TREP – Lucian EP

Since forming two years back, Welsh metallers TREP has earned potent support and reputation across South Wales. Now they are hoping to spark similar reactions further afield with the release of their debut EP, Lucian and with it offering up five slices of imaginatively woven alt-metal it is not too hard to expect decent success in the intent and hopes of the Cardiff based trio.

Lucian revels in the band’s mix of classic and modern alternative metal, its character nurtured in melodic dexterity and rousing choruses gifted with individual craft. Freshly breathed and individually natured it also embraces inspirational hues of bands such as Muse, QOTSA, Mastodon, Tool and Breaking Benjamin; the first pair openly spicing the EP and its song’s inventive flavouring.

The first of two EPs which together unveil an elaborate story with themes looking at “dystopia, a dictatorship, and the use of technology for a chance at a better world…but at what cost?” the swiftly fascinating Lucian opens up with the single Silence the Crows. Immediately a guitar cast wire entangles ears, winding around their flesh with intimation and dexterity as rhythms gather their bait and in turn the quickly captivating vocal blend of guitarist Rhys Evans and the supporting tones of bassist Sam Green and drummer Max Hill steps forward. There is a flirtatious touch and lure to the song from its first breath but equally a snarl in its melodic almost deceitful smile, an edge which is as much threat as it is sonic enterprise as Evans guitar reveals greater flavouring and invention by the passage.

It is easy to hear why the song made a more than decent lure to attention when released as a demo in 2017, and is now flourishing in the band’s growth in sound and the surroundings of the EP; its rich presence matched by that of next up The Time You Have Lost. There is something familiar to the track which only adds to its swift lure and bold enterprise whilst welcoming an array of melodic and sonic hues to its creative breast. Arguably even more virulent than its infectious predecessor, the song equally has its own volatile instincts which just add to its drama and increasingly captivation.

The EP’s best track is followed by the equally enticing It’ll Never Happen. Rising on a calmer breeze of sound and attack, it strolls with inescapable catchiness but all the while is brewing up the next twist and turn which then breeds another moment of fluid but unpredictable adventure. Maybe more of a grower than its predecessor despite its swift persuasion, the song rises to set down one more highlight of Lucian before another potent bloom in Architect spins its own dextrous and resourceful web around ears. Classic metal spicing accompanies its rise, Avenged Sevenfold coming to mind a little as the song broadens its tempting but also there is something to it which carries an eighties rock/new wave flavouring. It is an essence which teased within earlier songs but is a rich scent here even if a direct comparison still evades our ears.

The outstanding Better World brings the release to a close, the song an alluring mix of melodic metal and stoner infused rock ‘n’ roll with rich grooves and versatile rhythms offering to references to the likes of Mastodon and Red Fang. Again the great vocal mix of the trio is a magnet within the captivation of the sounds set on casting their own adventure and eager temptation.

Impressive from the off and only increasing its stature and potency over time and listens, Lucian is a striking and rousing first proper introduction to TREP; so much so we are already greedily anticipating the next chapter in the sonic story.

The Lucien EP is out now; available @ https://trepmerch.bigcartel.com

https://www.facebook.com/TrepBand/

 Pete RingMaster 21/03/2019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Ringing the changes: 21 Taras Interview

21 Taras is a rock band from Littleton, Colorado which having sparked keen attention through previous releases has ventured into new directions in sound and adventure. This evolution is at the heart of their new album, Change. Wanting to now more we recently chatted with the band learning…

Can you first introduce the band and give us some background to how it all started?

4 out of the 5 of us went to school together. James and Alec shared some classes and started the band, then shortly after recruited Jimmy. James went up to the first person he saw; who just so happened to be Jimmy; and asked if he played bass. Austin was later introduced to the band in a similar fashion. I (Julian) moved to Colorado in 2014 and met James online on some band finder website. They sent me some songs to throw some vocals on and we played our first show just a couple weeks later.

Have you been or are involved in other bands? If so has that had any impact on what you are doing now, in maybe inspiring a change of style or direction?

We all have been playing music for a while now in one way or another, but this is pretty much our first real band. I had a project back when I lived in Alaska with one of my good friends Rio, but it was just the two of us. James and Alec had gone through a few other line-ups under a different band name, but as of late 2014 the line-up has been set and that is when the final name change to 21 Taras ensued.

What inspired the band name?

It comes from Buddhism. They have 21 different forms of Tara, all based around self-empowerment and self-enlightenment. The name stands for how we try to continually grow as not only musicians, but also as people through our music and songwriting.

Was there any specific idea behind the forming of the band and also in what you wanted it and your sound to offer?

We just want to continue evolving. Just about four years in, and we have changed so much already. I don’t think we ever try to plan for where things go; it just sort of happens. We’ve tried to dictate things before but that is a good way for things to end up forced.

Do the same things still drive the band from its first steps or have they evolved over time?

I think now having a full music studio at our disposal has greatly changed everything. It allows us to be more creative as we are working on our time. Our mentor/producer Jim Boyd deserves a lot of credit for our last record. With him opening up his studio to us, it really led to the growth of the songs and the overall freedom the album possesses.

Since your early days, how would you say your sound has evolved?

We started out with more of a hard rock and grunge presence, and it has evolved rather quickly to more of a 60s and 70s influenced sound. Things are getting more and more psychedelic influenced as we speak.

Has it been more of an organic movement of sound or more deliberately wanting to try new things?

A bit of both, I think everyone was starting to get a little burnt out and I think we just had a lack of direction. We were kind of floating in one area with no real progression occurring. We all had a big free flowing discussion back in February with the main message being about trying new things. Just taking more outside influences and putting them to use. It really has led to some very diverse songs for us.

Presumably across the band there is a wide range of inspirations; are there any in particular which have impacted not only on the band’s music but your personal approach and ideas to creating and playing music?

A big one for us is the Beatles. Right around Rubber Soul is when they really started to branch out and grow their sound. I just love how one band can have so many songs from different ends of the spectrum, from Honey Pie to Helter Skelter, they really changed the confines of a particular album mould. Other bands that do this are Queen and the Beach Boys. As a band we all share so many influences with each other. For James he brings a lot of the heavier side such as bands like Earthless and Red Fang, while Alec is more of a classic aficionado with bands like Deep Purple and Led Zeppelin. Austin and Jimmy probably have the most eclectic tastes, although we all tend to enjoy a bit of everything. It is a good problem to have as it leads to a diverse palette.

Is there a particular process to the songwriting?

Every song is different really, some songs are written by one or two guys while others we all sit and write together. Sometimes one guy will write a section and bring it to the group, while other songs may be more fleshed out by the time it reaches the rehearsal room.

Where do you, more often than not, draw the inspirations to the lyrical side of your songs?

I write the lyrics and more often than not it is usually dictated by the music itself. There have been times however where I will write the lyrics first and the music will follow.

Give us some background to your latest release.

Our latest release is called Change and the name is to be taken quite literal. It marks several big changes for us as a band, such as our sound but also our songwriting processes and just our overall growth as a group.

Give us some insight to the themes and premise behind it and its songs.

The album starts off rather straight forward musically, and by song two we go to a very new place, for both the listener and the band itself. Gettin’ Hungry (track two) is very jazz influenced number featuring a good friend Mia Klosterman on backing vocals. The song and much of the album takes you through some of the mental hardships I was going through at the time. I tried to have the bridge of the song represent what I was going through internally during a very distressed time in my life being away from a loved one.

Are you a band which goes into the studio with songs pretty much in their final state or prefer to develop them as you record?

With a studio at our disposal, it allows us to do both simultaneously. The songs are constantly being devolved and modified.

Tell us about the live side to the band, presumably the favourite aspect of the band?

Performing has changed so much for us with the growth of our songs. With the new album containing so much depth and there being just five of us in the band, it creates a fun challenge to reproduce the music. We are always looking at new ways to reinvent the songs and create more of a cohesive show that really tells a story. It really is theatrical in a way.

It is not easy for any new band to make an impact regionally let alone nationally and further afield. How have you found it?

If the drive is there, it is always possible. We are very driven and determined, but we also genuinely love doing it. So even the smallest of impacts are very satisfying for us. We just have to keep going.

How has the internet and social media impacted on the band to date? Do you see it as something destined to become a negative from a positive?

Times and technology change and the only option is to adapt to your surroundings whether you like it or not. Social media is part of our generation and there isn’t really a way around that. There are both negative and positive aspects to that but one really big positive is that it allows for bands to connect directly with their fans and have a whole new reach that would have never been possible before. Of course this leads to over saturation, which is a whole other discussion, but you have to always find the good in a bad situation no matter the circumstances. Speaking of, here’s a shameless plug of our website! https://www.21tarasband.com/

Once again a big thanks for sharing time with us; anything you would like to add or reveal for the readers?

We put a lot of time into our new album Change and our goal is to take you on a journey through some of our favorite periods in music. The album focuses heavily on the mid to late 60s, as well as 70s with a bit of early jazz influence as well. You can listen to the band’s new album Change here: https://21tarasband.bandcamp.com/album/change

https://www.facebook.com/21tarasband   https://twitter.com/21TarasBand

Pete RingMaster 07/12/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Dog ‘N’ Style – Pub’s Calling

dognstyle-promo-pubc-3_RingMasterReview

Unleashing a flavoursome dose of rebel and spirit rousing rock ‘n’ roll within its muscular walls, French heavy rockers Dog ‘N’ Style have just released debut album Pub’s Calling. A hungry and virulent roar from start to finish, the ten track encounter revels in the band’s stoner and hard rock shaded rock ‘n’ roll which in turn inspires ears to greedily devour what is maybe not the most unique incitement but certainly one which leaves thick satisfaction.

Formed in 2013, Epinal hailing Dog ‘N’ Style quickly hit their stride live, the following three years seeing the Spinalien quartet play over a hundred shows across France and further afield including tours in Russia, Spain, and Luxemburg. Sharing stages with the likes of No One is Innocent, The Casualties, Tagada Jones, Ultra Vomit, and Burning Heads along the way the band’s melody infused heavy rocking has been increasingly praised while their self-titled debut EP of 2015 introduced the band to a broader attention which Pub’s Calling can only further ignite.

An earthy revving of an engine opens up the album, its growl welcoming the meaty body and sound of The Best of Me. Straight away the song sets the character and intent of sound and release, riffs and rhythms heavy and imposing as fiery flames of guitar and rich melodies collude with an infectious boisterousness. As most songs within Pub’s Calling, there is something familiar about the opener but a recognisable air which wraps the band’s commanding and enterprising songwriting to fine effect.

art_RingMasterReviewThe great start to the album continues with I Did Something Bad, the growl lined vocals of Greg Hal a magnetic essence as swinging riffs and rhythms unite while the guitars of Yan Pierrat and Hal spin a web of sonic and melodic adventure. Like its predecessor, there is an instinctive catchiness to the song which is irresistible even when the bass of Robin Rob’s grooves along on its own. The band lists inspirations as the likes of Black Stone Cherry, Steel Panthers, Red Fang, and Nashville Pussy, and it is those kinds of influences which especially leap around within the album’s second track.

Pretty Fly reveals a grouchier intent in its nature and sound from the off yet again grooves and the inviting tones of Hal are quickly seducing ears as the mighty rhythmic swings of drummer Boub Tchak resonate. A cantankerously toned bassline entangles the warmer but no less intrusive riffs and grooves of the guitars, it all contrasting and mixing masterfully with the melodic and fiery imagination which blossoms across the track before One Day springs its Gruntruck spiced proposal and in turn Bad Motorcycle swaggers in with its hard/classic rock fuelled stomp. Neither track quite live up to the heights of the first trio of songs yet spicy grooves and infectious roars as well as the sonic dexterity offered ensures both leave enjoyment high.

The release hits top gear again with Night Losers, its funk infested basslines alone sparking an already eager appetite as the tendrils of tangy guitar entangle ears. Again vocals and rhythms involve the listener with ease and though originality is maybe limited the imagination is swiftly hooked by the songs inventive twists, turns, and snarling enterprise.

With its southern rock hued melodies, the same applies to the excellent Running Out which swiftly seduces as sultry sonic sighs amidst calmer vocals and energies immerse ears in its smouldering but rhythmically imposing climate. Carrying a fierce snarl in its mellower stroll, the track is outstanding, best track contender which though closely rivalled within the album leaves the moment which lingers longest even as the bruising and thickly catchy rumble of Never Trust An Asshole mightily consumes ears and pleasure next.

The album’s title track is heavy rock ‘n’ roll at it most compelling and rousing, rhythms and riffs enslaving instincts as grooves and almost toxic melodies infest the imagination. It too is a battleground of attitude loaded aggression and energy infused with a tapestry of warm melodic invention and dustily charming harmonies.

Ensuring the album ends on a high similar to how it started, it calls time on the boozy rabble-rousing with the final Couple Of Beers, a track again weaving all the traits and contrasting shades of the Dog ‘N’ Style sound and invention in one exhilarating escapade. It is a fine end to Pub’s Calling, an album which may not be about to change the direction of muscle driven rock ‘n’ roll but certainly gives it something to get lively about.

Pub’s Calling is out now across most online stores.

 

https://www.facebook.com/dognstylemusic   https://twitter.com/dognstyle

Pete RingMaster 21/09/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Welcome Back Delta – Sucker

WBD_RingMasterReview

As commandingly infectious as it is resourcefully muscular, Sucker is one of those propositions which just demands attention. The second album from British rockers Welcome Back Delta, the album is a spicy brew of classic and blues rock with a stoner/grunge scent to its captivating aroma. It embraces familiar flavours and textures but in a creative devilment and character all of the Welcome Back Delta making.

Hailing from Cheltenham, Gloucestershire, Welcome Back Delta emerged in 2011 and quickly made an impact on their local music scene. Since then they have toured the UK several times and supported the likes of Clutch, Nick Oliveri’s Death Acoustic Tour, And So I Watch You From Afar, Lionize, and Karma to Burn. 2014 saw the well-received release of debut album Shocker, a success sure to be eclipsed with style and strength by Sucker.

Band and album get straight down to business with opener Beast Mode where from an initial ear catching ear spun hook and a swiftly joining rally of beats attention is hooked, riveted as Clutch like grooves and great group vocals uncage their catchy and dirty exploits around the lead and enjoyable slightly grouchy tones of vocalist/guitarist Joe Kelly. With the brooding bassline of Phil Davies carrying its only steely nature to align with the potent lures of Rob Duncan’s grooves, the track is soon in command of ears and appetite with a rousing chorus to complete the persuasion.

The bluesy tendrils of the following Snake In The Grass keep the commanding start going, grooves a smouldering lure of classic and familiar blues infection luring the listener into another potent chorus of group vocals. Caged by the firm and magnetic rhythms of drummer Steve Roberts, the song strolls along with a swagger and melodic glint in an intoxicating combination sparking listener participation with ease before the heftier weight and growl of Thrones takes over. Again there is no lack of contagiousness to its boozy grooves and imposing presence as ears and imagination are ignited alike again.

cover_RingMasterReviewGood variety across Sucker is another potent attribute, the country blues drama of Arms Dealer, which features guest Damon T, providing a flavoursome turn in the album’s landscape while Dadgerous featuring Bison Steed wraps itself in a Kyuss meets Red Fang-esque roar. The track is outstanding, a virulent trespass of the senses which ignites the spirit and energies of those it touches.

Jeremy’s Iron rumbles and grumbles next, its heavy riffs and cracking rhythms colluding with more of the smouldering grooves and instinctive catchiness Welcome Back Delta conjures at will while The Magic Of Flight shows the band is as adept at serenading ears, the track a tantalising mix of darkly grained vocals and simple but suggestive melody courted by the shadowed air of bass. It is hard to say that either is overly unique but both tracks, as the album, simply tempt and persuade with a sublime touch and invention.

More of that country breeding infests the lively Black Tie next with the following Preacher entangling itself in a web of blues endeavour and though neither quite match up to songs before them, each leave satisfaction thick and ears hungry for more which the closing and fiery rock ‘n’ roll of Don’t Hold It Against Me, Unless It Gets Hard provides in fine style. With rampant rhythms and tangy grooves it leaves a lingering taste of the album and the inspiration of a swift return into the rousing triumph of Sucker.

Sucker might not be the most unique slab of rock ‘n roll heard this year but it is one of the most enjoyable so we dare you to take a punt on Welcome Back Delta.

Sucker is out now and available @ http://welcomebackdelta.bandcamp.com/

Upcoming Live Dates

11th November- HARD ROCK HELL Festival

26th November- The Exchange, Bristol (Supporting Planet of Zeus)

http://welcomebackdelta.co.uk/   https://www.facebook.com/Welcomebackdelta

Pete RingMaster 22/09/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

The Bendal Interlude – Reign of the Unblinking Eye

bendalInterlude_RingMasterReview

Attempting to build on the reputation and acclaim earned through their previous clutch of EPs, British metallers The Bendal Interlude unleash their debut album; a cauldron of sludge, stoner, and blues with psych and thrash metal to sear and ignite the senses. The release is a beast of a proposition; an attention grabber reinforcing and pushing the already firm stature of the Liverpool quartet but maybe one not quite seeing the band going far enough with the new bold elements of flavour and imagination to steer them away from similarly designed offerings over recent times. Nevertheless Reign of the Unblinking Eye is a fiercely enticing and enjoyably rousing slab of predacious riffs, salacious grooves, and thumping rhythmic aggression.

Drawing on inspirations from bands such as Melvins, Crowbar, and Cathedral, The Bendal Interlude have increasingly drawn fans and attention through a quartet of releases, starting with an early Demo followed by the Foal Recordings EP in 2010, a Self-Titled EP the following year, and the Odourama EP in 2013, as well as a ferocious live presence which has seen the band share stages with the likes of Sunn O))), Earth, Orange Goblin, COC, Church of Misery, Red Fang and more. They have also made highly successful appearances at festivals like Hammerfest, Sonisphere, and Desertfest to persistently lure keen spotlights to their emergence.

For Reign of the Unblinking Eye, The Bendal Interlude took a new tact in its creation; guitarist Stu Taylor explaining recently, “We took a shift in direction when writing for the album Reign of The Unblinking Eye. The songs are much more elaborate and have a lot more going on sound-wise than previous releases. We played with time signatures, guitar harmonies, key changes, even laying down a 10-part resonator guitar part. It is by far the heaviest but also most dynamic thing we’ve written to date.” His words are quickly backed up by the album and a collection of songs which in contrast to the “abstract collection of ideas and imagery based around loose themes” which coloured previous releases, lyrically carry a more “autobiographical approach”.

art_RingMasterReviewBuckfast For Breakfast opens the album, an easily relatable repetitive vocal sample the spark to a wall of cantankerous riffs and rapier like rhythms. It is a senses trespassing confrontation, swiftly bound and veined by wiry grooves with richly engaging toxicity to their wandering sonic hands. The raw vocal squalling of Nat Gavin adds to the intrusive hostility tempering the melodic flirtation and the instinctive swing to the track’s stalking gait. It is an ear gripping start firmly backed by the blues intoxication and fiery rock ‘n’ roll of Losing Things. With Gavin’s caustic delivery, tracks are inevitably going to challenge with attitude loaded animosity yet as proven here, The Bendal Interlude merge it skilfully with a melodic/stoner prowess and addictive sonic contagion which gives every assault a captivating and inviting personality.

Next up is The Unblinking Eye and its initial electronically atmospheric suggestiveness which the track evolves into its own individual stomp of classic/groove metal fuelled ferociousness. It recruits body and imagination with consummate ease, the virulence of the grooves and infectious swing and lead hook of the track swiftly installing it as a major highlight within the album. The Bendal Interlude are rocking like a beast on heat in song and album, sparking similar reactions in the instincts and spirit of the listener.

Efram’s Hands provides a brooding groove entangled landscape of ravenous shadows and barbarous energy straight after whilst Pint of Bodies grumbles and rumbles with sonic and rhythmic rabidity whilst infusing a scent of enterprise not too removed from glam rock. Subsequently descending on the senses with a Down meets Cathedral like animosity before shifting again into an evocative melodic calm, it and its predecessor both whip up more greed for the album’s trespass before Creeks Gigantic prowls in with a thunderous rhythmic swagger led by the bass groove of Tommy Lloyd quickly matched by the resourceful craft and adventure of Taylors’ invention on guitar strings. Given further incendiary bite by the spiky beats of Dave Archer, the track is an imposingly catchy and intrusive weave of contrasting and dynamic textures finding kinship in the tracks’ vocal irritability and tempestuous air.

Anthemic and tenaciously delivered rhythms again lead an addictive and predictably groove infested persuasion as Triumph of Fortitudo steps in with bruising intensity and Cancer Bats like punk lined antagonism before stepping aside for the more merciful but equally commanding rock ‘n roll of The Block. Drama fuels every crawling riff and the doom coated breath which soaks a track layered with acidic grooving and vocal rancor. Maybe not as striking on personal tastes as other tracks within Reign of the Unblinking Eye, it still leaves satisfaction full; success sought and easily found by the closing emotional and creative animus of R.I.P.  An at times corrosive venture through varied styles and flavours within a core heavy rock storm, the song is a fascinating and increasingly impressing end to a similarly impacting release.

As suggested earlier, The Bendal Interlude could have dared to push their imagination even further but every play of Reign of the Unblinking Eye certainly reveals new twists within the all-consuming invasion of sound. Time and attention only benefits an appreciation of an instantly pleasing album which has the psyche and passions enslaved by crucial grooves in no time; a success no one can avoid or dismiss.

Reign of the Unblinking Eye is out now via Black Bow Records @ http://blackbowrecords.bigcartel.com/product/the-bendal-interlude-the-reign-of-the-unblinking-eye

https://www.facebook.com/THEBENDALINTERLUDE   http://thebendalinterlude.bandcamp.com/

Pete RingMaster 01/04/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com/

1968 – Self Titled EP

1968 Promo Shot_RingMaster Review

Taking the year as inspiration to name and sound, 1968 are poised to release their new self-titled EP and hopefully whip up thick attention to match the rich textures of their sound. With fiery grooves swinging from grouchy riffs and rhythms uncompromising in their addictive tenacity, the UK band’s rock ‘n’ roll is lava like persuasion crawling over and swallowing the senses with volcanic intensity from within an increasingly magnetic release.

Formed in 2013 out of an online meeting between guitarist Sam Orr and vocalist Jimi Ray and their mutual attraction to late sixties heavy psychedelic rock, the Cheshire hailing 1968 quickly grew with the addition of drummer Tommy Drury and on bass, Tom Richards known as The Bear. As each member brought their prowess and individual influences, the band bred its own invitingly tempestuous and creatively volatile invention with, as proven by the new release, imposing riffs, invasive rhythms, and a nostalgic yet fresh sonic/melodic intoxication leading the immersion and seduction of the senses.

1968 Cover Artwork_RingMaster ReviewMarauder looms up on the EP first, an emerging sonic mist filling air and ears before a brooding bassline and spicy grooves entangle around punchy beats and the instantly alluring grizzled vocals of Ray. Swiftly thoughts of Black Sabbath through to Red Fang come to mind as the track swings and saunters purposefully across the senses and into the imagination. Its toxic sultriness also has hints of the raw ferocity found in bands such as Possessor and XII Boar if not with the fierce and aggressive rabidity they possess. As a sign of things to come, the mesmeric roar continues to evolve and soar into fresh adventure; smouldering climates and seductive flames with psych rock veining wrapping the senses as intensity and energy ebb and flow to pleasing success.

With only the fade out a personal niggle, the great start to the EP is matched by the anthemic weight and grooved revelry of Green Sails. In some ways less imposing than its predecessor and in others a more rowdy exploit with punk attitude to its breath and growling tone, the song casts gripping grooves and incendiary rhythms to bridge sixties and modern heavy rock swagger and imagination within its contagious rumble.

Final track HMS Conan provides a nine minute exploit with stoner-esque bait and devilry within a bluesy old school shuffle. Fuzzy and beguiling, the track moves from a rousing stomp with dexterous grooves and sonic devilment through a dirty garage rock lined stroll into a noise fuelled, volcanic dive into dark depths of salacious and intimidating rock ‘n’ roll. It is magnetic stuff, on first listen seeming too long but with every encounter seeming to grow and blossom into something persuasively masterful with hooks and twists to get a lust on for and claim the EP’s pinnacle.

The 1968 EP is a major grower, strong on first appearances but becoming more essential with each and every listen. It does feel like the band is still finding its true sound and that only adds to the excitement in anticipation of big things for the band ahead. Right now though, pleasure is more than seriously taken care of, especially with impressing sonic warriors like HMS Conan leading the way.

The 1968 EP is available from 15th January, via Black Bow Records and available through all digital platforms.

https://www.facebook.com/1968Band   http://Twitter.com/1968Band

Pete RingMaster 14/01/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com/

‘1968’ arrives on 15th January via Black Bow Records,

1968 Online Promo Shot_ringmasterreview

BRIT RIFF BEASTS RELEASE 1968 NEW EP!

Fuzzy riff lords ‘1968’ blast their way to the forefront of the UK scene with their blistering self-titled EP out on Friday 15th January, via Black Bow Records and available through all digital platforms.

Although approximately 17,000 moons have passed since 1968 drew to a close, in 2013, the year 1968 was resurrected in the form of a band—a band who craftily fed from select recordings made in that year, as well as pulling influence from the heavier sounds produced later into the 70’s. The result is a retro outpouring of furious drums, throat-shaking bass-lines, bone-rattling riffs, and above all else, vocals that dance all over the top like fire spitting tornados.

The band were ignited two years ago when guitarist ‘Sam Orr’ and vocalist ‘J.R.’ met online and began talking about ideas regarding a more contemporary sound that still encapsulated aspects of what they admired from the heavy, psychedelic rock born back in the late 1960’s. The pair enlisted Tommy Drury to provide the engine for the band’s rhythm and the trio began to kick out the jams, but soon realised they needed a fully fledged bassist to achieve the sound they truly desired. Up stepped ‘The Bear’, a mountain of a man armed with four beefy 15” speakers. Drawing from his influences, stemming from Red Fang to Grand Funk Railroad, The Bear stamped his place within the camp immediately.

As a unit, 1968 thunder their way through material written with riffs, groove and cascading oceans of space noises coupled with copious amounts of fuzz. Powered by EL34 valves, Irish whiskey, Diesel, leathers and boots, 1968 are here to stay and they show no signs of stopping. With a brand new self-titled EP set to be unleashed in January, this record will devour you whole. The opening riff of ‘Marauder’ pounds at you like a wolf at your door – there’s just no denying this beast of a track. The swagger and Zeppelin-inspired groove of ‘Green Sails’ is next up, and hits you with an intoxicating riff assault and immense refrain served up by the industrious J.R. The closer, ‘HMS Conan’, is a fitting conclusion with its high velocity fused stoner rock that is an enthralling journey through the dark corridors of Sabbath and early Soundgarden. 1968 just hate standing still, so look out for tour dates through the Winter and beyond.

https://www.facebook.com/1968Band