Oh Captive – Two Mirrors

Oh Captive Online Promo shot

It is hard to supress a roar of frustration and disappointment when after enjoying a new and thrilling encounter from a band with all the tools and sounds to be a major presence in British alternative rock, they announce ‘on the eve’ of its unveiling they are to be no more. That is what has happened with Bristol quartet Oh Captive. Just a couple or so weeks before new EP Two Mirrors is released to light up ears and appetites, the band announced it had called it a day, though it might emerge to be more an internal evolution resulting in a name change and new direction rather than a full departure. Time will tell but whatever the outcome, they leave behind two impressive releases and a collection of vibrant and inventive songs, their latest the most captivating yet.

Formed in 2012, Oh Captive swiftly lit their local music scene and subsequently set about the whole UK scene with their energetic live presence, playing with the likes of Sonic Boom Six, UK Subs, Straight Lines, Max Raptor, Sharks, Blitz Kids, I Divide, Fighting With Wire, and Scholars along the way. Their sound has drawn comparisons to the likes of Biffy Clyro and Twin Atlantic, open and potent spices in the band’s debut EP Advance Creature, which was released in the March of 2013. It was a stirring and dynamic offering rippling with a potential which has been realised with sizeable success within Two Mirrors. The past year has seen Oh Captive supporting the likes of Marmozets and Arcane Roots, and make highly successful appearances at festivals such as Leopalooza and New Age, whilst media attention has grown as potently too. Now it may be over, but if so the band has gone out with a bang and ensured attention for their next exploits will be eagerly attentive.

Oh Captive - Cover Artwork   Two Mirrors opens with Recover, an instant ear grabbing proposition as vocalist Tim Kelly and a tangy rub of guitar combine a minimalistic but highly tempting bait to bring the song into view. It is not long before the heavy throated bassline of Tom Hitchins and the punchy beats of drummer Chris Hill leap in, accompanied by sonic flames cast by the guitars of Curtis King and Kelly. Immediately there is a drama to song and sound, light and dark textures colluding in an imposing but inviting web. Settling down a little for the continuation of the narrative from Kelly, the song increases its lure as it builds to energetic crescendos and an anthemic chorus. There are no major surprises in the melody soaked track but there is a bold invention to match its gait, which leaves expectations and predictability absent protagonists in the outstanding encounter.

The impressive start is backed with similar strength by Motion / No Motion. The second song is a rhythmically raucous stomp from its first breath with Hitchins offering a magnetic lure of a bassline. It is a dark coaxing surrounded by the concussive stick ability of Hill, a thick drawing of attention never wavering even as they are immersed in the sonic and melodic blaze of the guitars and the ever impressing tones of Kelly. There is something missing compared to its predecessor though, a small element just stopping it drawing the lustier satisfaction bred by Recover, but nevertheless the song has feet and imagination leaping in tandem with its resourceful enterprise.

Live Fast Don’t Last explores more of a croon for its creative shape and emotive intensity next. It has a slower flow and a more immersive canvas than the last songs with melodic tenacity and evocative expression from the vocals providing a deeper reflective colour and emotion to the encounter. It smoulders and tempts pleasingly as it shows another side and depth to the band’s songwriting and its creative realisation, though again cannot quite emulate the success of the first track and indeed its successor.

The EP’s title track brings it all to a lively and impressive close. Two Mirrors bounds along with another invitingly dark bassline aligned to eagerly swung beats, whilst their union is drenched in an anthemic energy and charm which the band seems to conjure at ease. Veined by richly enticing and tenacious guitar craft, the song makes a pungent end to a fine and enthralling release. If this is to be the end of Oh Captive, song and EP has seen them go out on a high and will leave fans saddened and newcomers kicking themselves for not discovering their promise and quality before.

The Two Mirrors EP is available from March 23rd through all digital outlets.

https://www.facebook.com/ohcaptive

RingMaster 23/03/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://reputationradio.yooco.org/

Wolfetone – Silence Is Acquiescence

Wolfetone Online Promo Shot

A slow burner which takes time to getting going in some ways but emerges as a quite tasty slab of adventurous rock ‘n’ roll, Silence Is Acquiescence suggests the UK has another highly promising proposition in its rock scene under the rather cool name of Wolfetone. The release loudly hints that this is a band we should definitely be watching out for ahead, and with its rampant potential and increasingly persuasive songs, the band’s highly enjoyable debut album suggests why wait, a sentiment we can only concur with. It is a attention holding start to Wolfetone’s persuasion on a national spotlight, one with a few things needing ironing out ahead, but a collection of dynamic and exciting songs which do what all encounters should, leaves ears eager and satisfaction full.

Hailing from Northampton and Milton Keynes, Wolfetone has taken little time luring in eager support and attention through a live presence which has seen the band pick up highly favourable reviews and increasing acclaim whilst sharing stages with the likes of Heart of a Coward and Scholars. Their dynamic mix of alternative and melodic rock is bred with inspirations from bands like Billy Talent, Sikth, Protest The Hero, Foo Fighters, Reuben, and Hundred Reasons but as Silence Is Acquiescence shows, but it is a sound with its own emerging and distinct personality as shown by the album.

It opens up with Blame Culture, a track which personally did not grab as quickly or fully as following songs subsequently do with greater ease. In saying that once the big healthy bassline showed its lure and a potent wiry hook bound a flame of riffs, the track certainly had interest and appetite engaged. In hindsight it is a relatively low key song in comparison to many of its successors, but doing enough to tempt and certainly showing the strength of the band’s songwriting as well as their individual and united skills. The firm and punchy rhythms of Baz Woodsford and the increasingly alluring dark throated tones cast by Ollie Young’s bass make the strongest impression in a song which ultimately lacks the spark to ignite personal tastes. That success though is swiftly solved by the following Tanks, a vibrant and immediately striking slice of melodic rock veined by another spicy bassline and a potent blaze of enterprise from the guitars of Andy 11095_674690912650087_5503712840674927464_nSimmons and Dan Moloney. There is also a pop punk contagion to the stride and chorus of the encounter, offering a dynamism lacking in the last song which in turn feeds a new energy in the craft of the band. The vocals of Moloney also have a new lease of life, ably backed by the rest of the band in a three pronged harmonic adventure.

Born Human steps up next and is similarly loaded with an eager attitude and adventurous nature; the album in full swing now and providing all the proof as to why Wolfetone is beginning to stir up a buzz. The prime hook of the song is a tangy temptation too which steals the show from equally robust and tenacious elements within the seriously catchy proposition, whilst the changing gait of the song adds to the easily accessible but unpredictable nature of the track.

The feverish Enemies with its emotional intimacy and thumping heartbeat has ears and imagination greedily involved, a tempting reinforced by the excellent slip into melodic and harmonic calm with just an edge of angst. It is a passing breath though as the song is soon flexing creative and rhythmic muscle as hooks bite and melodies flame over the captivating frame of the song. Another highlight of the album, it is matched in success by the impassioned drama of Lost Boys, where guitars and voice create a colourful scenery of lively melodies and reflective emotion respectively, and the punkier exploits of Milton. An immediate favourite on the album, the track stands toe to toe with the listener through abrasing riffs and bracing rhythms whilst vocals croon and hooks spread infectious enterprise. Once more the bass Young feeds instinctive likes as if it already knows what the listener wants, his growling instrument the darker intimidation of a song which is prepared to brawl but would rather rigorously party with the listener.

Another highlight of Silence Is Acquiescence seduces straight away, The Constant a song which is happy either stirring up a tempest of sound and endeavour or laying warm melodic hands on the senses, and does both with invention. There is certainly a depth to the sound and songwriting of Wolfetone which is untapped but hinted at throughout the album, this song the strongest evidence of that further promise and potential which we will hopefully be exploring over future releases.

The album is finished by an acoustic version of Blame Culture, a wholly captivating offering with bewitching strings, but one which does emphasize the only issue with Silence Is Acquiescence, and that is the production on the vocals. Less prominent on the first couple of tracks but increasingly obvious as songs pass by, the excellent voice of Moloney and the supporting tones of the band come in a hollow embrace. It is a slightly cavernous effect surrounding them which is almost as if the vocals were recorded in a large cold bathroom rather than where the rest of the songs were laid down. The fact it cannot stop the songs making such strong impressions is testament to the band and the writing but it does just temper and stop an impressive debut from being a truly striking introduction.

Nevertheless Wolfetone has set down a potent marker and base for their next steps, and bred a definite appetite for their highly enjoyable sounds with their impressive release.

Silence Is Acquiescence is available from February 23rd @ https://itunes.apple.com/gb/album/silence-is-acquiescence/id955979528 and through all stores.

https://www.facebook.com/wolfetoneuk

RingMaster 23/02/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from http://www.thereputationlabel.today

OH CAPTIVE DROP THEIR NEW VIDEO!‏

Oh Captive Online Promo Shot

OH CAPTIVE RELEASE BRAND NEW STAND ALONE SINGLE !

 

Rising Bristol post-punk quartet ‘Oh Captive’ have nationally unleashed their debut EP ‘Advance Creature’ and they now charge forward with their brand new stand alone video single ‘Tricking Us’  which you can view now @

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8-MwVnpTwbY

 Hailing from the South West, Oh Captive produce innovative music that rails against the din of predictability and still rings true with compelling clarity. Sparking glowing comparisons to the likes of Coheed & Cambria and Twin Atlantic, Oh Captive have crafted a sound of their own.

Originally formed less than two years ago, Oh Captive cut their teeth with countless hours in grimy rehearsal rooms before BBC Devon Introducing beckoned in early 2013. By the year’s end, Oh Captive had shared stages across the UK with Sonic Boom Six, Straight Lines, Max Raptor, Sharks, Blitz Kidz, I Divide and Scholars. The foursome fully honed their songs in the live arena in anticipation for completing a debut EP that would prove to startle and sparkle in equal measure.

 

The post-punk outfit have just released their debut EP ‘Advanced Creature’, which has already picked up widespread national praise. Big Cheese Magazine have featured the band in their April 2014 issue with an exclusive interview and Rocksound have recently reviewed the record and have placed a track on their covermount CD. The EP has already notched up key online and radio support, notably from XFM.

Now with their brand new stand alone single in the shape of ‘Tricking Us’ (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8-MwVnpTwbY ), which is out now , the foursome are set to hit new heights, and with UK shows in the pipeline throughout the year, just watch them soar.

www.facebook.com/ohcaptive

 

Oh Captive – Advance Creature EP

Oh Captive Online Promo Shot

Disregarding the deceptive label of post punk seemingly placed upon them, certainly on the accompanying promo sheet, what UK’s Oh Captive actually cast is a magnetic brew of pop punk and alternative rock around a rigorous spine of muscular melodic rock. Presented on their debut EP Advance Creature, the band’s sound it’s an exciting blend of passion and sonic textures drenched in striking craft and undeniable potential. It is a release which sparks fires in the emotions though not always retaining the same intensity, but from start to finish provides a fuse to the imagination and ignites a keen appetite for Oh Captive now and in the future.

The Bristol quartet emerged in 2012 and took little time is awakening an eager following locally before last year striking out around the country with bands such as Sonic Boom Six, UK Subs, Straight Lines, Max Raptor, Sharks, Blitz Kids, I Divide, Fighting With Wire, and Scholars. Comparisons to the likes of Coheed & Cambria and Twin Atlantic have fallen upon the band over time, comparisons relatively easy to understand listening to their four track debut.

The release opens with Beds Of Many Ghosts and immediately has ears entangled with enticing melodies, crisp rhythms, and a coaxing Oh Captive Cover Artworkhook which lays down the first seductive bait. Settling into its confident stride, the track relaxes around the vocals of guitarist Tim Kelly but all the time is creating a virulence of hooks courted by an emerging groove. It is a striking narrative coloured further by thirsty shadows provided by bassist Tom Hitchins and the guitars of Kelly and Curtis King which weave a provocative and contagious web of enterprise. The song is an irresistible encounter, one which has a familiar air to it in many ways but steps beyond that security with bold imagination and a thoughtful swinging design from the impressive rhythms of drummer Chris Hill.

The excellent start is swiftly supported and matched by Terrible Lives. The track again shows no restraint in unleashing contagious hooks and evocative melodies around a persistent rhythmic beckoning which frames the fine tones of Kelly ably supported by those of King. The song teases with guitar and rhythms alone at times; the bass held in reserve but once involved in the suasion opens up the depths and darker textures of songs and songwriting. Like the first track, it creates a tapestry of smart twists and turns employing a skilful persistently changing gait evolving the face of the song whilst brewing an almost toxic groove to wrap the track and subsequently steal the show in a quite scintillating climax. Both songs are strongly memorable but the second really gets under the skin with that deviously addictive groove most of all.

The remaining two songs do not reach the stature of their predecessors though both only cement an impressive introduction to the band. The title track steps up next, its tender melodic start courted by a sonic mist before it expands into a rich and evocative blaze of passionate sounds and lyrical reflections. Perfectly balanced and vibrantly poised, the track courts the senses with a masterfully woven venture of dark rhythms and radiant melodies aligned to similarly captivating vocals, and though it does not entrench itself in the memory as those before, its presence only enhances the promise of the band.

The closing Retreat Being reasserts punchy rhythms and almost rapacious sinews to the skeleton of another track which is just at ease crooning at and seducing ears as it is forging a sturdier imposing persuasion. The bass of Hitchins is especially vocal and melancholic in the track to lead thoughts deep into an emotional intensity but as excellent as the song is again it lacks the spark to impact beyond its departure.

Overall Advance Creature is an EP which potently grips thoughts and emotions throughout. It is a striking entrance by Oh Captives, one soaked in a promise which suggests the band is going to have a rosy future whilst providing plenty of exciting investigations ahead.

The self-released Advanced Creature EP is available digitally from April 28th

www.facebook.com/ohcaptive

8/10

RingMaster 27/04/12014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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OH CAPTIVE to release ‘Advanced Creature’, out 28th April‏

Oh Captive Online Promo Shot

 
Oh Captive’s STUNNING DEBUT EP RELEASED!

 

 

 

Rising Bristol post-punk quartet ‘Oh Captive’ nationally unleash their debut EP ‘Advanced Creature’ through all digital outlets on Monday 28th April.

 

 

Hailing from the South West, Oh Captive produce innovative music that rails against the din of predictability and still rings true with compelling clarity. Sparking glowing comparisons to the likes of Coheed & Cambria and Twin Atlantic, Oh Captive have crafted a sound of their own, and the evidence can be heard on their brand new hotly-tipped EP entitled ‘Advance Creature’.

 

 

Originally formed less than two years ago, Oh Captive cut their teeth with countless hours in grimy rehearsal rooms before BBC Devon Introducing beckoned in early 2013. By the year’s end, Oh Captive had shared stages across the UK with Sonic Boom Six, Straight Lines, Max Raptor, Sharks, Blitz Kidz, I Divide and Scholars. The foursome fully honed their songs in the live arena in anticipation for completing a debut EP that would prove to startle and sparkle in equal measure.

 

 

Advance Creature peddles a firecracker brand of intensely melodic post-punk, where concise hooks pierce the air with disarming force. There’s honesty and maturity to Oh Captive; their sound is raw but emotionally redolent, ferocious but refined. The oft-kilter phrasing of the songs has enough to engage even the most discerning ears. Although the band never once crosses the border into over-indulgence, they still manage to create an effective ruse for a pop sensibility that’s ripe for FM playlists. And in Tim Kelly, Oh Captive have a frontman whose infectious, yet understated vocal delivery throws the spotlight on compelling vocal melodies. Behind that await rousing choruses, the dovetailing guitar melodies of Curtis King and an airtight rhythm section compromised of Tom Hitchins and Chris Hill. The post-punk outfit have a record that is sure to raise them to new heights, and with UK shows in the pipeline throughout the year, just watch them soar.

 

 

Oh Captive Cover Artwork

 

 

 

Cold Summer – UK Tour

videoshot

Post hardcore band Cold Summer have annouced the dates to their upcoming UK tour in support of their debut self-titled album released last year.

Cold Summer are fast becoming a critically acclaimed Rock/Post-Hardcore band, reaping the rewards for some fine releases which started with the self release of two EP’s, ‘Transitions’ and ‘Wake’ during 2012, before the Yorkshire band’s
release of their acclaimed debut album album in 2013.
To promote the release the band are heading out on a week long tour of the UK in February 2014. Building on a large and growing fan base across the North of England garnered as Cold Summer played sold out shows alongside well respected bands such as Funeral For A Friend(Distiller Records), Polar (In At The Deep End) Lemuria (Bridge Nine Records), End Of A Year/Self Defense Family (Deathwish Records), Margate (Cybertracks), Blitz Kids (Redbull), Scholars (Banquet), and Aficionado (No Sleep Records) since forming.
Now is the time for more of the country to catch one of the most promising Britsh bands live and with their still passions impressing album.
coldsummertourposter
The dates for the 2014 Cold Summer UK Tour in February:
Saturday 15th – Lounge 41 – Workington
Sunday 16th – The Zombie Hut – Corby
Monday 17th – The Vault Inn – Stockton On-Tees
Tuesday 18th – The Ship Inn – Preston
Wednesday 19th – The Old Blue Last – London 
Thursday 20th – The Hobgoblin – Bath
Friday 21st – Frog & Nightgown – Worksop
 
coldsummerselftitledcover

Interview with Chris Aylett and Sam Nicholls of Scholars

The end of February saw the release of a single which with an eagerness and energy most bands flounder for immediately installed its creators as a band to swiftly check out and as ones to watch very closely. The band in question was UK rock band Scholars and their single Bad For Business a song which mesmerises whilst firing up the instinct to have fun and express oneself.  We had the pleasure to find out more about the band and their music withy the chance to talk to bassist Chris Aylett and vocalist Sam Nicholls.

Hi gentlemen and welcome to The Ringmaster Review.

For many you have just burst into view so could you please introduce and give a history to the band and its members?

Chris: In a nutshell we’re a 5 piece rock band from Hemel Hempstead. We’ve been together for about 5 years now. Myself and Mike (drums) have always played in the same bands, since we were 11 years old – incidentally our first band was fronted by Frank Carter of Gallows and now Pure Love fame. Tom and Sam knew each other from school and both played in bands of good local repute. We were a 4 piece until last February, when the second guitarist we’d been searching for years finally appeared, in the form of Mr Cal Owen. We’ve recorded and released a lot of demos and we’ve just now reached the point where we’re happy we’ve got enough quality material to record our first album. How would you describe your sound again for newcomers to the band?

How would you describe your sound again for newcomers to the band?

Sam: I think we probably span a couple of different genres and we do try to blend a bit of everything that we enjoy. It’s mainly an alt rock basis but the songs are structured like pop and they’re high energy and often a little pissed off like punk rock. It’s a bit of a frankensound.

What are the influences which have shaped your sound inside and outside of music?

Chris: Musically, our starting point has always been balls-out rock and emo, bands like At The Drive In, Hundred Reasons and Million Dead. You can add to that your classic ‘indie’ bands like The Smiths, The Cure and Tears For Fears – really strong songwriting which pushed the envelope lyrically and musically. You don’t seem to get many bands these days that manage to combine mainstream appeal with genuine musical innovation. More recently we’ve started getting into more electronic music – LFO, Aphex Twin, Flying Lotus – which is starting to have a bit of an effect on our sound.

Where does the band name come from and does it reflect you as musicians?

Chris: I wish there was an interesting story behind the name but there really isn’t. When we started out we had a different singer and me and him threw a few names around based on what we liked the sound of. Scholars stuck. Does it reflect us as musicians? Loosely at best I think!

Hemel Hempstead is your home town, is it a big inspiration for you and does it have a healthy music scene for a relatively small place compared to a city?

Sam: There used to be a really healthy music scene in our town when I was a teenager. I used to go to our local arts centre every weekend to watch local bands. But now they’ve closed down almost all the decent places to play, it’s harder for kids to get into rock music in our town. We’ve actually put on some of our own shows in the past and we hope to do so in the future. They’re always a bit success because everyone is crying out for live music in our town.

Having recently reviewed your fantastic new single Bad For Business, we reflected that though unique you are in the similar high energy and infectious camp alongside the likes of Max Raptor, Innercity Pirates and Baddies, is this comparison you can see yourselves?

Sam: Well having played with and been blown away by both Max Raptor and Baddies, I couldn’t be more flattered by that! They’re very different bands but we certainly do have some overlap with them. Even if it’s just how much we love ‘going off’ properly onstage.

Your first single Tornadoes and Fractures was another great track. How do you feel you have evolved as songwriters from the bands beginnings to the new release though it is actually a relatively short time?

Chris: We’ve definitely refined the process. We used to spend hours upon hours tweaking one song only to realise after several weeks that what we had to start with wasn’t great and we were effectively polishing a turd. We listen back to demos of old and realise how overcomplicated they were – we’d throw in every good idea we had. I think we’ve finally learned that less is more. A shout out must go to our manager Mark who helped show us the way; you can’t overestimate the value of an informed outside perspective.

How does the songwriting process happen within Scholars?

Chris: It’s varied over the years. We used to jam together and see what happened, and although that yielded some good results they were a long time coming. These days we each bring semi-formed ideas to the table and ruthlessly go through them, picking out the choicest morsels to develop. In honesty, we now find that if the bulk of a song hasn’t come together within one rehearsal, it’s not likely to happen. Bad For Business came from one riff and was written in about 20 minutes at the end of a rehearsal, for example.

There seems to be a definite thought given to the visual content of Scholars as well as the music it seems, as with the sleeve design for Tornadoes and Fractures and I believe I read you co-ordinate but vary the colours you wear on stage? Is this just extra fun for you or does it have a deeper importance to the band?

Sam: I think it all comes from a desire to be a little unusual and it just has to feel right to us rather than having any specific significance. We used to actually dress ‘colour coded’ onstage but it felt a bit Power Rangers so it’s more subtle now. The whole team have input on how everything looks and it was actually guitarist Tom who came up with the idea for the origami sleeve for Tornadoes. He brought a prototype to rehearsal and it was just clearly the way to go.

What does a Scholars show offer fans, are they as high energy as your singles so far have suggested?

Chris: High energy is pretty accurate, we’ve always gone for it live. We quite like people to think that we’re slightly unhinged and that anything could happen. I think some bands forget that when they play a show, the audience are also watching what they’re doing and that’s 50% of the entertainment. It’s actually a bit arrogant to think that your music is so special and mind blowing that you just need to stand around performing it and that’s enough for 30 minutes. Basically, people are overwhelmed with entertainment options these days and unless you’re Sigur Ros you’ve got to do something a bit special to stop people playing Angry Birds while you’re on stage.

More and more bands seem to want to recreate a live sound close to their recordings rather than the other way round these days but I get the impression you guys just go for it in your gigs, it is about having and giving a fun time and show primarily for you?.

Sam: I don’t know exactly how it started but we discovered somewhere along the line that putting everything into your live show just feels really good and I’ve honestly never felt more right with the world than when we’re playing live and really nailing it. It just feels like that’s what I was born to do. So there would really be no point in us meticulously crafting and polishing songs on record and then struggling to play them exactly the same note-for-note live. It’d lose all its appeal for me. I’d rather go the other way around and try to bottle the sound of the live show when we record. It’s a challenge though!

You have shared stages with the likes of Hundred Reasons, The Computers, The Xcerts, Don Brocco and Gay For Johnny Depp, any gigs that have stood out or been a highlight so far?

Sam: Certainly the last night of HR in Nottingham for me, but mainly because I got to do guest vocals on ‘If I Could’ (my teenage self would never have believed you if you’d told him that was going to happen). The whole Don Broco tour was a huge laugh. Shows with the Gays and The Computers are always great but also hard work because they’re ferociously good live bands. We have to seriously step it up so as to not be eclipsed by their madness.

And any you would rather were lost from the memory?

Chris: Yep! We’ve had a handful of absolute shitstorms. We did a round trip of nearly 10 hours in a hired van to do a festival only to have the event shut down seconds before we were about to start playing – we’d set up and were ready to go. On another occasion we had a row with a pissed up soundman whose wife threatened to knock Sam’s block off. In a way the terrible experiences strengthen the bond between you and make the good shows all the better so we tend to laugh them off.

Do you have a focused direction for Scholars in music and sound ahead or do you just let things evolve organically?

Sam: It would be difficult to try and have a solid plan for our sound I think. We’re always trying new things so it’s always changing but we’re also quite good at reining it in, I don’t think we’ll accidentally end up as a funk band or anything.

Is there an album on the horizon, or more singles first?

Chris: There is indeed an album on the way – we’ll be in the studio in April. We’ve got plans for a few singles leading up to it too.

As still a young and upcoming band how hard do you find it to get strong gigs that will elevate your stature compared to those that are great but at a level you have played for a while?

Sam: Well we’re really grateful for all the help and support and great opportunities we receive at the moment. Shows are rarely disappointing for us even if they aren’t necessarily stadium support tours and main stage festival slots. The big break for us would be to get out on tour in support of someone awesome. I’d just like to let Biffy Clyro know that if they’re ever short of an opening act… well y’know.

What is next for the band over the coming weeks?

Chris: We’re filming another video in the next couple of weeks…we’ve got a crazy idea for it and it should be a mental couple of days. Otherwise we’re going to be getting our heads down finishing off songs for the album and starting pre-production.

Many thanks for taking time to chat with us, good luck with your excellent single.

Would you like to end with words for the world?

Sam: Thanks very much. As a wise man once said… Do, or do not. There is no ‘try’.

Oh and lastly how about a dark shameful secret about another band member?

Chris: I’ve been racking my brains for about half an hour and I can’t really think of anything. We’ve all listened to some dodgy bands and had dodgy haircuts in our time but that’s all par for the course. I can give you an interesting fact – Tom (our guitarist, also responsible for recording many of our demos) works for Jeff Wayne of ‘War of the Worlds’ fame and has in his time recorded artists as diverse as Dani Filth and Rhydian off X Factor.

The RingMaster Review 05/03/2012

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