Saint Tragedy – Prolonging The Agony

Formed in 2008, Saint Tragedy is a hard rock outfit from Kenosha, Wisconsin and they have just released a rather flavoursome new EP in the shape of Prolonging The Agony. They have a sound which is not dramatically unique but as the six tracks within their latest release reveals, it is a fresh and thoroughly enjoyable proposition.

Consisting of vocalist Wayne Wiginton, guitarist Matt Brudniewicz, bassist Eric Serbedzija, and drummer Jason Scuffham, Saint Tragedy has honed their sound over the years into a boisterous and enterprisingly crafted rock ‘n’ roll roar and it all comes together within Prolonging The Agony. It might not be an encounter which startles yet from start to finish, especially at its departure we only wanted to have more of its goods to rock out with.

As the EP opens up with Make Believe where familiarity and individualism collude to tempt and grab ears, straight away the band’s music with its muscular lures and melodic fire begins working its way under the skin. Like a fusion of Poets Of The Fall and the sadly demised US outfit Resin, sound and song stomp across the senses, rhythms adding their heavy thump alongside the rapacious tenacity of riffs. Wiginton’s vocals swiftly appeal too, adding further dexterity and tone to a track which continues to blossom with melodic enterprise and infectious craft by the second.

It is an impressive start which only continues with Ties That Bind. From maybe a less striking start though its early hook is pure infection alongside potent vocals, the song brews its own highly catchy and persuasive rumble with a chorus so easy to get involved with. Guitarist Brudniewicz once more firmly entices with his sonic enterprise, the rhythmic half of the band providing a formidable yet equally infectious lure before No More Religion takes over. The third track opens with the simple alignment of Wiginton’s croon and the melodic suggestion of guitar, a rich union which ignites into another rousing rock ‘n’ roll incitement equipped with tasty hooks and scorched melodies. Major surprises are few but skilfully nurtured enticements plentiful.

Move On has an old school feel to its confident stroll, classic rock hues and a sultry twinge to its melodic voice adding to its smouldering presence. Though it did not quite grab as forcibly as its predecessors, the song only pleases with its sultry air and emotive touch before being followed by the robust shuffle of Would I Lie. It too maybe lacked the spark of those earlier tracks for personal tastes but more than added to the strength and attraction of the EP with its melodic flames and steely undercurrent.

Closing with an alluring acoustic version of their song, Jumpin’ the Gun, Saint Tragedy prove themselves to be one highly enjoyable and accomplished proposition. They may be something of a secret to a great many right now but Prolonging The Agony could just change that. As mentioned surprises are not thick in coming forward but persistent enjoyment is far more eager.

Prolonging The Agony is available now via Pavement Entertainment.

 

https://www.facebook.com/SaintTragedyMusic/

Pete RingMaster 31/01/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Dead Man’s Hand – Till Karma Forgets

DMH_RingMasterReview

Not to be confused with seemingly many other bands with the same moniker, Dead Man’s Hand is a band bred in the Seattle music scene but it is fair to say really hit their stride once its founders relocated to Kansas City. Now they are poised to release their new album Till Karma Forgets, a twelve song strong slice of raw rock ‘n’ roll which maybe does not leave ears awestruck but certainly provides them with a thoroughly enjoyable time.

Formed in 2012 by vocalist/guitarist Kasey McGrew when he teamed up with guitarist Bret Palmer, Dead Man’s Hand struggled with finding the right line-up initially; that was until the pair moved to Kansas City the following year where they found bassist Jeffery Kent and drummer James Aguiar. Soon the band found itself sharing stages with the likes of HURT, PopEvil, and The Dreaming at venues such as The Voodoo Lounge and Granada. 2014 saw Dead Man’s Hand touring with Burning and win Best New Artist in the Midwest Music Awards. Last year saw a second tour for the quartet, plenty of radio play, and more nominations at the 2015 Midwest Music Awards. Now following up an earlier demo EP with the same name, the band is poking at broader awareness for their accomplished and fiery rock ‘n’ roll with The Pavement Entertainment released Til Karma Forgets.

The album opens with the groove bound Hangman, a track making a controlled entrance before sauntering into the imagination with mellow lures entangled in more incendiary strikes of guitar. The vocals of McGrew, potently backed by Palmer’s strong tones, emulate the sound around them, crooning at certain moments and roaring with thick emotion in the songs eruptions of intensity. Easily revealing the unmistakable craft and skills of the band whilst pleasing ears, it is a great start to Til Karma Forgets backed as powerfully by the excellent Lock & Key. Grungier hues crowd the hard and melodic rock body of the song, all magnetic spicing adding to a great stock in grooves and rhythmic enticement around another catchy chorus. Whilst eclipsing its predecessor, a touch of southern goodness also comes out with the song overall reminding a touch of fellow US rockers Resin.

DMHart_RingMasterReviewPaint A Picture is a calmer emotive proposition next, vocals and melodies wrapping ears as feistier flames occasionally rise up around them whilst So What offers a grittier tempting of blues and hard rock which prowls ears with expressive guitar and vocals taking the lead. Its snarl only increases in its rousing chorus where the irritability, which seems to fuel bass and riffs throughout, adds more oil to the blaze.

Through the spicy grooving of Veto and the attractive intimidation of Wash Away, band and album keeps pleasure and appetite as keen as ever. The first of the pair is an especially unpredictable and magnetic affair as at ease aggressively growling at the senses as it is seducing them. Its successor evolves from a seriously coaxing lure from Aguiar into a predator with hungry riffs, and the still boldly rolling bait of beats, courting a less imposing vocal delivery. It is a great mix with the dark shadows and the song’s natural predation alone whipping up the passion as it steals best song honours on Til Karma Forgets.

Its title track comes next and it too marks a particularly memorable peak in the landscape of the album, carrying a slight Life Of Agony feel to particularly its more emotive and restrained moments. Despite its grouchiness and aggressive elements, there still feels like there is beast still trying to escape, and if there is any moan about the album it is that it does not fulfil the great and open potential to unleash this instinctive ferocity. Nevertheless, the track rocks like a disturbed bear before a milder but no less resourceful stroll with Slide Of Hand leaves ears thickly satisfied; guitars especially spicy and flavoursome within the encounter.

Another inviting strain of blues rock colours the swiftly infectious Beneath The Dirt next, where whiffs of Nirvana and Sick Puppies tempt thoughts. The track is yet another addictive episode in the album; a track, which like Til Karma Forgets as a whole, might not be venturing into unique pastures or setting the world on fire but without doubt leaves the listener gripped and hungry for more of its unbridled rock ‘n’ roll.

Through the scorching blaze of Masquerade and the emotively melodic Broken Ground, things continue to richly entice and firmly please; the first of the two another notable proposition, with Not For Nothing closing up the album in fine style too with its captivating, impassioned, and tempestuous balladry.

Though the album is missing that last spark or bite of intensity to really ignite the passions, it is not too hard to expect Dead Man’s Hand finding a host of new fans and plaudits with Till Karma Forgets, a release which offers honest rock ‘n’ roll with heart and quality.

Till Karma Forgets is released April 29th via Pavement Entertainment through most online stores.

https://www.facebook.com/DMHMUSIC

Pete RingMaster 29/04/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Dead Air Republic – With Extreme Prejudice

DAR_RingMasterReview

We all know how criminal it is when the most untalented of people get their fifteen minutes of fame and attention on TV shows and through money driven exploits of others whilst there are real and extremely talented people going majorly unrecognised or remain never known. Listening to With Extreme Prejudice, the new EP from Canadian rockers Dead Air Republic, it is really brought home. As adverts begin on UK TV announcing the next instalment of as many Britons as they can find with less talent than a blank piece of paper, something no doubt replicated on every continent, here is a tenaciously creative band breeding prime rock ‘n’ roll which is going unnoticed by most.

With Extreme Prejudice is the chance to buck the trend in some small way whilst treating ears to six tracks of multi-flavoured and impassioned rock and metal roars. Dead Air Republic was formed in 2008 by musicians returning from a long hiatus from making music with fire in their creative bellies and determined passion in their emotive energy. It is a fire and intent which inflamed their well-received self-titled debut album released in 2013 and now energises the Ottawa hailing quintet’s new encounter.

As individual as their sound is, it is also easy to pick out suggested inspirations as the EP involves ears and the imagination from its first breath. One band though does unexpectedly coming to the fore quite often and that is US band Resin, they another unrecognised talent sharing an ability to write and sculpt truly anthemic hooks and swinging grooves within emotionally tempestuous proposals. It is a pleasing hue emerging swiftly within opener Just Another Bullet. A great steely groove welcomes ears and entices an early appetite straight away, crisp rhythms and snarling riffs quickly adding their bait as the song evolves and creatively grumbles. Once the sandy tones of vocalist Marc Bourgon gets in on the act, the track is in full magnetic swing around the gripping collusion of Mike Derstroff’s beats and a highly infectious bassline from Ben Barnes. Grooves and melodic flames spring from the irresistible swagger in motion, guitarists David Maltais and Richard Bent adding their sonic enterprise and backing voices to an increasingly impressive incitement. The track is superb, rock ‘n’ roll to ignite the spirit, involve the body, and get the juices eagerly flowing.

DAR_Front_Art_RingMasterReviewExample 1 strides in next with its own web of grouchy riffs and sonic tempting, Bourgon again quickly impressing with his expressive delivery with the band backing him in potent vocal kind. As with its predecessor, there is something familiar to the song and sound yet mostly indefinable as it adds great spice to the fresh stomp lighting the senses. Certainly there is a touch of Tool to the track, but again a colour in the Dead Air Republic palette which becomes more dynamic and unpredictable with every inventive minute. Anthemic to the core, the song continues the already mighty presence of the release in ear and thought before making way for the darker drama of The Waves.

The third track emerges on an atmospheric air with portentous edges to its raw sonic lure before things settle into a melancholic stroll with that slightly unsettled electronic ambience still working away. Guitars and vocals proceed to share melodic and harmonic angst as rhythms add a firm but unassuming hand within the disturbed climate of a song. Becoming more buoyant and energetic over time, it is a another potent shade to the band’s invention which without quite making the same impact as the first pair on personal reactions still had ears and attention transfixed across its imaginative body.

The air is mightily stirred again as Good at Never rides in on a great nagging tide of riffs. Their immediate addictiveness only breeds greater persuasion as the song rises up into its own irritable and snarling grunge/punk contagion. Again hooks and grooves spew a virulent potency which alone has the listener fully involved with vocals and the raw anthemic heart of the song coaxing a physical involvement which carries on into the classic rock and metal blaze of Buzzkill. It is easy to hear the influences of bands like Maiden and Sabbath within the fiery and vigorous bellow of the song but again essences only employed with the distinct imagination and touch of the Canadians.

Giving the listener a great heavy metal fix and more, the EP turns to its heavier rock ‘n’ roll side for closing track Enough of This Mess. Still metallic strains are a spicy part but spinning a sound seemingly fostering a liking for bands such as Pearl Jam, Seether, and again Tool, the song creates its own unique and highly persuasive adventure.

The track is a fine end to an outstanding release which deserves the fullest of attention. Whether it sparks that success time will tell but rather than be numbed by something posing as entertainment whether on TV, Radio, or the like, we suggest taking a punt at turning off the switch and embracing real and exciting times going by the name of Dead Air Republic.

The With Extreme Prejudice EP is out now across most online stores.

http://www.deadairrepublic.com   https://www.facebook.com/Dead-Air-Republic-169929886356153

Pete RingMaster 30/03/3016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Resin – Embrace The Fall

Resin Online Promo Shot

Not to be confused with the excellent US alternative rock band of the same name (though they may not be going anymore), rockers Resin are stepping forward to find their place in UK rock with new album Embrace The Fall. Nine tracks of accomplished and adventurous grunge and alternative rock, the album is a strong and enjoyable piece of honest sounds and thoughtful invention though not flawless and at times not equipped with enough to have the passions firing on all cylinders compared to other bands and releases. The album nevertheless is overall an enjoyable slice of musicianship and imagination.

Formed in 2006 in Hinckley, Leicestershire, from the meeting of guitarists Mark ‘Chez’ Roseby and Sime Yarwood, Resin was soon a trio with the addition of vocalist James Botha, who had just relocated South Africa. After a search the line-up was completed by bassist Dave ‘Sev’ Seville and Mark Abbott who plays drums, cajon, and cello. 2010 formerly introduced the band to the public soon backed by a wealth of live shows and numerous festival appearances. Since then they have shared stages with bands such as Voodoo Six, Fearless Vampire, I am Giant, and Dr and the Medics, whilst honing their sound and craft. With inspirations worn proudly on its sleeve, the music of Resin has loud whispers of bands like Seether, A Perfect Circle, Alice In Chains and more to it, whilst coincidently also reminding of the other Resin mentioned previously and smaller US bands such as Damsel Down.

Listening to the album the qualities and skill of the members of Resin is undeniable each offering an intelligent and intriguing narrative Resin Cover Artworkwhich many bands could take note of. This makes each song a passage of emotive and personal discovery wrapped in sounds and imagination that strengthens the musical drama and lyrical potency. From the opener Entropy onwards you feel every song comes from the heart and every note and word is bred from reflective passion. The song opens up the release with an introduction of almost melancholic guitar paced by the excellent call of the cello from Abbott. There is warmth to the slowly emerging atmosphere being cast by the track, a heat accelerated by the joining vocal harmonies and tight guitar flames. Into its heart the track ambles nicely along with enterprise and infectiousness but also immediately shows the weak points of the album. Firstly as with the majority of the songs there is a too close a familiarity to others which influences have sprung from for the band, then there are the vocals of Botha. His voice and delivery is great it has to be confirmed but within the song and album, and primarily down to the third issue of the cloudy production, there is a missing snarl and depth to ignite the songs further. For all of that though the track makes a pleasing start to the album and ensures continued participation of its course.

The following pair of Carpe Diem and Fallen flounders a little in the wake of the opener but again do enough to keep attention firm, the first a Pearl Jam like blaze of sonic and melodic empathy with thoughts and the second an inventive breeze of strings alone caressing the delivery of Botha whilst adding their own emotional hues. Both though suffer from the production of the album which defuses their potency and impact. Their successor Fake does finds good company in the dulled sound, riffs and bass carving out a formidable presence veined by crisp beats, but equally the surface production tempers the success by blunting the cutting edge of vocals and guitars with a seeming lack of understanding. It is a shame as the song itself is full of promise.

After the fiery Instinct the album’s pinnacle opens up its declaration. Beskadig, meaning damage, injure, spoil, is sung in Afrikaans by Botha and in its acoustic delivery offers a charm and deep emotive presence that defies producer and mix to create a real gem of a song. Acoustic guitars and touches have a ready and welcome place on Embrace The Fall but nowhere else is it as impressive and thrilling as upon this enthralling song.

The highlight is followed by the Nirvana bred Clouds, a song which again has all the attributes to satisfy and leave the listener hungry for more but its close proximity to the Seattle band in sound ensures it fails a little flat especially when it opens up the burners. The raucous aspect of the song has no definition to its fire but with the smouldering croon which surrounds the expulsions offering strength and seductive temptation, the song is another showing the potential of the band and the wish with no disrespect to those recording the album that Resin finds understanding hands ahead on their releases.

Completed by the very decent and melodically vibrant Poison and an acoustic version of Clouds which fairs stronger than the full version to be honest, Embrace The Fall is a pleasing album but one which could have been much better, a lost opportunity in many ways. It does make for an encounter that marks the band as a rising proposition and one hopefully finding a studio able to exploit their certain talent.

www.facebook.com/resinonline

7/10

RingMaster 04/08/2013

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Ashes Of Tyranny – Shrine

Ashes Of Tyranny

It is certainly not an EP you will be shouting from the rooftops over but Shrine, the debut release from US melodic metallers Ashes Of Tyranny has despite its flaws enough to get your teeth and lingering interest into. First of all it has songs which constantly grab attention and even if many need more work to find their pinnacles they consistently leave a level of satisfaction which inspires returns. Equally there is a musicianship and invention which grabs attention and though the album does not offer anything new it offers a craft and strength to the core of its tracks which mark the band as one of strong promise.

Apparently the seeds of the Kansas based go back around a decade with vocalist/rhythm guitarist Jamison Brummel and lead guitarist Adam Caylor playing and writing together initially in the version of what was to become Ashes Of Tyranny called the Jamie and Adam show. Numerous changes and a few band names followed with bassist Dave Miller becoming another of the consistent members when joining around seven years ago alongside Caylor and Brummel. From at one point seeming the end of the band the trio emerged again as Ashes Of Tyranny, and listening to their first album one assumes at their most creative.

The release opens with Demolition Man, a single guitar caress lighting the ear before vocals and the rest of the band step coverforward with eagerness coated sinews. The riffs which drive the song are laid back but hold a carnivorous breath to their muscular presence whilst drums and bass prowl and push the senses with intimidation and strength. It is a strong and pleasing start but one which clearly suggests some issues which the rest of the release confirms.  The main two are the production and vocals, which are linked rather than singularly bringing problems. Brummel has a more than decent voice, his melodic tones and further into the EP grittier delivery right for the music but they also come over flat, without a spark to match the rigorous sounds. It is enough to deflate the impact of the song though not to keep them from attracting attention more often than not, and tied into and a result of the equally bland and uninspiring, DIY suggested production.

The following title track opens with gentle vocal harmonies across a great twang voiced guitar before launching into a cavalcade of rampant riffs and thumping rhythms, the chugging gait of the guitars almost thrash toned as they respectfully but incisively romp through the ear. Like the first, the song has a familiarity to it but also a hook and melodic poise which makes for a pleasing companion despite the mentioned continuing negative aspects, and easily has thoughts and emotions engaged if not seduced. The same can be said of the likes of The Rag Man, a track with a weak start, again more due to the production, but steels itself for an effective presence once into its full stride, and the intense Start the Flood. This song is one of the biggest highlights, the stirring mix of paces, vocals, and imaginative enterprise energising the already in place notion that Ashes of Tyranny has plenty inside and a future promise which is calling out from within the release for greater opportunities, certainly studio wise to show itself.

Shrine does get better as it progresses, songs such Satisfy bringing another notable moment to the release whilst the emotive For You stretches the variety of the songwriting again with its rich melodic provocation. Still the production is doing songs and vocals no favours but looking beyond these limitations and you sense there is a gem of a release waiting to escape. The closing pair of Suffer and Deathbringer satisfyingly completes what is an enterprising release. The best way is to look at Shrine as a demo, certainly production wise it falls into that raw basic status, but one bringing a suggestion of what could emerge. Vocally a snarl to the delivery might elevate things but to be honest you can only feel the problems would be ironed out in a good studio.

Shrine actually reminds of The Catalyst from US melodic metal band Resin. It too was a debut of definite appeal but was flat in its presence, but given the opportunity the band followed it with an album, Truth Be Told, which revisited the same songs and more and emerged as one of the very best undiscovered releases. We suggest Ashes Of Tyranny might do the very same thing ahead but for now their EP is well worth a look as you wait.

http://www.ashesoftyranny.com

6.5/10

RingMaster 04/07/2013

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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RESIN debut ‘Embrace The Fall’ released 5th August‏

Resin Online Promo Shot

ECLECTIC UK ALTERNATIVE CREW RESIN REBOOT DEBUT ALBUM THIS SUMMER!

Brit riff beasts ‘Resin’ stake their claim as rising alternative rock newcomers, armed with their new album ‘Embrace the Fall’, out in stores from Monday 5th August.
Channelling from acts such as Seether, A Perfect Circle and Alice In Chains, UK alt-rockers ‘Resin’ pack a formidable punch and are blessed with thoughtful song-writing abilities and a range of musicianship and diversity that is rarely seen amongst today’s current glut of metal/metalcore bands. Expansive, eclectic and brooding, Resin will rise to the surface this year.
Formed in Hinckley, Leicestershire, the early beginnings of Resin can be traced back to a happenstance meeting in a bar between Guitarists Mark ‘Chez’ Roseby and Sime Yarwood. Soon after the duo crossed paths with vocalist James Botha, who had just moved to the area from South Africa. The trio started to rattle out cover versions and hunted for a suitable drummer and bassist to fulfil their true potential. After a relentless search, the three piece finally uncovered Dave ‘Sev’ Seville on Bass and Mark Abbott who plays Drums, Cajon, and Cello. With a full line-up in tow, Resin were unleashed to the general public at the tail end of 2010. A constant bout of shows throughout the heart of England followed, as well as numerous successful festival appearances throughout 2010. And during the last twelve months, the band have stepped it up even further, snaring a series of shows supporting everyone from Voodoo Six, Fearless Vampire Killers and I am Giant, to Dr and the Medics.
At the end of 2012, Resin turned their attention towards recording, and the quintet marched into the recording studio to work on their debut album. After a series of intense recording sessions and another six months of writing and re-shaping, the band emerged from the studios with their debut record, ‘Embrace The Fall’, and it’s a triumphant record that is not bound by fashion. The beautifully bleak ‘Entropy’ opens proceedings and clearly lays out the band’s manifesto amidst grinding hard riffs balanced with subtle acoustic tendencies and capped with pertinent strains of nihilism. As the record moves on, the quintet tip their caps to Cornnell and Co with the Soundgarden-esque drive of ‘Fake’. The album then swings back with the acoustic laden “Beskadig’, which, sung in Afrikaans, is a homage to Botha’s native South African roots. The record continues its sweeping journey with the majestic and flowingly anthemic ‘Poison’. Now, armed with a growing fan-base and their debut album set for a re-launch, the scene is set for the band to kick on and break out to the nation.
Resin Cover Artwork