The Sectile Interview

Hi and thank you for sparing time to chat with us.

Gabriel Gaba (Vocals): Of course, the pleasure is ours!

Could you first introduce the band and tell us how it came to be?

GG – I am Gabriel Gaba, the singer of Sectile, 5-piece prog metal band from Dublin, Ireland. The band started in 2016 when Mark O’Reilly (guitars) and Cormac Hennigan (bass), who have been friends since school but had never been in a band together, decided to meet and jam some ideas at the beginning of 2016. The creative juices started to flow and once they had a couple of demos made, they started looking for potential band members online. That’s how they found me and then later on Zachary Newman (drums). Things started a bit slowly at first, with the four of us meeting occasionally to play around with the demos. The band only became an official thing in November of that year, that’s after we found a 2nd guitarist, came up with the name, recorded a home-brewed demo and created our band profiles on social networks!

How would you define not only your sound but the creative character of the band?

GG – Probably one of the hardest tasks for a musician is to define their own sound! We usually just do our thing without worrying much with labels and let people decide for themselves. That being said, we still think progressive metal is the best ‘easy way’ to inform others of what we do. We try to combine our various influences to craft tunes that have enough complexity in them to keep things interesting, but still have really cool and beautiful chords and melodies, hooky choruses and a good contrast between heavy and quiet sections. We generally focus a little less on technical displays (though there’s plenty of that for those who dig it) and more on simply writing tunes that we would love to enjoy as listeners. We are definitely a songwriting driven band, at the time of this interview, our first album is not even released yet and we are already hard at work at writing the second, and let me tell you, it is sounding very exciting so far!

Are there any previous musical experiences for band members and how have they been embraced in what you do now?

GG – All of us have had previous bands, in various subgenres of rock and metal, and that experience stays with you. Prog metal is the common denominator in our taste for music but each of us lets their influences seep into Sectile. Speaking for myself, I grew up enjoying heavy metal and hard rock in equal measure, bands like Aerosmith, Skid Row and Guns n’ Roses are among my favourites, up there with classic metal such as Iron Maiden and Savatage. I played hard rock in cover bands for years! Sectile doesn’t really sound like any of those bands, but I believe the influence comes through in the vocals, especially with the presence of high notes. I played in pop-rock oriented bands too, and I believe it gave me valuable insight in terms of writing good hooks, which is something we definitely explore in the context of Sectile.

Is there a particular process to the band’s songwriting?

GG – It varied over time, but it’s usually up to our guitarist Mark to do the bulk of the writing. We have an online drive where he saves the song ideas and the rest of us will listen to that and think of our parts. But the magic really happens at practices, when we put everything together and jam those ‘drafts’ with our drummer Zachary. Zach is more of a ‘in the moment’ guy rather than someone who does a lot of homework, and he comes up with unbelievable stuff on the spot, which in turn affect the guitars and everything else. So the process is very organic, with the five of us exploring a lot of ideas during those jams, guided by the song drafts Mark writes. For the vocals I will often mumble something over while the boys are playing to create the basic vocal melodies and later on write lyrics that fit those melodies.

Would you tell us about your latest release?

GG – Our debut full-length album is coming out on the 25th of February, it is titled ‘Falls Apart’ and it has 7 songs. One of the songs on it, ‘The Hunt’ was launched as a single about a year ago, and we have another single and video – ‘Black Cloud’ – ahead of this release, on the 4th of February. We are beyond excited to finally have a full album out, it is something that we worked hard to achieve and we’re very proud of the result! We hope people love it as much as we do.

What are the major inspirations to its heart and themes?

GG – The album covers a wide spectrum, from light to dark. The melodies that appeal to us the most tend to be melancholic, and the lyrics also reflect that, as we speak of themes that pertain to the darker aspects of the human psyche. I am a big fan of sci-fi and horror books and movies, but we try not to be too obvious about it in the lyrics, they’re more metaphorical. We also have a lot of savage riffs and big choruses in the songs, we like that contrast!

I am always intrigued as to how artists choose track order on albums and EP’s and whether in hindsight they would change that. What has been the deciding factor for you or do songs or the main do that organically?

GG – That’s a great question! On Sectile, as a new and largely unknown band, we strive to balance our artistic integrity with strategic thinking when making those kinds of decisions. A band with an established fanbase has more freedom, as they can count on people checking out the full album either way. An unknown band doesn’t have that luxury, so you have to make sure the first song will grab the attention of many different types of listeners from the get-go, because if it doesn’t, you may never get another chance. So the first few songs have to be some of your best, and the more ‘demanding’ songs can come later once the listener has already decided to give you their time. It’s also important to finish with a banger to leave a positive lasting impression!

What do you find the most enjoyable part of being in a band and similarly the most cathartic?

GG – There are many great things about being in a band! To me it’s always been a way to keep my sanity and blow off some steam, so I suppose it is not only a pleasure but it’s also ‘therapeutic’ in a way. When you’re in a band with people you genuinely like, and you’re creating music together, that’s an incomparable kind of satisfaction. As for cathartic moments, those tend to be when you play live and you see the crowd really getting into the music and what you’re trying to do. It’s a really phenomenal feeling!

For anyone contemplating checking you out live give some teasers as to what they can expect.

GG – A local reviewer said at one of our first gigs that “Sectile is a band that needs to be seen live”. We really work hard into putting on a great show. There are a lot of times where we let the songs speak for themselves but when things get energetic, so do we! It’s actually very hard for me to stand still on stage, growing up I was fascinated with that 70’s – 80’s type of rockstar frontmen who really owned the stage, and started to emulate that, even at practices to really get the hang of it. Bruce Dickinson is my number one influence there, he’s the number 1 metal frontman of all time for me.

What has been your most thrilling moment on stage to date?

GG – Just recently we decided to organise our own headline gig at a local bar that’s not exclusively a rock / metal venue, we had never played there before. Right before we started, the place suddenly got full, most people were total strangers who didn’t know they were at a prog gig. Anyway, we finished our set with an epic 13-minute long tune, and even so the crowd immediately started to chant “one more tune”! That was absolutely unexpected under the circumstances and totally exhilarating!

Do you have live dates coming up?

GG – Absolutely! We are back in Dublin’s Fibber Magees for Metal 2 the Masses again, and we’re really excited about it. We also have our album launch party in The Grand Social on February 28th with a cracking support line-up. That’s going to be a great night we think!

What else can we expect in the near future from you guys?

GG – 2020 is really going to be all about our new album. We plan to work our hardest to share this music with as many people as we possibly can, through promotion and through live performances. With this album in hand we are really aiming to broaden the Sectile name, and we really can’t wait to find out what people think of it!

What are the major inspirations to you sound wise and as a musician?

GG – This answer can change for any of the band members depending on what day you ask them! But, I find that there are a number of bands we always circle back around to when we’re songwriting or discussing musical ideas collectively. Bands like Opeth, Leprous, Porcupine Tree, Symphony X, Pain of Salvation and TesseracT would be some of them. To me personally, in addition to those I could mention Savatage, Iron Maiden, Skid Row, Angra, Marillion, Jeff Buckley, Devin Townsend, Guns n’ Roses and Jimmy Gnecco from Ours.

And finally what song or release would you say was the spark to your passion for music?

GG – It’s hard to say! I’ve been into music for as long as I can remember, rock and metal captured my attention early on. More than a specific song or album, perhaps I should mention the first time I saw a live gig, it was my brother’s rock covers band with his high school mates, that day really changed my life because I was absolutely blown away to see that it was possible to get on a stage and play a gig in front of people. I decided then that I would pursue the same thing, part of me is probably still yearning for the thrill I felt that day as a child.

Many thanks once again; anything else you would like to add?

GG – First of all, thanks for the interview! I would like to invite everyone to check out our new single and video ‘Black Cloud’ (available from February 4th) as well as the ‘Falls Apart’ album, out on February 25th. We love to interact with our audience so please drop us a message on social media telling us what you think of the album! You can find it on all platforms for streaming and / or for purchase on digital and CD formats – just look for Sectile on your preferred service. Thanks for listening!

check Sectile out further @…

https://www.facebook.com/sectile/   https://twitter.com/SectileOfficial   https://www.instagram.com/sectileofficial   https://sectileofficial.bandcamp.com/

Pete RingMaster

The RingMaster Review 27/02/2020

Copyright RingMasterReview: MyFreeCopyright

MPG (Mike Paradine Group) – Bayonne, NJ

MPG_RingMaster Review

Having stomped around and downed a brew or three to the debut Mike Paradine Group album, Death in The Family around four years ago, there was no disguising the anticipation waiting to check out its successor Bayonne, NJ after its recent release. Thanks to the man himself, we have got our eager teeth into Mike Paradine’s second solo album, and true to say expectations were not let down in any size or form.

Bayonne bred Paradine is probably better known as drummer and songwriter in New Jersey based metal band ArticFlame, the band he founded after leaving heavy metallers Balistik Kick, where he had been a member for thirteen years, in disillusion at its “negativity and inactivity”. Since emerging, Paradine and ArticFlame have released to date a quartet of increasingly acclaimed albums whilst sharing stages with the likes of W.A.S.P., Manowar, Savatage, Quiet Riot and many others.

Also the author of King of Toys, a highly praised horror/poetry book about a 5 year old boy who is abused by his drug addled parents and after a horrible episode of abuse, sees his broken down toys come to life and avenge the event, Paradine unveiled his debut solo album Death In The Family in 2012. It was built on a collection of personal songs lyrically seeded in themes such as an on-going feud with certain family members, growing up in the late 70’s, early 80’s in Bayonne, 9/11, and his battle with cancer as a 13 year old, as well as more humour fuelled adventures. The album was a heart delivered and felt proposition of rousing emotion and rock ‘n’ roll which its successor emulates with similarly intimate tracks based on experiences, people, and life in the home city where he still resides. Where it Bayonne, NJ differs to the first album is in its sound. Whereas Death In The Family revelled in numerous styles across heavy and hard rock to varied metal exploits, the second full-length sees the band stick solely to the hard rock sound which Paradine started his musical life playing. As the release soon shows though, it does not prevent songs from offering a broad variety of sound and enterprise, or from sparking the same depth of pleasure as the previous encounter.

art_RingMaster ReviewWith Paradine writing the lyrics, melodies and playing the drums across the majority of the album and Allen Carescia writing the music, playing guitar/bass, and producing, Bayonne, NJ quickly grips ears and attention with opener Deadbeat Dad. Straight away there is a grouchy attitude and muscular intent to the song’s rock ‘n’ roll, guitars sharing irritable riffs as rhythms firmly jab behind the growling tones of Paradine. Direct and pulling no punches, the song is a raw and potent slab of confrontational rock ‘n’ roll backed as strongly by the similarly toned Heaven Would Be Hell for Me. Almost predatory in its stroll and sonic belligerence, the song is east to be drawn to but truly comes alive when harmonies and melodic flames dynamically erupt to leave an already keen appetite greedier.

In the first MPG album, a host of vocalists featured across its songs but for Bayonne, NJ Paradine and, as in the third track, fellow ArticFlame Michael Clayton Moore take turns driving tracks. Fair to say there is a different spark and dynamic at play with Clayton Moore’s recognisable tones; tracks given another rich hue to tempt with, a third emerging when both vocalists unite their contrasting styles for an anthemic lure again as here. In tandem with that, Paradine’s rhythms are alone as thick a tempting in the song as too the sultrily spiced guitar adventure brewing within its boisterous persuasion.

Riot at the Public House stirs up body and emotions in similar style and fashion next, the aggressive attitude of the opener returning to line the invitation of hooks and grooves and colour the prowl of the bass. Clayton Moore again leads the excellent rousing of body and spirit, embracing the great contrast between both men’s tones vocals, though as good as it all is, things leap up another gear, vocally and musically, in Unforgotten Highway. The song is spellbinding as melodic caresses and emotive shadows cradle the superb vocals and emotional expression of Clayton Moor. As soon found, it is an provocative incitement which stays with thoughts long after it leaves ears, its melodies alone as lingering as the potency of the vocals and the subtle percussive touch of Paradine.

Bayonne is potently delivered to ears and imagination through Zombietown next, its barren spirit and decaying landscape enjoyably tempered by the honky-tonk piano/keys spawned shuffle uniting with Paradine’s accusing delivery and the agitated nature of the sounds around him. Showing yet one more strain of the varied flavouring to the album, the striking proposal makes way for another in the funk infested rock ‘n’ roll of Dancing Bag of Bones. There is a Cooper-esque feel to the song as it sizzles in sonic endeavour and spicy enticement, flirting and twisting like its protagonist in ears before leaving heftily satisfied emotions in the masterful hands of Little Darling. A superb cover of the Thin Lizzy classic, it quickly revels in Paradine’s undisguised passion for the Irish rockers, an essence enjoyably scenting many songs within the album, whilst showing its own adventurous touches in thrilling tribute to the legends.

Obviously inspired by that aforementioned book of Paradine, King of Toys simmers in and seduces ears soon after, its melodies an emotive suggestiveness within the music of this time Mike Marino. Keys and guitars court each other’s respective elegance and fiery drama as an array of vocal textures bring the tale to the imagination. More of a grower than other tracks, it too leaves a lingering and enjoyable mark before the old school air of Taking on all the World blazes away with an impassioned weave of melodic acidity and blues infested invention. Without quite sparking the same fire as numerous others on the release, it still has ears enthralled and a wish for more vocal before the album closes on the twin treats of Hey Mama, another irresistible cover of this time The Godz track, and finally Daddys Little Girl. Each recorded separately to the rest of the album, the first features Dave Manheimer and Kilroy on guitar with “Ghost” Meehan on bass alongside Paradine whilst the closer is an emotive ballad with drummer Mike Young backing Clayton Moore who wrote the, yes “sappy” but richly enjoyable song.

Increasingly impressive, Bayonne, NJ is a rock ‘n’ roll treat so easy to get unavoidably involved in, and as the first MPG release, a proposition which just makes an appetite for more as lively as the pleasure found within it.

Bayonne, NJ is out now through http://www.mikeparadine.com/

https://www.facebook.com/mpgrocks/

Pete RingMaster 3/02/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Reverence – When Darkness Calls

It has to be said power metal is not generally the most appetizing menu for our tastes here though there have been some releases in recent times and bands we have found a liking for. With the pedigree of the line-up of Reverence their debut album When Darkness Calls was always going to be one which needed attention and offered much intrigue. It has turned out to be an album which will have fans of the genre in a blissful state as it more than lives up to hopes and expectations and to be honest at times even had this place rocking like a kangaroo on a bungy rope.

The band began its creation in 2010 when guitarist/song­writer Bryan Holland and vocalist/songwriter Todd Michael Hall came together with the intention of creating a band in the words of Holland “…with soaring vocalist, unstoppable riffs, screaming leads and crushing rhythms…” , a power metal band. With the history of the pair the band was always going to induce great attention, Holland having been a major part of Tokyo Blade and Arrest whilst Hall was the frontman with Jack Starr’s Burning Starr. The pair brought in the powerful and skilful ability of drummer Steve Wacholz (Doc Killdrums), a founding member of Savatage as well as being in Crimson Glory, and the talents of bassist Ned Meloni (Burning Starr, Defiance and Land of the Dead) and guitarist Pete Rossi who had played with Joe Stump (HolyHell) and shared stages with the likes of bands Lynch Mob and Avenged Sevenfold. Now When Darkness Calls reveals the results of their union with its release through Razar Ice Records and it has to be said it is rather impressive.

The opening to first and title track is stunning, its air dramatic and presence riveting as it heralds the arrival of a song which is titanic in energy and power. Arguably whether the song lives up to its beginning can be debated from dusk to dawn but it is a thunderous slab of crusading riffs, lively rhythms, and soaring melodic enterprise. Vocally Hall is as strong as expected his tones lighting up the remaining part of the atmosphere the guitars had not already ignited with their sonic display. The group vocal harmonies are tremendous and it all flows with a prowess and quality that one even with the power involved borders beauty.

The opener is one of the real highlights on the album but no subsequent song leaves one lacking satisfaction or pleasure. The likes of the excellent flaming gem Bleed For Me with its attention grabbing attitude and mesmeric melodic ingenuity and the charging intensity of Phantom Road continue the onslaught of gratification. Both leave one breathless and energised within, something admittedly one did not expect to ever say about a power metal driven release. With a heart and intent to ignite the deepest enjoyment with the core qualities of metal which capture us all, Reverence produce the goods and more.

Tracks like Gatekeeper, Monster with thrilling bass work from Meloni to send shivers down the spine, and the closing beast Vengeance Is Mine only leave one riled up and enthused though that can be said about every track on the album especially After The Leaves Have Fallen, an emotive ballad rivalling for best song and showing the great voice of Hall to the fullest effect. Generally ballads struggle to grab our enthusiasm but this song is immense and lights fires which leave burning scars with its melodic excellence.

When Darkness Calls surprised in the fact it found a more welcome home with us than the genre usually can produce but then again Reverence are not your general type of band. The album will be declared best of the year by power metal lovers and it is hard to argue in their category with only personal tastes here denying it a higher place across the whole spectrum of metal.

http://reverencemetal.com

Ringmaster 06/08/2012

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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