Vanity – Perspective // Empathy

If there is one thing to describe Perspective // Empathy from British metallers Vanity, it is that it is riveting. There are plenty more striking attributes to the five track metalcore tempest, craft and imagination among them, but it offers a fascination which upon personal tastes few similar genre propositions have come close to.

Formed in 2012 and formerly known as Vanity Draws Blood, Vanity has climbed up the UK metal scene with increasing brutality and invention accompanied by an equally ascending amount of acclaim which began simmering with their debut EP, I Witness, released in 2014. From its success, the London sextet began working on a series of works under the title of Perspective. The first in Perspective // Dread appeared to rich praise last year, the single Anxiety which featured CJ McMahon of Thy Art Is Murder leading the way. It is easy to expect that Perspective // Empathy is destined to make an even bigger impact; its body alone establishing Vanity as one of Britain’s most promising and imaginative confrontations.

The EP opens up with the atmospheric enticing of Empathy, the instrumental piece a haunting yet inviting lure with drama and portentous suggestion in its air and elegance in its character before slipping into the waiting jaws of Tranquil. Featuring the warm tones of Lilly Macieira, the track explodes on ears, guitars winding venomously around them as rhythms pounce to spear the senses. To the aggression though, there is an instinctive catchiness which fuels grooves and the overall surge of the song, an infectiousness which even infests the uncompromising assault of raw throated, emotionally open vocals. Alongside an inventive unpredictability and imagination festers and boils over, the subsequent duel vocal attack of varying discontent and subsequent melodic temptation lying at the heart of the track’s captivating evolution. Add Macieira’s almost angelic presence and it is a song which enthrals.

Sorrow swiftly follows, it too emerging from a suggestive harmonic calm with ferocious intent and wind but equally with that wealth of undisguised enterprise and imagination. Stabbing beats and bone shaking riffs devour as melodies and vocal dexterity blossom, every second a fresh adventure but united in the flowing and certainly uncompromising yet inviting storm. As all tracks, with every listen a new depth and side to elements within the song emerge and though it is fair to say that just on the initial engagement the EP and its contents stir the appetite real fascination grows with every submission to the fire.

Again Macieira features on the EP’s fourth track, opening Extrovert with her harmonic caress as melodies cradle her presence. In time the mellow temptation becomes the bed for emotive and physical turbulence where vocals and guitars are almost in conflict within their intensive unity, a fight which ignites the ire and creative dexterity skilfully consuming ears. Clean vocals in turn rise from within that fire, just part of the imaginative depth and adventure persuading ears and pleasure.

Final track Affinity is more of the same but individual in its tapestry of sound and imagination, contrasts and extremes coming together in a kaleidoscope of sound and emotion just gripping attention. It is a magnetic close to an encounter which dares you to look away even for a second and miss something memorable, a challenge impossible to take on.

We would say Perspective // Empathy needs time to truly blossom in ears though as mentioned earlier it undoubtedly pleasures from its first breath; in return though the rewards increase and impress. The final line of the press release for the EP suggests that the sextet of Kerrie Alexander, Ryan Stevens, Elliot Plummer, Charles Jones, and Luke Jervis is one “of the most exciting and original bands at the vanguard of the UK scene.” There is nothing within the new EP to suggest otherwise.

Perspective // Empathy is available now on iTunes.

http://www.vanitydrawsblood.co.uk/    https://www.facebook.com/VANITYUK/

Pete RingMaster 26/09/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Gnarwolf – II

Photo credit: Scott W. Coleman

Not to be confused with the equally fine British hardcore band Gnarwolves, Gnarwolf is a primal roar from Texas whose snarl is also hardcore bred and demandingly distinct. The Austin hailing foursome of Andy, Trent, Steven, and Polo are about to release their second EP, II. Like its title, musically the band gets to the point without fuss. There is no beating around the bush in sound and intent, just raw and intensive examinations of the senses and emotions; a trespass which is merciless, abrasive, and increasingly tasty.

There is no mistaking the admitted influence of bands such as Every Time I Die, Norma Jean, and The Chariot in the Gnarwolf sound, essences which fuelled last year’s debut EP. Abandon was a formidable introduction to the band and it seems quickly picked up a whole new flood of fans the way of the quartet. It is success easy to imagine II finding as a bare minimum. There is a new wealth of inventive hostility and unpredictable imagination to their sophomore release without defusing any of the venomous causticity and cacophony of antagonism which enhanced its predecessor, as well as the potential of even bolder things nestling in its stirring body.

It starts with Harold: The Hero where straight away beats rap at the door before ravenous metal seeded riffs and senses slamming beats join throat scarring spite flavoured vocals in breaking through the defences. It is an instant punk roar to get off on, the technical dance of the guitars enhancing rather than distracting from the instinctive belligerent holler. That unpredictability is already at play, adding an almost schizophrenic hue to the dirty frenzy gripping ears and a quickly awoken appetite.

Its persuasive challenge is followed by that of Jessie: The Sheriff, an even more agitated and concussive affair veined by toxically spicy grooves and mixed vocal uproar. For a minute and a half it bullies, ravages, and invigorates body and satisfaction, hitting the sweet spot in noisy discontent and ferocity before Mr. And Mrs Jenkins: The Mayor And His Wife unleashes its own infectiously irritable clamour of sound and heart where sonic ire twists and turns with increasing corrosive seduction.

Anne: The Widow entwines ears in its own intoxicating but fearsome hooks next; the flirtation of a citric melody quickly accompanied by vocal exasperation and in turn a gloriously predatory bassline. It all merges into something harsher and filthier within a few more seconds, a brawling cloud of ill-content eventually losing its shape as that first sonic lure frees itself again with vocal harmonics as raw as they are warmly enticing in tow. The song is pure captivation eventually leaving lingering wounds on emotionally and sonically scoured flesh and senses.

From there Hector: The Foreigner simply throws its mordant might at the listener, guitars and vocals a scalding scourge as rhythms prowl with their own dark intent. For personal tastes, some of the twists do not come off as well as elsewhere within the release but are fleeting moments in another highly bracing and pleasurable assault.

The EP concludes with The Dodge Brothers: The Cowboys, a maelstrom of spiralling guitar incitement, rhythmic blitzing, and vocal acrimony but also a theatre of melody woven drama as keys court thoughts and emotions from within the turmoil to brew a haunting epilogue.

There seems to be an exciting wave of noise-mongers emerging right now, new and those finally seeing some attention from their place within the underground. Gnarwolf seal their place to the fore of that outbreak with II, a release as punk and metal as it is noise and hardcore, and more and more one thrilling invasion of the psyche.

The II EP is released April 8th.

For more info check out…

https://www.facebook.com/gnarlywerewolf   https://twitter.com/gnarlywerewolf   https://gnarlywerewolf.bandcamp.com/

Pete RingMaster 31/03/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Unheard Before The Wake – Humanity Burning

UnheardBeforeTheWake_RingMasterReview

It is fair to say that Humanity Burning took its time to fully convince, for its ideas and elements to fall into place within ears and understanding, but when it did, the new EP from UK melodic death metallers Unheard Before The Wake showed why the band is beginning to be strongly noticed within the British metal underground. Unleashing five intrusive tracks which devour the senses while intriguing the imagination, the band’s sophomore EP emerges as an attention grabbing trespass.

Formed at the end of 2013, the Sutton hailing Unheard Before The Wake has increasingly lured fans and keen interest through the release of their self-titled debut EP on 2014 and more so a live presence which has seen the quintet share stages with the likes of Xerath, Meat Train, and A Vulgar Picture. Their sound is a tempest of extreme flavours unafraid to entangle black and classic hues into its death and melodic metal bred invention. Humanity Burning is the band’s new national assault on ears, a release which maybe does not always fit perfectly with personal tastes but certainly left them with an appetite for more.

The EP opens with its title track and a nagging of riffs, their whiney hue like raw nectar swiftly grabbing keen attention further enhanced by the barbarous torrent of beats and the great gnarly tone of the bass. As its predatory nature continues to ignite the appetite, the track rumbles and grumbles like an awakened beast, subsequently stretching into its prowling gait and animosity as the heavy throaty growls of vocalist Chris Rossiter enter the scene. At this point the guitars of Dylan-Thomas Chinchen and Ryan Adams expand their own tapestry of enterprise and sonic flavouring, the song blossoming into an unpredictable and increasingly rousing proposition. On the initial listen, it almost seems to have too much going on in its rabid assault but with time each twist and turn skilfully flows and in turn impresses. The personal taste thing does kick in as cleaner vocals make their appearance, an addition which just does not work for these ears, though the only time something grates against rather than benefits the song.

Unheard Before The Wake Cover Artwork_RingMasterReviewLurker steps up next, again with an opening which demands attention. This time the invitation is a threatening collusion of sound and texture, almost asylum like in its tone and vocal cries. Framing the drama, drummer Jasper Brownlow and bassist Adam McGuinness again place wonderfully grouchy bait which only finds greater impact as a thrash bred surge of riffs and energy erupts. As its predecessor, the song also flows through intensive and slower predacious moments to keep expectations on their toes, especially the almost theatrical passage of the lyrical protagonist’s introspection which comes forward.

It is clear Unheard Before The Wake know how to compose a song to make an immediate impact, The Pluto God also stirring up ears in seconds with its fierce waltz of grooves within an intimidating rhythmic shuffle. In no time from that great start, the song is stalking the senses and psyche with the excellent heavy throated growling of Rossiter a potent lure in the corrosive storm. The twist of classic metal seeded vocals derail the track a touch again for these ears though it is soon back to its former glory with raw guttural vocals leading to a weave of tantalising craft and flavours.

The EP’s best track, Right To Die, comes next; it a maelstrom of intrusive rhythms and riffs bound in roaming grooves and melodic toxicity which swiftly inflames air and ears. Clean vocals do make another appearance but in spoken form to great effect, providing another texture in the resourceful blaze of sound and imagination.

Completed by an instrumental reprise of its title track, Humanity Burning is a release which takes its time but makes a thoroughly enjoyable persuasion of the potential and readymade qualities of Unheard Before The Wake. Their sound still feels like it is in evolution which only adds to their promise. The press release suggests Humanity Burning is something fans of The Black Dahlia Murder, Carcass, Dimmu Borgir, and Cannibal Corpse might take a shine to; something easy to agree with. As for the clean vocals, we suggest the band really does not need them with everything else boiling up rather nicely.

The Humanity Burning EP is released April 29th @ https://unheardbeforethewake.bandcamp.com/ and most online stores.

http://www.unheardbeforethewake.com/   https://www.facebook.com/unheardbeforethewake

Pete RingMaster 28/04/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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The Scrap Dealers – After A Thousand Blows

TSD_RingMaster Review

After A Thousand Blows is the absorbing debut album from Belgian band The Scrap Dealers, a quintet unafraid to merge distinctive sounds into one immersive experience. As shown by their latest release, it is an imaginative collation of flavours which maybe not be always forcibly unique quite yet but certainly offers a fresh and fascinating captivation for ears and imagination.

Formed in 2012 in Liège, The Scrap Dealers initially emerged with a garage punk sound, releasing their attention grabbing debut EP Red Like Blood two years later. At that point though, the band began embracing a more psychedelic rock driven direction in sound; kraut and shoegaze influences amongst many similarly woven into their new explorations. Towards the end of 2014, a second offering in the shape of a self-titled EP was unveiled, the impressive release making a potent bridge between the band’s old and new blends of sound. After A Thousand Blows is another resourceful step in the evolution, but an encounter at times still enjoyably showing the rawer rock ‘n’ roll instincts the quintet of Hugues Daro, Régis Germain, Justin Mathieu, Cédric Georges, and Bruno Lecocq began with.

Recorded, mixed, and mastered by Allan Snon and Jeremy Alonzi, and released on Belgian DIY record label JauneOrange, After A Thousand Blows opens up with the instantly atmospheric Walking Alone. From its first portentous rumblings, keys and guitars entwine in a sonic mist sharing dark shadows and melancholic ambience. As bold beats enter the affair, a lighter hue begins to blossom; the catchiness of rhythms the eventual spark to warm melodies and a sultry glaze around the darker essences which remain as potent as ever. The vocals equally have a harmonic glow to them, thoughts of My Bloody Valentine and Curve emerging as the song continues to shimmer yet there is a strain of alternative and psych rock which only adds more character to the gripping start to the album.

The following I’ll Never Be Like You also emerges with a singular coaxing of sound but does not hang around before unveiling its own psych pop adventure with a persistent catchiness which infests everything from voice to guitar, bass to drums, and indeed the listener. As shown by its predecessor and all tracks to come, there is a drama in the songwriting and music of The Scrap Dealers; an intriguing undercurrent which has the imagination as hooked as firmly ears are enthralled by the virulence of sound. Here the magnetic but predacious tone of the bass is a prime instigator; enticing shadowy clouds and emotive dilemmas whilst offering addictive bait of its own backed by flirty beats and the evocative tapestry cast by the guitars.

A scent of the band’s garage rock origins comes with She Doesn’t Wanna Leave Your Mind, the track a slimmer, compared to the thicker immersions of the earlier songs, but no less emotive embrace of ears. Its raw and fuzzy textures easily engage and stir attention though the sinister air and volatile breath of Keep My Silence Safe soon puts it in the shade. There is no escaping an enticing essence of The Jesus and Mary Chain to the excellent encounter, especially as its dark invasive entrance slips into another magnetic stroll lit with psychedelic colouring and pop rock revelry. From the dark there is light, a switch of mood and texture which all the tracks seem to be built upon no matter which contrast they start from, and no more alluring than within this siren of a song.

The surf rock laced melodic rock romancing of That’s What We Call Love takes over to keep ears greedy, its tangy nature and whiff of discordance tantalising as it engagingly seduces. As potent as it is though, the ten minute adventure of I Lost My Faith in no time steals all attention from its companion. The closing track has the psyche rock mesmerism of The Horrors and the melodic enticing of Slowdive woven into its own distinct and seductive landscape of enveloping shadows and immersive beauty. Maybe a tad too long for personal tastes, the song is a riveting close to a thoroughly enthralling release, whilst The Scrap Dealers are a band who, as their sound continues to evolve, is on the path to being a potent part of the psychedelic and shoegaze landscape.

After A Thousand Blows is out now via JauneOrange in conjunction with Sick Fuzz Records, digitally and on vinyl and tape @ https://thescrapdealers.bandcamp.com/

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Pete RingMaster 23/02/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Garth Arum – The Dawn Of A New Creation

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Though it took a few journeys to fully seduce thoughts and emotions The Dawn Of A New Creation, the debut album from Garth Arum emerged an enthralling release and experience which is intriguingly unpredictable and invigoratingly skilfully crafted. It is an adventure taking in varied melodic landscapes and diverse sceneries bred in multiple genres and refreshing flavourings.  As mentioned it takes time to totally persuade but once enamoured with its imaginative premises the album is one to linger long in the passions.

Garth Arum is the solo project of Nightmarer, the vocalist and guitarist of Spanish avant-garde black metallers As Light Dies. The project has its seeds in compositions which the musician started in 1997 and completed in 2003, The Dawn Of A New Creation, the first of possibly four proposed releases which unveils eleven of these striking and inventive songs. The tracks are vibrant pieces of avant-garde experimentalism fused and veined with the hearts of ambient sounds, classical compositions, and dreamy electronics, resulting in songs which capture the imagination whilst taking flight with thoughts and emotions through riveting and entrancing soundscapes. The album is at ease in venturing  through bright and vibrantly warm scenery or shadow drenched darker climes, often seamlessly merging both into the same breath of imagination as it traverses desolate emotive realms and evocative fantasy clad glories within moments of each other or simultaneously.

The Satanath Records released album starts with the beauty and splendour of A New Creation, the opening crystalline melodic Coverwaters of the track soon wrapped by the sinews of jagged riffs and angelic harmonies provided by guest Cecilia Tallo from On3ric4. It is a short invitation which beckons with a warm and beckoning grace skirted by harder emotive shadows and evocations. Its brief presence is soon taken by Shadows Of The Past, another song with a beauty clad start, this time provided by great piano caresses and soon after symphonic embraces. It is a mere few moments though before the muscular intensity of the track explodes to darken the skies, riffs and rhythms building up their intimidation, though again it is a swift cloud as the song evolves into a stirring mix of both extremes to feed every appetite, the vocals offering a scowling blackened breath whilst guitars bring flames of melodic invention. Incendiary to thought bred imagery and senses, the track lights up a cascade of ever shifting investigations as emotional textures steal the imagination for its own provocation.

The ferocious start of A Barrage Of Hate is soon swapped for an irresistible groove and barbed hooks which shuffle between seducing and chewing up the ear. In another scintillating rampage across the emotions the track combines a clutch of opposing styles into one inciting passage, a song which employs black and death metal as well as classical and melodic rock for what could be the first ‘extreme pop metal ‘song. It is a tantalising track which defies description but asks to be labelled with a plethora of tags, but simply it is in a class of its own, as is the album.

Through the likes of the excellent The Path To Oblivion featuring the voice of Lady Carrot from Aegri Somnialends, a song which is a combination of gothic metal and early The Cure, and Rusty Hands with Slo from Smohalla providing the vocals, the album continues to impress even if slipping below the highest plateaus set by earlier songs. The second of the two songs toys with ears and thoughts, further chilling ambiences and intrusive rhythmic enterprise drenched in rabid invention locked in with sonic discoveries and acidic melodic weaves which are brought to bear on the great vocals harmonies. It is soon surpassed though by the warm seduction of Trip (Part I), the track again witnessing the soprano grace of Lady Carrot within folk spiced metallic fascination.

Further highlights on what is a persistently impressive release come with the deliciously fiery almost bedlamic dance of Lucid Dreams and the caustically black atmospheric Yearned freedom which finds the vocals of Camille Giraudeau (Smohalla and Stagnant Waters) adding their strong expression to the impacting tempest. The Dawn Of A New Creation is an album which inspires the imagination to create its own narrative and emotive canvas  whilst leading thoughts into varied ventures with each listen, especially as each endeavour sees more corners and depths discovered by the listener. Fresh and truly imaginative the album is destined to leave very satisfied hearts in its wake whilst igniting hunger for the next episode of the Garth Arum project.

www.facebook.com/gartharum

8/10

RingMaster 24/06/2013

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Matt Finucane: Glow In The Dark

Hard Science the latest single from UK songwriter Matt Finucane left a mixed emotion to its intriguing and unpredictable sounds. The song hit the spot at times but also missed easily in others moments to spawn an uncertainty towards his wrong footing invention. August 13th sees the release of his new album Glow In The Dark via Light Crude and is a collection of songs which offer a broader understanding of the man and his intent. It does really not solve the riddle of how one feels about his music but it certainly makes it fun trying to find out.

From Brighton, Finucane began on his solo quest in 2008 after fronting art rock band Empty Vessels. His limited edition Episodes EP of the same year drew some attention but he stepped back to write more songs. Last year saw the singles Wet Dream Disaster and Hands Up released, the latter earning some good radio play. Both marked the way for debut album This Mucky Age which came out in July that year and again to strong responses. A re-issue of Episodes began 2012 with Hard Science which with its release in July heralded the imminent arrival of Glow In The Dark. Though our first introduction to the man, within a few tracks of the album it is clear Finucane is one who rips up the supposed rules into little shreds and discovers his own path. There is always something impressive about a musician prepared to create his own world of sound and disregard what came before and the opinions of others. The album is a perfect reflection and one can only admire its rugged use of discordance for a blistered adventure. Sometimes it did not work to the preference of these ears but to the ideas and emerging intention one can only nod in approval.

Finucane is from the same stock and well of musical destruction as Mark E. Smith, an explorer and purveyor of the wonderfully unconventional and confrontational. You can add elements of Lou Reed and Iggy Pop especially vocally to the man but it is that breath which took The Fall to such heights which marks the sounds and invention of Finucane.

The album opens with the acoustic enticement of Into It. The track is simply guitar and voice stirring up the air with a gentle coaxing of the senses whilst an electric whisper plays in the background like a searchlight of inciteful invention. Finucane has a voice which takes a little while to warm to and at times is not easy to get a handle on though as always it is a matter of personal taste and connection. As the song plays there emerges a shuffling sound as if the body of familiarity and expectation is being dragged to the nearest dumpster to inspire great delight even if the thoughts drawn were not as intended.

Hard Science works better within the context of the album or it is just that it has worn the defences down through multiple plays. The sizzling electrified surface sound which roughs up the ear is a great counter to the strong melodic play and eager hook which becomes quite infectious over time. Imagine Thomas Dolby creating sound with 1,000 volts running through his veins and you can imagine Hard Science.

The likes of Face Of Stone with its assembly of disconnected but perfectly aligned sounds, Impermanence and its disruptive garage rock barracking, and the acoustically shimmering In The Market Place, all leave one in various degrees of pleasure. Each keeps one attentive to their presentation though trigger many questions alongside the enjoyment they bring, though thought provoking music is never ever a flaw in our book.

The highlight of the album comes with a consecutive trio of songs. The first Larkin’ hypnotises with a nonstop spotting of the senses through pulsating beats and irresistible melodic guitar strikes. Easily the best song on the release it jabs persistently whilst giving a caustic vocal rub and that alone is mesmeric but with the distillery of thrilling concussive unique sounds and teasing hooks it elevates itself to greatness. The other two tracks have their own individual and equally compulsive worlds. Great Beginnings pulsates with a swing groove which no one can say no to within its stirring discordance whilst Doom Vibes is a sinister caress with less than healthy intentions which leaves one rattled but needing to feel its shadows again.

The album is maybe a rocky journey with the likes of Love Unknown, Alter Ego Hi-Way, and Yr Own Poison not hitting same personal target of the hungrily received imaginative sounds of the tracks previously mentioned. There is nothing truly wrong with them but just do not find a welcoming home but this is a release for individuals, what works for one will not always for another. Glow In The Dark is a release which deserves investigation, to ignore it would be a mistake. Honesty dictates that we declare the album was certainly enjoyable but by how much is still in debate with a decision not expected until further meet ups.

http://mattfinucane.net/

RingMaster 10/08/2012

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Anterior – Echoes of the Fallen

From their early days UK death metalers Anterior grabbed attention and interest with their potential and tightly delivered creativity. Shows with the likes of 3 Inches Of Blood and Skindred, the release of their first official songs via their Myspace profile with brought a host of offers from labels, and the signing of a worldwide deal with Metal Blade Records in December 2006 all happened in a short amount of time. Debut album This Age Of Silence was released to a just mass of critical acclaim in 2007, its quality and the bands realised promise clear to see, now with their new album Echoes of the Fallen released again via Metal Blade Records September 13th the band has confirmed and taken their stock even higher.

Echoes of the Fallen has been a long thoughtful process with 2010 being taken off by the band to concentrate on the completion of the songwriting for the release and as the year came to an end the starting of its recording. The album is an impressive and powerful result for the measured effort in its creation, and being the first recording of the new line-up of Anterior the release also shows that as great as the previous album was there is a marked and strong natural unity between this crew that excels and adds more to Echoes of the Fallen.  

The album hits the mark from the off with ‘To Live Not Remain’ leaving a trail of scorch marks in the ear as drummer James Cook and bassist James Britton thrust forth a forceful heavy rhythm attack that pounds the senses whilst the guitars of Leon Kemp and Steven Nixon weave and play around them with red hot riffs and sounds, their play with melodies and direct sounds resulting in incisive grooves that set an eager tone. A strong start to the album immediately raised by ‘Blood in the Throne Room’ where the guitars create an even greater tapestry of impressive interplay between power and melodies, the razor sharp solo a blissful addition. As on the opener and each track on the album vocalist Luke Davies is right on form, his delivery of growls and hoarse vocals a perfect fit to the harsh and smoother sonic sounds.

A feature of the band’s songs that is great is that there is no focal point in the tracks, in most tunes it seems like the vocalist or guitarist takes centre stage but with Anterior each song is a band effort with equal footing and every aspect of the band shines clearly, the album’s best track ‘Tyranny’ a perfect example. A metal core flavoured song it hits hard and low whilst the body is wrapped in stirring and insurgent guitar strikes before delivering again an impressive solo. Whatever one’s view of the release no one can deny the ability of the band and its individual members.

There is a very strong consistency across Echoes of the Fallen though at times also a similarity which does not detract from the release but does feel like it is just missing its potential at times. To be fair with the driving intensity of ‘By Horror Haunted ‘, the rapid response calling of ‘The Evangelist’, and the post hardcore tinged brutality of ‘Sleep Soundly No More as examples any less than positive comment is mere nit picking.

The overall sensation upon listening to Echoes of the Fallen is of full satisfaction with each and every listen bringing a little more to the fore. Anterior will strongly build on their already existing acclaim with Echoes of the Fallen and with more of their highly charged live shows coming up the recommendation is to check them and the album out and soon.

http://www.metalblade.com/anterior

http://www.facebook.com/ANTERIOR1

RingMaster 03/09/2011

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