The Harry MacIntosh Project – Such is the Vulture’s Love

Photo courtesy of (c)liarbillyt132014

Photo courtesy of (c)liarbillyt132014

Returning with their first collection of new songs in around seven years, UK experimental punks The Harry MacIntosh Project unleash the Such is the Vulture’s Love EP to remind the British rock scene what an exciting proposition they are. Berkshire based, the quintet contrary to what the band name might suggest, create a bracing brew of punk and noise rock wrapped in alternative rock tenacity. There is still more to their sound as proven by the new release, but imagine a brew of Richard Hell, At the Drive In, The Jesus Lizard, and Blood Brothers, and maybe add a thick pinch of Pere Ubu and you get a clearer idea.

As said it has been quite a while since the self-release of their Macrophage EP in 2006, though there has been a live album to keep us happy too, but with their recent signing to London-based Zube Records the band is back to incite ears and psyche in fine style once again. The time between releases has also seen a line-up change and a more defined and mature handle on their ever warped ability to stir things up with instinctive, noise fuelled invention. It is all in evidence upon Such is the Vulture’s Love and it is fair to say that it is good to have fresh and raw sounds from the band in the British rock ‘n’ roll landscape again.

10291714_10153149234802438_5040363608279764080_n     It all starts with Error Terror, a warped sonic disturbance of jazzy intent brewing up to the point where the band step forward with sharp hooks, wiry grooves and bustling rhythms. It is an immediate flavoursome tonic of sound, becoming more acidic and tangy with the vocals of Trip Hazzard, his appearance seeming to spark a more citric touch to the guitar enterprise of David Anderson and Thomas Cox. The song continues to prowls the senses as the meaty beats of Paul Hopgood collude with the throaty lines cast by Thom Draven’s bass, but throughout and just as potent is an infectious almost virulent swing to the track. It is a mighty and compelling start to the release and quickly matched by its successor.

…and this Cat has a similar swagger to its body and presence too, guitars spilling catchy grooves whilst rhythms are more boisterous than aggressive. It is a gripping entrance soon leading to greater reactions as the track slips into a melodic calm with evocative resonance and invasive, slightly Parisian charm. The track is outstanding, too short maybe causing a moan when it stops such the enjoyment given, but a tapestry of hues suggested by many of the bands previously mentioned. They are just small hints of colour though to a sound which comparing it to anyone borders on selling it short, certainly from within the second song upon Such is the Vulture’s Love.

(I Spent the Night In A) Washing is a voracious rock ‘n’ roll stomp doing its best to steal top honours on the EP. Rugged on its punk side and bewitching in its sonic endeavour, the track bullies and entices ears simultaneously, rhythms the most volatile protagonist, though the gripping bass part of their invention with its catchiness tempers the ferocity of the drums. With Hazzard spilling more and more expression, and at times animosity with every song, the encounter is another to leave like-minded bands wishing it was them and the listener feeling like they are being serenaded by a pissed off hornet.

The release closes with Mouldy Water, a dark intimidation of a song with a muddy atmosphere and a seemingly antagonistic nature caressing the senses with caustic melodies bullied by tempestuous rhythms. As in the other songs we are only giving glimpses to the emotional and atmospheric turbulence and raw beauty pervading the encounter, every moment in a song a new wash of invention and wonderful agitation hard to replicate in words.

Hopefully it will not be another vast stretch of time before The Harry MacIntosh Project unleashes some more of their impressive new direction of sound. Such is the Vulture’s Love is an excellent and enthralling treat for the now but it also leaves pleasure in the arm of want, a need for more, and even its superb body can solely satisfy that for too long.

Such is the Vulture’s Love is released April 25th via Zube Records on CD, seven-inch coloured vinyl, and as a digital download.

http://www.facebook.com/theharrymacintoshproject

RingMaster 23/04/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Electric Shit: Downtown Blues

Cover Front

    The combination of blues and punk can often make for a dirty slab of pleasure which thrills and energises the appetite whatever the hunger the time. The new single from Mexican trio Electric Shit is certainly evidence to that, a two song attack of raw insatiable rock n roll which whets the taste buds. The release is unrefined and raucous with the kind of honest sound which goes a long way and on this occasion certainly leaves a depth of satisfaction and enjoyment which cannot be dismissed as just another record from just another band.

From Ecatepec, the band consists of Marco aka Thee Preacher (guitar and vocals), José Reza aka Leadbelly (bass), and Eduardo H (drums) and was formed around a year ago.  There is not much else we can share about the band except to express further the promise and pleasure their single provides a declaration for.

The title track is immediately a fiery encounter speared by sonic flames and a pulsating throaty bass groove. Its initial blaze soon settles as the excellent bass groan and crisp beats drive directly through the ear for a stronger compelling enticement whilst the swagger of the expressive accent soaked vocals brings an extra persuasion to the infectiousness of the song. The continual groove is repetitive and in league with mesmeric shadows to bring a firmly gripping captivation from first note to last which allows the skilful craft and acidic spirals of fire from the guitar of Marco to sizzle as it offers its own full temptation. Admittedly the song does not ignite any undiscovered avenues but with a stoner breath to is riled core and a roughen blues surface it catches the imagination with every scuzzy surface it brings.

As strong and appealing as the first song is, second song All My Troubles leaves it in its garage punk wake. Starting with a bass hook to open vats of nostalgia and soon finding an accomplice in the great Richard Hell like vocals in that deed, the song is punk rock at its best aided by another rich pulse of blues rock n roll. The groove and swagger of the song leaves a grin on the face and emotions whilst the drums and bass enlist feet and thoughts to their uncomplicated contagion. Once more the guitar of Marco leaves sparks with his great sonic fire which seamlessly expels from within his constantly enthralling riffs and adding to the instinctive feel of the song.

With debut album Dirty & Heavy due later in the year, Electric Shit has raised an excitement and anticipation for its release with heart and accomplishment. Downtown Blues and especially All My Trouble are the strongest persuasion for an investigation in to the forthcoming release and to keep a steady eye on this impressive band.

Find out how to get your free download of Downtown Blues @ http://www.facebook.com/electricshit

8/10

RingMaster 01/03/2013

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Popular Giants: Self Titled

Pop Giants

    Whilst arguably not offering anything new in the grand scheme of things the self-titled album from Californian rockers Popular Giants is a quite irresistible riot of rock n roll. Fusing the best varied flavours of punk rock with garage rock and other distinctive flavours, the Los Angeles quartet burst out of the speakers with an energy and hunger which is impossible not to be persuaded and enamoured by. Consisting of thirteen raucous treats of rock music at its dirtiest best the album unleashes a vigorous fun in its boisterous company which you just cannot deny.

The band was formed in 2011 by guitarist/vocalist/songwriter Christopher Peacock with the intent of getting back to playing the old school punk he grew up upon. With the addition of guitarist/vocalist John Fortin, bassist Francis Cyan, and drummer Mike Criddell to the ranks, the sound of the band found its own natural evolution to the bruising, insatiable, and varied sounds which light up this impressive album from start to finish. The four members found an instant and shared vision on how songs and their music should find their most powerful and dynamic stature as well as on how they would sound to escape the ‘sterile’ digital prevalence of today. The band recorded their album using a Stevens two –inch analog tape machine from the seventies to produce the ‘fat steamroller sound of Popular Giants live’, and in fact the machine was the exact same one Pink Floyd used on The Wall.

As soon as the immediate contagion of Pretty Life sets in to start the album off, there is a sense of something exciting in the winds, 309054_505764392782988_2063941150_nthe release soon proving that right with ease with every one of its infectious seconds. The opener lights up the ear with bulging rhythms and coaxing riffs whilst the vocals of Peacock top the riot with expression and passion. With essences of Foo Fighters and Living End to its irresistible anthem, the song flicks all the switches of satisfaction and full pleasure to begin one thrilling cruise down their sonic highway.

So Happy sends the infection up another level with its delicious teasing beckoning within a stormy energy, the song a punk/rock incitement recalling spices of Nirvana and Offspring in a new tasty recipe all Popular Giants. The following On The Road is just the same though for the Seattle trio loud whispers swap an Everclear loud hint for the ear from within another bounty of compelling riffs, teasing hooks, and ear rapping beats.

Song by song the passion and balls of the band fire up their imaginative party, the likes of We Want Your Soul with a Buzzcocks scented hook and pop punk harmonies, the garage rock/grunge coated Devil I Ain’t Done, and the barging old school punk bite It’s Not Your Fault, leaving a warm glow on the heart and a ripe greedy demand for much more. The third of the these songs barely musters 30 seconds in length but in its snapping snarl leaves a giant rapture, a song in all ways seventies punk bands would be proud of.

Amongst nothing but real highs across the whole release the loftiest pinnacles come in the second half of the album starting with the excellent Trepidation. With Fortin taking the lead vocally, the track bristles with the agitation and contagion of Bad Religion across its drive of provocative riffs and jabbing rhythms. It is an addiction forming song backed up with equal potency by the stunning I’m Not The One. With a heavier muscular intensity and force to its predatory stance, the track melds a rich mix of garage rock and punk with a Heartbreakers breath to its fiery voice. It is an instinctive squall for the passions to latch on to and be inspired by, a song which calls to the heart.

The cover of the Turbonegro track Get It On is a very decent encounter with a great punk rawness to its roar whilst its successor Antibody is a delicious attitude spitting poke with a New York Dolls swagger and Richard Hell snarl. It also has a ‘nasty’ Pistols groove which lights the deepest fires and a barrage of riffing that demands and receives willing attention.

With plenty more great tracks including another cover, this time of Unsatisfied by The Godfathers, this is an album which feeds all the wants of a punk rock album with accomplished excellence. Ok it is not going to break down new walls for you to play behind but it is hard to remember too many punk releases recently offering this much energy and fun to unite with.

https://www.facebook.com/PopularGiants

8/10

Ringmaster 02/02/2013

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright