Radiodrone-The Truth Syndicate Diaries

Radiodrone_RingMaster Review

They have a sound which more than backs up the punch and potency of their lyrical confrontation on the world today, and now US rockers Radiodrone have an album to really stir up attention. The Orange County quartet pulls no blows when it comes to unleashing their take on the social and political ills contaminating the landscape we all battle through and it is fair to say no quarter is given by their debut full-length. That is not to day it is all anger and violence though, The Truth Syndicate Diaries equipped with the thickest contagions, most virulent anthems, and a melodic prowess to give any band a run for its money. Is it the most original thing you will come across this year, probably not, but if looking for one massively invigorating and accomplished proposition, this is a done deal.

Radiodrone began early 2014 and quickly whipped up keen support and awareness for themselves through what has been called a “searing” live presence and tracks like Want it Back and NeverLoution, two early singles sparking acclaim and rich radio play. There is rebellion in the band’s rock ‘n’ roll and as suggested earlier in their lyrical stance, yet it is evolved into something which never gets predictable or is lacking in diversity. The band has been described as being “part schizoid Five Finger Death Punch on the heavy edge, part Foo Fighters rock with the commercial aspects and part hard grooves”, a valid hint which is quickly realised and more by album opener Game Change.

The album is top and tailed by intro skits /provocative commentaries, and every song split by the same, but the release really takes off once Game Change hits ears with rapping beats as its guitars brew up a tasty scrub of riffs. The track is soon into a welcoming feisty stride with the rhythms of drummer Danny Molgaard and bassist Stephen Appel continuing to offer threat and infectious tempting. A hard rock air and swing quickly hits the song as guitarist Ethan Hedayat lays a thick lure with his lead vocals, a strong presence assisted as potently in voice by fellow guitarist Randy Cash and Appel. It is a rousing stomp, stirring up the appetite with heavy rock ‘n’ roll hooks to hang your allegiance on and an anthemic might which easily diminishes any reason to moan the lack of major surprises.

cover_RingMaster Review   The following Want it Back is similarly textured and crafted but quickly filling out into its own antagonistic and commanding character. The bass of Appel is wonderfully grizzly whilst the swinging slaps of Molgaard just seem to get more intensive and effective with every passing rally of beats. The track is a predator yet tempered by again impressive vocal strengths and blends, as well as the magnetic enterprise of both guitarists. You can feel a touch of bands like Seether, Godsmack, and Shinedown to the track, such flavours woven into its own if not unique certainly individual incitement.

NeverLoution is a more even tempered and reserved proposal yet with another throaty bass lure amidst wiry strands of sonic grooving, it blossoms into a tenacious and rigorously persuasive offering. Its melodic side and underlying snarl reminds a touch of Sick Puppies whilst its metallic groaning has a whisper of Nonpoint, and combined both aspects only add to another swift nudge on enjoyment before the gripping Get Your Head Down emerges with an enticing sonic shimmer and melodic coaxing. Appel persistently gives the richest alluring shadows to songs, and here his bass is an entrapping resonance leading ears straight into an infectious tempest making up the body of the song, but a stormy muscular affair built on spicy grooves and melodic flames.

Both Showdown and Massive keep things seriously rocking, the first with dirty blues lined walls around jagged riffs and stabbing beats driven by, as now expected, mouth-watering enterprise from vocals and guitars, and the second through its dusty croon across a restrained yet fiery and unreservedly catchy landscape. In their individual ways, the pair of tracks incites another surge of pleasure whilst impressing more, as the album, with every listen. Despite that potency though, they still have to submit to the best track on the album, the raging roar of Battle Call. Instantly like an old friend back to stir up trouble and anarchy, the song enters ears with a sturdy stride and confrontational attitude. The vocals are an easy conscription to its call alone but backed by the sinew driven rhythms and scything hooks of the track, it is an invigorating storm embracing broader melodic escapades to its vivaciously resourceful and incendiary canvas. Quite simply this is the kind of song the word anthem was composed for.

We’re Alright is a slow burner of a song, its smoulder working away on ears and thoughts with an underlying and unrelenting persistence. It also takes a few listens to find the same level of greed for its creative adventure as other exploits upon the album. Like Pop Evil meets Stone Sour, the song leaves a good impression from the off nevertheless triggering a want to go back for more. That success is aggressively ripe within the compelling and bracing snarl of Double Think, just one more offer upon The Truth Syndicate Diaries to get keenly involved with.

The album comes to a close with Don’t Get Me Started, one final voraciously galvanic and superbly crafted inflaming of emotion and energy from release and listener. It perfectly sums up The Truth Syndicate Diaries, an album which might not flirt with startling originality but out rocks and outshines most contenders, and yes it just gets better and better over time to.

The Truth Syndicate Diaries is available now on ITunes, and Amazon.

http://radiodronemusic.com/   https://www.facebook.com/pages/Radiodrone/1462833703951662

RingMaster 14/07/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Oceanic – City Of Glass

Oceanic PR 2

Not sure exactly why but the depth and quality to the Israeli metal/rock scene always surprises, even despite covering numerous releases and artists from its creative well. You have the likes of Orphaned Land, Ferium, and Desert amongst a great many stirring up the world scene with their varied sounds, and from within the underground bands like Walkways making their mark. To the latter you can now add Oceanic, a band beginning to draw and earn potent responses to their presence and debut album, City Of Glass. Formed in 2009, the Tel Aviv quartet has inspired strong and increasing attention, especially over the past couple of years, and now with their first album nudging greater awareness, Oceanic has the potential to be another breaking into broader spotlights well beyond their homeland.

The band’s sound is melodic/alternative rock but with an appetite to throw in unique twists of progressive exploration and feisty imagination. As shown upon City Of Glass it makes for a fascinating and unpredictable proposition which can offer familiar essences in a fresh and often offbeat design. There are moments where things just confuse and miss their target but for the main, album and sound are one captivating tempting. The band itself has grown its stature and reputation in the Israel underground scene through appearances at events like Progstage 2012 and in supporting the likes of Pain of Salvation. Band experiences are not restricted to Oceanic alone either, bassist Or Lubianiker having toured as part of bands for Marty Friedman and Gus G whilst playing on Yossi Sassi’s album Desert Butterflies. The ex-Orphaned Land guitarist is now returning the favour by producing City Of Glass, and providing guest guitar, vocal, and bouzoukitar enterprise within certain songs on the release.

A Scanner Darkly starts things off and swiftly has ears and attention intrigued; it’s atmospheric opening inviting but also oppressively hazy. It is a tantalising mix veined by gentle melodic Oceanic - City of Glass - Front (sRGB)coaxing and soon joined by the gentle husky vocal reflections of guitarist Idan Liberman. The song gently immerses senses and imagination, broadening its intensity and provocative textures with smooth and warm persuasion. Before long its passion and energy breaks through the calm though, crisp beats and a dark bassline uniting with fiery enterprise from the guitars of Amir Manbar and Liberman, whilst the latter’s vocal tones also elevate in emotion and roaring vivacity. The song by now offers a mix of Palms, Bush, and in some ways System Of A Down, melodies and harmonies blooming in a fiercer cage of beats from Gal Shochet and throaty bass suggestiveness from Lubianiker. The song continues to ebb and flow in its intensity, increasingly impressing and exciting ears and imagination.

The following Wind Up In Barrel (Tribute To Walter) continues the strong start, raising the album’s game straight away with its rolling rhythmic start. A sudden drop into an emotive calm catches ears by surprise, losing that potent start quickly and dramatically wrong-footing, especially first time around, but it is soon embroiled in a brewing climatic of creative voracity and sonic agitation. Vocally too, Liberman seems to find a left field approach to his delivery which only adds to the riveting drama of the song. It takes time but the track eventually emerges as an inescapable seduction whetting the appetite further for album and the sultry embrace of South Of Heaven which follows. Its smouldering lures and charm is just the lead into more tempestuous but restrained musical and emotional progressive bred turbulence. It is a compelling encounter, essences of bands like Shinedown and Seether making glimpses in the magnetic presence of the song.

Both Enter and Clouds keep attention and enjoyment high, each again a mix of aggressive energies and reflecting tranquillity, never lingering in either too long and uniting them with craft and invention. Neither song creates new templates for rock ‘n’ roll it is fair to say, but both provide refreshing and thoroughly satisfying proposals, the first a melodic bellow with tangy sonic endeavour from the guitars and another rhythmic enticement to equally intimidate and excite. It only grows in pungent appeal and strength over time whilst its successor almost stalks ears with its heavy rhythmic resonance and predatory riffing, though again it is tempered by the strong vocal and guitar sculpted enterprise bringing warmth and light to the darker tones.

The brief and harmonically elegant Fish You Shouldn’t Eat (Part 1) slips in next, its musty warmth and sonic shimmer, a pleasing appetiser for the impact of These Countless Hours. This is a song which left ears and thoughts undecided and still does even though it is also a compelling puzzle. It starts off in impressive style, rugged beats and caustic tone a swiftly enthralling protagonist aided by similarly robust vocals. It continues to light ears until something strange happens, an exploration of invention emerges which sees music and vocals going in different directions. Both continue to work just not together for personal tastes, and we devour anything with a warped twist or avant-garde approach. It is almost as if singer and instruments have their own individual songs and are trying to unite them as one. The fact that it keeps luring ears back to try to make sense of it is a testament to what is going on in ideation just not its success.

We are back on an even keel with HMS Beagle, an intensive ballad of power and emotion with more roaring senses licking flames than a bushfire, and straight after through the melodic smooch of Eva The Cat Doesn’t Sleep, a song with a Poets Of the Fall whisper to its melodic and creative beauty. Vocally Liberman shows his full and strong range, occasionally showing an Andy Partridge like lilt, whilst guitars and rhythms combine in a graceful romance of accompanying sound.

The track Oceanic brings City Of Glass to an epic end, its meaty length and imaginative textures a rich croon of soaring vocals and provocative melodies wrapped in thick bass shadows and gripping beats. It has a latent aggression and underlying anger to it too, which only seems to intensify the emotion and sonic tempest smothering ears. It is a fine end to a great album. There are certainly moments which do not work as well as others but ultimately, City Of Glass is a dramatic and enthralling storm of melodic and alternative rock very easy to recommend all at least should check out.

City Of Glass is available now @ http://oceanicband.com/album/city-of-glass-full-album

https://www.facebook.com/OceanicBand

RingMaster 18/03/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://reputationradio.yooco.org/

Feral Sun – Evacuate

 

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The final week of January sees the debut album from UK rockers Feral Sun getting a well-deserved reboot, a re-release sure to mop up the unsuspecting appetites and fans that were not netted the first time around by the band. Evacuate is quite simply a collection of emotive and sonic anthems which come in varying forms and all roar with a snarling angst. They are also propositions which seem as familiar as they are fresh, the band weaving inspirations from the likes of open Stone Sour, Karnivool, Alter Bridge, and Trivium into their own distinctive designs. It plays like an old friend re-groomed, revitalised, and with a new found individuality.

Formed in 2009, the London quartet spent time honing their sound and live set before unleashing themselves locally and gaining a swift reputation and potent following for their stage ferocity and similarly impacting sound. Next came the creating of their first album, an imposing but feistily seductive encounter which again embraced a strong and acclaimed acceptance upon its first unveiling. With anticipations keen thanks to a trio of singles from the release, Evacuate is now poised to inflame the country with its national outing, with an inevitable success it is easy to expect thanks to its stirring and imaginative body of sound and enterprise.

Evacuate takes little time in awakening ears and attention as opener Find A Way follows its initial jangle of guitar with a wall of heavily swung beats and predatory riffs. It is a formidable entrance given greater potency by the instantly magnetic vocals of Mick Burns and a broader coaxing of guitar from himself and lead guitarist Marco lo Coco. That earlier mentioned familiarity is soon apparent but it only spices up the dramatic weight and character of the song. At times essences of Seether make a suggestive whisper and in others a mix of Stone Sour and Mudvayne, but all colouring which increases the reach and appeal of the impressive start.

There is also a raw quality to the track and a ‘raggedness’ to riffs which only increases the texture and lure of the proposition, revealing one aspect of the band’s sound to which the next up Alone Feral Sun covershows another. Also offering an aggressive touch at first, the song soon slips into a mellower melodic landscape, Burns opening up an emotive narrative with increasingly impressing vocals as lo Coco tantalises with an elegant melody against the darker provocative tones of Alex Nikitin’s bass and the skilfully fluid rhythms of drummer Jay Stephenson. His rhythmic incitement ebbs and flow in attack and weight perfectly as the song croons with passion and intensity as a 3 Days Grace like persuasion spices the unique theatre of Feral Sun’s invention and fiery craft, the band entwining melodic and hard rock with a more classic bred adventure.

The album’s excellent title track is stomping with teeth bared and passions inflamed next, prodding and swiping at ears with antagonistic attitude wrapped in a sonic and melodic tempering. Feet and voice are swiftly recruited by the song, its anthemic qualities as potent as the intimate drama colouring the track before it passes the listeners over to the alluring charm of People Are Dying. Its opening balladry within a sultry climate, leads senses and imagination into evocative scenery of acoustic led persuasion when subsequently opens up into an expanse of fiercer fiery incitement in sound and vocals. A slow burner compared to its predecessors and arguably never reaching their plateaus, the song still impresses and thrills much as One More Day after it.

With no song leaving ears and satisfaction wanting, there is a shallow dip in the album caused by the might of its start and impending closing stretch. This song for example a seriously compelling stroll of brewing anger and militant intensity with a craft individually and united from the band to match, yet it just misses the final spark to emulate the heights of the early songs. Nevertheless with lo Coco spinning a web of impressive skill and adventure around the ever striking vocals, it leaves a lingering pleasure and impression just as the Audioslave scented Into Pieces and the enslaving Long Road. The first of the two almost stalks ears and thoughts with its predacious gait and aggravated riffery whilst the second finds a similarly imposing leer to its sound and emotion bound in another strapping of sonic intrigue and vocal might, especially in the latter passage where the whole band unveil an irresistible vocal call to arms.

Breathe continues the strong diversity to Evacuate next with its distinctive and rigorously engaging balladry. Its highly pleasing flame of melodies and harmonies is followed by the equally potent emotional reflection of Take This Away. The track aligns resourceful calm and expression with raw blazes of angst soaked aggression from guitars and rhythms, providing further evidence of the maturity and imagination within the band’s songwriting and its fascinating realisation.

The album ends as mightily as it began, with firstly Caught In The Act exploring a mouth-watering blend of hard rock revelry and dirty rock ‘n’ roll tenacity. It results in the most inventive and unpredictable treat on Evacuate. The whole album is a heady peak of quality and temptation, but its start and finish provide the pinnacles with this song a tempestuous march of hungry riffs, hostile rhythms, and grooves to drool over. Its successor Falling is just as exhilarating with its virulent stroll of vocals and hooks interspersed with gripping rock pop devilry posing as a chorus. The album’s final song leaves ears and appetites, which are already full to bursting with highly enjoyable sounds and enterprise, just that little bit hungrier and greedier for more.

Evacuate is a roaring stomp of a release, not always as unique as it might be but for the main using the recognisable flavouring in fresh and contagious ways. For a riot of thoroughly satisfying and invigorating rock ‘n’ roll, it is hard to imagine too many over shadowing Feral Sun’s debut in the coming months.

Evacuate is released on Monday 26th January through all good stores and @ http://www.feralsun.bigcartel.com/

http://www.feralsun.com/

RingMaster 26/01/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Fahran – Chasing Hours

Fahran Online Promo Shot

Their second album but our introduction to UK hard rockers Fahran, the band easily gives potent reason to the busy acclaim around them with new album Chasing Hours. Made up of thirteen impressively accomplished and melodically fired tracks, the release awakens a rich intrigue for the quintet. It is not an encounter which manages to ignite a fire in the belly of passions, though it has moments where it takes them on a lustful dance, but certainly from start to finish it sparks and encourages a healthy appetite for the band’s potential and magnetically flavoursome sound.

Fahran was formed in 2012 after emerging from the ashes of Toxic Federation. It was not long before the Breaston five-piece unveiled their self-titled debut album to strong and keen responses from fans and media alike. Infusing inspirations from the likes of Queen, Iron Maiden, Shinedown, Alter Bridge, and Black Stone Cherry into their expressive hard rock sound, the band has also built an attention grabbing reputation with their live performances, which has seen them successfully play the Bloodstock and Download Festivals. Last year saw the departure of bassist Alex Stroud and vocalist Nick Whitcroft but the band swiftly bounced back recruiting Josh Ballantyne and Matt Black on bass and voice respectively, before creating the crowd funded Chasing Hours. With the pair alongside guitarists Jake Graham and Chris Byrne, and drummer JR Windsor, Fahran are poised to wrap up the attention and emotions of the nationwide rock scene with their second album, and it is hard not to imagine the band finding an intensive spotlight upon them from its release.

Chasing Hours is a refreshing treat for all hard and melodic rock fans but even if those genres generally are not the staple diet of ears the band offers plenty within the album to fire up attentive interest. Opening track Long Gone Fahran Cover Artworkinstantly flirts with the imagination through a delicious and slightly melancholic strum of guitar, its tone soon assisted by the darker breath of the bass and resonating swipes of drums. A sonic bred atmosphere rises around the masterful coaxing next to fill senses and thoughts with poetic drama and emotive suggestiveness. It is a fascinating introduction to the song which brews to a greater intensity before parting for equally enticing grooves and rhythmic enterprise to stake their claim on the passions. In no time the track is launching into a feisty and melodic striding of sound and intent which without the potency of that glorious beginning still inspires a highly satisfied and eager reaction.

Straight away the band’s songwriting craft and technical skills are open within the first song, showing a maturity and invention which belies their still young years. These qualities are right away reinforced by the next up Take This City Alive. Equipped with an eighties bred vivacity and infectiousness, the song bounces along with an absorbing weave of sonic endeavour and antagonistic rhythmic aggression. It leaps at the ears and taunts them to embrace the swing and boisterous familiarity of its body, which even with an aversion to its seed era is not easy to refuse. A Thousand Nights is one of those classically fuelled rock songs where again the band do not hide their inspirations as it flames around ears. It does not come up to the same levels of the first couple of tracks but with riveting guitar enterprise and ideation from Graham and Byrne locked within the intimidating rhythmic bait of Windsor, the track offers increasingly inviting bait within melodic rampancy.

Current single I Heard A Joke Once unloads a muscular and sonically alluring proposition with riffs a contagious beckoning across the track. It is a forceful suasion though again, for personal tastes, lacks the spark of the opening pair and many of the subsequent tracks on the album, including the following title track. A sinew sculpted slice of rock balladry with a whiff of country rock and classical seduction to its emotive narrative, Chasing Hours is a smouldering slice of enjoyment which maybe does not set emotions raging but has them simmering very nicely before making way for the boldly pleasing pair of Cased In Steel and You Could Be Mine. The first of the two finds more rugged scenery to soak in earnest vocals and melodies whilst the second is a similarly sturdy with a raw canvas of persuasion coated in evocative sonic hues and the persistently impressing vocals of Black. The song also reminds forcibly that the band really know how to cast enslaving grooves and rhythmic baiting.

As good as those songs and the highlights before them are, they are mere appetisers for the true pinnacles of the album. First up comes the brilliant Some Kind Of Family, a storming stomp of a track which from its first riotous breath also entwines ears in emotionally coloured melodies and sonic adventure to enthral and potently feed the imagination. Hooks and grooves are short yet deeply entrenching whilst Black and band find their most mesmeric vocal strength yet, all within the ever spicy and gripping rhythmic web of Windsor and Ballantyne. Its magnificence is swiftly equalled by Are We Free, a fiery rampage of scorched grooves and menacing beats all honed into a blaze of seductively bruising rock ‘n’ roll with more than an air of Black Stone Cherry and Seether to it. The bass of Ballantyne stalks with predatory instincts across the song for his finest moment but again it is the pleasingly nagging grooves and their irresistible toxicity which seal the deal with a greedy appetite.

Back To Me with its wonderful almost folkish opening suggests it is a rival to the might of the previous pair, guitars and vocals a spellbinding union. But without admittedly losing its hold on attention and satisfaction, it does slip into a more formulaic hard rock offering, though with it continually flirting with those initial lures it finds a ready welcome anytime. Prison is similar in that success, its elegant melodies and emotive hues a transfixing enticing which gives the song its tightest grip on the passions yet the powerful and climactic expulsions, where Black shows his richest delivery in the song, despite making a striking impression still lose the early hold the track had. Nevertheless it is a potent and continually growing proposition but soon left pale against the metallic enticement and melodic rock invention of the outstanding Black Mirror. Another major moment of the release, the song proves the band can merge gentle caresses with raucous intensity for an exhilarating incitement.

Completed by the highly agreeable if underwhelming Storms We Ride, the album is a persistently engaging and rigorously captivating encounter. Chasing Hours has moments where it ebbs and flows in its success, though to be fair that is as much down to personal tastes as anything, but also dramatic moments where Fahran show they have the potential to take UK hard rock to a new world awakening level. It is hard not to be excited about the future of this band.

Chasing Hours is available from Monday 11th August through all digital outlets.

http://www.fahran.com/

8/10

RingMaster 09/08/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Pop Evil – Onyx

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Though its veins are not exactly bursting with originality, Onyx the new album from US rockers Pop Evil is without doubt a rigorously compelling and invigorating slab of fiery melodic rock. Every shrug of its sinews and each melodic flame exhaled soak ears with an open familiarity whilst every muscular blaze of emotion and searing of sonic enterprise leaves thoughts and passions greedily content. It is may be not going to set the year on fire but the band’s third album is definitely bringing it a thoroughly enjoyable stomp of aural temptation.

Still under a keen spotlight after touring across Europe supporting Five Finger Death Punch, the band hits the European market and ears with a mighty slab of potent contagion. Released via Eleven Seven Records, the album has a voracity and tempestuous passion to its body which along with inciting melodies and perfectly barbed hooks, simple enthrals the senses and imagination. Having already established themselves on their side of The Pond with their rich tempting sound and albums War of Angels and even more so Lipstick on the Mirror, as well as a clutch of attention grabbing singles, the Michigan quintet are setting their sights on a wider audience and it is hard not to expect a healthy success through Onyx alone. Having also impressively shared stages with the likes of Three Doors Down, Papa Roach, Puddle Of Mudd, Theory of a Deadman, Buckcherry, Judas Priest, Black Stone Cherry, and Seether since forming, as well as going through the obstacles music throws up including line-up changes, Pop Evil have found a fresh and determined tenacity which shines across their new release as powerfully as the craft and passion soaking it. Produced by Johnny K (Disturbed, 3 Doors Down, Megadeth), Onyx is an encounter which does not herald a torrent of surprises but does ensure satisfaction is fat to bursting.

The album gets off to a flyer with opener Goodbye My Friend, an instant attention grabbing encounter which from its initial guitar and bass coaxing awakens a potent appetite for what is to come. Nick Fuelling and Dave Grahs take little time casting a web of riffs and grooves to snare the imagination whilst bassist Matt DiRito brings a predatory growl to the mix to accentuate the immediate potency of the song. It is an enthralling mix to which vocalist Leigh Kakaty adds his impressive tones as the rhythms of drummer Josh Marunde punctuate and frame the thrilling enticement. The track also offers the comparisons which stand across the whole album, its sounds like a mix of Seether and Sevendust with the metallic rapaciousness of Spineshank, the emotive angst of Three Days Grace, and the anthemic craft of Drowning Pool. To be fair though that still only gives part of the picture as shown by the second song on the album.

Bringing a rich colour of Alice In Chains to its striking canvas of sound and gripping narrative, Deal with the Devil prowls and strolls around the senses like a warrior, the guitars and bass crowding ears with forceful intensity and ravenous intent whilst rhythms punch with weighty persuasion. The latest single is a stirring and climactic incitement, ablaze at times with infection soaked melodies and senses entwining grooves for a thoroughly exciting temptation. One not quite matched but certainly thrillingly backed up by previous single Trenches. Holding a defiant air to its body of sound and lyrical call, there is an air of antagonism to the song which only urges the sonic warfare of the guitars to blaze with brighter flames and virulence as additional keys and electronic bait bring extra charm.

The riotous charge of the album takes a break with power ballad Torn To Pieces, a magnetic song which goes exactly where expectations assume but still leaves a lingering and increasingly potent lure in its wake. Kakaty is a powerful and controlled vocalist throughout the album and shows his depth of expression and emotional quality masterfully here to match the strengths of the sounds caressing and at times scorching his words. It is a glorious emotive encounter which leaves the following Divide looking a little pale in comparison. To be fair the song is a feisty and vivaciously striding suasion but lacks the extra guile of say its predecessor or the punchy invention of other songs on the release. Nevertheless it makes a pleasing play upon the ears as does its successor Beautiful, another song which just misses the potency and success of others, but still leaves a flavoursome offering for a hungry appetite to devour.

Things return to the opening plateau with the outstanding Silence & Scars, a song which seduces and pressurises thoughts and emotions simultaneously with imaginative and emotion driven invention. There is a touch of Bush to the song, its grunge spice and melodic weaves absorbing whilst a cathartic essence to its whole picture offers a magnetic radiance. The track is bewitching as is next up Sick Sense, a furnace of a song which is as raw as it is mesmeric, as caustically charged as it is a resourceful seducing. Again it is like an instant friend, that familiar seeding inescapable bait but with a voracious fuel to the backing vocal roars and a nu-metal menace to the ingenious twists within the song, again that Spineshank reference coming forth, the track is an exhilarating proposition.

Fly Away and Behind Closed Doors keep the album burning brightly and at times ferociously, the first an eagerly striding charge of pop rock urgency across evocative textures whilst the second steps into a more formula yet forcibly appealing canter of melodic fire and vocal enticement. Both songs leave a smoking long term bait working away even after their departure, their heat and passion enough to override a slightly predictable design, before the more aggressive and excellent Welcome To Reality has it moment to ignite the senses. It again confirms that Pop Evil are masters at creating songs which might not break away from existing trodden paths but bind the listener up in feverishly addictive and irresistible anthems.

The album closes with Flawed, a striking dramatic and impressive end to Onyx which simply underlines the quality and exciting presence of band and release. Pop Evil is not inventing the wheel, or arguably even redesigning it, but it is giving it a breath-taking and often scintillating soak of explosive colour.

Onyx is available now through Eleven Seven Music with the standard European version holding 3 additional tracks whilst the deluxe version features an extra 5.

www.popevil.com/

8.5/10

RingMaster 02/07/2014

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The Hunger Pact – Cold Woman EP

The Hunger Pact Online picture

Hailing from Reading, UK alternative rock band The Hunger Pact is continuing to emerge as one rather compelling and accomplished presence. Their self-titled EP released earlier this year triggered strong attention with its four track invitation to a new breath of inventive and richly promising multi-flavoured rock. Now the trio returns with its successor the Cold Woman EP to further the promise and reputation of a rather fine new band.

Consisting of vocalist/multi-instrumentalist (drums, bass…) Ed Rogers, his guitarist brother Ollie, and rhythm guitarist James Pierce, The Hunger Pact brings a parade of eclectic and potent inspirations into their distinctive sound, the likes of Eric Clapton, BB King, Flyleaf, Nirvana, Guns N Roses, Santana, Seether, and Daughtry amongst many spicing up their invention. Originally a solo project for Ed, with The Hunger Pact EP a strong first marker, the band expanded with Ollie providing the guitars for the release and beyond, and James linking up for subsequent live shows. Now with the release of Cold Woman you can sense another big step is about to be taken; their debut release the awareness nudging introduction and the new EP a potent reinforcement and you suspect sizeable trigger to a wider recognition.

The release opens with the title track, a slowly brewing song whose initial touch is that of raw brooding guitar and sonic coaxing as the The Hunger Pact Cover Artworkvocals of Ed opens up an emotive narrative with a strong expressive delivery. The song continues well into its body with the opening slow burn of a persuasion and energy, its presence a smouldering evocation with gently stirring sonic blazes from the guitar aligned to the melancholic laced bass prowling the scenery. As mentioned it is a simmering heat which simultaneously breeds a sonic temptation and intensity that without ever scalding the air spawns a fiery finale which flows seamlessly into its successor. The track is a mesmeric lure into the release and band making the perfect canvas for Alright to spawn its busier sinewed provocation from. The second track is a sturdier more classically rock bred encounter with an element of punk rock to its breath, and whilst not quite magnetising the imagination and emotions to the same potency as its predecessor makes for another deeply satisfying temptation. There is a simplicity which cores the track, and release, a straight forward lure which teases out stronger hunger but also a craft and invention to the guitar and the enterprise of everything on offer which screams out promise and adventure.

Cold Woman is completed by the predation coated and raw Alone Again, its sound coming with a causticity which suggests it was recorded as a live take and an unpolished attraction implying that on stage the band is as equally a formidable proposition. The track seems to finish too soon, well for the enjoyment and appetite anyway, it’s closing sonic dissipation expelled seemingly mid-chorus or certainly whilst the song is in full confrontation. To be honest whilst greed wishes it had held off, the moment works very well and indicates yet again that there is an invention and imagination to the band which will see them flourish with great adventures ahead.

The Cold Woman EP is a thoroughly captivating and exciting release, and though it is one spark short of a raging fire, it burns away with a creativity and charm that will surely only see The Hunger Pact excel and emerge as a potent force ahead.

http://www.thehungerpact.com/

7.5/10

RingMaster 25/10/2013

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Superfecta – Self Titled EP

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Last year demo single She’s a Star attached itself to the ear with a richness of promise even if in a raw state. There was a craft and passion to it which made Superfecta a proposition to make note of. Now the band unleash their self-titled debut EP with the same song revisited making a stronger persuasion alongside a trio of just as impressive tracks, and the promise already embedded intensified and even more potent.

The London based quartet of vocalist Andy Urwin, guitarist Danun Todd, bassist Max D Pinto, and Bolivian drummer Junior, formed in the summer of 2011 spending the first year writing and honing their sound whilst impressing with their live performances. With a sound which is hard rock and grunge cored as well as melodically coloured, the band entered the studio earlier this year to record the EP, and a rather tasty larger introduction it has emerged to be.

The release opens with the new beefier and intensive version of She’s a Star, the song emerging from a tantalising and mysterious sonic Superfecta - Superfecta - The EP - Artworkhaze before the guitars twist away to create a thrilling clearing of sinewy riffs, firmly crisp rhythms, and the drawing vocals of Urwin. Immediately there is an air of Stone Temple Pilots and Soundgarden to the song, the smouldering heat of the sounds bewitching around the richly hued guitar suasion and throaty bass temptation. There is a familiarity to the song which the whole EP comes under it emerges, but a lure which though soaked in recognition only fires up the appetite further. Wholly infectious the track impressively reveals a band with strong craft and imagination to their songwriting and music, even if one still finding their truly unique sound and presence.

The following Paradox is as equally compelling, the guitar of Todd drawing an enticing beckoning which the rest of the band feed from and accelerate until the track is striding confidently and engagingly through the ear. There is a classic rock lilt to the riffs stretching the variety of the release whilst the chorus is another magnetic call on voice and passions. Like its predecessor there is a catchiness which only recruits full and eager attention whilst feet stroll keenly alongside the rhythmic stomp, it all resulting in another very easy to enjoy and succumb to offering.

Inside caresses the ear with a gentle elegant narrative, acoustic guitar kissing the senses at the start as the drums and bass respectfully pace its croon. Vocals too are reserved but powerful especially in the small crescendos of intensity and passion which climb from the simmering heart of the song. There is a whisper of Alice In Chains and Seether to the track which adds extra evocative spice and though it fails to find the same heights of the previous pair, the song is again undeniable evidence of a rather promising and skilful band.

Final song Pendulum kicks up the gears to charge with a rock ‘n’ roll predation, hard and classic rock whispers fuelling its feisty enterprise and ravenous breath. The choppy riffs and melodic colour flowing from the muscular energy only feed the emerged hunger whilst the sonic flames licking at its sides from time to time bring greedy rapture to the boisterous revelry.

Whether the song or EP is offering anything new or unique is debatable but with the accomplished presentation and passionate  delivery not forgetting thrilling enterprise, the EP is a refreshing and deeply satisfying encounter which has anticipation for the future on full alert.

www.facebook.com/Superfectarocks

8.5/10

RingMaster 02/10/2013

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Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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