Popes Of Chillitown – Work Hard, Play Hard, See You In The Graveyard

Releases which have us throwing feet, hips, and bodies around in an uninhibited frenzy are just as boisterously devoured here as those provoking thoughts and imagination into the same eager exploits. Work Hard, Play Hard, See You In The Graveyard, the new album from UK outfit Popes Of Chillitown is one such example, an encounter which stirs up every aspect of the human spirit across thirteen slices of what for the moment we will simply call ska punk but is so much more. The band and release swiftly had the body bouncing, energies uncaged, and mind feeding off its insightful social and personal lyrical intimation. It is one of those unforgettable, deviously manipulative propositions which will surely set Popes Of Chillitown on the way to being a household name far beyond the ska and punk scene.

From London, Popes Of Chillitown has already bred and nurtured a fine reputation across two albums and a live presence which has had venues and bodies bouncing, as the album now, with lustful participation. 2013 saw the release of their pledge-funded debut album A Word To The Wise, a keenly embraced encounter eclipsed by its even more eagerly received successor To The Moon two years later. Since that first offering, the sextet has further lit up the live scene, from the Capital bursting across the UK and into Europe sharing stages with the likes of Reel Big Fish, The Selecter, The Skints, Imperial Leisure, [Spunge], Mouthwash, The Snare and many more along the way.

As Work Hard, Play Hard, See You In The Graveyard swiftly reveals, the band’s sound has an irresistibility which borders on the viral. It is a fusion of upbeat ska, punk, 2-tone, dub, drum & bass, reggae, indie with plenty more flavoursome spices working away in the mix; a rousing incitement which never flirts with the predictable and across the new album, easily the band’s finest moment yet, persistently has body, imagination, and spirit bounding.

Straight away as intrigue coaxes ears there is a sense of drama and mischief at play which swiftly sparks opener Prang into life, the track springing along with wilful exuberance. The guitar of Tom Penn winds around ears from an already persuasive hook spraying stroll while the rhythmic prowess of bassist Arvin Bancil and drummer Jack Ashley gets under the skin in no time. Matt Conner’s rousing vocals are just as effective, listener participation we found inevitable and can keen testify to. The track is superb, its twist into discord and off kilter imagination icing on the stomp.

The flames of trombonist Ieuan Williams and saxophonist Jon Pryce open up the following Get Off/Get On, lighting the way to another persuasive saunter ridden by the increasingly captivating vocals of Conner. There is a touch of [Spunge] meets King Prawn to the track, a tasty flavouring quickly ignited by the band’s own raucously individual enterprise.

Fair to say Work Hard, Play Hard, See You In The Graveyard already had its temptation racing through our veins in two songs but raised the temperature of its persuasion even more with next up Vexed. Cored by a hook which had ears and appetite dangling like a fish on a rod as well as a glorious teasing yet taunting grumble of a bassline, the track instantly took the album’s seductive clamour to another level. Brewing an addictive roar something akin to The Mighty Mighty Bosstones meets Capdown with the rawer edge of The Hostiles, the track simply and quickly had us enslaved and adding our less able attributes.

The equally outstanding No Manners In Ireland is next, the song a web of twists and turns littered with creative hooks and melodic lures which seduce like sonic sirens. Guitars and vocals dance on the swagger of the rhythms, their dark lined joy seared with the soulful flames of brass as the song evolves in form and imagination across four minutes plus of pure magnetism. Its glory is matched by that of the far briefer but just as riveting Graveyard. A dub infested mix of Skindred and again King Prawn, the slither of a track just ignited the senses before Upside Down got the body rocking and rolling with its almost salacious bounce and antics.

Across the fiery ska fuelled punk ‘n’ roll of The Last Elephant and the swinging holler of Mr. Piotr, physical reaction is inescapable as thoughts invest in more of the band’s lyrical inference, both tracks cauldrons of drama and physical manipulation so easy to devour while the likes of What A Guy and Inner Peace add yet more variety and adventure to the album’s beauty. The first erupts from a haunting melancholic sigh into another inescapable to resist canter, voice and hips soon embroiled in its creative romp before its companion smoulders seductively on the senses with its less boisterous but just as tenacious reflection. From guitars to rhythms, brass to voice, the song serenades and seduces; volatility in its heart adding greater depth to its inventive cry and increasingly rising temperature and intensity.

Take Control is punk rock blessed with the ear clipping tenacity of ska; a rousing trespass of an incitement under a sweltering climate of suggestion cast by sax and trombone. Unsurprisingly again indulgence in its swing is unavoidable, a lack of discipline thankfully the whole of Work Hard, Play Hard, See You In The Graveyard exploits.

The album closes up with firstly the melodically shimmering Lego Prisoners, a track resembling what you might imagine emerging from the essences of Ruts DC, The Skints, and a calm Random Hand being locked in together, and lastly Culpa and its reggae brewed saunter where grooves and beats overwhelm restraints even before voice and hooks sink their temptation into ears.

It all makes for one deliciously riveting and rousing adventure going by the name of Work Hard, Play Hard, See You In The Graveyard. Popes Of Chillitown has been firing up the ska and punk scene pretty much from their first days but are now ready to be spoken in the same breath as those bands which immediately come to mind as inspirations to the across the array of styles the Londoners skilfully embrace and employ in their own adventure. After Work Hard, Play Hard, See You In The Graveyard they might just be the first name to lips.

Work Hard, Play Hard, See You In The Graveyard is out now on 12inch vinyl, CD and Digital Download @ https://popesofchillitown.bandcamp.com/album/work-hard-play-hard-see-you-in-the-graveyard

 

Upcoming Popes Of Chillitown tour dates:

MAY 27 – BOURNEMOUTH Cursus Festival

JUN 02 – NOTTINGHAM The Maze

JUN 09 – CHEPSTOW Balter Festival

AUG 04 – BLACKPOOL Rebellion Festival

AUG 09 – NEWCASTLE Trillians*

AUG 10 – GLASGOW Audio*

AUG 11 – LONDON Underworld*

AUG 12 – WINCHESTER Boomtown Fair

*w/ Fishbone

http://www.popesofchillitown.com/   https://www.facebook.com/PopesOfChillitown    https://twitter.com/popesofctown

Pete RingMaster 18/05/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

The Hostiles – Last Call

The Hostiles Promo Shot_RingMasterReview

Giving the most glorious workout to swinging hips and inexhaustible feet, as well as instinctive pleasure, Scottish Ska-punks The Hostiles recently released new album Last Call. It offers thirteen tracks of melody thick, brass clad, and feverishly delivered punk ‘n’ roll as raw and snarling as they are inescapably irresistible.

Formed in 2001, The Hostiles began with brothers Josh (guitar/vocals), and Chris Barron (bass/vocals). Growing up in the US, the pair was seduced by the sounds of west coast ska and the likes of Reel Big Fish, NOFX, and No Doubt. In their teens, the pair moved to Scotland, soon discovering the rawer energy and sounds of bands such as Capdown, Lightyear, and King Prawn. Linking up with Callum Douglas (drums) and Steve Bruce (trombone), The Hostiles was soon rousing the local live scene with in time Joe Stainke (trombone) completing the current line-up. Quickly renowned for their energetic live performances, the band’s reputation swiftly grew and spread, helped in turn by the release of debut album Always Looking Forward in 2009. Proceeding to share stages with bands such as Reel Big Fish, Less Than Jake, Zebrahead, The Mad Caddies, Strike Anywhere, and many more, The Hostiles followed up their attention luring first album with the Late Nights… And Early Hours EP in 2012 and the single/video For A Good Time Call 07946058526 two years later.

Now it is Last Call drawing attention and from its first minute arousing body and spirit. From the opening intro, the album leaps upon the listener with opener Ed Knows. An attitude laden bassline stalks the initial vocal draw, both leading into a fiery lure of guitar and rapier like swings from Douglas. Quickly as the trombones share their melodic flames, the track is a contagious blaze of infectious sound with a funk infused swing and punk ingrained fuel to its roar. There is little time before the listener is adding their full contribution in voice and movement, a success matched in the following Inconsiderate. A lighter stomp of a song with Hammond flavoured keys courting its instantly open catchiness, it carries a familiar air which only adds to its thrilling appeal.

The Hostiles Cover Artwork_RingMasterReviewThe band’s inspirations are never far from the surface at times, the second song evidence but spices used to shape songs which undoubtedly have The Hostiles character, as shown again in the prowling You Liar. Swaggering alone with mischief in its creative glands, the song is confrontational but an epidemic  of big hooks and intimidating attitude, and quite superb. It reveals the great mix of pop honed and punk rock driven sounds which have sparked the band’s passions over time, all woven into another distinctive proposition before things calm a touch with I’ll Assume. It is just a touch too as the song soon shows its teeth and melodic prowess in a King Prawn like canter with exotic melodies and moody basslines entangling the ever potent vocals and swathes of mariachi hued trombone.

Both Night Out with its dirty tone and ridiculously infectious enterprise and its successor Wish You All The Best has body and soul leaping. The first is ska punk at its most creatively virulent and indeed addictive while the second is a boisterous romp shaped with smart hooks and persuasive melodies as well cast in imaginative drama coloured by rock guitar and theatrical brass.

The album continues to keep the listener on their toes with a broad grin on their face as the punk brawl of Spend My Life, the gentler sway of So, I Wonder, and the blazing exploits of Late Nights come, go, and leave ears and appetite aroused. The third of the trio especially adds another pinnacle to Last Call, all offering undeniable reasons to embrace The Hostiles adventure, with To Err Is Human providing another major highlight. The band’s latest single, it also has a hint of Mariachi El Bronx to its melodic and trombone nurtured side, a great flavour mixing with heavier punk rock attitude.

Released From Captivity uncages another addictive tempting, guitars and bass alone creating a web of hooks which snare body and heart with ease. Familiar essences come to the surface of the song but flavours simply used to shade its own individual devilment before the closing pair of encounters starting with Nobody Else. The song does not make the same impact as others within Last Call, yet has mutual participation with ease so does little wrong before the album’s title track brings it all to a cantankerous close. It is a ska infested hardcore brawl of a proposal, vocals a throated scraping challenge as brass bring a tonic to the imposingly grouchy touch of guitar and rhythms.

It makes for an unexpected and pleasing end to a release which sees ears and fingers itching to go again within seconds of its close. There are a few rather special ska flavoured punksters around right now and as proven by Last Call, The Hostiles stand by their side.

Last Call is out now on Bubble Tea Records @ http://thehostiles.bandcamp.com/

https://www.facebook.com/thehostiles/   http://www.thehostiles.co.uk/

Pete RingMaster 05/08/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Daylight – One More Fight

Daylight_RingMaster Review

Though released back home a year ago, One More Fight gets its own UK release this month on the eve of Spanish pop punks Daylight’s UK tour. Such its storming collection of contagious anthems it would be no surprise if a great many of British genre fans have already a copy of their highly persuasive release in their collection, but if not, the time has come to grab some, not ground-breaking but inescapably rousing, pop punk either for the speakers or live.

Formed in 2004, the Barcelona hailing quartet has over the years toured through Europe, Russia, China, and Japan, as well as successfully play Groezrock, headline The X-Games, and shared stages with the likes of MXPX, McFly, Reel Big Fish, Zebrahead, and The Ataris. Their imminent tour around the UK is their first though and as mentioned marked by the release of One More Fight. Produced and mixed by Andrea Fusini (Upon This Downing, Ms. White, Ready Set Fall) alongside Andrew Wade (A Day to Remember, The Ghost Inside, A Loss for Words), the album instantly leaps on ears igniting body and appetite with boisterous ease.

Opener Anthem Of The Broken lives up to the first part of its title immediately, vocal harmonies and roars within tenacious riffs igniting ears as punchy rhythms give them a healthy examination. There is nothing flawed musically in the song either, the heavy wiry tone of Olek Burek’s bass irresistible whilst the guitars of Wojtek Burek and Albert Domenech almost dance on the senses as they cast magnetic aggression and fiery enterprise. The combined vocal persuasion of the Burek brothers is just as impressive too, the track strolling with lively attitude and physical prowess into waiting imagination and enjoyment.

cover_RingMaster Review     The following Kickbacks is a touch more reserved in its assault but still a thumping encounter built on the voracious swipes of Victor Vera’s muscle on drum skin. With the body soon bouncing as eagerly as the song’s, rich satisfaction is alive without a care for the kind of general familiarity which seems to come with pop punk releases as a whole. As the track shows, The Daylight touch and impassioned energy brings an ingredient which makes already strong songwriting standout from the masses too, that and an ability to create instinctive hooks and melodies which seem to know what tastes like and want.

The forcibly catchy Consequences takes over with its own easy going and rigorously infectious stomp next, guitars and bass a busy maelstrom of enterprise pierced by again heftily swung beats and wrapped in the captivation of the vocals. It also continues the imagination which brings resourceful and unexpected twists in certain moments, an invention even more open in the sonic shimmer of Now Or Never. The song entwines elegant melodies around expected catchiness, vocals leading the gentle but anthemic roar as in its lining, a great glimpse of discord and shadowed contrast comes and goes to further entice.

We Are Strong has a Jimmy Eat World spicing to its tempting, the electro winking of its predecessor again pulsating in the enthused hug of the song. With a New Found Glory scented air brewing up and subsequently soaking the heart of the track, its more than agreeable presence swaps with the equally alluring loud croon of Another Day. Though neither proposition incites the same energy of responses as those before them, each leaves ears with a smile and pleasure strong before being eclipsed by the Good Charlotte meets Weezer meets McFly like Best Days of Our Lifes. There is a touch of Green Day to the song too, and a wealth of imagination from Hammond-esque keys to rap shaped vocals which ensure it is a proposition which, without major originality on show, offers a fresh and bewitching weave of eclectic contagion.

The song should be the closing track to One More Fight, its feel good factor the perfect way to end the album. In fact it could even be as the track line-up is marked two ways on the promo sent to us and on the band’s Bandcamp different again, so do not take our line-up as read, just that it is true to the quality of the great release.

The thrilling Revolution is next in our schedule, from a grouchy bassline and confrontational incitement from drums and guitars, the song challenges and enlists full involvement in its aggressive anthem of a roar. Green Day again springs to mind as the track rivals the starters for best track honours, its defiance in word and emotion the griping fuel to the sound igniting fresh greed.

The final two songs on the album keep things rolling along with joyful energy, End Of The World releasing its Living End spiced rock ‘n’ roll first leaving Crazy Youth Gone Wild to bring a thoroughly enjoyable romp of a release to a rewarding close. As suggested One More Fight is not Daylight breaking down walls or reshaping the pop punk scene but it is them proving they are one of the genre’s most potent if for many still secret pleasures.

Britain time to get on those feet and romp…

One More Fight is released in the UK on 23rd October.

Daylight’s UK tour dates:

27 Oct – London, Boston Music Room

28 Oct – Edinburgh, Opium

29 Oct – Ayr, West Of The Moon

30 Oct – Dundee, Drouthys

31 Oct – Glasgow, Nice And Sleazy

01 Nov – Sheffield, The Hop

02 Nov – Derby, The Vic Inn

03 Nov – Frome, Cheese And Grain

04 Nov – Swansea, The Scene

http://www.daylightband.com http://www.facebook.com/daylight http://www.twitter.com/daylightband

Pete RingMaster 23/10/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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New Town Kings – Pack Up Bye Bye

newtownkings-packup_RingMaster Review

New Town Kings has more than earned the reputation as one of the UK’s most exciting new reggae propositions, through their irresistible live presence and just as potently last year’s outstanding Pull Up & Rewind EP, which drew as much rich attention upon its reboot earlier this year. Now the Essex based nine-piece are poised to grip national awareness and energy with new single Pack Up Bye Bye, a contagion of Jamaican reggae/ska pop which if there is such a thing as the sound of summer, has it ingrained in every vibrant pore.

Pack Up...cover_RingMaster Review   Formed in 2007, New Town Kings has lit up the UK and European live scene with their inventive and tenacious sound. They have been declared Britain’s greatest traditional Ska band, a claim backed up by shows with the likes of Reel Big Fish, The Slackers, The Skints, Congo Natty, and just recently Neville Staple. Acclaimed festival appearances have also only reinforced and increased the Colchester band’s stature over the years whilst the Pull Up & Rewind EP, as suggested earlier, set out a new statement of creative intent and success for the band. It was a declaration and ascent in sound which is now poised to whip up a new surge of fresh and broader appetites through Pack Up Bye Bye.

From its first rhythmic click the song flirts with ears and imagination, quickly taking them on a warm dance of catchy hooks, warm bubbly keys, and a vocal enticing from Dabs Bonner which just lures closer attention. Swinging with a reggae groove lined with choppy ska clips of guitar, the track just commands involvement from the listener, especially when unveiling its anthem of a chorus. The song is pure addiction from start to finish but that crescendo of virulence is simply irresistible, a sultry temptress offering the richest seduction within the lively simmer fuelling the rocksteady sculpted alchemy.

With a summer ahead of exciting festival and show endeavours, Pack Up Bye Bye with its open look at the angst of relationships, is the strongest, most vocal reason why New Town Kings should be on the agenda for all event goers and your new daily soundtrack.

Pack Up Bye Bye is available now as a free download @ https://soundcloud.com/newtownkings/pack-up-bye-bye-1

Upcoming New Town Kings live dates…

August 1st – Brightlingsea Music Fest (UK)

August 6-9th – Rebellion, Blackpool (UK)

August 13-16th – Boomtown, Winchester (UK)

September 11th – Colchester Arts Centre (UK)

September 12th – Norwich Arts Centre (UK)

September 17th – Cluney2, Newcastle (UK)

September 19th – Borderline, London (UK)

September 22th – Lille (F) – Venue tbc

September 23rd – Berlin (GER) – SO36 (w/ THE SLACKERS)

September 24th Hamburg (GER) – Hafenklang (w/ THE SLACKERS)

September 25th Cologne (GER) – Underground (w/ THE SLACKERS)

October 30th – Skalloween, New Cross Inn, London (UK)

October 31st – Aalst, (Belgium)

https://www.facebook.com/newtownkings      http://www.newtownkings.com/

RingMaster 24/07/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

 

The Meow Meows – Friends On Benefits EP

meow meows_RingMaster Review

Starting with one of the most flirtatious embraces likely to be heard this summer and proceeding to cast another two slices of pure aural suggestiveness, the Friends On Benefits EP from UK ska rockers The Meow Meows, puts the irresistible into virulent temptation. Three songs of the Brighton nine-piece’s increasingly renown fusion of eighties ska and even older garage rock with a more than healthy punk bred diversity, the EP is one inescapable incitement for body and imagination.

The Meow Meows emerged on the Brighton live scene around 2005, the collective rising from the ashes of several bands from the south-coast ska-punk scene. It was not long before their reputation and fan-base flourished through their energetic live presence and a sound which bewitched feet and ears with infectious ease. The years since forming have seen the band share stages with the likes of The Temptations, The Skatalites, Reel Big Fish, The Beat, The Selecter, King Blues, The Skints, and Hollie Cook amongst many, and the release of a couple of well-received albums. Debut full-length Songs From The Fridge stirred up plenty of attention but it is probably fair to say that its 2013 successor Somehow We Met, helped push the band into new spotlights. Friends On Benefits, like that album, was recorded with producer and reggae legend Prince Fatty and quickly confirms The Meow Meows as one of the UK’s truly instinctive creators of contagion.

cover_RingMaster Review     The seeds to the Friends On Benefits EP arose from the band being one of ten artists commissioned by Fuel Theatre for their Music to Move to project, its aim to create works from bands in union with choreographers which would inspire the general public to dance. Equipped with another pair of toe inciting swingers, also loaded with humour laced and snarling social /political themed lyrics, band and release swiftly set hips to work with the EP’s title track. Brass and rhythms instantly collude in a gentle but forceful sway as guitars within another breath add their sultry hues to the melodic smile of the keys. Alternating their individual vocals over the verses, both Danny and Hanna spark further hunger, the two ladies temptress like within the rousing swagger and shuffle of the song. With a whiff of The Bodysnatchers to it, as well as The Beaubowbelles and The Jellycats, the track is a spellbinding and lingering bounce of a persuasion swiftly matched by its successor.

London Road has an even chirpier gait to its stroll, brass and beats quick-footed protagonists within the key’s smouldering caress. As in the first, the music embraces the vocals with a more restrained energy yet it never loses the infectious lure ripe in its presence and enterprise, in fact springing new melodic flames with every twist of its irresistible tempting. As it proceeds with a distinctive and magnetically quaint Hammond organ tone seducing, the song gently and seamlessly evolves to subsequently emerge with a Martha and the Muffins like new wave colouring which seems to feed and accelerate the excellent ska fuelled and increasingly agitated climax of the outstanding song.

The EP is completed by Tits & Hatred, a more old school punk endeavour which echoes with essences of bands like Au Pairs and The Raincoats within its severely tantalising and eagerly varied character. The track is again primarily brewed from the band’s seventies inspired 2-tone/ska punk inspirations which of course are in turn dosed up with the band’s compelling touch and imagination; the result being one mouth-watering end to one thrilling proposition.

The Meow Meows create ska punk ’n’ roll to lose your inhibitions and body to, with Friends On Benefits the spark to lustful endeavour.

The Friends On Benefits EP is available on vinyl from July 13th via Jump Up! Records and digitally @ https://itunes.apple.com/gb/album/friends-on-benefits-single/id997669416 or http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B00Y6EIGXO?keywords=Friends%20On%20Benefits%20EP&qid=1436784848&ref_=sr_1_1&sr=8-1

http://www.themeowmeows.com/     https://www.facebook.com/themeowmeows

RingMaster 13/07/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

 

 

The Cardboard Crowns – Global Citizen

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There are treats, there are triumphs, and there is undiluted devilry, and in the case of Global Citizen there are irrepressible riots of combining all three. The album comes from Canadian rockers The Cardboard Crowns, a band creating a mischievous maelstrom of adventure from the raw tenacity of punk, the majestic swagger of ska, and the sultry charm of reggae, not forgetting a very healthy dose of pop. Formed in 2009, the band has been a relative secret outside of their home borders but it is easy with a little bit of luck to see that changing thanks to the thrilling stomp of Global Citizen.

Hailing from Aylmer, Quebec and now Ottawa based, The Cardboard Crowns’ seeds begin in high school with Joel “Rat” Kuehn (vocals/guitar), David “Tokyo” Speirs (drums), and Matthew “Googles” Megannety (lead guitar), the first two already strong friends before meeting the third in that place of learning. They formed a trio of garage bands, The Madd Fizz, The Fog Pilots, and The Rocket-Propelled Space-Fish along the way of their musical journey, potent steps which have laid the seeds for what they offer today. It was with the link-up with bassist Franks “Mystery Skunk” Cuningham around five years ago though that the spark for Cardboard Crowns was ignited, and from that point it has been full steam ahead for the band and its insatiable revelry.

It does not take long to realise the eclectic and inventive expanse of sound and imagination which fuels the album, the first three songs enough to reveal the wonderfully unpredictable and infectious variety at play. Opener Pulling Teeth sets things off, its opening and immediately engaging acoustic caress and alluring vocals folk like with a summery breeze to their relaxed temptation. It is just the gentle coaxing to bigger and bolder things though, energy building towards a rampant stride of punchy rhythms and tangy grooves driven by equally tenacious vocals from Kuehn and band. The song reminds of British band Knots, its emerging instinctive and anthemic stomp inescapable flirtation for feet and passions. The track is exceptional, fiery blazes of raw guitar only adding to the drama and power of the brilliant encounter.

Its might is soon backed up as the album’s title track and the following Hats Off unveil their distinctive and diverse designs. The first of the two strolls in on a smiling stride of reggae seeded Album Cover (Small)riffs and a rhythmic swing which soon has body and imagination swaying in unison. There is a just as vibrant pop punk enterprise to the song, bands like Smashmouth and Reel Big Fish coming to mind as it swerves and entices with vivacious melodies and bubbly chords, though the track ultimately evolves a unique identity. It’s smiling gait and devilry is matched by its successor, ska bred stabs igniting ears within seconds as a punkish air sets in motion another contagious persuasion. The song though not flawless, the band shouts not working for personal tastes, manages to smoulder and bounce simultaneously, like an exotic temptress with seductive curves and voracious appetite.

Sun And The Stars winds around ears next; its tone equipped with a country twang aligned to smoky keys and Southern kissed sonic flaming. Again sound and vocals provides a seriously catchy and excitable devilry and even though it lacks the final persuasive spark which ignited its predecessors, the track leaves appetite hungrier and satisfaction fuller. It is a level of pleasure straight away thrust to new levels by the outstanding Shut My Mouth, another incendiary romp of piercing hooks and devilish enterprise allowing pop punk and ska to collude in a virulently infectious rascality which might even have the power to bring the feet of the lifeless to dance.

The thrilling adventures and diversity just keeps coming as Olé brings its Latin ska tempting to tease and excite ears and imagination. The cosmopolitan shuffle is a festival of swarthy rhythms and rosy faced melodies, a lively footed canter merging the rebellious charm of Mano Negra with the seductive zeal of Les Négresses Vertes. At the song’s end its gentle hug allows a breather to be taken before the rugged brilliance of Your Son has body and emotions leaping again. Adding new causticity to vocals and chords, the track switches its roars and croons for the album’s most ferociously captivating offering. Pop and punk collide, virtually brawling throughout as they breed some of the sharpest appetising hooks and rhythmic provocation you are likely to devour this year.

The release is brought to an end by firstly the seriously magnetic Bounty On His Head, a part punk and part folk romp, and lastly through the carnival-esque tempting of Generations. The final song is a mix of gypsy punk and folk vaudeville, like a mix of Tankus The Henge and Flogging Molly, and a sensational end to one scintillating tapestry of sound and invention.

It is hard to imagine The Cardboard Crowns remaining a relatively unknown proposition once Global Citizen works its alchemy around the world. The album offering music just as it should be; imaginative, passionate, and pure fun.

Global Citizen is available now @ http://thecardboardcrowns.bandcamp.com/

http://www.thecardboardcrowns.com/

RingMaster 04/12/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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New Town Kings – Pull Up & Rewind EP

NewTownKings colour

Released earlier this year, UK band New Town Kings give their Pull Up & Rewind EP a reboot on December 8th, a second outing for the thrilling encounter sure to mop up the appetites of those missing its first coming. Consisting of four tracks combining traditional Jamaican reggae and ska adventure with fresh invention and enterprise, the release shows exactly why the Colchester nine-piece band are no strangers to rich attention and acclaim.

Formed in 2007, New Town Kings has become an eagerly devoured live presence, playing shows across the UK and Europe on their way to being acclaimed as Britain’s greatest traditional Ska band. Shows with the likes of Reel Big Fish, The Slackers, The Skints, Congo Natty and numerous more, as well as this past summer successful appearances at Boomtown Fair and Rebellion have only seen the band’s reputation and stature grow whilst their two albums, Sounds Of The New Town in 2008 and M.O.J.O 4 years later, have potently reinforced their captivating presence and adventure. The first release featuring new vocalist Dabs Bonner, Pull Up & Rewind persistently smooches with the imagination musically whilst thoughts are engaged with more politically aware lyrics from the band, and feet well they have no escape from the EP’s flirtation of rich reggae spicing.

The release opens with Changes, a song which as soon as its first flame of brass crosses ears has full and keen attention. Jabbing prods of guitar from Stuart McClung and John Maynard soon add their potent bait whilst the throaty bass lure of Tommy Marchant makes an instant temptation as the song strolls with vibrant energy. The warm tones of Bonner ensure that though his words challenge with provocative lyrical bait they are a firm but gentle persuasion rather than a demand which suits the sultry climate of the track perfectly. Erupting further with the heated craft of Rory Sadler’s sax and Rob Landen’s trumpet, the song is an irresistible anthem with the power to ignite thoughts and inflame passions.

As impressive as it is though, Luna Rosa soon adds a bit of shade to its success, the second track sheer melodic and infectious beauty. Rising on a brass coaxing which in turn sparks a jumpy Digital-Artstride of spiky riffs and another delicious bassline, the song is soon riding the passions with an impossibly contagious chorus amidst a pungent waltz of colourful Hammond sculpted temptation from Scott James. It is an inescapable enticement aligning to slightly more aggressive vocals from Bonner and the wonderfully skittish yet controlled beats of drummer Sky Roskell-Cheale and the percussive enterprise of Rob Band which themselves simply captivate. The song is a party in the ears and emotions, a sultry temptation with Latin hues and addictive intent.

Things mellow with Grabbed My Hand, a smouldering reggae bred kiss on the senses with enough lively vivacity to it making a just as potent persuasion on swaying bodies before it. Bonner again simply impresses, his addition to the band opening up new textures to explore with as here robustly flavoured and inventive sounds. The dark tones of bass contrast perfectly with the summer tones of the keys and harmonies whilst between them, jangling guitar hooks and thick soulful brass calls only intensify the unveiling emotion clad lyrical narrative.

Closing track Cool The Pressure Down is another with little trouble stirring up lustful movements in the listener, Marchant’s bass Barry White to the warm Four Tops seducing of guitars, keys, and multi-flavoured vocals. It is a festival of humid summer sounds and as its predecessor, though not matching the brilliance of the opening pair, leaves ears wholly enraptured with its ska fuelled temptation.

New Town Kings is one of those feasts greed was invented for with Pull Up & Rewind making a very tasty snack as we await the next full plate of the band’s distinctive and irrepressible invention.

Pull Up & Rewind is available from December 8th

http://www.newtownkings.com/

RingMaster 04/12/2014

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