The Decline – Resister

The decline_RingMaster Review

Third album in and Australian skate punksters, The Decline, continue to offer contagion fuelled stomps that simply rouse up the spirit. Resister is packed to the rafters with imagination crafted and wholly magnetic propositions, tracks which only want to offer a good time whilst uncaging a lyrical substance easy to get involved with. Pop/skate punk boundaries are certainly not worried too forcibly by the thirteen track adventure but any resistance to its unstoppable virulence is swiftly dead in its invigorating waters.

Formed in 2006, the Perth hailing quartet made its first strong attention grabbing mark with debut album I’m Not Gonna Lie to You in 2010, an encounter straight away pushing the band towards international awareness. Its acclaimed successor of the following year, Are You Going To Eat That, helped spark the opportunity for The Decline to undertake a headlining tour of Europe as well as a Japanese tour with Israeli pop-punkers Useless ID and So-Cal 90’s super band Implants. Across the years the band has continued to share stages with the likes of Descendents, Unwritten Law, Frenzal Rhomb, Propagandhi, Bodyjar, Bouncing Souls, Anti-Flag, Lagwagon, No Use For A Name, No Fun At All, Guttermouth, and The Flatliners, they amongst a great many others. 2014 saw the release of the crowd-funded Can I Borrow A Feeling EP as well as another hectic tour schedule whilst after a line-up shuffle earlier this year, The Decline set about recording Resister, its immediate unveiling coming just before the band hits the festivals Punk Rock Holiday in Slovenia, Munich’s Free and Easy Fest, and Rebellion, the latter one part of a UK tour running through August. With further global shows in the offing too, Resister provides the most potent incentive to check the band out and make this a summer of insatiable romping.

Resister Artwork_RingMaster ReviewThe release opens with New Again, a short, punchy encounter which quickly sets the creative scene for the album. Jangling melodies flirt with muscular rhythms whilst the potent vocals of guitarists Pat Decline and Ben Elliott unite and entwine across the tenacious start to the album. There are no surprises but plenty of fiercely flavoursome sounds setting up ears and appetite for the following Giving Up is a Gateway Drug, the first single from Resister. With the thumping beats of Harry steering the song into view, his drums a blur of activity, the song twists and turns with emotion and energy. Every second is a tempestuous and easy persuasion for ears, vocals again slightly outshining the sounds, but all aspects crafted with inventive and unpredictable elements.

As strong as its start is, Resister kicks up another gear or two from I Don’t Believe onwards. Featuring guest vocals from Cameron Baines of Bodyjar, the third track boldly enters on rolling anthemic rhythms, they in turn laced with sonic spicing from the guitars before it all colludes in one seriously infectious incitement. A whiff of older schooled punk embraces poppier exploits resulting in a rigorous and pungent anthem swinging punches at the music scene and stirring up new hunger for the release. It is an appetite fed just as healthily and fully by Almost Never Met You, a song littered with tangy riffs, sparkling hooks, and the ever impressing vocal combination. The throaty bass twang of Ray Ray as good as steals the show but is matched all the way by the spices just mentioned and a Green Day meets Bodyjar essence coating the excellent encounter.

Both The Blurst of Times and You Call This A Holiday? keep the album’s new levels roaring in ears and thoughts, the first with fiery atmosphere and attitude to body and voice, and the second through its seamless and magnetic passage from a riveting acoustic/vocal lure into another throttle to the floor ball of creative and physical energy. Each, but especially the former, has an air of The Living End to the full-blooded tempting whilst Camberwell Street straight after, explodes with a richer hardcore but melody drenched escapade. It does not quite live up to its predecessors, but again with skilled endeavour and ideation spicing every aspect the song, hits the spot nicely before making way for the similarly successful Broken Bones.

The thickly pleasing Wrecking Ball fires up the passions, even with its opening barbershop skit. Subsequently into an unbridled bellow of aggression and explosive energy, the track is an easy persuasion of rippling rhythms, inescapable hooks, and more potent vocal combinations. But as good as it is though, it gets over shadowed by the outstanding You’re Not The Waitress, another pop infused punk tempest which is pure contagion.

The thirty second Little Voices is more of the same, revealing a similarity to the previous track and others around it without losing its individual potency during a short tenure of ears. It stirs the emotions nicely which Underworld Tour takes on a thrilling ride straight after with its NOFX/Motion City Soundtrack/ Set Your Goals like fusion of sound and imagination. Again rousing is the best word to describe its heavy satisfaction breeding character as it leaves the listener on a high ready for the closing catchy onslaught of Start Again. The song sums up The Decline sound perfectly, melodically hot, energetically sizzling, and creatively lively in a gripping finish to a fine album.

As suggested earlier, major surprises come in rare batches across Resister yet few moments truly feed expectations and every song is a galvanic exploit hard to turn away from. That certainly works for us!

Resister is available now through Pee Records (Australia) @, Bird Attack (USA) @, and Cargo Records (Europe/UK).

The Decline UK tour dates:

Sat 8th – The Maze, Nottingham

Sun 9th – Rebellion Festival, Blackpool

Mon 10th – New Cross Inn, London w/ MDC (Millions of Dead Cops)

Wed 12th – Brudenell, Leeds w/ MDC (Millions of Dead Cops)

Thu 13th – The Hope And Ruin, Brighton

Fri 14th – Owl Sanctuary, Norwich w/War On Women

Sat 15th – Nice N Sleazy, Glasgow

Sun 16th – Exchange, Bristol w/ Teenage Bottlerocket

Mon 17th – The Fighting Cocks, Kingston

RingMaster 03/08/2015

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Six Time Champion – Expecting Honesty

Six Time Champion Promo

Packed to the gills with creative adrenaline and healthy attitude driven by a fiery heart, the new release from and sound of UK pop punks Six Time Champion swiftly seizes attention before taking the listener on a dramatic and seriously compelling ride. The band’s five-track encounter is a tempest of energy and emotion showing that melodic hook driven contagion does not mean there has to be an absence of imposing muscle and confrontational intensity.

Bursting out of Brighton last year, Six Time Champion drew on inspirations from band such as A Day To Remember, Set Your Goals, and Such Gold in their sound and was soon raising keen attention for themselves around the south coast. Debut EP Old Friends, Loose Ends a year ago did the band’s emerging reputation no harm but it is with Expecting Honesty that it is easy to expect real movement in gaining nationwide attention.

Recorded as its predecessor with Lewis Johns, Expecting Honesty stands bold and tall before ears from its first breath. Opener Running Dry rises on a sonic wind and swiftly has the excellent vocals of James Dagg magnetically enticing ears with his delivery whilst the guitars of Simon Glover and Will Smithers sculpt a web of sonic enterprise speared by bulging riffs and similarly intense strikes of bass bait from Steve Isted. It is soon a voracious blaze punctuated by the punches of drummer Richard Titheradge, the track striding with sinews and confidence to the fore but courting a virulent infectiousness which ignites the imagination. The first two of the earlier mentioned influences seem to be raised up as comparisons to the band predominantly but as track and especially EP continues, there is a definite air to early CIV to the sound.6TC EP Artwork

The following Happiness in Emptiness takes the striking start and pushes it on with a musky atmosphere of sonic and rhythmic incitement bound in melodic causticity. As its predecessor the track swings with a catchiness which is inescapable and a formidable intensity which makes every note, syllable, and swing hard hitting and lingering. It is probably fair to say that Six Time Champion does not have that truly unique sound yet but it has a freshness and character which leaves much of the pack watching their wake. The tenacious slice of robust rock ‘n’ roll is matched by the EPs title track, Expecting Honesty striding purposefully with its lyrical and vocal drama encased in an intrusive frame of fierce jabs from Titheradge. The song roars and challenges, almost brawls with ears and thoughts at times, but again lures with an infectiousness which tempers the underlying hostility of the provocation.

Dragging My Feet saunters in next, its initial muggy flame soon relaxing into a feisty canter of probing rhythms and riffs to which Dagg croons with expression and passion ably backed by the rest of the band in voice and endeavour. Like the last song, neither quite finds the spark of those before them but both raise another twang of hunger in the appetite ready for the outstanding closer Separation. The final track sums up the band perfectly, its volatile energy and rhythmic ferocity the challenge and guitar invention the seduction, the extremes conspiring to create inescapable contagion of sound all sparked again by the increasingly pleasing vocals and tantalising invention in the songwriting.

Six Time Champion may not be a fully unique proposition yet but thanks to Expecting Honesty, in quality and potential, it is hard to doubt that this will be their successful destination. Anticipation for highly flavoursome times ahead is also unavoidable via the impressive EP.

Expecting Honesty is available as a name your price download now @

RingMaster 01/12/2014

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Get Stoked – Washington Street EP


Creating a proposition which simultaneously invites the listener to brawl and party with its feisty mix of pop punk and rawer hardcore aggressiveness, the Washington Street EP is one impressive entrance from US punks Get Stoked. It unleashes five tracks which show an imagination and want to invent something strikingly different yet comes with a familiarity which plays like a returning friend loaded up with devilish intent. It is a highly enjoyable romp which dares to be adventurous and is confident enough to employ those highly flavoursome and recognisable spices.

Hailing from Mount Pleasant, Michigan, Get Stoked consists of vocalist Cameron Wheeler, guitarists Ryan Turek and Zach Smith, bassist Ben Jensen, and drummer Jacob Cardona. Other than the quintet citing influences such as The Wonder Years, The Story So Far, Set Your Goals, A Day To Remember, and All Time Low upon their music, there is little more we can tell about the band other than they write and craft rather appetising slices of sinew sculpted pop punk.

Released via Imminence Records, Washington Street opens up with the instrumental Intro, a minute and a half of thumping rhythms provoking through infectious riffs and hooks courted by a dark toned bass temptation. It is not an ep_Cover_3explosive piece but one hinting at the potent offerings to come whilst treating feet and imagination to an energetic dance. Its successful beckoning is followed by the imposing presence of Actions Speak Louder Than Words. Starting with the strong tones of Wheeler over swipes of guitar and an increasingly intimidating run of beats, it is an engaging if unsurprising start even with the also appealing backing vocals of Turek building up the lure of the song. It is when the track suddenly twists into a livelier surge of antagonistic beats and scything strikes of guitar that it comes alive, slipping into a melodic flame of expectations feeding and ear refreshing pop punk revelry. From vocals to sonic incitement, heavy rhythms to abrasing riffery, the song is a thrilling stomp which allows its inventive unpredictability to run naked through the track. The song also shows why the band has been compared to some of their inspirations but just as strongly and pleasingly it lights the senses with older essences of Hagfish and Mucky Pup.

The following Hand In Your Demise takes little time in seizing the imagination and appetite, its opening roam of compelling rhythms and an evocative melodic tendril the forerunner to a blaze of sonic endeavour and melodic tenacity ridden by once again impressing vocals and flirtatious energy. The track is soon stamping its rhythmic feet with firm intent too whilst the guitars cast a web of emotive and infectious designs to which Wheeler wraps his pleasing delivery and lyrical narrative. Though not quite matching its predecessor, the track similarly just grows and excels vocally and musically the deeper into its body it goes to provide another exciting proposition.

Forward Progress lacks the spark of the last pair of songs but nevertheless parades a strong mix of ideation and sounds revealing more of the depth and expressive ability of the band whilst shaping another infectious and provocative encounter. It is soon left in the shadow of the closing title track though; a song from its opening crystalline melody embraces a string of styles and inventive exploration. A rugged cage of riffs and beats initially traps ears with a vocal drama from Wheeler captivating the imagination. The track then bursts into another pungent stride of pop punk clad in a hardcore predaciousness before slipping into something melodically comfortable and anthemically contagious. It is an enthralling slab of punk rock which alone provides enough evidence to suggest Get Stoked is a band with the potential to make major strides and create impressive marks on the punk scene.

That suggestion is more than backed up by the rest of the Washington Street EP, a release easy to recommend to those wanting something more substantial and braver in their pop punk.

The Washington Street EP is available now via Imminence Records @


RingMaster 20/08/2014

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Fathoms – Cold Youth EP


Last year UK hardcore metallers Fathoms introduced themselves with the Transitions EP, a six track free download release which left you thinking that the Brighton quintet had a towering future in UK metal. Their acclaimed release’s successor is now upon us and the Cold Youth EP not only confirms and furthers that suspicion but makes the previous confrontation seem almost deceptive in its promise. The new four track fury is breath-taking, an incinerator of senses and thoughts which launches a torrential and imaginative tirade of invention and ferocity to leave the most potent of rapture in its blistering wake.

Formed late 2010, Fathoms took little time in finding a fervour led fanbase for their aggressively intensive sounds and acclaim for their live performances which has seen them share stages with the likes of A Hero A Fake, Polar, Dividing The Silence, Legend, Set Your Goals, Deez Nutz, and Napoleon as well as tours across the UK, Europe, and the US all equally as successful. The Transitions EP took what their fans knew to a wider audience and strong acclaim within media coverage but with Cold Youth you only feel it was a gentle start as the release in its immense presence surely is a trigger to major things.

Opener Pride of Lions springs from a sample of a speech on teaching children in a sonic haze to inflict the cruellest rhythmic badgering ColdYouthand predatory riffing within an instantly unpredictable and riveting corruptive temptation, the guitars of James Munn and Dan Goddard sculpting and conjuring a web of insidious provocation and startling imagination. It is impossibly captivating, the drums of Lui Sarabia insatiably inventive and impacting whilst bassist Tom Axtell is like a heavyweight raptor as he skirts it all with his carnivorous intent. It is a staggering start, a ridiculously addictive torrent of abuse which is ridden by the equally aggressive and corrosive vocals and vicious scowls of Max Campbell. His attack is uncompromising but also diverse like the sound which ensures something different and apart from not only other similarly clad bands but their previous release.

The following XIV soon notches the intensity and craft up a level, a contagious lure fuelling the chorus and primal swagger of the track whilst the guitars again twist song and manipulate air into a destructive narrative which senses and imagination can only devour with greed. To be overly critical there are elements which are well used and trodden in recent years but employed in a blazing creative fire as here it is hardly an issue. It is fair to say if breakdowns do not feed your appetite song and release might struggle to fully persuade but there is still a wealth of invention to seduce that same hunger whilst for those with a passion for such invention the track is a furnace of manna.

Third song Old Bones opens on a progressive caress if with a soak of menace, and soon stretches its evocative breath into a flesh flailing, bone splintering expanse of crippling rhythmic danger and sonic intrusion. It is a glorious slab of aural turmoil, perfectly crafted and impossible to resist. The vocals solo and as a band, are a fury which is virulently infectious and bewitching whilst musically there is debris flying mentally and emotionally before the thrilling corrosive escapade.

The closing Home/Less is just as ridiculously addictive and inventive, waspish grooves uniting with raptorial rhythms and the intensive riff brutality. The technical craft and inventive thought of the song and whole release, again is transfixing and makes multiple listens to Cold Youth essential to explore and suffer all of its glories, though it only takes one engagement to breed lust.

Fathoms have gone far beyond what was expected after the Transitions EP or maybe just got there quicker. The bottom-line though is that the Ghost Music released Cold Youth is a staggering slice of sadistic mastery which makes the future of the band even more exciting and you can imagine ground-breaking.


RingMaster 02/10/2013

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The Heights – Drag Race On The Moon

the heightspromo1

Hailing from Toronto, Canadian pop rock band The Heights are set to make the summer a warmer and more melodic place with their new EP Drag Race On The Moon. Made up of five vibrant and enterprising alternative/melodic rock songs which flirt with the ear from start to finish, the release is sure to bring the band to a stronger and wider spread attention.

Initially a solo project for Gavin Sutton (vocals / guitar / piano), The Heights soon expanded to a full encounter with the addition of guitarist Nick Dooley, bassist Colin Jacques, and Tyler Jones on drums. The self-titled and Bonacres EPs from the band set appetites alight but it is Drag Race On The Moon which looks set to make the quartet a name on a greater array of lips and passions. Employing inspirations from the likes of Coldplay, City and Colour, and John Mayer, which are open whispers in their clean cut and honed sound, there is a freshness and invention to the band which is impossible to dismiss even if they do not find the spark to ignite your passions. Earning further acclaim for their live performances which has seen them play with bands such as Set Your Goals, Silverstein and Fireworks to name a few, The Heights with the release of the EP stand at the door to greater recognition, whether it is the actual key the next months will tell but certainly the band offers everything available within them to provoke success with their new offering.

Opening song Soldier is an immediate rich attraction, its initial atmosphere brewing behind the emotive and excellent vocals of drotmcoverSutton as intriguing as the keys which also add their voice. Those impacting lures open up a deeper bait for the senses as drums and bass walk around and cage the melodic flames beginning to lick at the ear. Once its chorus erupts for the first time there is a contagion at large which wraps tightly around thoughts and emotions and continues throughout the rest of the song. Reminding of UK band Candidate23 though arguably not quite as virulently addictive, band and song add further drama and energy to the excellent track and secure certain acclaim well before its final note kisses the ear.

The following Some You Give Away has a sense of The Wonder Stuff to its first melodic caresses but then evolves into a boisterous and energy fuelled pleasure complete with jangly guitar strokes and evocative keys. Again the vocals are outstanding and ably aided by the rest of band in voice and inventive sound. A track which prods and leaps through the ear at times,  it is a heated blaze of melodic imagination and impressively crafted songwriting continuing the strong start with ease.

Both Devil and Spinning Webs unveil their feisty yet elegant depths, the first another song with punchy rhythms and sonic crescendos which ignite around the chorus as the keys spread a resourceful and smouldering ambience to the emotive tones of vocals and words. With an element of Doves to it the track passes the baton on to its successor who runs with a piano led narrative which is coated in a melodic beauty which demands total clarity. That the band gives as harmonies lead in sultry bass persuasion and rhythmic tenderness to support another great vocal and keys invitation. Maybe not as impacting as previous more energy driven songs it is still a treat of honed and sculpted excellence.

Closing song You Make Me is the weakest on the release, though still a more than satisfying encounter, which lacks the individuality of earlier songs to set the band and release apart from the rest but with strong craft and passion coaxed enterprise it makes a more than decent conclusion to a fine EP nevertheless. It is hard to say that Drag Race On The Moon got our passions excited enough to ignite any lingering ardour but undoubtedly it got feet dancing and sparked lively reactions in its eager company which is not a bad thing.


RingMaster 09/07/2013

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Only Fumes & Corpses -Selfish Act II


Like going from one extreme to another, Irish hardcore punks Only Fumes & Corpses have released the second part of their two-sided attack Selfish Act.  Whereas Act I, or side one of a proposed physical release, rampaged over the senses and passions through thirteen songs barely touching twelve minutes in accumulative length, the B-side to the ‘album’ consists of one mountainous track lasting around seventeen minutes. Selfish Act II is a towering release which easily defies the temptation to avoid its massive presence by enthralling and seducing the ear and senses with a riveting expanse of invention and imagination. As caustic and raging as one would suspect after its predecessor, the track induces a captivated and thrilled participate in its charge and an exhausted but deeply satisfied admirer in its wake after expelling its final ounce of ferocity.

The Galway quintet formed in 2005 and took no time in earning a reputation as one of the hardest working and determined hardcore bands in Ireland. The years have seen the band scorching stages and audiences alongside the likes of Sick Of It All, Glassjaw, Agnostic Front, Set Your Goals, Sonic Boon Six and many more. Releases from their self-released four track demo through to the Read What Is In Between EP and debut album Who Really Cares, What Really Lasts also brought strong acclaim upon the band no more so than with last EP Selfish Act 1. The new release, classed as an EP too, continues their impressive presence to date but equally takes the band and sound to another pinnacle.

Released via Lockjaw Records, the track opens with a sonic burn of sound with further guitar teasing opening up within to brew an Only Fumes & Corpses - Selfish Act II - Artemerging web of melodic and acidic air upon the ear, the vocals of Momme caustically caressing within the nurtured embrace. It is a slow and deliberate wrapping around the senses whilst intensity is bred and caged within the rhythms and bass lure. With energy in hand it builds into a crescendo which explodes again into a riotous stretch of hardcore urgency and aggression. With a contagious temptation in tow to the punk viciousness, the track easily recruits thoughts and emotions, even if more so musically than lyrically certainly across the whole of the song.

Group shouts and the lone corrosive venom unleashed drive a spiked flame of spite through the core of the song to elevate its potency but it is the adventure and enterprise of the music which captivates most.  Seven plus minutes in and a folk metal like swagger breaks out to add a smile to the fire whilst the energy and pace of the song settles into a less demanding but fully magnetic invitation which then leads into another scintillating metallic temptation with the bass finding extra depths to its throat and the riffs grinding another level into the passions. Superbly crafted melodic near progressive enterprise takes its turn to push the narrative further before again more fluent ideas run along a blade of hard and metalcore like fascination.

Through to its end the track shifts and evolves, never leaving a moment devoid of imagination or excitement and making what seems on paper is an excessive tide of time feel like a passing blink. Selfish Act II is exceptional, the finest thing Only Fumes & Corpses has achieved whilst pushing the bar for British and European hardcore up a few more notches.


RingMaster 05/06/2013

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Only Fumes & Corpses – Selfish Act 1

Less than twelve minutes in length yet thirteen songs in content, Selfish Act 1 from Irish hardcore punk band Only Fumes & Corpses is definitely not a blink and you miss release. It is an abrasive and cutting assault of violent energy and brutal intensity which no one could possibly ignore. The songs charge and bristle with an uncompromising intent and destructive nature brought through challenging punk rock at its most caustic.

From Galway, the band formed in 2005 and become renowned as one of the hardest working and determined hardcore bands in Ireland. They have toured relentlessly throughout Europe as well as their homeland, sharing stages with the likes of Sick Of It All, Glassjaw, Bane, Comeback Kid, Capdown, Set Your Goals, Sonic Boon Six, Agnostic Front, and No Trigger, continually garnering acclaim along the way. Their releases similarly have made strong impressions; their self released four track demo, the eight song Read What Is In Between EP, and debut album Who Really Cares, What Really Lasts on Lockjaw Records, marking the band as one to firmly watch. With a new line-up, the quintet has released the first of two EPs in the shape of Selfish Act 1, again through Lockjaw, to surely ignite a mightier horizon for the band.

The title track distorts the air first, the blistering instrumental a scouring breath upon the ear with a restrained energy which sets things up powerfully for the impending rush of violence. The following Blinded screams at the senses in vocal and sonic breath, whilst within its 30 second fury it pulls an anthemic lure out of its brusque heart.

Tracks like Lost Generation with its squalling vocals and scything guitar sonics continue to ignite the senses whilst other rages such as the initially prowling Towers Fall with its defiant breath and the raging Won’t Come Back enflame the passions with their swift yet potent spite and intent.

The epic Full Circle, well at a minute and a half and compared to other songs feels like a giant piece of adrenaline fired animosity, is a ferocious pummelling from rhythms and churning riffs. The gang shouts combine with the vocals to agitate the senses further whilst the track as a whole is a wall of challenging and emotive energy. As this track confirms, each song despite their brief life always feel complete and even when there are moments where you wish there was a longer presence the tracks are rounded and wholly effective in their mission and success.

Further standout tracks include Smile Forever, the explosive We Were Heroes, and the captivating two parts of The Lush, arguably where the band explore their songwriting and individual abilities the most openly.

Selfish Act 1 is an excellent riot of hardcore punk brought with skill, expression, and most of all passion. It offers all the destructive antagonism and will you could require in a release whilst giving it individuality to set Only Fumes & Corpses apart from most other similarly driven bands. Angst has never been so slight yet so impactful.

RingMaster 08/10/2012

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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