King Salami and the Cumberland 3 – Goin’ Back To Wurstville

If there is one band in this fast paced world which gives the body an even more intensive and thorough workout it is undoubtedly King Salami and the Cumberland 3. This is a band where an Automated External Defibrillator should always be on hand at every show they play, waiting and ready to revive the inevitable wasted bodies.  Now that need has been transferred to the band’s records. When playing all three of the band’s albums back to back, apart from a danger to health, it is a hard choice to say which is best, all in their openly individual ways an equal treat, but without doubt Goin’ Back To Wurstville is the most demanding and exciting for heart and limbs yet.

The new album from the Sultan of Sausage and his fellow creative rascals is a blur of incitement, a cavalcade of irresistible temptation for feet and hips. Each of its thirteen songs teases and infests the psyche, sharing groove woven rhythm & blues punk ‘n’ roll to lose all shades of sanity to. As ever, it is a busy time for the quartet; gigs coming up at a rate of knots across the globe before and even more so after their highlight performance on the BBC show The UK’s Best Part-Time Band last year. With the outfit in the middle of a UK tour right now and featuring in Roger Corman’s movie, Death Race 2050, you can be sure that Goin’ Back To Wurstville is only going to accelerate the demand on the boys and their riotous sound.

Featuring Spencer Evoy from fellow body contorters MFC Chicken and his salacious sax, Goin’ Back To Wurstville quickly gets down to business with Pineapple Mama, the song feeding off the album’s lively Intro with an initial bass groan and flames of fiery sax, they leading to an insistent romp of riffs and rhythms led by King Salami’s inevitable energy and vocal revelry. It is party time, the song swinging from the rafters with body enslaving grooves dangling their insatiable bait to further ensnare ears and limbs. Soul, r&b, rock ‘n’ roll and more excitable flavours all get involved in the multi-flavoured proposal, King Salami and co straight away feeding greedy hopes with a fresh new adventure.

The pugilistic rascality of Nosebleed Boogie is next, guitars and sax colluding in a devilish enticement of melodic theatre as King Salami uses Ali like vocal footwork to evade the rhythmic punches, his magnetic prowess like a blend of Bo Diddley and Little Walter before offering even feistier fun in the boisterous romp of Busy Body. An infection of spicy grooves and virulent riffs, the song ensures the listener is on the end of major manipulation echoing its title before the glorious adventure of King Ghidorah rises up from its oriental bed with sixties cinematic adventure fuelling its melodies and rhythms. With King Salami a dramatic narrator, T. Bone Sanchez’s grooves are a three headed tempting of flirtatious hookery, melodic seduction, and tenacious persuasion, theatre skirted by the addictive rhythmic rumble of bassist Kamikaze UT Vincent and drummer Eric Baconstrip.

There is no escaping the frisky intent of the following King Size Love, its rockabilly nurtured stroll manhandled by addiction shaping rhythms and coloured with more of the salacious enterprise which continually and artfully springs from the guitar of Sanchez across the album. Feet and hips are swiftly lost to the song’s shuffle, lungs already gasping for breath by this point within Goin’ Back To Wurstville but managing to find plenty more air for the blues strung jungle of She Was A Mau Mau and after that, the garage punk lined surf rock lit antics of No Stoppin’. The first of the two is a sweltering near on muggy affair for the heart whilst its successor is a blaze of instrumental rock ‘n’ roll which has the body at its most frenetically subservient in the hands of the album.

The treats just keep coming too; Tiger In My Tank keeps the listener moving like a puppet on tricky strings of rhythmic pestering and melodic misbehaviour, all urged on by the saucy blasts of sax and King Salami’s inexhaustible energy and spirited character.

Stutterin’ Sue leaps around with garage rock rapacity and raw captivation next while Camel Hop after that sees roving basslines and agitated beats stir up another voracious contagion of sound and spirit rousing enterprise, sultry Arabian scented  grooves winding around ears and appetite as rock ‘n’ roll rumbles in the belly of song and listener. Both tracks are an epidemic of temptation, unrelenting creative persistence more than matched by the Johnny Kidd and The Pirates hued Shiver which follows.

Concluded by the double diablerie of firstly the album’s dirt encrusted rock ‘n’ roll road trip going under its title track moniker and lastly the carnival of Latin summer fun that is Caramba!, the sensational Goin’ Back To Wurstville is bliss for ears and soul. With each of the King Salami and the Cumberland 3 releases we seem to offer nothing but lustful praise so with their third full-length we were determined to find something which might be suggested the band could improve upon. Quite simply we failed, though you know the band will still find something fresh and bolder next time and with regards to best album question, listening it as these fingers tap, yep Goin’ Back To Wurstville wins the debate.

Goin’ Back To Wurstville is out now on Dirty Waters Records @ http://www.dirtywaterrecords.co.uk/shop/#!/King-Salami-and-the-Cumberland-Three/c/2793708/offset=9&sort=normal

https://www.facebook.com/KingSalamiandtheCumberland3/

Pete RingMaster 22/03/2017

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Offal / Zombie Cookbook – Split 7” EP

 

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There is a certain individual sickness to the visceral charms of Brazil’s most prominent and inventive extreme metal bands, an insidiousness which seems to coat riffs, grooves, and indeed songs. That sickness is a creeping toxin flavouring the new split release from Offal and Zombie Cookbook too; a poisonous and malevolent offering which worms under the skin with infectious temptation. It is not a release which actually startles, not initially anyway, but over time emerges as a visceral sonic assassin to which imagination and emotions become playthings. A swift and lethal scourge of the senses from two bands which are potently emerging on the broader extreme metal scene, the 7” split comes courtesy of a label, Black Hole Productions, which is no stranger to unleashing underground treats from band such as Lymphatic Phlegm, Xxx Maniak, Haemorrhage, and Gruesome Stuff Relish.

Offal is first up on the release, a quartet from Curitiba consisting of vocalist André Luiz, guitarist Tersis Zonato, bassist João Carlos Ongaro, and drummer Igor Thomaz. To the release of their well-received self-titled debut album in 2006, the band has added a second full-length and a string of splits with bands such as Bowel Fetus, Anatomia, Decrepitaph, and Mausoleum, all helping to increase their reputation and stature in the underground. References to Autopsy and Carcass have been cast over their sound, and as opener Dementia Trash. The Cult Of The Low-budget Cin devours ears it is something to agree with yet only slightly flavours the band’s voracious sound. Riffs are an immediate scrub of aggression in the song, swiftly offal1-680x406backed by the thunderous and turbulent assault of rhythms. Lorded over by the dark coated cavernously toned growls of Luiz, the track is a mix of predacious stalking and rabid intent. It is a rather compelling proposition gaining greater strength of persuasion across its length, imposing sonically and in success as its narrative courts the craft and blood-fests of cinematic gore/cult b-movie movie pioneers like Herschell Gordon Lewis, Ed Wood, and Roger Corman.

A great incitement for ears and imagination, the band’s second proposal Spinal Extractions Fiend For Blood is a more savage and irritable, no make that violent encounter, and just as highly palatable even at its mere 45 seconds. It hangs around enough to get the teeth into and to ignite a healthy appetite but is too short to get as much satisfaction out of it as wished, though that want is soon fed impressively by Zombie Cookbook.

foto-para-pagina-BHP-680x451The band’s name and indeed that of its members, in vocalist Dr. Stink, guitarists Horace Bones and Ed The Dead, bassist Purgy, and drummer Dr Freudstein, alone provide colourful and mischievous bait, a lure instantly backed by their first track Motel Hell. There is thrash bred ferocity to the charge and hostility of the song, energy and creative adventure which is as psychotic as it is groove infectious. The vocals equally have a character and captivating rabidity to them which only ignites ears and enjoyment, bringing a chunk of the originality which revolves within an accomplished if familiar template of sound.

Its voracious appetite and body only gets more deviously addictive and magnetic over time, much as that of its successor Eredità Maledetta. The first of the band’s two songs ends on a great finale of pure unbridled thrash contagion, a sonic tirade plainly contrasted by the demonic seeded entrance of the second, though it does not take long for the track to expel a spiteful breath and leap into its own ravenous destructive tempest. It also is much shorter than its companion, but does offer two minutes of furious extreme metal combat to reinforce a greedy appetite as sparked by the EP to explore the band, something which applies to Offal also.

It is hard to suggest you will hear anything dramatically new on the split but with undeniably impressive songs both bands make invigorating additions to the full underground arena of extreme OFFAL & ZOMBIE COOKBOOK - Split 7-ep - CAPA PROMO ZCKmetal. Both Offal and Zombie Cookbook could be looking at infiltrating the broadest spotlights sometime soon too, especially if they continue uncaging beasts like those on their shared offering.

The 7” Split EP is available now via Black Hole Productions @ https://blackholeprods.bandcamp.com/album/split-7ep

http://www.offalgore.com/       http://www.zombiecookbook.com.br/

RingMaster 05/03/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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