The Ghost Next Door – A Feast For The Sixth Sense

Eager anticipation and high expectations often go hand in hand when facing the successor to a release which lit the fires of true pleasure and both were eager participants going into the first listen of the new album from US metallers for The Ghost Next Door. A Feast For The Sixth Sense is the successor to the band’s acclaimed self-titled debut of four years back and very quickly more than lived up to hopes, intrigue, and expectancy the news of its impending arrival inspired.

Hailing from Berkeley, California, The Ghost Next Door was founded by vocalist/guitarist Gary Wendt (ex-Skinlab, Sacrilege B.C.) and spent its early years playing around California whilst nurturing a sound marrying “the dark melancholy of 80’s and 90’s alternative with the aggression and drive of Bay Area metal.” It was when the outfit disbanded though that perversely things shifted and the band found a place within a broader wealth of appetites. In that period Wendt continued to work on recordings already underway with that first album emerging via Mausoleum Records to great responses and praise which in turn led to the band reforming. Since then they have shared stages with the likes of DRI, SpiralArms, Dr. Know, and Comes with the Fall amongst many while working on the successor to that well-received debut. Now we have A Feast For The Sixth Sense and it is easy to say that it leaves that previous treat well behind in its creative wake.

The band’s sound is not so hard to tag but equally not easy to really pin down. It is labelled alternative metal for the main but embraces a host of flavours within the metal/rock landscape as quickly shown by album opener Deadworld. Dark shadows immediately loom over the senses, their atmospheric flight as portentous as it is inviting before an ear gripping bassline from Noah Whitfield ventures into ears and imagination. It carries alluring drama which is swiftly embraced too by the guitars of Wendt and Aaron Asghari as all the while the dangerously flirtatious beats of Sebastien Castelain bounce along. Bordering on the claustrophobic, those heavy shadows continue to lurk as the song relaxes into its almost swinging stroll, they and the sound itself crowding the senses as Wendt’s potent tones join the emerging doom infested temptation. Already a web of styles and flavours converge on the song and imagination, a mix only enticing with greater craft and adventure as the track continues.

It is a thickly seductive and threateningly magnetic start to the album quickly matched in power and invention by Fodder for the Meat Grinder. A far more energetic proposition as grooves link up with spirited boisterousness, the song still openly shares a matching enterprise and imagination to its predecessor. The agility of Castelain’s beats collude eagerly with the brooding throat of Whitfield’s bass as all the while infectious grooves entangle the thrust of hungry riffs, the only thing restraining their voracity being the melodic passages and calms which also only add to the highly infectious song’s impressive landscape.

Doubt follows and swiftly instils its own contagious character in ears and appetite. Though not an aggressive onslaught there is a predacious edge to its breath and enterprise which alone grips attention; a hue just as potent within Wendt’s mix of melodic and growling vocals. As similarly melodic wires sprung from a web of metal diversity and sonic radiance bred further flames of such flair, the song just enthralled before making way for the darker cosmic drama of Event Horizon. Again bold rhythms make for an irresistible coaxing into the inescapable eye of the tempest intimated in sound and the lyrical prowess and observation which fuels the roar of A Feast For The Sixth Sense as predatory animation soaks all.

Through the southern lined creative confrontation of American Nightmare and the ravening prowl and subsequent trespass of Behind the Mask, the album only firmed its grip on enjoyment while LCD proved itself a temptress with ire in her voice and devious temptation in her movement. The song has as many post punk and alternative rock traits as it does melodic and nu metal attributes and all going to create one of the album’s compelling pinnacles.

Exclusive to the digital and CD release of the album, the pair of I Am Become Death and The Sacrifice Person brings their own fresh aspects to the nature of the release. The first is spun from a mix of melodic and alternative metal with grunge and progressive rock fibres and swiftly captured the imagination with the second seeded in a similar composition but blossoming its own unique melodic fascination. As much as the urge here is always towards listening to great releases on vinyl there is no way either of these delicious offerings should be missed.

The album ends with Stop Here On Red; another song which certainly at first is embroiled in the great gothic/post punk sounds of the eighties, early Killing Joke coming to mind throughout the outstanding close to an equally riveting and thrilling release. Winding itself around the senses in sheer sonic temptation, the track equally showed itself adept at new wave-esque twists and melodic suggestiveness ensuring that the only urge on its departure was to explore over again.

As much as we enjoyed the first album from The Ghost Next Door that pleasure is replaced by a lustier passion for A Feast For The Sixth Sense and the thought that it is high time that the band is stalked by major attention.

A Feast For The Sixth Sense is out now via Ripple Music across most stores and @ https://ripplemusic.bandcamp.com/album/a-feast-for-the-sixth-sense

https://theghostnextdoorband.com/    https://www.facebook.com/theghostnextdoor/   https://twitter.com/gh0stnextdoor

Pete RingMaster 14/03/2019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

BoneHawk – Albino Rhino

BONEHAWK_RingMasterReview

Having already been gobbled up in as a limited vinyl release through Hornacious Wax Records in 2014, Albino Rhino from US heavy rockers BoneHawk gets its official CD release via Ripple Music, who the band recently signed with, this month. Already preceded by single/video Los Vientos, as part of the label’s Second Coming Of Heavy series but not actually on the album, the band’s returning debut album is an invitation and wake call to those yet to discover the melodic and groove woven rock ‘n’ roll of the Michigan quartet.

With its seeds already sown when guitarist/vocalist Matt Helt and guitarist Chad Houts first met and bonded in third grade at school in Kalamazoo, BoneHawk emerged in 2011 after the pair played together in various projects over the years. With bassist Chris Voss alongside Houts and Helt who also provided drums, the trio set about recording Albino Rhino with Jim Diamond at Ghetto Recorders in Detroit. In less than two months the first run of vinyl was sold out whilst, with drummer Jay Rylander and bassist Taylor Wallace by now alongside the founding duo, BoneHawk was being devoured on their local live scene. A second ‘Ultraviolet Purple’ pressing of the album followed and either sparked the attention or came about through the attention of Ripple Music boss Todd Severin. Whichever the line of events, it has led to the CD availability of Albino Rhino, a release which maybe did not blow us away but certainly has sparked persistence in returning for more helpings of the band’s riff loaded and groove strapped persuasion.

Inspirations for the band seem to stem from the likes of Iron Maiden, Thin Lizzy, Led Zeppelin, and Black Sabbath; the latter certainly and quickly an open influence and hue to Albino Rhino. It opens with Argenia and straight away grooves are enjoyably entangling ears as the bass almost dances on the ear with its throaty tempting. Beats have a hefty swipe to their touch too whilst riffs and the harmonic tone of the vocals, singular and as a pair, bring further magnetism to a quickly and highly infectious song. The blend of dark and melodic, heavy and light grabs the imagination with ease, contrasting as potently with the more intensive touch of the rhythms as the song continues to captivate and impress.

art_RingMasterReviewThe following Sexy Beast is just as swift a persuasion; its sizzling air immediately coating the senses with an appetising coaxing, almost echoing the fiery textures which coloured its predecessor before casting its own spicy flames in a prowling gait. There is a great delta blues like tone to the track and especially its rich melodies and emotive tone, but as shown in the first track and becomes repeated throughout Albino Rhino, things never seem to hang around in one shade of sound or imagination for long. Hot Mary is the same; the song evolving an initial heavy stroll with a juicy blues scent to its grooves through catchy swings of beats and riffs matched in infectiousness by the ever engaging vocals of Helt.

Weaving a seventies heavy rock vibe, Tonight We Ride steps up next, keeping the listener’s physical and vocal involvement as busy as ever whilst Warchild is like a net of appetite trapping grooves and stoner-esque temptation. Sometimes it takes a band like BoneHawk to make ears remember how close many genres are to each other, how they are a one-step evolution from another and the relative pointlessness of tags in so many ways. The song is a festival of flavour even in its generally reserved and slim body; a paint box of rock ‘n’ roll colours especially vibrant in its furnace of a chorus and additional crescendos.

Ulysses puts in its claim for best track honours next, the song a feisty and ears blistering stomp of individual craft and anthemic tempting quickly followed by the dirtier, almost sludgy theatre of Desert Run. Its rugged landscape is sultry and almost imposing but with its cow bell and searing tendrils of melodic acidity alone, its creative body is just as welcoming as anything on offer by the album.

There is a whiff of Pentagram to Nomad which next takes over and envelops ears in a tangy melodic smoulder with again grooves which seem to writhe and entangle with snake like dexterity as rhythms cage and provoke even stronger physical engagement. There is an instinctive bond between song and listener which is never absent from any track within the album and certainly not the closing pair of the virulently swinging Going Over The High Side and the closing title track of Albino Rhino. For almost eight minutes, the final encounter fascinates and enthrals with its individual drama of sound and accomplished craft sculpted with stirring imagination. In many ways it is the most unique song on the album and a potent end to the spirit rousing encounter.

We look eagerly forward to what comes next from BoneHawk; going by Albino Rhino it is likely to be weighty and seriously alluring. Add a little more originality and the band could kick up a real storm of attention around themselves to build on what will assumedly arise from this highly enjoyable re-release.

Albino Rhino is released on CD on April 22nd via Ripple Music across most stores and downloadable now @ https://bonehawk.bandcamp.com/album/albino-rhino-2

https://www.facebook.com/bonehawkkzoo

Pete RingMaster 22/04/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Desert Suns – Self-Titled

Desert Suns band photo_RingMaster Review

Released in the Autumn of 2014, the self-titled debut album from San Diego quartet Desert Suns gets its deserved official worldwide re-release this January through a special collaboration between Ripple Music and HeviSike Records. For those missing that original limited run of 300 copies on vinyl through Birmingham-based HeviSike , its return is the chance to grab one highly flavoursome slab of stoner bred rock ‘n’ roll.

Formed late 2013, Desert Suns quickly drew attention with their first single Burning Temples which was released in the January of the following year. Seven months later and their six track debut album confirmed the initial potency of sound and imagination within that early single in a fiery and immersive blend of stoner and heavy metal, psyche and blues rock. The band’s sound, as at times their lyrics and song themes, demands attention without the heavy weight of it ever becoming invasively imposing, and within the Tony Reed (Mos Generator/Stone Axe) mastered album provides a powerful invitation to the listener, if without really wanting to take no for an answer.

DESERT-SUNS---DESERT-SUNS_RingMaster Review

Artwork-Jimmy Ovadia

Burning Temples starts things off, an initial sonic static the bed for heavier rumblings and clamorous energies before one hefty groove grows from within the low key tempest. It relaxes with an elegant shimmer to its lure and melodic spice to its touch as the dark bassline of David Russell aligns to his quickly alluring vocals though the forceful and agile beats of drummer Ben McDowell subsequently raises the intensity as the guitars of Woogie Maggard and Anthony Belluto twist and turn with magnetic grooves and riffs. As the track becomes a contagious blaze enslaving hips, ears, and imagination, it is easy to sense Black Sabbath and Deep Purple inspirations at play, the music masterfully and voraciously ebbing and flowing in energy whilst providing a continuous full-on sultry temptation.

After the incendiary climax of the first song has ignited ears and keen involvement further, the following Space Pussy shows it is even more ferociously enflamed with quick sonic and melodic intoxication. Raw and seductive flames soon live up to the suggested salacious exploits and skills of the song’s protagonist, their intensive heat casting a vociferous smoulder in sound and atmosphere which almost has the senses woozy, though sinew swung rhythms and a great gnarly bass tone provides a rapturous temper to that cosmic inebriety smothering ears.

The blues infested rock ‘n’ roll tempest of Passing Through gets ears excited all over again, its feisty swagger courting a virulent catchiness driven by tenacious rhythms and swinging grooves matched by the Ozzy-esque vocal temping of Russell. The track is irresistible, taking a great first impression of the album up another notch with its flirtatious enterprise and anthemic dexterity of music and craft. As across the album, there is something familiar to the Desert Suns sound but a hue only adding to the lure of its bordering on mischievous revelry.

A breath is allowed to be taken by the blues croon of Ten Feet Down as ears feast on a new twist in the landscape of the release. Blues and country rock merge to serenade as harmonica and guitar colour a salty portrait of suggestiveness around it, all colluding for a magnetic encounter before Memories of Home portentously pulsates into view and unfurls a lumbering beast of a stoner/heavy metal fuelled proposition. A scent of Fu Manchu meets Electric Wizard meets Kyuss looms up within the tantalising proposal, whilst mellow and soporific textures unite with the ravaging torrents stirred up by grooves and a hungry energy to create another hard to resist confrontation.

Run Through My Roots brings the album to a compelling close, its atmospheric soundscape and pungent rhythmic suggestiveness the prelude to another forceful and heavyweight enveloping of the senses. Once more romancing calms are seductive oases amidst increasingly volatile eruptions and predacious outbursts, their mesmeric caresses breaking ravenous outpourings of sound and emotion as the track offers a fascinating end to a thoroughly enthralling and enjoyable release.

Second time around, Desert Suns is not to be missed and already thoughts are eagerly turning to what comes next from the band, where they have imaginatively ventured since the creation of their album two years ago.

Desert Suns is out now through Ripple Music in North America on CD and Royal Blue vinyl and on Beer Brown vinyl in the UK through HeviSike Records with digital copies @ https://desertsuns.bandcamp.com/

https://www.facebook.com/desertsunssd  http://www.desertsunsmusic.com/

Pete RingMaster 20/01/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Grifter – Return Of The Bearded Brethren

Pic SarahStygall

Pic SarahStygall

Almost three years after the release of their very appetising, riff stocked debut album, UK rockers Grifter return with another mighty slab of muscular temptation in the form of second album Return Of The Bearded Brethren. The successor to their acclaimed self-titled full-length which delivered eleven slices of unbridled dirty rock ‘n’ roll, the new proposition finds the trio building on all the essences which made the last release a formidable triumph. With greater maturity and style raging through the songwriting and increased devilment to their sound, Return Of The Bearded Brethren is a seductive beast of a release with grooves, hooks, and riffs all honed to an irresistible stature. It is fair to say that the album is again not exactly creating new templates for heavy rock but definitely the band is giving another very healthy and thrilling stomp to greedily devour.

Released as their 2011 debut on Ripple Music, Return Of The Bearded Brethren sees the threesome of vocalist/guitarist Ollie Stygall, bassist Phil Harris, and drummer/backing vocalist Foz Foster finding a tighter ruggedness in their sound as well as a keener and equally potent adventure. Formed in 2003 Grifter, as shown by their High Unholy Mighty Rollin’ and The Simplicity of the Riff is Key EPs in 2008 and 2010 respectively, has never been slow in barging through ears with the meatiest attack of contagious big boned riffery and spicy grooves. Their first album set a new plateau for the band with its collection of songs crafted over the years leading up to its release, a base which the Rich Robinson produced blaze of The Return Of The Bearded Brethren has embraced whilst breeding its own dirt encrusted and invigorating character. Spawning songs themed by tales of “Guinness, ’70s sex symbols, drinking regrets, religious folly, and more”, the weighty treat of heavy rock revelry is one of those encounters which turns a party into a riot, a raucous gathering into an orgy of unbridled debauchery, and leaves all concerned exhausted and blissfully wasted.

As soon as the album hits the ears with opener Black Gold you know things are going to get filthy and lustful, especially with the following She Mountain backing it up with a similarly lusty seduction of infectiousness and sinew driven RIPPLE_2393energy. The first track primes ears with punchy beats before unleashing the most delicious of contagion drenched grooves. The bass riffing of Harris sets a throaty spine to which the swinging rhythms of Foster provides irresistible bait, but it is once the excellent vocal lure of Stygall alongside his increasingly tempting string play that the song becomes an inescapable slave master to feet and emotions. With hints of blues fire and imagination entangling sonic enterprise across its narrative, the track continues to bind body and soul tightly whilst its swagger and relentless stride of vocals and sound is the purest anthemic enticement. Its successor is similarly commanding and insatiable in recruiting senses and passions. A stronger whisper of blues flirtation makes its touch known but primarily the song is again an anthem of heavy boned rhythms, saucy grooves, and antagonistic riffs which converge into one blaze of addictiveness.

To be honest such the majesty of the first pair of songs that the album never manages to reach the same pinnacle again but that is no slight on the rest of the impressive encounter. The sultry Southern rock twang of Paranoiac Blues immediately feeds the greedy appetite already triggered by the album with its flavoursome flame of blues angst and spicy sonic endeavour. Like Seasick Steve does ZZ Top with the weight of Orange Goblin behind it, the track winds around the imagination with a glorious invention and melodic flaming before making way for Princess Leia. Guitars and bass are immediately prowling ears, appearing its slower stride with bursts of catchy urgency, whilst the rhythmic taunting of Foster ignites a tension of aggression in the again impossibly infectious proposition. With it also having a video for it, the track looks like the lead into the album which is understandable though you do also wonder why the might of the first two tracks were overlooked.

The outstanding Bow Down To The Monkey adds its bear like prowl and smouldering enticing to the album next, vocals and grooves as magnetic as the jabbing rhythms and carnivorous tone of the bass are predatory. The song wraps itself lasciviously around ears with an open flirtatious enterprise to add another creative twist to the album, as does Braggard’s Boast with its raunchy riffing and acidic grooves within a bar room brawl of heavy rock meets classic metal. It is not a track which grips as potently as others upon the release but still has body and emotions leaping eagerly, making a great appetiser for the bluesy rampancy of It’s Not Me, It’s You. As with many of the songs on the album there is a familiarity to some of the twists and essences within the track yet it only brews up a stronger link between the release and passions for the main. At times storming with all cylinders ablaze and in others smouldering with a smooch of a coaxing, the track is a riveting evocation of old and modern rock ‘n’ roll, something Grifter are very adept at fusing.

Both Fire Water and the title track keep the juices of the album and reactions flowing keenly, the first an old school seeded rocker with a sauntering and mischievous gait to its infection soaked endeavour, especially around an addictive chorus, whilst the second is prime sonic enticing which again feels more like an old returning friend than a new acquaintance but is still as fresh and inspiring to limbs and voice as you could wish for. Its rigorous success is followed by album closer Fairies Wear Boots, a cover of the Black Sabbath track which hits all the right notes and sweet spot with a raw and caustically graced Grifter unique stroll. It is a fine end to a mouth-watering release from the band. The Return Of The Bearded Brethren is not a awe inspiring triumph or maybe one to squash all expectations but it is one to bring one of the most enjoyable and compelling rock ‘n’ roll treats this year and that is more than enough to get excited over.

Return Of The Bearded Brethren is available via Ripple Music in North America now and in Europe on the 18th August on CD, limited Vinyl, and Digitally and at http://grifter.bigcartel.com/product/the-return-of-the-bearded-brethren-cd-album

http://www.grifterrock.co.uk

8.5/10

RingMaster 13/08/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Trucker Diablo – Songs of Iron

truckerDiablo

If The Devil Rhythm, the debut album from Northern Ireland rockers Trucker Diablo set your passions racing, than hold onto your gear sticks as the juggernaut has returned with second album Songs of Iron. Cut from the same template and loaded with the same high grade fuel of rock ‘n’ roll as its predecessor, the new fourteen track release burns another riveting expanse of intensive rubber on to the road The Devil Rhythm left ablaze for another irresistible contagious fury of rebellious rock.

Since forming in 2008, Trucker Diablo has been on an accelerated rise, the band consisting of four friends who united to unleash music they have a full passion for whilst employing experiences gained in the ranks of Joyrider and TILTED to full potency, making deep lingering marks by the day. It was not long after starting that the band was reaping acclaim and support with their live performances, the likes of Ricky Warwick, Ginger Wildheart, Joe Elliot, Damon Johnson, and Cormac Neeson endorsing their rising presence. Supporting and playing alongside bands such as Foo Fighters, Terrorvision, Anthrax, and Thin Lizzy in shows and festival as well as their own intensive touring has only reinforced their stature with The Devil Rhythm marking another impressive statement in their ascent last year.

Released through Ripple Music, Songs of Iron explodes from its very first second never letting up through to its final sizzling lick of300energy. Red Light On opens up the brawl with heated riffs and concussive beats beckoning the ear around the snarling temptation offered with intimidating power by bassist Glenn Harrison. It is an immediate hook to the senses and lays an inviting canvas for the impressive vocals spread and shared between guitarists Tom Harte and Simon Haddock. Thumping rhythms and big boned riffs seize the air with strong craft and energy to taking the listener on a contagious and commanding ride, a charge which makes no demands but incites a full involvement with its muscular intent. With melodies and barbed hooks, not forgetting the scintillating solo, as striking as the rippling sinews framing them the song is a pleasing start soon surpassed by the excellent Year Of The Truck.

From the first note the song gnaws in the ear with savage rapacious hunger, the riffs iron clad and as intrusive as any Meshuggah or Mastodon could conjure and lying somewhere in between the two in voice, ensnaring the passions with intensive persuasion whilst the drums of Terry Crawford cage all with crisp and potent invention. It is again the bass growl of Harrison which seals the ardour in tight, one of the highlights of the last album just as riveting and viciously seductive this time around in nothing but impressive attributes offered by all members on  Songs of Iron. Virulently anthemic and catchy, the track launches an irresistible call on voice and limbs for a full involvement and contribution towards its gasoline burn up, though all the songs have that power in varying degrees.

The southern rock toned stance of passion and enterprise, The Rebel steps up next to leave further irresistible inducement working on the passions. Loud whispers of ZZ Top and Black Label Society add their rich vapours to the track and single from the release, a song which with ease accelerates the heart rate, and beyond safety levels one suspects such its epidemic call. It is a staggering start to the album which is continued now into the heart of the release through the likes of Drive, the outstanding Not So Superstar and its dirty brew of scorching rock ‘n’ roll, and the melodic hard rock honed The Streets Run Red, whilst others such as the muscle bruising Lie to Me and the emotive ballad Maybe You’re the One bring further variety and depth forward. Admittedly not all the tracks ignite the same heights of passion as others but there is never a moment where satisfaction is left half-filled or the stirring skill and invention of the band not openly there to be hailed.

Further especially enriching highlights come through the crushing Bulldozer, where again that bass rips the senses to tattered remnants of their former self aided by corrosively greedy riffs and rhythms whilst the anthem bearing chorus and group harmonies light a melodic fire to sear the wounds, When’s it Gonna Rain with its seriously chunky riffs and southern heat, and best track on the album Shame On You. The last of these three has a swagger which like it’s delicious grooves is an addiction of toxic suasion, its lure permanent and deeply entrenched in thought and heart by its end, the delicious addiction cast by devil spawn riffs and rabid rhythms wrapped in a sonic furnace.

Completed by the excellent I Want To Party With You, a song giving you exactly what it desires, Songs of Iron is an exceptional slab of rock ‘n’ roll, all songs mentioned and left for your discovery pure adrenaline raising pleasure. There is no boundary breaking going on here just riotous rampage within what is one of the most exhilarating albums this year so far, and that is more than good enough for us.

https://www.facebook.com/TRUCKERDIABLO

9/10

RingMaster 14/05/2013

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Mothership: Self Titled

Mothership Live

    The bio for the self-titled album from US rock band stated the band Mothership had a sound which ‘satisfies like a steaming hot stew of UFO and Iron Maiden, blended with the southern swagger of Molly Hatchet and ZZ Top’. Now that statement is enough to send an army of classic rock fans across battlefields and sultry deserts to grab an ear full of the promise suggested and in this instance they would not be disappointed upon arrival. The trio from Dallas is a formidable and impressive unit which knows the richest essences of rock n roll and how to brew them into feisty and fiery melodic encounters.

Founded by brothers Kelley (guitar) and Kyle (bass) Juett, the band fuses stirring elements of hard rock, stoner, blues, and classic rock into a thrilling guitar driven sound all of their own. The pair grew up on the seventies record collection of their father John, who they recruited on drums as their rock project emerged in 2010. Creating songs bursting with raucous riffs and melodic flames, the band knowing the contribution of their father was temporary began searching with his help for a permanent replacement who came in the shape of Judge Smith late 2011. The following year saw the band enter the studio to record their debut which was then self-released later in the year. Now given a re-release though Ripple Music, and following a successful end of last year supporting bands such as Prong, Red Fang, Gypsyhawk, Earthen Grave, and Lo-Pan, Mothership is set to ignite 2013 for all heavy rock fans.

The album opens with the mesmeric instrumental Hallucination, a track which emerges from a spacey ambience through firm Ripple Music - RPL2188beats and a sultry guitar glaze upon the ear. Its early presence is a slow smouldering enticement of sonic caresses and sinewy rhythms which equally burn and kiss the ear to capture the imagination, a union which goes into overload once the track instantly shifts up a couple of gears to rock the air out of the passions. It is an enthralling encounter to announce the album and ensure only a riveted focus is at play for the rest of the release.

With barely time to lick the lips of the prospects to come the following Cosmic Rain engages the ear with punchy rhythms and spires of sonic persuasion. Within seconds it has feet and emotions in league with its passionate gait and heated expanse. As the fine vocals of Kelley launch from the musical fire to add to the already anthemic stoner swing, the track rampages as a delicious agreement of blues and rock wrapped in heart driven energy. Mid-way the song takes a step into an aside full of bass beckoning to intrigue and elevate the already submissive senses further before returning to its uncomplicated and fully enthralling revelry.

As the songs City Nights and Angel of Death open up their hard rock hearts with craft and eagerness there is a continued variety under the overall pulsating lick and hook raining skies of the album. Though neither song steps onto the same lofty plateau of their predecessor, both crowd the ear with inciting blues guitar mastery and refreshing winds of instinctive and satisfying rock n roll, with the second of the two especially rife with a seventies brilliancy recalling the likes of Thin Lizzy.

Adding another step into new avenues Win Or Lose is a strolling treat of heavy rhythms and unavoidable intensive energy veined by a niggling sonic insistence and melodic elegance. Within its expressive stance the track moves through levels of pace and creative heat whilst offering moments of simmering beauty, rampant guitar crafted pulses, and heavyweight rumblings all delivered with invention and passion. It is a tremendous track which makes way for the equalling spellbinding and explosive Elenin and the towering closer Eagle Soars.

The final track is a masterful treat of lung bursting energy driven by robust rhythms and scintillating sonic seduction. The song rides the passions with majestic ease and accomplished skill as it immerses the senses in searing sonic bait and wickedly tempting melodic glamour. It is a final triumph which directs one straight back into the arms of the album, the lure of diving right back in to the release too irresistible.

Mothership, band and album, are encounters any fan ranging the likes of Red Fang to Orange Goblin and Black Sabbath to Thin Lizzy will find an ardour for as the band primes itself for a massive year.

http://www.facebook.com/mothershipusa

8/10

RingMaster 12/02/2013

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Fen: Of Losing Interest

From initially being an intriguing and pleasing presence in the ear to becoming a persistent and incessant returnee long after its departure, Of Losing Interest the new album from Fen is a thriving infection gone wild. Given the chance and deserved attention the album becomes a niggling treat for the psyche with its contagion of progressive melodic enterprise, insatiable rock n roll hooks, and mesmeric shadows. It is a release which expectations assumed would be decent going by recent history and reality shows is something far more impressive and deeply pleasing. It is an essential investigation for all which just falls short of making album of the year claims.

Of Losing Interest is the fifth album from the quartet from British Columbia which formed in 1998, and the second for Ripple Music. Previous album of 2010 Trails Out Of Gloom was the introduction for many of us to the sounds of the band, the critically acclaimed album a melancholic progressive weave to unsettle and ignite the senses. The new release is said to have taken its breath from further back in the history of the band, its heart returning to the more metallic and heavier aspects of early Fen. If that is so is for those acquainted with their first trio of albums to confirm but Of Losing Interest is certainly a robust and energetic beast as eclectic as you could wish and with muscles rippling and twisting with eagerness. It does not neglect its progressive imagination either and delivers lyrics and sounds wrapped tightly in the darkest shadows the band loves to frequent.

The album brings together a band line up first assembled in 1999 of vocalist/guitarist Doug Harrison, lead guitarist Sam Levin, bassist Jeff Caron, and Nando Polesel on drums. The foursome combine upon Of Losing Interest to offer nine tracks which thump the senses into eager submission whilst hypnotising them with a technical prowess and melodic invention which often leaves a shortage of breath in its wake. It inspires and thrills constantly to make the near forty minutes in its company only ever rewarding.

The album opens with Riddled and immediately ruffles the ear with explosive metallic riffs. It then settles into a melodic gait with the vocals of Harrison weaving his tones and words with a sure elegance whilst the guitars stroke the atmosphere with gentle imaginative invention. The beats of Polesel are strong though give the impression of a beast just waiting to burst from the cage the gentler stroll of the song allows whilst the bass of Caron stalks and prowls with menace and attitude. As the track evolves it throws of its ties to create a storming attack of sprawling riffs and inciteful rhythms.  It is an outstanding start which immediately shows the intent and turn of direction in the sound of the band.

The title track saunters in next with further addiction making sounds and intent. Bringing a Tool like craft into a fusion of melodic enterprise and barbed hooks which would not be out of place in Soundgarden or early Bush compositions, the song lights up all the right spots inside and to be honest as enjoyable as their previous album was there is already the strongest feeling that this is where the band need to be, the sounds and songwriting so imaginative and vibrant.

Every song borders perfection but some rise to greater heights than others for personal taste, the first being Nice For Three Days with its bruising charm. It is an impactful distillery of bristling energies and caustic melodic rubs which leaves one gasping in delight. Imagine the feistiness stripped from the likes Mondo Generator and Foo Fighters and given extra volts of Kyuss attitude and you get Fen on this excellent song.

The explosive multi faceted The Glove takes one to greater plateaus next with its slightly Dog Fashion Disco spiced shifting interactive play for the senses. The song is an exploration of greedy riffs and teasing melodic manipulation which excites on every level.  Drunken Relief and the closing Snake Path again leave one with raging fires of pleasure inside, the first being a dark weave of creative lyrics and oppressive yet incendiary sounds. The song one is magnetic, its shadowed heart nightmarish whilst fully compulsive. The final song leaves one wonderfully agitated with its unrelenting catchiness and irresistible energy. It is arguably the least involved song on the album but as deeply infectious and warmly inviting as any.

If the likes of Tool, Incubus, Porcupine Tree, Soundgarden do it for you than Fen and Of Losing Interest is a must. The album offers so much more though that all will find plenty of pleasure within its walls, it is melodic rock at its best.

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RingMaster 13/08/2012

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