker squalling presence of the second of the two. An antagonistic cage of riffs and drums from the first second, it scowls and teases with scarring tenacity whilst within the raw frame keys and the stunning vocals of Murphy roar and soar.

The track is exceptional but so is the closing eleven minutes plus of the title track which brings The World We Used To Know to a mighty close. An epic journey and creative escapade in its own right, the song seems to draw on all the hearts of its predecessors as it draws a mouth-watering and bewitching soundscape all of its own. Everything about it is sensational and its lengthy presence seemingly over in a flash thanks to its wonderfully busy maze of startling craft and volcanic enterprise.

2015 has already in its brief time seen some quite invigorating encounters, the new 6:33 and Cold Snap albums coming to mind, and on that frontline of excellence Shattered Skies sits looking rather sensational with The World We Used To Know.

The self-released The World We Used To Know is available now @ http://shatteredskies.bigcartel.com/product/the-world-we-used-to-know and digitally @ http://shatteredskies.bandcamp.com/

https://www.facebook.com/shatteredskiesofficial

RingMaster 15/01/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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