Killer Refrigerator – Refrigeration Plague

Whether you heeded the warning the first time around or indeed the second, US metallers Killer Refrigerator are back to stir us again to the threat of and war with lethal appliances through new album Refrigeration Plague. This time around the rebel rousing caution comes in an even more multi-textured and flavoured technical death thrash proposal which simply has you glancing over your shoulder at those electrical menaces lurking and waiting to strike.

Refrigeration Plague sees the alert incite and rabid creative antics of vocalist/guitarist Cody Coon (UnKured) once more linking up with bassist Countess “Lia” Blender and producer Luke “Java” Sackenheim from Bum-Ass Studios who also took care of mixing and mastering the Cincinnati outfit’s latest confrontation. The album follows 2014 debut full-length When Fridges Rule This World and the moment when arguably people really took notice, The Fridge and the Power it Holds EP of the following year. Confirming the suggestion Java made when sending over the album that Refrigeration Plague is a “tighter” proposition from the band than ever before, the release equally swiftly declares itself their most unpredictable and creatively psychotic without losing any intensity in its instinctive death/thrash breeding across fourteen ferocious encounters.

It opens up with Autoerotic Refrigeration and the dancing bass of Blender before things become far more frantic as Coon in guitar and voice vents his anxiety. Ravenously infectious and rapaciously nagging, the track is a minute and a half of fevered goodness setting up album and a greedy appetite for it with ease.

From there the listener is dragged into the darker heavier grime of Vacuum Doom (Rise of the Dirt Devil), every element as eagerly skittish in the first now revealing a slower, predatory side. Prowling with a sonic glint in its eye, the squealing guitar and vocal tones of Coon again entice; their trespass darkening as the track reveals the bolder tempest of its heart and technical menace of its presence. It ebbs and flows in intensity and creative mania before Night of the Living Bed slips in with its initial corrupted innocence surrounding the introductory tones of Adolf Green who subsequently sets the release ablaze with his sax. The track itself is a sweltering pyre of blackened death and thrash metal; the sonic niggle of the guitar a wiry web as loco as it is skilful; an insanity which eventually consumes the whole irresistible and increasingly psychotic encounter.

Dryers Eve follows with its own creative dementia; a technical delirium which invades and festers like a virus in the psyche. Again the senses enjoyably squirm under the threat of voice and guitar, instincts seduced by the roaming exploits of the bass whether the track saunters or launches itself at breakneck speed. As another threat is uncovered, Killer Refrigerator shows it has really grown in all aspects, next up C.H.U.D. confirming the fact with its virulent asylum of sound and craft. As most around it, it is a slither of a track but one more active and compelling than most multi-minute offerings.

The excellent funky antics of The Revenge of Frankenstove has hips and imagination swinging next, its cross-over mania a sinister and beguiling aberration while De Maytagus Dom Samsungus is a murky yet still contagious consumption of the senses. Both tracks have body and thoughts trapped and elated with their individual enmities, the first especially addictive before the visceral stomp of Gas Station Strangulation eclipses both; bloodlust in its nostrils and sinful misdoings in its soul.

A Salad Named Elizabeth follows with the guest introduction of Kitty [Pryde]; her flirtatiously unaware of danger tones the prelude to another kitchen nightmare of demonic proportions. Its rabidity in sound and intent is a tsunami of primal discontent and skilful manipulation which fascinates and ravishes the senses. Whether its death bred body quite lives up to the excellent opening is debateable but across four plus minutes, the song has attention and pleasure engrossed, a success Spaghetti and Meatballs similarly achieves with its evil rascality.

The excellently titled It’s Not Over Toilet’s Over springs its technical helter-skelter straight after, infesting ears with sonic and rhythmic paranoia while the murderous trial of Splatterfarm is rose coloured pleasure chewing on the senses.

Refrigeration Plague finishes off with firstly its title track, a malevolent infestation of sound and enterprise becoming more violently catchy by the minute and lastly Beyond Frigid Horizons, a kaleidoscopic fury of metal which almost does not know when to depart and is all the more fun for it.

Killer Refrigerator is not a band for everyone, especially if a sense of humour is left at home, but musically is one of the most enjoyably imaginative and voraciously bold extreme metal propositions out there. So be brave and dive into Refrigeration Plague you have nothing to lose and everything to gain as all those appliances leer at you waiting.

Refrigeration Plague is available now @ https://bumass.bandcamp.com/album/refrigeration-plague

https://www.facebook.com/KillerFridge/

Pete RingMaster 15/08/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Killer Refrigerator – The Fridge and the Power it Holds

LukeCoffee

We all know that technology is taking us over, but an on-going war between it and man, well easy to have doubts there. That was until this computer began deciding alone when it was going to connect to the internet and my iPod began mashing up songs randomly like a manic DJ to mess with the psyche. Of course if we had all listened to Killer Refrigerator previously battle plans would be drawn up and war cries in place. Thankfully they have returned with second release The Fridge and the Power it Holds at the right time, to awaken all and help turn the conflict back into the hands of humanity.

From Ohio, Killer Refrigerator is the side-project of Cody Coon, the guitarist/vocalist of death thrashers UnKured. Recognising man’s slavery to iPhones, toasters, blenders, every appliance imaginable; a dependency seeded from the aftermath of surviving an attempt to wipe out humanity a Millennia ago by the omniscient refrigerator Lord Freezus Christ ( You may laugh but think about the panic and fever which breaks out when you lose your phone), Cody and Luke “Java” Sackenheim decided to rebel against the appliances in 2014 and formed Killer Refrigerator, releasing debut album When Fridges Rule This World as their first assault and warning soon after.

Drawing on cult movies such as Microwave Massacre, Terrorvision, and Basket Case alongside their belief that appliances want to destroy the world, the band create a bedlam of sound and psychological ferocity from a vicious tangling of every extreme flavour that they can conjure, with much more besides. The Fridge and the Power it Holds EP provides seven tracks of almost indescribable but thoroughly thrilling confrontation, and sets up the battle front perfectly for upcoming second album Refrigeration Plague.

TFATPIT_OPTIMIZED     For all the theatre behind the intent and creativity of the band, Killer Refrigerator has a skilled and inventive sound which if you can ride its unpredictable tsunami, blows ears and imagination away, with the passions in quick succession. Straight away The Fridge and the Power It Holds is rich evidence as opener Terrorvision erupts into life with a web of sonic enterprise sculpted by guitars. A muscular and skittish rhythmic accompaniment adds to the initial coaxing before it all colludes with a dark bassline and a salacious mix of senses scorching vocals for a hellacious punk lined ferocity. Not reaching a minute and a half in length, it is a searing and striking start swiftly over shadowed by the excellent Slaystation. Predatory in its first breath, almost sizing up the listener as it dangles a discord kissed bassline and sonic lures from its rhythmic spine, the track is soon driving for the jugular on a tide of thrash bred riffery and ruinous vocal incitement. Squirming around this, acidic flavoured melodies and progressive nurtured endeavour fascinates, leading ears towards an unexpected Nintendo-core interlude before exploding again into the creative and rasping sonic fury the track started with. As mentioned previously, the band’s sound is an unrelenting and evolving maelstrom defying real description but with avant-garde and mathcore tendencies as prevalent as death and grind endeavours, it is a one compelling and intoxicating assault, deranged manna for the imagination.

Shower Thrashing Death toys with folk metal influences before turning into a carnivorous rampage of thrash/death seeded lavatorial rampage announcing the coming of the “toilet gods”. The bass simply seduces within the grimy scenery whilst vocals announce the demise of all with an outstanding mix of vocal deliveries which range from hardcore angst, grind squalls, to Patton-esque crooning. One of the pinnacles of the release it is matched by Killer Refrigerator VS Godzilla, the big fight off between two merciless goliaths. The track stomps with heavyweight rhythmic feet and fiery climactic endeavour, guitars scything across the battleground with sonic rapacity whilst vocal war cries breed a warped anthemic support.

The insidiously enthralling Slave To The Easy-Bake comes next, a scourge of sonic grooving and melodic flaming spun around a simple but gripping bassline. Of course this does not tell the whole deranged psychotic story of the song, every aspect from vocals to guitars, beats to imagination a distorted intrusion to fear or greedily devour.

The EP’s title track steps up next and after battering the listener senseless through pummelling beats, goes on a brutal and feverish march of searing grooves and scarring riffery. It holds back at one point to intensify its weight and drama, before regaining momentum but with an even more destructive and imposing trespass of the psyche. Deathcore, thrash, mathcore, and psyche rock are all in there running amok with the ideation and raw adventure of the band, the outcome another mouth-watering violation.

   The Fridge And The Power It Holds closes with bonus track To Hell With Cancer, one of the most grouchy siren-esque enticements you are likely to hear this year. Ravaging air and ears around a funk bred devilry, the track is a carnival for the mosh pit and a thrilling, uncompromising call to arms.

Lyrically and musically The Fridge And The Power It Holds is so much fun but equally a serious slam of extreme incitement which might have a theme bred from a truth stretched to cultish proportions, but delivers it as a unique and irresistible tempest. It is probably not going to work for all but if it does click an explosive thrilling time is guaranteed.

The Fridge And The Power It Holds EP is available as a name your price download from April 7th @ https://killerfridge.bandcamp.com/album/the-fridge-and-the-power-it-holds

As a backstory to their origins, the band recently released a 20 minute documentary featuring the hilarious exploits of Cody and his fellow fridge warrior Luke “Java” Sackenheim. The documentary can be viewed here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8m1zCBvL4EU

https://www.facebook.com/KillerFridge

RingMaster 07/04/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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