Yorkshire Rats -Sea of Souls

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It is with thanks to Carl of the excellent Chalkman Video that UK punk rock ‘n’ rollers Yorkshire Rats and their debut album Sea of Souls recently and firmly hit our radar. He gave us the heads up on the Leeds quartet having recently shot a video with the guys, and led us to one of those albums which lights ears initially but equally simmers away in the psyche to emerge as one thrilling riot of temptation.

Yorkshire Rats began in 2004, formed by Don Mercy once of Abrasive Wheels and Billy No Mates. Soon into their aggressive stride the band subsequently released, in the words of their bio, “a rabble-rousing 7” and a hooligan fuelled EP.” 2006 saw the band support to great success Rancid but then go on an extended hiatus. They have now returned fuelled to the top with contagious rock ‘n’ roll tenacity, punk confrontation, and potent lyrical incitements, all found to great effect on debut album Sea of Souls. Consisting of Kurt Alexander, Matt Lee, and Chris Furness alongside Mercy, Yorkshire Rats confront, incite, and thrill across thirteen tracks of bracing punk ‘n’ roll antagonism.

There is an instant stirring up of ears and appetite with album opener Hurry Up and Wait, the rolling heavily jabbing enticement of the drums swift persuasion. Raw guitar caresses need little prompting to add their lures, or the swagger lined bassline which jumps in at the same time. It is a feisty and contagious uniting topped by expressive vocals with a delivery which is part challenge, part invitation. The song is the kind of attention grabber all albums should start with, a song revealing the heart of a band’s sound and encounter’s intent with anthemic guile.

sos album artThe following Glory Days opens on a juicy stroking of slim but pungent riffs before opening up into a dusty rock stroll still driven by the initial hook lined guitar bait. The track does not quite have the bite of its predecessor but compensates with a catchiness and blaze of sonic enterprise which again has an early appetite fed well before making way for the album’s title track. Sea of Souls shows a whisper of the Californian punk influences which also colour the band’s sound, whilst the track itself gently but firmly embraces ears and thoughts with infectious rock sounds and lyrical suggestiveness.

The pair of Everyday and Mary Comes First offer fresh variety to an already flavoursome encounter, the former infusing a Flogging Molly lilt to its guitar endeavour whilst rhythms cast an anthemic baiting and the latter with a smell of Tom Petty to its riffery, in a striking landscape of emotive contemplation and rock ‘n’ roll contagion. Both songs have feet and emotions fired up, the first especially incendiary with its magnetic mix of flavours and almost predatory hooks, but as great as they are, they find themselves shaded by the Green Day-esque Lawful Civil Rights. Guitars and bass bring even stronger glimpses of the Cali scene whilst spinning their own anthemic and addictive proposal around punchy beats and expressive vocal reflection.

The opening dark and predatory bass resonance bringing Struck Down into view is one of those invitations only the deaf can resist, especially once guitars add their sonic scythes to the portentous air. Erupting in a tempest of rhythmic aggression and hostile attitude driven by belligerent vocals, the track weaves in strains of psychobilly and blues tinting into its punk roar, creating one of the most momentous and memorable exploits upon the album.

The calm and inviting balladry of You Don’t Know Anything entices ears and emotions next before Only the Rich Men stomps and rumbles with its raucously engaging sounds. Each again shows a different colour to the Yorkshire Rats sound, not major side steps but hues which reveal the strong variety to the bands creativity and tone.

No Freedom as the previous song is another rock ‘n’ roll romp, but with more rigour in its energy and infectiousness in its punk devilry. Rhythms brew up an inescapable slavery for feet and emotions whilst riffs and vocals blaze over deviously addictive hooks. Though not quite the final song it still makes for a mighty finale before Sea of Souls closes with a trio of excellent acoustic demos of Mary Comes First, Only the Rich Men, and the title track.

You cannot quite call Yorkshire Rats a new band, even with their prolonged absence, but they take ears with a freshness which makes their debut album play like a starting point for the band. A base for bigger and just as enjoyable things to breed from we suspect.

Sea of Souls is out now via Indelirium Records @ http://indeliriumrecords.com/releases-carousel/idr067-yorkshire-rats-sea-of-souls/ and most online stores.

http://www.YorkshireRats.com/     https://www.facebook.com/yorkshirerats

RingMaster 26/04/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

 

Hung Like Jack – Fire beneath me/ Life’s first sign of rage

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If you thought the summer was going to be one of peace and warm calm then think again as this is when UK rockers Hung Like Jack release their next roar of voracious rock ‘n’ roll in the uncompromising shapes of Fire beneath me and Life’s first sign of rage. Equipped with the brawling tenacity and flavoursome enterprise the band has become renowned for, the new songs also reveals a fresh virulence to their sound’s aggressiveness and uncompromising ferocity. They are raw, intrusive, and confrontational but in the same strength the songs are a blaze of punk ‘n’ roll contagion.

Hung Like Jack began in 2007 finding its richest line-up and sound once vocalist John, guitarist Tim, and bassist Hakim linked up with beast of a drummer Denz. The band has been a greedily devoured proposition on the North of England live scene for quite a while whilst their trio of EPs have increasingly drawn acclaim and attention, the third, White Powder, especially so with its release in the January of 2014. Now they are geared up with squalling riffs, barbarous rhythms, and anthemic fury to unleash their new single.

11066515_889393494458755_821227949457285194_n   With just its first breath Fire beneath me is a wall of imposing yet compelling sound, guitars and drums an immediate provocation backed by throaty bass lures. Once vocals take their run at ears, the song has appetite and emotions centred on its exploits and increasingly enamoured as hooks and beats collide in a busy and rugged brawl. As mentioned though, contagiousness ignites just as potently within the song whilst the melodic enterprise of Tim adds a vibrant colouring to the stormy canvas of the song. Punk and varied heavy rock textures rage and unite across the excellent provocation, blasting out a rock ‘n’ roll incitement very hard to turn down and certainly ignore.

The single’s other track is similarly imposing, though the bellow of group vocals opening up Life’s first sign of rage are not as stable as they could be. They are soon a distant thought though as riffs and rhythms align for a bracing torrent of intensity and infectious persuasion inflamed further by the roaring tones of John. It is fair to say that the song is far more predatory and hostile than Fire beneath me but still expels a wind of anthemic might which leaves limbs and voice enlisted. The senses though just wilt under the rest of the uncaged onslaught, basking in every minute of it.

There is no hiding place with The Darlington based quartet’s sound or indeed their creative attitude, and in the Dave Hills recorded, mixed, and mastered release, no chance of a relaxing time, just a fiercely enjoyable one.

Fire beneath me/ Life’s first sign of rage will be released on May 22nd with a Launch party being held at the Railway Tavern in Darlington the same night.

https://www.facebook.com/hunglikejack

RingMaster 26/04/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

Bulletproof Rose – Loud Hard Fast

Bulletproof Rose Promo Picture

Its title is Loud Hard Fast and that just about sums up the new EP from UK rockers Bulletproof Rose, though to that you can add enjoyable if unsurprising. That lack of originality is not necessarily a bad thing in the hands of strong musicians and it is fair to say that the Cumbria quartet is that, and certain familiarity bred from inspirations can often add a captivating essence to songs, which again generally applies here, but for long term and potent persuasion on a national appetite will it be enough for Bulletproof Rose to make a breakthrough we have to wonder.

Hailing from Workington and formed in 2012 with the current line-up uniting last year, Bulletproof Rose has certainly bred a mighty reputation for their live performances and tenacious rock ‘n’ roll locally, spreading further afield in recent times. Drawing on influences like AC/DC, Guns N Roses, and Motley Crue, all open from the first breath of the EP, the band is on a steady rise which Loud Hard Fast can only reinforce, though by how much time will tell.

The song Bulletproof Rose sets the riot rolling, the guitars of Jacob Siddle and Brian Robinson ruffling air and ears with raucous, if restrained riffs as the heavy jabs of drummer Dan Wallace punctuate their caustic tempting. The song is soon into a captivating and more predatory stroll though, the bass of Dane Riach adding throaty enticement as the vocals of Siddle bring their roar into play. Feet and emotions are soon fully engaged by this point, the thumping antagonism of rock ‘n’ roll and fevered energy an easy contagion to be infected by whilst the soaring solos work on the imagination. As suggested earlier there is little to surprise in the band’s sound and subsequently song but it still provides a heavily engaging proposal that feet and satisfaction cannot turn down

Bulletproof Rose Cover Art   The following Gypsy explores a blues/classic rock landscape with fiery riffs and strong armed rhythms. It is a song growing in strength as the intensity aggressively rises within the song but in turn losing a little of that potency when relaxing around moments of melodic and sonic enterprise as band vocal calls try to being an anthemic climate into play. There is certainly the spark of its predecessor lacking in the song but has enough to involve voice and appetite before making way for My Girl. Immediately there is a rawer volatile punk essence and attitude to the song, riffs and beats adding more of a snarl to their presence matched by the impressing voice of Siddle. Expectations are barely challenged across the song but it is another occasion where a juicy and inventive solo aligned to raucous exploits easily compensate.

Bang Your Head is the same, familiarity soaking every aspect but countered by an anthemic roar, the strongest moment on the EP in that respect, and the infectiousness fuelling the encounter. It’s most potent weaponry though is the outstanding guitar prowess igniting the song, especially in a twin solo strike. In some ways the rest of the song cannot quite back this up but again as feet and voice are fully recruited to its cause, there is no doubting that the song provides a fun and pleasing time.

The EP ends with its title track, a song opening on a great seventies rock n’ roll riff which is as much glam, a la Sweet, as it is dirty, i.e. Motorhead. Riffs and rhythms simply gnaw and pound away at the senses, whilst vocally Siddle offers a punkish tone which only adds to the irresistible theatre of rock ‘n’ roll romping with the listener. The downing of aggression for a calmer passage does not quite work for personal tastes, its predacious prowling good but defused by the distance from it guitars are taken by the production, though it all evens out again before the song ends on a highly appetising finale crafted by the impressive and thrilling enterprise of Siddle and Robinson.

It would be wrong to say that enjoyment with Loud Hard Fast was anything but full and as a first introduction to Bulletproof Rose it is a pleasing proposition from a band with some mean creative and technical skills. For real originality and surprises though we will have to wait and hope they are next on the agenda for the band.

The Loud Hard Fast EP is available from 27th April from all digital stores.

https://www.facebook.com/BulletproofRose

RingMaster 27/04/2015

 

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Throw The Goat – Blood, Sweat & Beers

Throw The Goat

If like us you are a sucker for dirt encrusted, alcohol fuelled rock ‘n’ roll then Blood, Sweat & Beers from US rockers Throw The Goat is a must. It is a brawl in the ears and party in the heart, rock music at its most instinctively aggressive and virulent. Whether the second album from the Californian trio offers anything more is debatable; certainly it is not trying to explore or expose anything particularly new but equally there is a freshness and tenacity to its sonic fight and incitement which ensures this is no run of the mill proposition. The truth is it does not matter if Throw The Goat is crafting riots from existing vats of ideation, with a sound which plays like the bastard son of a merger of bands like The Clash, Agnostic Front, and Motorhead to just pluck three from the past decades of rock ‘n’ roll, they and their new album is one irresistible rampage.

Blood, Sweat & Beers is the follow-up to the band’s acclaimed debut album Black Mountain of 2012. Recorded with, as its predecessor, Finch drummer Alex Pappas who also mixed and mastered it, the new encounter is a continuation of the power and addictiveness found in its predecessor but with an openly new breath and energy to its stomp. Released on the band’s own label Regurgitation Records in the US in March, it has been kicking up a storm of praise and attention, with the UK now in its sights this month.

Opener Buffalo takes a handful of seconds to make a gentle coaxing of ears before unleashing a tirade of rowdy riffs and antagonistic rhythms. Those beats are met head on in energy and aggression by the vocals of bassist Michael Schnalzer, and in no time aligned to a blaze of great varied vocals from across the band and sonic enterprise courtesy of Brian Parnell’s guitar. It is an instinctively anthemic punk ‘n’ roll provocation setting the party off to a mighty start, though the song is swiftly surpassed by the album’s outstanding title track. Blood, Sweat & Beers flies from the traps with a feisty roll of stick prowess from drummer Scott Snyder. Within the time it takes the listener to get to their feet he is driving forcibly on with fiercely swung beats with the track now a raging tempest of rabid riffs, squirming grooves, and vocal addictiveness. Again the whole band offers plenty to make an aggressive provocation a ridiculously magnetic one, in voice and sound, an offering rife with unbridled energy and ripe with virulent contagion. Quite simply the track is a roar of rock ‘n’ roll which will rarely be rivalled this year.

cover     The band brews up its dirtiest punk side for Drown next, a simple raw rage of riffs and rhythms bound in spicy melodic hooks and vocal antagonism which goes down like a beer in the hands of a thirsty man. Its unsurprising but richly satisfying incitement is followed by the slower predatory flirtation of Swamp. Its air is thick with toxic attitude and body a brooding mesh of rhythmic intimidation and wiry sonic colour, and yet another appealing twist in the variety by the album. Building up intensity and energy within its tempestuous dark climate, the song proceeds to shift from sludgy scenery to raucous explosiveness, entwining both within its imposing walls.

The filth clad bassline opening up All We Have is an instant addictive lure, bait increasingly infectious as a feverish rumble of beats from Snyder adds fresh dramatic with their temptation. The best opening to any song on the album, a riotous anthemic seduction all on its own, it leads to another ridiculously gripping and intrusive persuasion of punk and heavy rock. Parnell spins a melodic web as the song continues to twist and shift into new inventive and bewitching scenery, whilst noise rock and hardcore elements are flirted with for another major highlight of the album.

     Idyllwild Eyes crowds in on the acclaim given with its own bellow of bristling vocals, spiteful beats, and abrasing riffs. It also brings a highly flavoursome melodic lure from Parnell, a regular occurrence on all songs, alongside the unpredictable tendency in their invention which the band showed on the last song. These are times where you almost feel that the band missed a trick on the album by not using this increasingly successful adventure more in their songwriting, though it offers a potential which will hopefully be realised by the band and to be excited by ahead.

Ears and passions are lit again by Uprooted, a riveting prowl of a punk rock song, and straight after through the eighty eight second bawl of aggression and attitude that is 8 More Minutes. Soaked in a hardcore heart, the track simply rages around deeply grabbing hooks and addictive rhythms for a brief and seriously potent anthem. The album from its broader rock opening, delves into heavier and more hostile punk belligerence towards its latter stages, this song a prime example backed by the similarly bred Waste straight after. Despite the increasing animosity permeating the songs in sound and vocals though, hooks and grooves lose none of their enticement and potency within the tracks whilst the swinging sticks of Snyder are a constant source of pure incitement.

Road Home brings the album to a close, the song a rowdy and lusty slab of devilry which maybe is more straight forward and unsurprising compared to other songs before it, but still provides an exciting end to one of the most enjoyable encounters to stir up the year so far. Throw The Goat is rock ‘n’ roll through and through with a sound and indeed album to match. This is one bruising all rock fans need.

Blood, Sweat & Beers is available now via Regurgitation Records @ https://throwthegoat.bandcamp.com/album/blood-sweat-beers

http://www.throwthegoat.net/   https://www.facebook.com/throwthegoat

RingMaster 22/04/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

Hellbound Hearts – The Proximity Effect

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It was 2013 when UK rockers Hellbound Hearts caught our ears and imagination with their potential ridden and thoroughly thrilling Outside EP. It was one of those encounters which simply brought energetic and eager life to feet and emotions whilst impressively building on their already well-received self-titled EP of 2011, the year the band emerged. Now they have returned with their thumping new persuasion, The Proximity Effect, an EP which not only realises much of the promise of its predecessors but sets out a new recipe of inspiring adventure to be explored ahead.

The time between the last and new EP seems to have been a testing time for the York band; personnel changes, health issues, and recording issues thorns in building on their already potent presence and reputation. Now the trio of vocalist/guitarist Danny Lambert (ex-Terrorvision), bassist Craig McLaren, and drummer Billy James Mitchell (ex-Glitterati) have overcome all obstacles and unleashed their finest irresistible slab of rock ‘n’ roll yet. Already the band has unleashed their renowned live performances on the year, sure to continue in the vein which earned them success and high praise through performances with the likes of Black Spiders, JettBlack, The Treatment, Terrorvision, Sons of Icarus and Warrior Soul in the past. It is The Proximity Effect which will be the prime weapon in whipping up the broadest national attention though, something it has already begun sparking since its release.

Posters In The Sun descends on ears first, opening with a caress of raw but inviting guitar accompanied by a just as dirty riff, and soon finding heavy beats adding to the tempting. Once the dark tones of McLaren’s bass infuse their increasingly alluring enterprise, the track is stomping with punk attitude and rock ‘n’ roll voracity. Vocals bring their melodic roar to the web of hooks and captivating riffs soon after whilst Mitchell’s swinging sticks just seem to get more compelling and tenacious, much as the song. It is all coloured by a rock pop infectiousness which early on begins to blossom inside the encounter and ripen especially in its chorus. The song is the spice of addiction and makes one highly enjoyable and gripping start to the EP.

The following Ones And Zeros makes a just as imaginative entrance, a weave of melodic chords being accosted and complimented by a great resonance of throaty bass. Swiftly more aggressive than its predecessor but no less virulent, the song prowls and strolls across verse and chorus as a torrent of addictive hooks, musically and vocally, colour the first stage and a mellower catchiness lighting up the latter. Again there is a punk tenacity to the mix of metal and hard rock, resulting in a gripping blaze of sound around a host of creative and vocal temptations.

There is a grungier air to Bones next, a mellower essence which wraps around the alternative metal canvas. Equally though there is a raw aggressive edge to it all which lines the more voracious passages of the song. Riffs and hooks especially ignite thoughts and appetite whilst the punchy beats just keep it all caged in a slightly intimidating frame. Not as immediately infectious as the first two, the track is a growing and mighty persuasion revealing another new twist and flavouring to the band’s songwriting and sound.

Overall there feels a harsher nature, more volatile character to the EP than its predecessor. It never actually erupts in hostility but the danger is there and the songs all benefit from it, as shown by the closing Silence Falls. The last track has an open familiarity to it, bred from its pop punk and alternative rock collusion as much as anything, and is soon seducing with thick melodies and bracing riffs matched by addiction forging rhythms. Stirring up imagination and the pleasures alike with potent and magnetic enterprise, the song is a formidable and mouth-watering end to a similarly impacting release.

It may have been a turbulent 2014 for Hellbound Hearts but they are back, and on even more impressive form with a sound and creative adventure to match. If you are looking for feisty rock ‘n’ roll to invigorate your daily soundtrack then The Proximity Effect is a wise and thrilling choice.

The Proximity Effect EP is available now @ http://hellboundhearts.bandcamp.com/album/the-proximity-effect

http://www.hellboundhearts.com/   https://www.facebook.com/wearehellboundhearts

RingMaster 19/04/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

Dead Shed Jokers – Self Titled

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Released two years ago, the Peculiar Pastimes EP unleashed one of our persistently favourite songs of the past few years in the frenetic and inventive shape of its title track. Now its creators, Welsh rockers Dead Shed Jokers return with their new album, a self-titled affair which is fiery and explosive rock ‘n’ roll at its multi-coloured imaginative best. Across eight tracks, band and sound brew a tempestuous and riveting riot of captivating enterprise and incendiary adventure drawing on every form of rock music you can imagine for one individual and exciting devilment.

Hailing from Aberdare/Merthyr, Dead Shed Jokers impressed with debut album Peyote Smile in 2011. It awoke the UK scene to a new almost mischievously inventive band which the Peculiar Pastimes EP reinforced with its title track alone. The rest of its tracks were live cuts which confirmed that on stage the band was just as furiously explosive and compelling too. All the attributes and qualities of both releases have been pushed on again with the Pity My Brain Records released new album, but equally an even greater impacting, attention grabbing diversity and maturity has festered inside the band’s songwriting and sound. The result a release which is as unpredictable as it is stormy and as fascinating as it is immediately contagious.

The album opens with Dafydd’s Song and instantly throws a wall of fiery grooves and imposing rhythms against ears. Its melodic toxicity and scorching guitar endeavour has the imagination whipped up just as quickly too, especially as classic rock tones align to the drama of the vocals now riding the ferocious wave of sound and adventure. There is a theatre to song and sound, something evolving to matching success across the remainder of the album, and coloured by the increasingly impressive vocals and spicy grooving.

From a sensational start things mellow with Delay the Morning. Well for its start anyway as gentle melodies court a scuzzier atmosphere. Once the vocal roar erupts though so the intensity of the encounter grows, every element uniting in a bracing storm of sonic hooks, tangy grooves, and driving rhythms wrapped in raw energy. There is a touch of bands like The Dropper’s Neck and Damn Vandals to the song especially in its punkish psyche lit elements which equally only adds to the intriguing and addictive character of the outstanding creative brawl.

A Cautionary Tale as its predecessor begins its tempting with a gentler coaxing before flexing its rhythmic muscles and sonic sinews for a theatre of explosive rock ‘n’ roll. There is a carnival-esque quality to its underlying swing whilst the busy sounds around it weave a tapestry of everything from alternative and progressive rock to dark and psychedelic rock ‘n’ roll. Intimidating and transfixing, the excellent offering makes way for Memoirs of Mr Bryant, the band’s recent single. Rich in blues hues and face melting energy, the track bellows and stomps with aggression and tempestuous intent, at times seeming to flirt with the senses but for the main treating them to a furnace of invention and power.

The volcanic and ferocity of the album seems to kick up another gear with Made in Vietnam, as does the infectiousness and warped ideation. A rugged assault in some moments, a sultry seducing in others, the track is a maze of sonic endeavour and melodic flaming employing a volatile fusion of stoner, hard, and blues rock. Once again ears and appetite are inspired to offer lustful reactions, as they are also with the enthralling Love is Diseased which follows. Swimming through a psychedelic haze, the song ebbs and flows in intensity, increasingly tightening its grip on thoughts and psyche with vocal harmonies, furious riffs, and sweltering grooving, not forgetting the submerged but open catchiness at its core.

The release is brought to a fine end by firstly the irresistible raucous stroll of Rapture Riddles, a blistering stomp of searing creative intrigue and vocal drama, and lastly Exit Stage Left (Applause). The final song is a voice and piano led calm after the tempest of creative fury igniting the rest of the album, and another enjoyable twist in the adventure of the release. It too has a fierce edge which emerges towards the song’s closing touch showing that even in more peaceful waters there is never a moment where you can make assumptions about the songwriting and invention of Dead Shed Jokers.

Rock ‘n’ roll can come in many forms, and most infused into this album, but often there is that final spark of creative danger and bravery missing. Dead Shed Jokers are fuelled by it and it is at its most accomplished and exciting on their new release. Now it is time for the world to show the same boldness, grab a listen, and reap the rewards.

Dead Shed Jokers is out now via Pity My Brain Records digitally @ https://itunes.apple.com/us/album/dead-shed-jokers/id983757315 and on CD where the first 100 will receive some extra goodies via https://deadshedjokers.bigcartel.com

https://www.facebook.com/DeadShedJokers

RingMaster 14/04/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

Bite The Shark -Tantrum EP

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It is fair to say that the first Bite The Shark release, the three track First Blood, suggested that British rock ‘n’ roll had a new protagonist to breed some real excitement over. Now the Manchester trio return with the explosive Tantrum EP, a roaring, stomping encounter not only making that previous loud hint a reality but thrusting the band to the forefront of incendiary revelry. Consisting of five ferocious and mischievous punk ‘n’ roll anthems, Tantrum simply leaves bodies breathless and emotions blazing. Every exploit within its raucous walls is the host of volatile sounds, feisty imagination, and adrenaline soaked devilment; all providing a virulent contagion conducive to naughty habits and unbridled enjoyment.

Formed a couple of months past a year ago, Bite The Shark swiftly lit an eager and vocal local following which spread as potently and easily with the release of First Blood last year. Luring in acclaim and keen online radio attention with the Romesh Dodangoda (Motörhead, Bullet For My Valentine, Twin Atlantic) recorded release, the threesome of brothers Adam and Edd Langmead alongside Rory O’Grady have been kicking up a storm on the live scene too, the weeks leading up to the release of Tantrum alone finding the band rampaging round the UK on tour with Drop Down Smiling and Fake The Attack. Again recorded with Dodangoda, Tantrum is the band’s next mighty temptation on the nation, one with the qualities and tunes to ignite the UK rock scene.

Rock & Roll in the Soul hits ears first and lives up to its title instantly. An opening guitar hook makes the first rich connection, matched within seconds by an equally tempting heavy bassline. The song soon hits its stride with raw riffs and punchy rhythms led by similarly feisty vocals, a mix alone enough to have feet and emotions bounding along with its persuasion. Add a ridiculously compelling chorus and the first anthem of the EP is stirring up imagination and thrills. Imagination and diversity are never far from the forefront of Bite The Shark songs, as well as lyrical provocation, and both are as rampant as the thick sounds within the tremendous opener.

10897961_327152687479870_8976137320647029148_n   Good rowdy times continue with Little Fishy which follows, guitars brewing up a voracious and abrasing blaze within which vocals romp and mischievous ideation plays. With its mid-point merely a glimpse in its future, the song suddenly twists around from its initial stampede and begins prowling, indeed stalking the senses with predatory invention before returning to a frantic onslaught which in turn slips into a catchy TV show theme tune finale. The track is just irresistible just like Shiny Shoes straight after. Soon showing a heavier ferocious nature of its own to its riffs and rhythms, the song reveals an essence of classic rock entwined with power pop in its punk romp. Once more grooves and hooks breed addictiveness whilst vocals and fierce melodies offer searing magnetic hues.

There is no chance of a breather at any point within Tantrum either, each song a full on tempest of infection fuelled incitement as evidenced again by the outstanding Killzone. From the opening twang of riffs, ears and body are ready to accept the suggestive rampage in waiting The track’s entrance is almost a limbering up before chest beating rhythms and fury lined riffs explode in a steamy onrush. It is not a hell for leather charge though, hooks and band harmonies a tasty tempering to the aggressive foot to the floor energy offered, but it is certainly a seriously rousing slab of rock ‘n’ roll.

The release closes with Sleep when You’re Dead, though the CD also includes Burn em to the ground and Burn and Gas & Air which made up the bulk of the previous release. Drawing on blues rock spicing for its melodic essences, the track as its predecessor, is a balls to the wall rocker leaving no room for abstinence from joining in with body, voice, and energies. It is a glorious end to a spectacular riot of punk ‘n’ roll tenacity, a song unafraid to explore new depths and areas of songwriting and sound whilst the release simply bellows that Bite The Shark is one of the bands with the potential to take British rock ‘n’ roll into a new heyday.

The Tantrum EP is available now digitally @ https://itunes.apple.com/gb/album/tantrum-ep/id962681213 and on CD via http://bitethesharkmerch.bigcartel.com

http://www.facebook.com/bitetheshark   http://originaljunkie.wix.com/bitetheshark

RingMaster 09/04/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://reputationradio.yooco.org/