Introducing Reverse Family

RF_RingMasterReview

Ever had that dream where an insect invades the ear and sets up home to mercilessly tease and torment thereon in? If so, a form of similar reality is about to be unleashed as the Reverse Family step forward to announce themselves with a sound which trespasses and festers in the psyche. The difference is that this is set to be the most welcome invasion of ears as it crawls with relish into the imagination.

Reverse Family is the solo project of Walmington-on-Sea resident Dermot Illogical, better known as Andreas Vanderbraindrain, the frontman of British band The Tuesday Club. Aided by a fluid band of collaborators from time to time, the new offering from Dermot is a lo-fi exploration into an experimental DIY web of sounds and flavours which is hard to pin down but certainly embraces everything from post punk and noise pop to indie and old school punk.

The RingMaster Review had the honour and pleasure to be the first to hear the tracks set to make up My Songs About Life Mid Crisis, the debut album from Reverse Family which is not due until next year through Perfect Pop Co-op but makes the ideal introduction to the new proposition so we thought we would share our findings within its dementedly addictive lures.

The first song we came up against was Alchopoppers on Fast Food, a brief and gentle yet deviously engaging song which instantly entices thoughts of seventies bands like Swell Maps and The Shapes but with the melodic natures of The Freshies. It is captivating stuff even with a drop into calmer waters which does not quite connect with personal tastes. We are not sure of the album’s track order but if this is to be the opener it provides a potent start though the brilliant Way It Goes is an even bigger pull. Carrying an early Adam and The Ants feel to its magnetic stroll, the song is pure addiction with a funk revelry bubbling under its pop punk surface, Dermot as vocally mischievous as the guitar led sounds around him.

art_RingMasterReviewThere is great variety to the songs too; Bit Slits for example flirting with the senses through keys which manage to sound like the brass flames of Essential Logic while guitar and vocals veer towards the Nikki Sudden school of discord blessed minimalistic seduction while Electronic 6 entangles portentous keys and winy guitars with fuzzy vocals for a Dalek I Love You/Artery scented melancholy. It is fair to say that Dermot wears influences openly yet each song develops its own distinct character under often familiar hues.

Hand of God has a darker and meatier nature to its predacious swing, contagious hooks and a great grumbling bassline aligning with melodic enterprise for a proposal which swiftly grips ears and appetite; a success just as easily won by the lively pop bounce of One Eyed, a seemingly early Television Personalities seeded encounter and the hypnotic I Can Sense Their Watching Eyes. This too has a flavour of Dirk Wears White Sox to it but with funky beats and another irresistible post punk guitar jangle in its off kilter dub teased shuffle, the track blossoming into another unique proposition within My Songs About Life Mid Crisis.

Other tracks in the mix are Business or Pleasure, a delicious song which sounds like Weezer soaping The Piranhas while recording it all in the bath, The Legend of Pierre with its haunting keys wrapped sultry croon, and Odd Mix Newgates, a seductive magnetic monotone tone spawned track surely inspired by Mark E. Smith.

The collection of tracks are completed by Higher Power with plaintive melodies and dour yet emotionally suggestive vocals and the outstanding May Number 10 Dream which again hints at bands like The Fall, Marc Riley and The Creepers, and The Mekons, as well as the criminally catchy Sods Law. Hips and feet beware as even in its low key nature it will have you swinging in an instant.

There are so many highlights offered by the Reverse Family songs; each track connecting with an ever eager hunger for punk fuelled, post punk spiced imagination. Plastic Punks epitomises this perfectly, its Fire Engines toned melodic jangle and Spizzenergi devilry sheer temptation again emerging as something specific to Reverse Family.

With a tongue in cheek lining to the lyrical reflection shaping songs which spreads into the music itself, Reverse Family is a beguiling adventure with a nod to the past and a grip on an imagination as fresh as it is, well quite simply a touch loco.

As mentioned My Songs About Life Mid Crisis is due for release next April but it is never too soon to get into something this craftily tasty.

http://reversefamily.co.uk

https://www.facebook.com/reversefamily/

Pete RingMaster 07/11/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Introducing the Perfect Pop Co-op

ppco_RingMasterReview

I hear you asking just what is Perfect Pop Co-op. In the words of its founders, it is “A record label set up by a bunch of music obsessives to release all of our various musical adventures…

There is a good chance you might already have come across the label especially if fans of the inimitable pop ‘n’ roll of The Tuesday Club.  Created by Andreas Vanderbraindrain and his colleagues in the band, PPCO was set up a few years back to release the exploits of The Tuesday Club as well as those of the bands they were also involved in at the time and previously. The success of The Tuesday Club quickly stole all attention and time it is fair to say, with the label becoming the sole vehicle for the band’s acclaim sparking releases over the past four years.

Tuesday Club_RingMasterReviewNow though, the label has gone back to its initial intent and is beginning to release old side projects, new side projects, collaborations, and plenty more alongside the continuing creative antics of The Tuesday Club. Under its umbrella, a clutch of singles are already lying provocatively available alongside the recent quadrilogy of EPs from The Tuesday Club, a collection of tracks ready to flirt with ears and imagination.

For those behind PPCO, the perfect pop song “is the 3 minute, or under, 7 inch vinyl” with the likes of the Buzzcocks singles, Virginia Plain from Roxy Music, and Get it On by T.Rex as examples. It is a design which has shaped The Tuesday Club songs since day one and going on early evidence is the starting point for the bands on the PPCO roster which also includes The Bleeed, The DIY or Die Organisation (also known as The D.O.D.O), Andreas and the Wolf, and Reverse Family.

Alongside the music, PPCO also has an online magazine keeping all up to date with the label and its bands with half devoted to the world of The Tuesday Club, which their fans know is a full time job in itself. The latest issue has insight on those bands behind the label’s new releases, plus additional features on the likes of Department S and Automat as well as news, shows and much more. The magazine is a throwback to the seventies DIY press in tone and character, a time when it was almost as much fun and informative to read about bands as it was to hear them.

As to the music, we have already mentioned the four EPs of The Tuesday Club released over the past eighteen months, Forbidden Kiss, My Consciousness, Lady Gargar, and Boo Hoo, for ppco4_RingMasterReviewwhich you can find reviews elsewhere within The RR. Alongside them there is also the original New Glamour single from the band, a track which swiftly became a crowd lust and here shares the plaudits with its B-side Old Before Your Time, a typical and an as ever one of a kind Tuesday Club encounter.

Also recently available is The D.O.D.O single Waiting for the Walls to Come Down. The Saint Albans band, consisting of vocalist/guitarist Andy Scratch, guitarist Steve Filth, and bassist/keyboardist/drummer John Viney, creates a psych pop adventure with a great scent of darker punk blues to it, especially in Waiting for the Walls to Come Down. It has a nostalgic seventies air too yet strolls along with a fresh rock ‘n’ roll swagger embracing decades of the genre’s invention. It is accompanied by the sultry croon of Into The Black, a thrilling slow tease of a song with a southern bred air caressing the imagination like a mix of John Otway and a Bowie inspired Wedding Present.

Also out now is The Silent Scream EP by The Bleeed. With its title borrowed from one of the best episodes in the Hammer House of Horror series of the eighties starring the legendary ppco 1_RingMasterReviewPeter Cushing, the EP and its title track quickly thrust their sonic tendrils through ears. The opener rhythmically dances with devilish intent on the senses instantly, the quartet of Beautiful Wolf, TB telski, Andreas Vanderbraindrain, and Wasabi P flirting with and prowling the psyche with their horror punk ‘n’ roll. Seemingly inspired by eighties gothic rock as well as darker rock ‘n’ roll hues, the song swings along with a character and dark melodic drama which does reminds a touch of the previously mentioned Department S. The track is glorious, a rousing slice of dark anthemic pop backed up as potently by the punkish Valerie Leon (Queen of Neon), a tribute to one of Hammer Film’s many stars and finally Super Juice, a wonderfully irritable and fiery song.

All these releases can be found on the Perfect Pop Co-op bandcamp site with the added treat of a free to download cover of Commando from The Bleeed, a track released to celebrate the 40th anniversary of the release of The Ramones’ debut album.

It is just the start of big things from Perfect Pop Co-op, plenty more releases being line-up with in time the label hoping to embrace a broader expanse of bands. They have certainly started in style with the first selection of records, uncaging hungry and unpredictable pop ‘n’ roll encounters that simply excite and grab attention.

Keep an eye and ear out for what comes next at, musically https://theperfectpopco-op.bandcamp.com, and in word and vision @ https://issuu.com/perfectpopco-op/docs/in_the_club_028_may_16/1

https://www.facebook.com/The-Perfect-Pop-Co-Op-205518542879875/

Pete RingMaster 16/05/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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