No holds barred rockin’: talking Jackson Firebird with Dale Hudak

JF2_RingMaster Review

   2014 saw Australian rockers Jackson Firebird unleash a riot of distinct rock ‘n’ roll across Europe through debut album Cock Rockin’. Heftily acclaimed and greedily devoured, it quickly repeated the success already found by its storming tracks in the duo’s homeland. A year on and the pair of guitarist/vocalist Brendan Harvey and drummer/vocalist Dale Hudak has repeated the incitement with second full-length Shake The Breakdown. Not needing to be asked twice if we wanted to get back in touch with the guys to learn about the new release we thrust a host of questions at Dale with the following insight into Jackson Firebird, album, and studio antics.

Hi Dale, welcome back to The RingMaster Review

Last time we talked with you was after the European release of debut album Cock Rockin’ last year. Apart from the obvious being your new album Shake The Breakdown in the making and releasing, what have the months since also brought the way of Jackson Firebird?

Hey Pete, thanks for the great questions mate. Lately most interviews have been aimed squarely at Brendan’s sex change operation so this is refreshing. We recorded the new album late in 2014 so it’s been almost a year. We have been just itching to get it out there and tour the balls out of it. Other than an Aus tour earlier in the year and the odd show, we have had a quiet 2015. Personally I have learnt to throw together quite a delicious cheesy potato bake and mastered a recipe for a triple choc brownie. But somehow we have managed to find the time to jam our arses off and now just want to get out there and play!

Now the dust has fully settled on that first album, what are your thoughts looking back at its success outside of your homeland?

We started off jamming in the family bakery just as an excuse to get together with mates, make some noise and get drunk on a Tuesday night. We never considered success outside of our small town let alone out of the country. Success comes to me in the form of people wanting to come to our shows, stick around and party with us. That feeling of being able to hold a whole room or watching someone picked up and thrown about on a crowd while losing their shit makes us feel like we’ve done good. We saw a bit of that last time we were in Europe.

What kind of doors, if any, has it opened for the band?

I am now able to get the best table at any McDonalds restaurant in Mildura. So there’s that.

JFcover2_RingMaster ReviewAs we just said second album Shake The Breakdown has been recently uncaged. How did you approach its creation compared to Cock Rockin’?

We went into Cock Rockin as having a bunch of songs that we wanted to record so we could have something to sell at gigs and show the grandkids and stuff. We mostly produced it ourselves and recorded and paid for it in drips and drabs. Shake the Breakdown started with a trip over to Austin TX for SXSW in 2013 where we had a chance to record a few songs with legend producer Chris Frenchie Smith. He was totally on our wavelength and found the sound we were chasing so it made sense to go back and finish it off with him. Frenchie’s production was the big difference between Cock and Shake. He shoved us when we needed a push and pulled us when we needed a tug. He definitely got more out of us than if we were to do it by ourselves again. Talking about creative input, not about semen you dirty bugger.

If you had to nail down the major differences and the evolution between the two albums what would they be for you?

I think with Cock Rockin we managed to get a live sounding album that sounds bigger than just two people. With Shake the Breakdown it’s taken up a few notches but in a way that we can still achieve live with just the two of us. We still tried to keep our music simple stupid stripped back rocking but now it’s centered by a wall of noise. We probably got a bit more adventurous with the style of some of the songs on the new album. Not on purpose, just “Hudak:   Harvey, I got a riff I think you should sing this one”. “Harvey: SCREAMS!!!!!”

Get Away is finished.

As the first album and as you just implied, Shake The Breakdown feels like its songs are a live encounter for ears but did you change anything in the recording approach this time around or where did you certainly evolve things?

Just like Cock Rockin we recorded every song on the new album with both of us belting it out in the same room as if we were playing live. All the rhythm guitar at least was laid down at the same time as the drums. Harvs was more than patient with my continual fuck ups but there were a few times he had to dodge a flying drum stick aimed at his head. We used a Moog synth to get some of the fat bass sounds and over dubbed geet leads and stuff but tried to keep the songs as live as possible.

There is more variety in the sound of Shake The Breakdown too, were there any specific inspirations which might attribute to the adventure at play?

We never really have anything particular in mind before writing a song other than it’s got to be fun and a challenge to play live. Riffs and melodies can come from anywhere at any time so my phone’s voice memo is choca block full of humming or stupid guitar voices or just singing. It’s all gold at the time, but when you revisit at jam it’s more what was I thinking? Wait, was I actually taking a shit during that one? The fact that I sing a few more songs on this album may attribute to the variety in sound. The writing process remained the same but my style of singing takes some of the songs in different directions.

I believe the first album consisted of songs which had been around a while in the Jackson Firebird armoury just waiting to be unleashed; how about with Shake The Breakdown, are these fresh JF1_RingMaster Reviewfrom the pen encounters other than the covers of course?

The song Shake the Breakdown is actually one of the first songs we wrote together. We recorded a demo of it ages ago but it wasn’t until we got together with Frenchie that we considered giving the song a better go in the studio. It’s a song I play on the bottle bin and a permanent fixture to the JF set list so it was important to have on an album. All of the other songs are newbies.

As always the band’s humour runs wild across the release as the great sounds, particular stories which have inspired songs?

The Headache Mantra stemmed from my love of the show Monkey Magic. For those who haven’t seen it, it’s about an arrogant bad motherfucker monkey king who takes on heaven and wins. In short, the Buddha makes him follow around a ladyboy and kicks heaps of demon arse along the way. The headache mantra is the chant that makes Monkey’s head ring tighten. This made him yelp in a way not unlike what happens in the song. It’s hard to explain; watch it, 80s cheese in all its glory!

We mentioned the covers on the album. Your take on Queen’s Fat Bottomed Girls was a treat but the version of the Shirley Ellis classic, The Clapping Song had the room in a riotous union, as indeed many others tracks to be fair. You did not seem to dissect and twist them about too majorly yet found a character to them which was wholly different. What was the idea behind firstly of choosing the pair and of how you approached them?

Fat Bottomed Girls was suggested by Frenchie when we had some time up our sleeves in the studio. We thought he was taking the piss but his vision was to totally under think the track. Queen made such a brilliant rock song and the lyrics are all a bit tongue in cheek so we humored Frenchie. Harvs was practically watching a YouTube tutorial on how to play the song while we were recording it. Frenchie was pummelling the Moog and jumping around like a man possessed and I was just cracking up as it went down. My biggest stress with the song was even attempting Freddie’s vocal. But I had the megaphone set up next to the drums so Frenchie asked me to lay down a guide vocal. That ended up being the vocal we used and the track was finished in half a day. I think it’s this rawness that gives our version its flavour.

The Clapping Song was a song Kmart used in their advertising for a good six months in Australia so it was hard not to hear it whenever the TV was on. It was stuck in my head on a daily basis so we jammed in it. Kmart to thank for that.

Is there any particular moment within Shake The Breakdown which has you especially smiling inside?

Mostly in Fat Bottomed Girls when Harvs was trying to nail the guitar break short solo bit. He got so pissed off that he just kind of sloppily slaps the strings randomly and Frenchie goes “perfect!” and we move on. Listening to the wrongness of that part makes me smile a bit inside.

jf4_RingMaster ReviewYou are already out there uncaging the album on stage? What is on the horizon live wise?

There is some pretty intensive touring on the near horizon before the end of the year, both in Australia and Europe. Not all of the dates have been confirmed yet so check out our website or Facebook for updates. We are playing a killer festival on the 3rd of Oct called Chopped Rod & Custom which is full of crazy old cars, rev heads and rock n roll. Drag racing all day can’t wait!

What is left in store for 2015 from Jackson Firebird?

Touring and more touring and playing our tits off touring and going to watch that new Star Wars movie.

Thanks again for sharing your time with us, any final thoughts you would like to leave on?

If you get a chance come and see us play we’ll have cracker of a time!

Oh and finally, there are a few great duos creating blood boiling rock ‘n’ roll right now, we mentioned a couple in our review of Shake The Breakdown. Are there any which ignite your personal flames of passion?

Yes!!!! The Fumes, The Black Keys (early days), Local H, The Mess Hall King of the North, and Royal Blood are all sick bands.

Read our review of Shake the Breakdown @

Pete RingMaster 04/10/2015

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Archi Deep and the Monkeyshakers – #3

Archie Deep_RingMaster Review

With two releases under their belts, French rockers Archi Deep and the Monkeyshakers might still be lurking in the shadows of recognition with a great many but that could be changing with the release of their new mini album which is simply called #3. Bursting with attitude loaded, fiery rock ‘n’ roll, the band’s third offering is a blaze of impassioned sound and inventive tenacity which makes a very good impression first time around but just gets more creatively impressive and boldly persuasive with every taking of its rousing stomp.

Hailing from Oléron, an island off the Atlantic coast of France and due west of Rochefort, Archi Deep and the Monkeyshakers consists of Archi Deep, Camille Sullet, and Martin Leroy. Formed around two years ago, the band quickly sparked attention with debut EP #1 in the November of 2013. Shows and tours around France followed with hunger, the band more recently spreading their sounds in French tours and into the UK after the successful release last year of their second EP, #2. Now their energy fuelled blues spiced, and slightly warped rock ‘n’ roll has an increasingly thrilling outing with the latest proposal from the band. With this also our introduction to Archi Deep and the Monkeyshakers, we cannot say how it compares to their previous encounters, or describe the growth of their sound, but looking ahead with #3 as evidence, this is a band going places and more than worthy of a hefty moment of your time.

cover_RingMaster Review   Their sound is a kind of a mix between two UK bands past and present, a kind of coincidental hybrid of My Red Cell and Medusa, and as suggested more irresistibly tempting with every excursion. The EP starts with Nowhere Man and a great scraping of guitar which in turn triggers a groaning bass groove aligned to equally cantankerous and thickly enticing scythes of melodic tonic. The voice of Archi carries similar attitude and expression, his tones also crawling seductively through ears but with an intimidating glint of devilish intent in tow. The song continues to prowl until the blues rock enterprise within the strings and fingers on the guitar cannot restrain their resourceful and smiling endeavour any longer, throwing off any wrap to further light ears and imagination. The band’s current single, it is stirring stuff with the heavy swiping beats only ensuring further that its impact just gets bigger and more tempestuous over time.

The excellent start continues with I’m On The Run, a song opening with a far mellower and gentle coaxing for ears. The enjoyable and already slightly off-kilter vocal delivery is an immediate tempting which is hugged by a hazy melodic web of guitar. Attention is tempted instantly and firmly hooked once a mighty rally of beats sparks the track to burst out with an infectious swing to its body and gait. A wonderful gnarly tone from the bass quickly adds to the theatre and addictiveness of the song, its raw snarl matched in fuzzy kind by riffs, the intensity of the beats, and the salacious glamour lining the enthralling tendrils of blues skinned craft spinning from guitars. It also carries a great stoner-esque feel to its almost bruising rock ‘n roll, another additive to leave thoughts and appetite grinning greedily.

High Minds engages ears next, its acoustic kaleidoscope a tapestry of flavours and seemingly inspirations, merging everything from rock to rap to indie to Lennon and McCartney with imagination. The song is an instant friend which again, as is the theme of the release, just gets more compelling and involving with every escapade with it, a quality once more reflected in the southern kissed, desert rock of I Can See. Whether, moving on a relaxed and spicy canter or uncaging a bracing tempest of energy, veined by molten guitar and spiky rhythmic adventure, the song is aural virulence and quite irresistible.

Taking a little longer than others to tap into the same kind of reactions found elsewhere, Real is a smouldering incitement which just seems to get more determined to have its way with every play, that an inevitable success with its great emotive and melodic turbulence, though with personal tastes it still has to settle for the shade of its companions, especially against the closing mercurial roar of If Only It Was Sunny. The song is glorious, an unpredictable and explosive blues croon of dirty and heart felt rock ‘n’ roll, and the perfect way to conclude one riveting release.

If you like your rock ‘n’ roll on fire than take it from us, Archi Deep and the Monkeyshakers and #3 is a must check out. Simple as that!

#3 is released October 2nd and available digitally at the band’s Bandcamp.

Pete RingMaster 01/10/2015

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Julian Grimm – Hazy

Julian Grimm pic 2_RingMaster Review

Grabbing the listener by the scruff of the neck and taking them on a relentless charge of energy fuelled rock ‘n’ roll, the new single from Julian Grimm rousingly whets the appetite for all forthcoming offerings from the artist. Next to come is an EP called Rebirth later this year and it is fair to say that it could not have been given a better flyer than the boisterous roar of Hazy.

The musical journey of Grimm began under the Brazilian shadows of Sao Paulo skyscrapers where his first exploits came in a couple of independent punk bands. Subsequently moving to the UK and London, more punk fuelled adventures followed in a few bands before he formed Snap Out, an outfit releasing the Static and Dino Diner EPs and who played across a host of venues such as the O2 Academy and Monarch. After this things colluded to push Grimm “away into his own darkness”, the band coming to an end because of it and the man using “his time incarcerated in the shadows to rebuild himself.” Now music has had a ‘rebirth’ within him with Hazy the first, if it is a sign of things to come, stirring anthem to hit ears and emotions.

The single is, according to Grimm “about a girl that inhabits both my dreams and my nightmares. I can never be sure who she is and what she wants to do with me, but I can’t help to be incredibly attracted to her. It’s a song about raw instinctive feelings, love and hate.” It is also a proposition which takes an inventively building breath before launching into a foot to the floor, adrenaline fuelled charge with scything rhythms, crunchy riffs, and snarling attitude, but equally exudes rich melodic warmth and contagious virulence throughout which leaves the body breathless and hunger for more, greedy.

Part punk, part alternative rock, and part power pop, to slim down all its flavours, Hazy also has a familiarity which only works in its favour and a passion that cannot fail to transfer to the listener. Simply it is rock ‘n’ roll to get highly enthused over and a potent hook for the upcoming Rebirth EP where more of the same would do very nicely please.

Hazy is out now via iTunes and other online stores.

Pete RingMaster 30/09/2015

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Braddock Station Garrison – A Hint of Recognition

BSG_RingMaster Review

Last year US rock band Braddock Station Garrison gave a strong and enjoyable introduction to their rock ‘n’ roll with debut EP/mini album High Water. Exploring all the best bits of that release whilst honing other potential but previously less striking elements in their sound, the Washington DC quartet has recently unveiled its successor, A Hint of Recognition. Still carrying a flavoursome Americana tang to their no frills rock ‘n’ roll, Braddock Station Garrison have produced another highly magnetic and creatively organic proposition with their second full-length to thoroughly enjoy. It is probably not a game changer in stirring major awareness of the band by wider spotlights, though it has enough to make a stir if given the chance, but A Hint of Recognition is definitely going to entice new fans as they show they are heading in the right creative direction for bigger rewards ahead.

Formed by vocalist/guitarist Steve Schillinger and lead guitarist Tom Soha in 2011; Braddock Station Garrison take inspirations from the likes of Tom Petty, Neil Young & Crazy Horse, Cheap Trick, Aerosmith, Johnny Cash, and The Smithereens into their openly growing sound. Completed by drummer Michael Chapman and bassist Michael Haddad, a line-up in place since mid-2014, the band released High Water last year to keen responses. Its fusion of classic and modern sounds was a highly appetising if unspectacular proposal which left a richness of pleasure in its wake. A Hint of Recognition continues the groundwork it laid but with more inventive tenacity, bolder imagination, and depth of sound. It is still not the offering to make an explosive impact but it definitely guarantees a thoroughly enjoyable time with every listen and who can say no to that.

cover_RingMaster Review   The album opens with Forgotten Teenage Dream, a contagious little number with jangly riffs and a great alluring bassline alongside the ever distinctive and appealing tones of Schillinger. With crispy beats adding to the easy going stroll, the song rather than providing a big splash to start things off is more a catchy coaxing, a warm up to bigger and brighter things. Nevertheless grooves and melodies offer a pleasing tempting which the more relaxed and emotive She’s Too Cool employs with relish in its more fifties rockabilly seeded stroll. As in its predecessor and the band’s sound generally, there is a masterful simplicity at work; leanness to the invention which ensures only the choice cuts of sound and imagination get involved in the song whilst avoiding unnecessary embellishments.

Things really takes off from the album’s third track, Lies, where once more a fifties breeding is carried by the tantalising air of the song, and initially through another tasty bass lure and the rich vocals. It is a flavour continued by sultry melodies and welcoming riffs cast by the guitars whilst a raw cascade of intensity only adds to the drama and unrelenting addictiveness of the song. Its success seems to spark something extra in its following companions too, Hey Cindy spinning a web of sonic tendrils across its body within a great rhythmic beckoning next. To this the guitars spray a creative smog like contrails behind a plane, with both Chapman and Haddad laying down gripping bait before Never In Danger emulates the earlier Lies with its own dark rock hues, though this time they touch upon a R.E.M. colouring in the song’s evocative swing. Infectious from first breath to last, the track is a reserved but lively seduction adding more warmth to the satisfaction already brewed by A Hint of Recognition.

More heady bass temptation brings a grin to lips as Any Day Any Way opens up, the enticement persistent as guitars spread fuzzy causticity across a punkish encounter unafraid to change tact and energy at the drop of a note. More inventive and fiery with each passing minute, the track is another striking high point which Stop and Reflect struggles to match right after, though its country twang and melodic smoulder only feeds a happy appetite before Johnny Stone Stole My Girl brings things to a rocking close. Its unsurprising yet irresistibly catchy shuffle feeds all wants from a slice of rock ‘n’ roll, especially with more of that flavoursome old school fifties tone to please personal tastes; a pursuit of which would definitely go down well and add something more to future Braddock Station Garrison songs it is easy to suggest on the evidence of A Hint of Recognition. More of the very solid and enjoyable sounds found on the band’s new album would be quite fine too.

A Hint of Recognition is out now via the Braddock Station Garrison Bandcamp.

Pete RingMaster 29/09/2015

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City Of Thieves – Incinerator

CoT_RingMaster Review

We just cannot say no to a rousing slab of rock ‘n’ roll at The RR and that is exactly what UK hard rockers City Of Thieves uncage with their debut EP, Incinerator. It is five tracks of varied, no frills heavy rock which may not carry too many big surprises but potently feeds the instincts to roar and brawl with revelry. After the first minute of its opener you will kind of know and certainly welcome what you are going to get thereon in, but with a formidable freshness and passion to it too, it quickly shows why there is a thick buzz brewing up around the band; Incinerator inciting heavy satisfaction as it sonically lives up to its name.

The London quartet emerged in May of 2015 and as soon as their sounds hit ears and their feet stomped on stage, City Of Thieves began stirring up rich attention. Their live debut was an acclaim awarded introduction at his year’s Camden Rocks Festival, whilst debut single and now EP title track Incinerator, saw the band play listed on the New Rock Show on Planet Rock Radio for 7 weeks. Since then the band has found itself booked for this year’s Hard Rock Hell, Legends Of Rock, and Rockstock Festivals, played Bloodstock, and seen their EP already covered in plaudits.

EP Artwork_RingMaster Review     Recorded with producer Toby Jepson (Little Angels, The Answer, The Virginmarys), mixed by Mike Fraser (Metallica, AC/DC, Slipknot, Aerosmith), and mastering by Simon Francis (Kodaline, Kaiser Chiefs, Primal Scream), the Incinerator EP starts with a bang and never looks back. That first single opens things up, enticing ears and teasing an instant appetite with its initial predatory prowl of riffs, they courted by the swiping beats of drummer Will Richards and the gnarly tones of Jamie Lailey’s bass. Pretty soon things have ‘relaxed’ into a fiery stroll as the guitars of Ben Austwick and Adam Wardle spin a melodic web of grooves and spicy riffs , and Lailey unveils his sandy, slightly grizzled vocal tones. Like an old buddy, a familiarity entwines with the sonic enterprise and stalking rhythms, and like a returning friend it only pleases as it comes further alive with individual prowess and a creative energy which many bands never ascend to, especially within a debut.

The great start continues with Buzzed Up City, a mellower and warmer grab of the senses but one not scrimping on vociferous snarls within its fiery heart as the band embraces a more classic rock tone with eighties hues in its infectious rock ‘n’ roll. It hits the spot with accuracy though is still eclipsed by its predecessor and the following Lay Me To Waste, the best track on the release. From the almost carnivorous tone of the bass, the rebellious nature of drums and riffs, and grooves which flirt like a lithe seductress, the track smoulders and blazes with a virulence and enterprise which swiftly captures the imagination, and of course greedy ears.

Here Comes The Shot is more of the same infection in its individual way. Its bluesy air and rumbling rhythms also immediate persuasion as vocally again Lailey, like the song and indeed EP, brings a ‘this is how it is, take it or leave it’ attitude and the taking is the only reply possible to the rousing anthem.

A live acoustic take of Mr 50/50 brings the release to a fine end, the song a closing reminder of the core craft and qualities of City Of Thieves always lying beneath the full on riotous sound of other tracks whilst providing a last shot of aural liquor complete with boozy harmonica.

The bottom-line here is that there are few BIG surprises with Incinerator but an unbridled dose of fun and rousing rock ‘n’ roll, and who is never up for that?

The Incinerator EP is available now via Townsend Records / Monster Box Music

Pete RingMaster 23/09/2015

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Mordecai – Fight Fire With Fire

Mordecai_RingMaster Review

British metallers Mordecai continue to grow and impress as proven by their recently released EP Valour. Now with thick confirmation of the fact and to entice a new horde of eager hungry ears the band release the single Fight Fire With Fire. The opening track to the EP, it is a storming tempest of dark metal and virulent aggression loaded with a passion, and quite simply impossible to ignore.

Hailing from Croydon, the London based quartet of vocalist/guitarist Dan M Hicks, lead guitarist Andy Short, bassist Mickey C, and drummer Alex Gooders has become one of the UK’s brightest hopes over the past couple of years. Formed in 2006, the band was already stirring up some attention but it was with a new settled line-up around 2010 that their Black Stone Cherry, Alter Bridge, and Black Label Society inspired sound seem to come truly alive with enthused reactions in return. Live the band has been a potent force, making successful appearances at the likes of Bloodstock, Bull Dog Bash and Hammerfest, as well as Download where they became one of the very few unsigned bands to be invited to play on consecutive years. Alongside that the band has shared stages with bands such as Black Light Burns, Bam Margera’s FFU, and Fightstar whilst 2013 saw the release of their eagerly anticipated debut album Undaunted, a well-received incitement followed and eclipsed this year by the aforementioned Valour EP. Recorded with John Mitchell (You Me At Six, Architects and Alter Bridge)at Outhouse Studios, it too was an acclaimed and hungrily welcomed proposition unleashing some of the band’s most adventurous and explosive songs to date, one of which being Fight Fire With Fire.

The single song opens on a lusty roar from Hicks, his ravenous tones backed by spicy riffs and hefty rhythms. Soon hitting a meaty stride, the track becomes as predatory as it is sonically invigorating; ears and appetite aflame from its contagious aggression and brawling weave of colourful grooves aligned to vocal calls and rhythmic animosity. With the guitars also spinning a web of sultry melodies and suggestive hues around the swiftly gripping confrontation, the air is ripe with adventure and drama, a rebel rousing incitement coursing through the creative bodies of the band and in turn the listener.

If they are still an unknown, Fight Fire With Fire is the perfect way to introduce yourself to Mordecai. It has all the elements and flavours which makes the band for so many one continually exciting proposal of addictively tempestuous of rock ‘n’ roll.

Fight Fire With Fire is available now

Pete Ringmaster 09/09/2015

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Jackson Firebird – Shake The Breakdown


Last year saw the global release via Napalm Records of Cock Rockin’, the debut album from Australian rockers Jackson Firebird. Already stirring up eager appetites in their homeland, its riotous expanse of multi-flavoured and feistily raw rock ‘n’ roll quickly went to work on a new expanse of ears and appetites with great success. Now the duo of guitarist/vocalist Brendan Harvey and drummer/vocalist Dale Hudak unleash its successor Shake The Breakdown, another riotous explosion of blistering heavy rock that incites the instincts to have a ball.

Things get swiftly hot and heavy with opener Mohawk Bang!, the track spewing tangy grooves and firm handed rhythms from its first breath. Vocals similarly leave nothing in the locker as they shuffle with zeal on the riotous stride increasingly brewing within the rousing encounter. Southern rock with a splatter of Rage Against The Machine spicing, the track is a storming start to the release, revealing new maturity and prowess in the band’s sound without losing any of the raw tenacity and incendiary texture which gripped throughout the band’s first album.

Get Away twists and grumbles next with a dirtier air and coating to its grouchy presence. Growling somewhere between Motorhead and Nirvana, the track is a web of insatiable grooves and rapier like beats luring a just as hungry appetite from the listener before New Wave parades its heavy hard rock revelry to again anthemic effect. Its skin also has an earthy tone whilst the fingers of Harvey create blues tinged squalls of sonic enterprise to lick lips over within the adrenaline driven charge of the song.

cover_ringmasterreviewFunk inspired grooves writhe throughout the blues spawned High Love next, its rockabilly seeded shuffle alone inescapable addiction but just as mightily matched by the searing contagion spawned by the guitar and speared by the scything rhythms of Hudak. Musically and vocally the track agreeably reminds of US duo, In The Whale, leaving slavery in its tail wind for the thick delta blues bred tempting of Sin For Your Lovin to reinforce, which it does with in fine swamp style before the first of two covers on the album teases ears. The first is a version of Queen’s Fat Bottomed Girls, Jackson Firebird turning it into a distortion soaked rock ‘n’ roll bellow which leaves a smile and potent satisfaction behind, if not the option to add it to the favourites within Shake The Breakdown.

Devil’s Door soon has ears and hips swinging next with a The Black Crowes meets Turbonegro swaggering within a sonic witchery, whilst Voodoo pushes those tones into even more eventful and resourceful endeavours through a creative maelstrom flirting with the recognisable essences of bands such as Red Hot Chili Peppers, The Black Keys, and Pearl Jam. The song equally creates its own character and essence to powerfully entice with before stepping back for the punk ‘n’ roll devilry of Headache Mantra to have its moment of glory lined with a compelling glam metal, rap metal, and noise rock lunacy.

The slow sultry shimmer and stroll of Sick ´n Tired soaks ears next but is soon providing expulsions of heavy boned riffs and commanding rhythms which free themselves from the bluesy climate from time to time. It is an incitement loaded with ‘deceit’ too, the song expressing being “sick ´n tired of playing the blues” and confirming it with Zack de la Rocha and co inspired eruptions.

The album’s second cover is its penultimate track too, Jackson Firebird just stirring up the passion with its rousing take on the Shirley Ellis classic The Clapping Song. Grooves are as virulent and addictively flavoursome as the organic anthemic instincts of the song and verse itself are overwhelming, the union ensuring there is no escaping the breathlessness grasping lungs and body by its close, not that the spidery sonic web of the album’s title track cares as it wraps the listener in a mouth-watering fuzz ball of blues temptation and rhythmic incitement which just gets more furious, tenacious, and compelling across its fiery body.

As its predecessor, Shake the Breakdown leaves a lustful want of more whilst pushing the band’s instinctive diversity of sound and heart fuelled hunger to rock ‘n’ roll to new heights. The bottom-line is that this is another encounter which demands it should be added to that must have list of 2015.

Shake The Breakdown is available now via Napalm Records.

Pete RingMaster 08/09/2015

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