Three Days From Retirement – If We Keep Walking Eventually We’ll Fall

Pic - Roisin Smith

Pic – Roisin Smith

Released last November, If We Keep Walking Eventually We’ll Fall, the latest EP from Scottish post rock band Three Days From Retirement (3DFR) is seemingly and deservedly getting a fresh push to spark new attention. The four-track EP is the result of a busy 2015 which also saw the Edinburgh hailing outfit eagerly embark on recording sessions, gigs, and a successful single. It is also evidence of the reason why the band’s cinematic post rock explorations are beginning to create a stir.

Formed in 2013, 3DFR take inspiration from the likes of Mogwai and Explosions in the Sky into their persistently evolving sound and invention. The following year featured the release of the band’s self-titled debut EP which eventually led to a link up with Infinite Hive Music and the unveiling of first single What Is Dead May Never Die last year. It was swiftly followed by the well-received If We Keep Walking Eventually We’ll Fall, which as suggested seems to be being given a new push to kick start another potent year for the quartet of Matty McGhie, David Henderson, Joe Warnock, and Matthew Floody.

Produced, mixed and mastered by Tony Doogan, the EP opens with Avalanche Error which instantly and gently lures ears and imagination into a melancholic yet inviting soundscape. Guitars and keys align like a meeting of planetary bodies to immerse the slow but ripe rhythmic canvas with melodic and suggestive caresses. A fine but expressive mix of cold laced shadows and an emotive colouring of sonic tempting only add to the restrained yet kaleidoscopic nature of the song and its tapestry of sound, a weave which grows a sense of volatility over time. Like an aural aurora borealis erupting with bolder and thicker drama as textures and intensity expand, the track is a poetic and magnetic start to the release.

art_RingMasterReviewIn contrast to the more earthbound feel of its predecessor, Shatner’s Rhapsody shares a spatial ambience with ears and thoughts next. Similarly it has elegance and intimate charm to its character whilst it’s blending of textures and emotional shades this time explores a more celestial atmosphere. Subsequently revealing an imposingly dark and weighty drama, the track transfixes before By the Power of Grayskull offers a more comfortable and romantic flight for the listener to discover, immerse in, and interpret. From virtually the song’s first touch, the funky tone of the bass provides a lure for the body, backed by the magnetic shuffle of beats, whilst the melodic mystique and shoegaze scented air and nature of guitars has ears and mind enthralled.

Spooky Action Across Distance brings the release to a haunting close; vocal reflection adding to the theatre of sound and imagination which is nothing less than a compelling persuasion. Though maybe not impacting as commandingly on personal tastes and emotions as the tracks before it, the track leaves thoughts eagerly busy and pleasure full whilst revealing another side to the band’s invention. The fact the emotive vocal/sonic union reminds of the Scars track Your Attention Please, does it no harm either.

Three Days From Retirement is beginning to command attention with many reasons why contained within the highly enjoyable If We Keep Walking Eventually We’ll Fall; a release as suggested deserving of another wave of attention from media and fresh listeners alike, especially fans of bands such as The Cure, Mogwai, Russian Circles, and Sigur Ros.

The If We Keep Walking Eventually We’ll Fall EP is out now via Infinite Hive Music at https://3daysfromretirement.bandcamp.com/album/if-we-keep-walking-eventually-well-fall-off and most online stores.

Upcoming live dates:

Friday March 18th 2016, Sneaky Pete’s, Edinburgh

Sunday March 20th 2016, Nice ‘n Sleazy, Glasgow

Friday April 22nd 2016, Banshee Labyrinth, Edinburgh

Tuesday May 10th 2016, Audio, Glasgow

https://www.facebook.com/THREEDAYSFROMRETIREMENT   https://twitter.com/3dfruk

Pete RingMaster 14/03/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Jarboe and Helen Money – Self Titled

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It is almost frightening how spellbinding the collaboration between Jarboe and Helen Money is on their self-titled album, how immersed into its dark inviting depths and ravenously siren-esque shadows ears, imagination, and simply reality becomes. The release is quite extraordinary, embroiling the listener in a soundscape of harmonic drones and sonic distortion but equally a sinister beauty and psyche engulfing adventure. It should probably be no surprise the impact of the album. When you place the evocative invention, craft, and voice of Swans co-founder and former vocalist Jarboe alongside the creative dark majesty of visionary cellist Helen Money (aka Alison Chesley), something startling was bound to happen, though an understatement in the case of their album.

Neither lady is a stranger to the skills and adventure of collaborating, Jarboe having worked on over 63 projects with the likes of Philip Anselmo, Neurosis, Jim Thirlwell, Merzbow, Bill Laswell, A Perfect Circle, Colin Marston, Cobalt, Cattle Decapitation, Justin K. Broadrick, Jesu…and the list goes on, alongside her 36 solo albums, whilst Helen Money has linked up with artists such as Mono, Anthrax, Russian Circles, Joe Lally and Shellac over time. They are experiences and bold adventures which have added to their own subsequent imaginative creativity, something their album reeks of.

The delicious tones of Money’s cello is the first caress as album opener For My Father embraces ears, its melancholic voice provocatively coaxing senses and thoughts under a just as darkly lit ambience. The heavy emotional air parts just a slither for the instantly magnetic presence of Jarboe, her radiant tones instantly poetic like against the shadows and the crinkling texture of her keys. The track continues its increasingly broadening embrace as both ladies unveil further shafts of melodic light and doom lined expression through their respective skills. The song is simply mesmeric, a golden sunrise of enterprise and melodic temptation but equally a breeding of dark clouds and imposing drama. As expansive a minimalistic proposition you are ever likely to be lost within, certainly outside of the album, there is an immediate immersion into the heart of the release, external light not to be seen and felt again until the album decides.

The following My Enemy My Friend is similarly a swift fascination of noir wrapped radiance; the alluring string plucking of Money tensing the spring for the flight of intensive sonic and emotional exploration. Within seconds the instrumental is resonating through body and thoughts, the lyrical and social nudging of the first track seemingly spreading into the intimidating but seductive breath of its successor. Keys and cello create a labyrinth of haunting and ominous suggestiveness, an incitement the imagination tenaciously casts scenes with whilst emotions bow before the weight of the track’s rousing portentousness. It is meditative and unsettling, and quite riveting, a success matched by the outstanding Hello Mr. Blue.

The almost carnivorous opening of what feels like bestial bass is glorious, something to sell your soul for. Whether it is bass or a brilliant merging of keys and cello which is also possible as repeat listens twist and turn with indecision, it is an enslaving start which only escalates into a kaleidoscope of, well creative alchemy to be honest. The floating harmonies of Jarboe seduce with celestial beauty whilst Money’s cello flirts with darkly centred eyes, every note having a knowing smile to their heavy persuasion. As Jarboe unveils the warmly delivered narrative, the track in contrast becomes a brewing maelstrom of agitation and aggravation, egged on by the contagious rhythmic dance of the piece. Every track already has breached new plateaus and taken the listener into inventively denser and increasingly threatening exploits, and this continues that exhilarating success as its marches towards its controlled but vocally bedlamic closure.

Wired is pretty much what it says on the tin, its presence a fibrous mesh of sounds and sonic intrigue presenting an intensive and feverish climate for ears and a sea of opportunities for the imagination to interpret and develop further, whether through its voracious incitement or the more of a harmonic smoulder it also harbours. There is little time for those thought bred adventures to take long term root though before the intimacy of Truth inspires with its own reflective beauty. Keys and sublimely drifting harmonies soaked in an air of loneliness kiss ears first before Jarboe opens up her vocal heart in a theatre of those continuing initial croons and just as emotive guitar stabs.

It is hard with words to present the drama and emotive intensity which comes with every bewitching track and the pair’s creative ingenuity which unrelentingly and deeply works away once breaching ears, but easy to enthuse over the ever evolving experiences which re-invent themselves in sound and visceral adventure with every listen. The closing Every Confidence is a perfect example. We can only hint at the tempestuous nature and climate which seeds from and descends on the senses and psyche after an initial gentle mesmeric croon of sound, but rigorously recommend its rapacious hunger to stretch not only the listener and their emotions, but the creative emprise bred by the artists pushing their instrumental and vocal limits.

It is a challenge and success which applies to the whole of the album. It is an astonishing encounter, a scourge of everything bland and predictable in modern music which goes beyond being something merely to listen to. You feel and almost taste the dynamic and intensive atmospheres of the tracks, you breath the drama and emotional intensity of the sounds and their inspiration, and ultimately it is a journey provided by Jarboe and Helen Money which you take and will never be the same again after.

Jarboe and Helen Money’s album is available now via Aurora Borealis as a black vinyl LP, on CD and digitally.

http://www.thelivingjarboe.com/     http://helenmoney.com/

RingMaster 04/03/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Deaf Eyes – Self Titled

Deaf Eyes - Band

Started as a side project in 2013 of the experimental psych progressive metallers Incoming Cerebral Overdrive, Dead Eyes proves itself to be a distinct and formidable entity in its own right with its self-titled debut album. Colliding eight tracks of intense and thunderous post metal with senses and imagination, the instrumental band lives up to its intent of exploring “obscure experimental sounds and atmospheres,” and “a monolithic approach to hard and heavy riffs with a “delayed research” of alternative vibes mixed in a psychedelic mood.” That is quite a wordy description of what consumes and seduces within their album but one realised within the leviathans of sound and textures which transfix and immerse the listener from start to finish. The album is a beast of a proposition but equally a rigorously sultry temptress journeying through exhausting landscapes as imposingly cinematic as they are carnally ravenous.

The Italian quartet begins their voracious seduction with Black Canvas, and in no time thoughts and emotions are engulfed in the drama and almost savage soundscape of the track. Carnivorous riffs and even more bestial bass predation swiftly overwhelm the senses, backed by the intense weight and hunger of the swiping rhythms. Just as the track is immensely intimidating it also impressively takes the imagination into an evolving and challenging climate of sonic and inventive suggestion, across a terrain of danger and intrigue which erupts and snarls with skilled rabidity and riveting ingenuity. It is a demanding and irresistible experience with a contagion which is toxic and inescapable.

Its dark realms are shadowed by those of the following Mirrors, its specific turbulence and antagonism expelled in a barely milder tempest but one with flickers of light and melodic charm to its hostility. The bass has a growl to reverse a tsunami of ravenous beasts whilst guitars wield a sonic enterprise which binds with venomous potency whilst its infestation of infectiousness is Deaf Eyes - Coverimpossible to fend off or resist. It dark corners and shadows are no less merciless than its outright tempestuous climate as the song unleashes a sound which holds essences of the likes of Neurosis and Russian Circles to its breast as well as those of Morkobot.

A more celestial jeopardy is investigated in Orbits, though with all tracks the adventure unfurling is as unique to the listener’s thoughts as the sounds casting the canvas and sonic emprise inspiring them. The track is one of the less intrusive on the album but still a provocative maelstrom of seriously confrontational invention and enterprise, a description suiting both the tantalising exotic and evocative scenery of The Eyes Of Regret and the agitated majesty of Draining Sun. The first of the two descends into a cavernous and melodically infused sonic haze which is as emotionally expansive as it is ferociously unpredictable and inventively coloured. Its exceptional sonic and innovatively perilous emprise is equalled by its successor, the track a hypnotic dance of repetitive riffery and preying rhythms within a psychedelically hued blaze of disturbed sonic revelry. The track is scintillating, a corrosive waltz physically and emotionally which bewitches with cultish persuasion. The accompanying press release listed Goblin as references and of all the songs this with its haunted shadows and demonic colouring is the prime reason.

Red Desert Lullaby keeps body and emotions just as eagerly busy, its thick smouldering climate a wrap to perilous escapades to envision and a sonic rapacity to bask in whilst next up The Withered drifts into a sinister province of crawling shadows and haunted emotions. Their dark secrets converge around a rugged spine of bass and rhythmic bullying of ears and emotions, an ensnaring and violation of the senses setting thoughts and passions aflame. It is a glorious predator and portrait of lost and turbulent emotions, another binding and ingenious traverse of places most fear to contemplate let alone traverse.

The album closes with the just as dark and Luciferian Commiserate, a primal senses ravishing beauty which scars as it seduces. The bracing incursion into psyche and emotions is an enthralling end to an exceptional release, an album which is a playground for the imagination and trial by sonic fire for the senses. It is quite exceptional and provides a new excursion into the unknown for thoughts and emotions with every violating listen.

Deaf Eyes is available now via Argonauta Records @ http://www.argonautarecords.com/shop/music-/41-deaf-eyes-deaf-eyes-cd.html

https://www.facebook.com/deafeyesband

RingMaster 12/11/2014

https://soundcloud.com/deaf-eyes

Stuntman – Incorporate The Excess

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    An infernal noise machine with a brutality to match, French senses annihilators Stuntman unleash all of their intensive malevolence and sonic fury, and then some, with new album Incorporate The Excess. A pestilence of hardcore and noise ferocity, the seven track release is a carnivorous slayer of the senses and entrapment of the passions from a band no stranger to corrupting audiences since their formation in 2002. It is a provocation which maybe is the Sète quartet at its most venomous and violent yet on a release which takes a couple of tracks before fully seducing the passions but once into its stride is a ruinous onslaught which leaves ears and body wasted and the imagination not forgetting emotions raging.

     With two previous albums, an EP and split, as well as numerous compilation appearances under their belt and more than 150 shows alongside five European tours where the band has shared stages with the likes of Coalesce, Russian Circles, Jucifer, Genghis Tron, Child Abuse, Kongh, Mumakil and many more, Stuntman have sculpted out a new depth of intensity with Incorporate The Excess. Released via Solar Flare Records digitally and as a 12” LP in addition to a CD release through Head Records and a cassette version through Lost Pilgrims, the album takes no prisoners, does not even allow them to raise hands in surrender, instead going straight for the jugular from its first full assault.

    The brief intro Broken Mirrors Lacerate sets things off, its minute long mix of samples and random metallic sounds SLF013---hi-res-coverrevealing little and offering not much more in the scheme of things. Once it steps aside for The Patriot, the Elite, the Icon the ferocious flight is ignited, the track a savage squall of ravenous riffs and rhythmic provocation scarred by the caustic vocals. The track grazes and scores the senses with a sonic rabidity aligned to a predation from the rhythms which is eye watering but equally it is a thrilling scourge which provides a familiar and unsurprising in many ways presence. Nevertheless the assault leaves a certain appetite wanting more which is duly delivered with the voracious Bag of Dicks, the vehemence drenched tempest another similarly driven and pleasing ravaging which like its predecessor is low on casting something out of the ordinary but unerringly hits the spot.

    Everything changes and ignites though with the album suddenly exploding into another kind of beast through firstly the rapacious tsunami of vicious contagion and groove fuelled animosity that is Horn of Misery. Its initial touch is a writhing swamp of sonic causticity and rhythmic violence merged into a senses smothering wall of hate. Once intensive virulently addictive grooves break free to entwine and seduce with the strongest acidic toxicity and rhythms provide a dislocated dance of barbaric enterprise, the song becomes an irresistible magnet of magnificence, a strike taking the release up numerous levels soon matched by the plateau reinforcing Roll the Skull. Snarling and nagging as it works over the senses with thunderous drum assault and acutely incisive and niggling riffs whilst the bass finds a greater delicious guttural predatory tone adding extra texture and snarl to its malevolence this time around, the track is a full on vat of intensive persuasive . Less pronounced but just as epidemically infected, grooves again steer the song deep into the imagination, their flailing arms wrapping unerringly around the passions and now unbridled hunger coated in greed for the release.

   The following Chaos Shepherd is a two minutes all out malicious antagonist, riffs and rhythms brewing up a pestilential onslaught which corrodes and suffocates with its blistering and hellacious anger. It makes the perfect softener of the senses for the closing eight minute slab of intensive severity, Scarecrow Warfare. The track is like a heavy plundering dark leviathan putting everything else in its shade with a towering tirade of riffs and ponderous concussive rhythms speared by discord coated sonic swipes. The track stalks and preys on ears with a bestial carnality to its intensity and uncompromising savagery to its seductive weaponry. An instrumental which you would imagine might outstay its long provocation, the track is a synapse drowning, passions igniting slab of heavy-duty sonic alchemy from start to finish and quite scintillating.

    It might take a couple of tracks to explode but Incorporate The Excess turns into one dangerously addictive and merciless treat. Stuntman takes noise and turns it into the most lethal seduction which makes their new album overall one frighteningly toxic temptation you only want more of.

https://stuntmannoise.bandcamp.com/

https://stuntmannoise.bandpage.com/

8.5/10

RingMaster 20/01/2014

 Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Carving Greater Visions: and interview with Carl Whitbread from Lo!

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Australian noise violators Lo! made an impressive entrance upon the world two years ago with the release of their startling and riveting debut album Look And Behold, now the return with its successor Monstrorum Historia, a sonic beast of a release which took everything bred on the first album to new and scintillating heights whilst exploring greater expanses of invention. It is a corrosive tempest, a mesh of hardcore, black and crushing sludge, and prime metal which is ferocious and wonderfully exhausting. To catch up with the band and find out more about their new album we had the pleasure to talk with Carl Whitbread again.

Hi and welcome back to The RingMaster Review.

We last spoke about Lo! with you at the tail end of 2011 around the release of your debut Look And Behold. Bring us up to date to what has happened with the band since, apart from creating another thrilling titan in the shape of the excellent Monstrorum Historia.

Since the release of ‘Look and Behold’, we’ve been playing around Aus as much as possible. We’ve been really lucky to get a lot of international supports here including Doomriders, Eyehategod, Burning Love, Russian Circles and Rosetta. We have also just finished a 25 day European tour with The Ocean and Cult of Luna which has been the experience of a lifetime!

How would you say your sound and adventure has evolved between albums?

The first album was mostly written and recorded by myself at home before any members even joined the band. Once we had established our current line-up, we tweaked the demos and added a couple more tracks and that became ‘Look and Behold’. This time round, we had obviously been playing together for over 3 years, so we were more of a ‘real band’ and knew each other much better as musicians and friends. The rough foundation for most of the songs were still written by me but there was input from everyone this time round which I think really helped push us further into our own sound.

Was there anything you learned making Look And Behold which you took into the recording of Monstrorum Historia to help make its creation smoother or gave it a particular flame inventively?

Well to be honest simply recording Monstrorum properly in a studio as a band was a massive improvement over the way we did ‘Look and Behold’. That album was thrown together in bits and pieces over a long period of time, things were recorded separately, drums were added over demos, vocals were done at 3 different locations etc., so it was a very non-tradition way of doing things. This time everything was done all at once so it was a much more ‘organic’ process and I think that showed in the final result.

Your sound has always been varied and pushing its limits but Monstrorum Historia takes that to another level whilst still having 480910_10151509927407732_1756219004_na presence which is distinctly Lo!; Was there any particular intent or aim musically when writing the new release in that area?

There was never any particular aim, just to write songs that flowed well and sounded good. We didn’t want to stray too far from what we had already established, but at the same time, step our sound up a to ‘second album standard’. It was a bit of a balancing act but thankfully it seemed to come pretty easily to us.

Lo And Behold set a certain benchmark for your songwriting and sound which the new album has raised to another level, but did that early success and creative plateau give you any extra personal pressure when it came to this new release?

It certainly did. The ‘Look and Behold’ songs had been written so long ago, and at a time before the band even existed, so there was a casualness to the whole song writing process. Now as an established band with a release under our belt, we definitely wondered if we’d be able to step up what we had already done, especially as there was a really short time period to get the songs written. One thing we were very aware of during the whole process is not making the songs sound rushed or just thrown together – we even ended up scrapping a couple that just didn’t seem to have the ‘Lo!’ vibe.

Did you approach the songs and recording of Monstrorum Historia differently to its predecessor then?

The song writing was pretty similar to ‘Look and Behold’- most of it was written and demoed at home. The main difference was this time there was a great deal of input from everyone. We all worked together in shaping the final result. As mentioned before, the recording process was more traditional this time and a lot of it was tracked together live. When it came to sound, we tried getting everything sounding the way we wanted from the start, instead of relying on too many mixing tricks.

Once more you explore dark corners and shadows with your songs, breeding a sonic antagonism and caustic wash which is as enthralling as it is intrusive. Do you closely sculpt the balance between both types of affects or does it naturally emerge as you bring songs to fruition?

It feels like a pretty natural process to me, but I guess that comes with time and experience and having a range of musical tastes and influences. There’s always some conscious thought about the balancing act, and we’re always aware not to stray too far from our sound, but it never feels forced.

Your most ferocious collection of songs to date would you agree?

Definitely. I think we just rolled with the vibe a bit more on this album and let the songs be what they should be. I also think the contribution of everyone this time led to a more ferocious sound, especially in the drum department. On the first album, Adrian was playing more or less what I had written, but this time as we wrote together he really let loose. Lot’s more double kick and blast beats \m/

Is there a particular moment or feel within Monstrorum Historia which gives you the strongest satisfaction?

Everything about it gives me satisfaction, haha. The fact that we wrote and recorded the whole thing in about 4 months, in amongst jobs / wives / girlfriends / kids, was a massive achievement (albeit a stressful one!). I also have a soft spot for the intro track ‘As Above’… the first half of that song was actually written for a trailer for an Australian horror series, but got rejected. I had always really liked it and thought it would make the perfect intro to this album, so I’m glad it got to see the light of day.

loTell us about instrumental Haven, Beneath Weeping Willows, a piece of music which for us provides a rapacious canvas for evolving imagery and thoughts to explore and be inspired by. What was the story behind it and its aural narrative?

This piece of music was the last song written for Monstrorum. I felt the album needed a bit of breathing space in the form of a quieter track. I had that bass riff lying around for a while which I hadn’t used for anything so we basically jammed it out in the recording studio and all the layers built up from there. We also got in our good friend and fellow drummer Ben Ellingworth to help out with the extra percussion pieces.

Once again also there are mischievous shadows within the album as with your last; is this a particular Australian trait of character do you think as you seem not alone amongst artists from down under in having that kind of humour in their music.

I think it’s very hard to grow up in Australia and not approach everything you do with a bit of humor, no matter how seriously you take things. That’s what we love the most about Australia. Everyone can completely take the piss out of themselves, but still do really awesome shit at the same time.

Tell us about your upcoming tour.lo2

We’re about to head around the east coast of Aus to promote the album. We’re bringing High Tension along with us – an amazing band from Melbourne who plays ballsy Mark of Cain style rock with a crazy screaming female singer. We also have killer supports in each city too.

Any plans for the rest of 2013 and beyond ready to be revealed yet?

Nothing set in stone yet, we’d like to possibly release a 7″ later in the year, and hopefully we can get back over to Europe!

Many thanks for taking time to talk with us again, and good luck with the tour etc. Any final thoughts you would like to unleash?

Cheers for the interview Pete, always a pleasure!

www.lookandbehold.net

Read the Monstrorum Historia review @ https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2013/04/22/lo-monstrorum-historia/

Pete RingMaster

The RingMaster Review 25/06/2013

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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