Regulus – Quadralith

If you are looking to be ensnared in some new and fresh groove wired trespasses, checking out the latest album from UK blues stoners Regulus would be one wise move. Quadralith is ten tracks of eagerly infectious heavy assed enterprise; a multi-flavoured affair from a quartet of highly accomplished musicians.

The successor to their 2014 debut album Smoke and following a self-titled third EP released a year later, Quadralith sees Sheffield hailing Regulus venture into a new plateau of sound and imagination. There is new energy and maturity to its presence and songwriting compared to its predecessors which in turn breeds a bolder tapestry of flavour and enterprise as well as new potential for future success.

The album opens up with Dominion and instantly winds a dirty enticing groove around ears before the robustly swinging rhythms of drummer Joe Milburn and bassist Martyn Lucas-Bewick spring their bait. As the guitars of Thomas Osborne and Luke Jennings add their melodic enterprise and hungry riffs, the latter’s vocals backed by the former’s to complete the potent lure, the track has attention firmly held. With a touch of early Desert Storm to its body, the song grows and blossoms by the minute and listen, laying the scene for things to come with its expanding net of flavours.

The following Last Chance To Die Young makes a more instant impact as the virulent beats of Milburn stirs the instincts from within a sonic cry. There is no escaping the organic draw of the grooves swiftly dancing on the appetite, riffs and rhythms courting that temptation with their own catchy tenacity. Vocals come with a greater snarl than in the first song, a cantankerousness which suits as both guitarists combine the imagination of their electric strings. Quickly igniting ears, the song builds on the strong invitation of its predecessor to really get things firing before Seven Tales Told gets funky and sultry with Lucas-Bewick’s magnetic bass leading the way. Merging blues rock essences with heavy stoner and that keen funkiness, the song flirts and imposes from within a raw contagious stroll.

The band takes the listener into darker depths with Bones, its heavy textures almost stalking the senses but again with a natural catchiness which only entices. Even as it slips into a blues croon, there is a swing to the rhythms which demands involvement as much as that coaxed by melodies and vocals, the potent addition of contrasting female tones catching the imagination. Its heavy, lurking prowess is followed by the country rock twanged Heart of Stone and the resourceful tapestry of The Dream Reaper. The first of the two easily pleases though lacks the vital sparks of many companions within Quadralith and is quickly outshone by the grooves woven, stoner heated roar of its successor. Taking best track honours, the song spins a sonic weave of temptation and enterprise which fascinates as it manipulates ears and body.

Poor Man’s Grave is no slouch in grabbing eager attention either; its instinctive swagger, if ebbing and flowing too much at times, a constant draw on which guitars and bass skilfully and magnetically conjure while Dutch is a slab of instrumental stoner rock ‘n roll which twists and turns with persistent boisterousness and ideation to continue the new high the album has found. Milburn is especially dexterous and compelling and just as potently backed by his band mates as the song masterfully dances upon the senses.

With a scent of XII Boar to its grouchy romp, Overcome keeps the passions burning, its lure devilish and infectiousness unwavering as it nurtures another pinnacle to Quadralith, success backed by the album’s title track as it brings the release to a fine close.

Across the album you sense a tempestuousness, an intimate angst but one used to drive and colour the creative adventure and energy of all four members of Regulus individually and as one. There are times when the album does not bite and sear as it might or personal tastes wish but it has a persistent potential which draws keen attention as much as the undoubted prowess and imagination of the band with pleasure the continuing result.

Quadralith is available now through Off Yer Rocka Recordings @ https://regulusband.bandcamp.com/

http://www.regulusband.com/    https://www.facebook.com/regulus.band    https://twitter.com/RegulusBand

Pete RingMaster 07/11/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Chaos Order/Werewolf Congress – Order of the Wolf Split 7”

digital cover

Bringing two explosive bands and four intensive riots, the Order of the Wolf Split 7” from Blasphemour Records is a rigorously imposing and invigorating slab of hardcore hostility. As drenched in potential as it is in quality, the release brings a pair of sizeable propositions in the shape of Chaos Order and Werewolf Congress into focus. Both seize their chance with relish and passion, the quartet of songs without going anywhere new for the hardcore scene certainly mark the pair of protagonists as two stirring elements within the genre.

Chaos-Order Chaos Order offer the first two slices of inventive anger, the band quartet from Memphis formed in 2011 by bassist Jared Filsinger. Its line-up is completed by vocalist Neal Bledsoe, guitarist Austin Russell, and drummer Sam Davidson, a foursome with a potent sound and unity which fires up attention and appetite with ease. The beginning of 2013 saw the release of their debut album Regulus, a well-received six track encounter which was followed by the just as keenly coveted sophomore full-length Vultures. Sticking to just vinyl and digital releases as with their second album and the split, Chaos Order make a striking start to the new release with Through Humanity’s Venom.

Heavy bruising rhythms and equally imposing bass riffs hit the ears first, swiftly joined by a richly acidic and venomous guitar temptation. There is certain carnivorous intent to the toxicity of Filsinger which instantly grips the imagination and passions, one just as quickly complemented by the continuing to intimidate weight of the drums and the caustic veining of guitar. It is a mesmeric start which explodes into a torrent of vocal spite, raging riffs, and similarly inflamed rhythmic antagonism. The vicious squalls of Bledsoe sears air and ears with a vitriolic passion which is as harsh and combative as the sounds striding voraciously around him, and just as compelling. A swaggering groove enters the mix as the song hits full stride, its gait almost mischievous which inspires the rest of the song to find a contagious bait and urgency to their suasion. It is a song which improves and becomes more virulent over listens from a first engagement which is memorable and impressive. Its partner in crime A Conscious Decision (Ritualistic Rebirth) is equally as threatening and incendiary, and arguably even more infectious with its hooks and sharp grooves. Rhythmically both Davidson and Filsinger impress unreservedly though the song is stolen by the captivating sonic designs conjured by Russell, his scything melodies and corrosive riffs a gripping tempting.

     Hailing from Orange County, California, Werewolf Congress takes influences from the like of Comeback Kid, Shai Halud, Every Time I wcDie, Defeater, and A Day to Remember into their similarly fiery sound. They cast a flavoursome muscular brew which is as caustic as it is melodically incisive, an essence of post hardcore spicing up a ferocious recipe which marked out their demo of last year. Their first rage here comes in the form of Second Chances, vocal intensity sparking the unleashing of punchy rhythms and scathing riffs which carry more than a twang of melody to their incitement. Vocalist Ryan Doria steers the angst gripped ship with style and raw expression whilst the rhythmic challenge of drummer William Galvin and bassist Jason Ruiz force menacing yet captivating vociferous shadows through which the vibrant charge of grazing riffs and citric sonic colour sculpted by Kevin Fifield and Dan Bieranowski flame. It is a dramatic and evocative fury which through a haunting ill-tempered and busy ambience flows into the closing tempest of The Dead Generation. Its furious intent crowds and pressures ears with a hellacious barrage of beats and less intimidating but just as abrasing riffs to leave thoughts and emotions pleasingly enlivened and intruded upon. The group vocals and melodic underbelly of the song is its greatest attribute though, an irrepressible lure to return to the song’s emotive depths and though its predecessor is a much more rounded temptation and makes a richer impact, both songs equally ensure Werewolf Congress is a band worthy of real attention.

     Order Of The Wolf is a great release from two bands casting an impressive introduction to our ears and probably a great many others. Chaos Order is just the better of the two provocations on the release with their unbridled hardcore veracity and ire, but both they and Werewolf Congress thrust themselves onto our map of the genre with immense ease.

Order of the Wolf (Split 7″) is available now @ http://blasphemourrecords.bandcamp.com digitally and on 7” vinyl with 50 yellow, 200 black, and 250 white coloured choices.

http://facebook.com/pages/Chaos-Order/500637426649863

http://facebook.com/werewolfcongress

8/10

RingMaster 27/05/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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