Secrets and exposures: an interview with Tricore/An Entire Legion

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Tricore

More a secret than they should and deserve to be, UK metallers Tricore has been one of the most inventive and exhilarating bands within the British metal underground scene for close to a decade. With its member’s sister project An Entire Legion, the band has continued to intrigue, surprise, and thrill with an unpredictable and persistently adventurous intent in sound and ideation. Recently both bands released strikingly re-mixed and re-mastered versions of the albums Less than man…More than rabbit and Flame Wizard, from Tricore and An Entire Legion respectively. This gave The RingMaster Review a nudge to delve deeper into the bands which we had the pleasure of doing with vocalist/drummer Chris ‘Kerl’ Kerley, guitarist Mark Carstairs, and bassist Chris Allan who also kindly offered the opportunity to win a digital copy of both albums.

Hi Guys, welcome to the site and thanks for sharing your time with us.

Kerl: No worries man. It’s a pleasure. Thank you for being such a proponent of our music.

You have just released remixed and re-mastered versions of your Tricore debut album Less than man…More than rabbit and the Flame Wizard full-length as An Entire Legion. Before we take a closer look at the releases and yourselves can you clear up the situation with the projects as I know some people have been a little confused; are Tricore and An Entire Legion working as separate projects still, as I know there was talk of merging under just one name at one point?

Kerl: Haha, yea it can get a bit confusing. For us as well. The musicians are much the same in both projects but musically they generally differ. Tricore tracks are generally straight up heavier, riff driven, longer tracks, slightly more technical in parts. Legion tracks vary in tone more; the melodies take more of a front seat, tighter structures and catchier choruses.

Chris A: Though the lines have been blurred with the Flame Wizard release.

Kerl: Yea. It’s possible that future releases will be under legion because it’s the preferred name. Either that or we’ll make up another new name to piss more people off!

 

Tricore

Tricore

As it was the early days of Tricore where we first discovered your sounds, tell us about the beginning of the band and your musical histories up to that point.

Kerl: Tricore was formed in 2006.

Mark: I joined the band a month after it was formed and we did our first gig as Tricore only a couple of weeks after that!

Kerl: Yea you did well to get the shit down man. Before 2006 we were called Unbound. We named our debut EP after the old band. A few of the ideas on the Less than man…more than rabbit album came from the Unbound days. I’ve been in bands since I was like 13-14 playing drums. First band I was in was called Undercurrent. I only started getting heavily into song writing when I started Unbound in my late teens.

Mark: I also started playing in my teens back in Scotland. I was in a local band before moving down south.

Chris A: Same for me… Been in bands since my teens and all through my twenties. All of us come from similar musical backgrounds. All of us are self-taught.

The band’s sound is unique and distinct, wonderfully difficult to pin down. What have been the major inspirations to your ideas and music?

Kerl: Variety! Spice of life and all that. Same applies to music. Learning about and respecting different genres of music can only aid you when it comes to song writing. I grew up on a diet of mostly rock & metal in the nineties and always preferred the bands I felt “stood out”. Bands who had their own thing going on a la Korn, System of a down, Slipknot, Sikth, Incubus, Paradise Lost, before that Pantera, Nirvana, RATM and many more. As time went on my tasted broadened and I started listening to all sorts, from orchestral to indie to electronic, new and old. Like the bands above we always try to stand out with our music, whichever project we’re working on.

Mark: I’ve been influenced by pretty much the A to Z of heavy metal!

Kerl: Yea man, Marks got one of the largest cd collections I’ve ever seen. Its nuts!

Your first EP Unbound in 2007 made the first mark, increased dramatically by the Follow EP four years later but it is the Less than Front cover, less than remasteredman…More than rabbit album which still rings the most potently with fans. Is that what you have found and why you have re-visited it for the new release?

Kerl: It was more about making the older releases sound as phat as possible. Less than man always felt a little too tinny to our ears which was a mix issue rather than a mastering one. Sean Magee did a great job at Abbey Road studios first time round. But we felt a re-mix and re-master would bring the music up into line.

How did you look at the album in regard to re-mastering and remixing it, where did you feel you could enhance its strengths and colour further?

Kerl: Everything needed at least a little tweaking. The vocals needed to be eq’d and brought forward, the guitars were given more thickness. The hi-end needed to be reduced universally. We met a great dude who mastered the new releases for us giving them the final polish they needed. And all for the right price! Which is always a factor when you’re producing yourself.

Was it the same reasons for re-working the Flame Wizard album under An Entire Legion too?

Kerl: Yes. Though those tracks were recorded more recently and had fared better. I think both releases are now really solid, production wise. I can’t see there’ll be a need to revisit them again. We’re not going to do a “George Lucas”.

When did An Entire Legion become a valid proposition alongside Tricore for your ideas and what inspired you to make the distinct separation?

Kerl: An Entire Legion was created in late 2009/10 primarily to go down a slightly more melodic route with our music.

Mark: Initially it was also a step we took in an attempt to find a drummer who could replace Chris, freeing him up to do vocals.

Kerl: Yea. The idea was that I’d remain on drums in Tricore and sing for Legion. Unfortunately we had no luck finding a suitable replacement on either drums or vocals.

Mark: Despite caining the auditions!

Kerl: I still remain doing both. After a while Legion became a place we could put those songs we felt didn’t quite fit under Tricore. Now it’s pretty much an anything goes, which is why both projects have blurred.

An entire legion

An entire legion

Did having the two projects on the go simultaneously make the songwriting a more interesting adventure and maybe more difficult. Deciding where melodies or, rhythmic twists as examples, would best fit?

Kerl: Luckily the writing for both releases was completed at separate times. Most of the music on Less than man was written in 2008. The tracks on Flame Wizard during 2011/12 so there were no difficulties due to overlapping. Though we have several projects we usually just focus on one at a time.

Have you a preference (not favourite) or find a greater ease in regard to the two bands when it comes to creating songs?

Kerl: Honestly no. I love creating music. I live for it. There’s no preference when it comes to band music for me, I just try and keep things interesting and distinctive.

Mark: Playing wise, I prefer the heavier tracks from any of our projects. But listening wise it’s great that we don’t limit ourselves and feel free enough to head down different routes when the itch arises.

Chris A: Yea I also appreciate the variety. As a player it keeps things interesting, challenging.

It seems like in the current climate of metal and rock; bands with something truly unique about them and their sound get passed over and often disappear far too soon. How have you guys managed to keep your passion and drive for two projects, three when we include Rind Skank, all this time criminally without the nationwide and beyond recognition we feel your music deserves?

Kerl: Cheers Pete man, awesome of you to say. It’s really easy to keep creating music because we love it but yea, things are tough out there right now. Zero exposure by mainstream media has kept some of the country’s best musicians and songwriters in relative obscurity.

Chris A: Piracy…

Kerl: Yep. Piracy has wrecked music sales, which used to be a vital revenue stream for bands. Heavier types of music are acutely affected by the loss of music sales because there are fewer ways to make up for the losses. Obtaining ad or film placements for heavy music, which can be a great source of income for songwriters in other genres, is rare. Touring is expensive and is not feasible for a lot bands without financial backing. Merch sales are directly linked to touring. Indie labels mostly sign what they know and what they feel safe taking on, so most of their rosters end up filled with bands that appear to be imitating one another. They can then group these guys up and send them out on hard-graft tours, which are rarely particularly lucrative. As for major labels, well they barely touch heavier acts. Why would they, there’s no longer any money in it. For us, like many bands, it’s difficult. We’ve lost key members in the past because they could no longer see a future in playing heavy music. Reality gets in the way of the ideal.

So my advice to anyone who wants to see the genre grow is to purchase the music of the bands whose music you enjoy. Purchase directly from them if possible. Keeping the industry financially healthy isn’t only about providing opportunities for current bands it’s for all the future ones as well.

Concerning how we personally keep driving forward. Pretty much by ignoring the above and crossing our fingers 😉

Briefly tell us about Rind Skank.

Kerl: Rind Skank is a rock/metal/dance fusion band we started in 2012. It was a chance to play around with things in another direction, which is always great fun.

Mark: We took out the need for a drummer by playing over synth beats, which gives us a project that we can play live as a three piece.

Chris A: Recently though we’ve been attempting to introduce acoustic drums into the mix, so we’ll see how that goes.

I believe there are a couple of previously unreleased tracks also within the new re-mastered releases. Tell us about them, they are brand new AEL flame wizsongs written recently?

Chris A: Yea, we released the tracks Richest Eyes and Twist the gimp on the Flame Wizard album. Both those songs were recorded in 2012 and were originally created for a different project, currently shelved. We dig the tracks and thought they’d fit well on the album. Both use more electronics than our other songs usually do. They’re also the only tracks I’m on because I only joined the band in 2012!

How does the songwriting work within the bands, is it the same method for both?

Kerl: I write the music for all the projects give or take some parts here and there and some of the solos (the better ones were written by Rich Wood). The process is usually – I write at home and then bring the songs down to practice where we can all pour over them.

What can new and especially existing fans specifically find different within the new outings for Flame Wizard and Less than man…More than rabbit from the originals to get their juices flowing again?

Kerl: Aside from the couple of new tracks on Flame Wizard it’s all about the production quality. We’ve just raised it up to a higher level than it was before. Considering our releases are self-produced with no fancy top end studio involved, I think we did a pretty good job.

What is the future for both Tricore and An Entire Legion, do you have specific plans or intent for 2014 and beyond with each?

Kerl: Nothing’s set in stone at the moment, though plenty of ideas. That’s the positive thing about being unsigned, no deadlines! Unfortunately there are some negatives. As the primary songwriter, these days, what I would like to do musically and what I have to do in order to make a living frequently conflict. Every time we record a significant amount of material, and I produce, it pretty much wipes out 3-4 months. That’s time we don’t get paid for up front. The main way to recoup is via sales of music and merch, which doesn’t cover it. The money we get from shows, when we’re able to play, is negligible.

Mark: Normally ends up costing us.

Any new songs and release on the horizons too?

Chris A: We have hopes to release a Rind Skank album at some point later this year, or maybe 2015. We may start a crowd-funding project to see if we can raise enough to make that feasible, which is something we’ve never done before

How about live, can we expect any venture on that side?

Kerl: Playing live has always been a rollercoaster for us. Constant line-up issues over the years have kept us grounded for a lot of the time. And I don’t mean that to sound like we’re a revolving door band with new members every week. Quite the opposite, our problems are finding the right people in the first place…People with the musical chops and a good working ethos. We’re looking forward to getting a more stable line-up and playing live more frequently.

Where is the best place for people to keep up with all things Tricore and An Entire Legion?

Kerl: Any of these sites,

Our bandcamp page for releases – http://tricore.bandcamp.com/

Our MySpace or Facebook for updates – https://myspace.com/thetricore

https://www.facebook.com/anentirelegion

https://www.facebook.com/tricoreuk

Or our hub site – http://tricor1.wix.com/underdogelite

Thanks once more for talking with us, any last thoughts you would like to share?

Kerl: It was an absolute pleasure man. Keep up the great work!

Mark: Cheers!

Chris A: Great talk dude.

Tricore pic 1

To win a digital copy of Less than man…More than rabbit or Flame Wizard, simply check out the last Bone Orchard podcast @ www.audioburger.com and tell us which Tricore track was featured in the comment box below. Closing date for entries is Sunday June 8th

Pete RingMaster

The RingMaster Review 22/05/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

http://www.audioburger.com

Reigniting passions and fight: An interview with Yap of One Minute Silence

PIC by Stefan Ferreira

PIC by Stefan Ferreira

 Like so many the return of UK rap metallers One Minute Silence bred a big sense of excitement for us when the band announced their return after a seven year absence a couple of years ago but it was the release of their first new material which came just a few weeks back that things took on real hungry proportions. The Fragmented Armageddon EP  was an absorbing and inciting confrontation that showed the band had lost none of the fire and fight inside its creativity and thoughts. Given the chance to find out more about the returning force we asked vocalist Yap about things like the cause of the ‘hiatus’, the spark that brought the band back, and of course the new EP as well as more politically shaped questions. Here is what he shared with us…

Hi Yap and thank you for sparing time to talk with us at The RingMaster Review.

I know we were not alone in having a strong twinge of excitement at not only hearing of the return of One Minute Silence but your first new release in a decade, the Fragmented Armageddon EP. Did you have any sense of the appetite for your return and hunger for new OMS sounds?

In a small nutshell – I went on a journey to ground myself, and came back grounded. I felt more focused as a person, more grown up.  I had ideas, but everything in the OMS camp is of an organic process, so it was just all about waiting to see what would happened when we regained our collective music head.

Can we first ask about the decision back in 2003 to put the band on the back burner? What was it that brewed and led you to that decision?

Like I said, I needed to go on a journey. I felt squashed in the music industry and in life in general. I was unhappy inside

Was it originally planned as a hiatus with thoughts to return at some point?

I had no thoughts of anything to be honest. I didn’t know what planet I was on, or where I was going. I just dropped the ring into the fires of Mordor and I left.

What filled the time of OMS’s member in the subsequent seven years?

All the guys kept their heads in music. Massy spent a lot of his time learning to produce his own sounds. And Glen, being the musical madman that he is kept himself busy mastering his mile. I subsequently went on to make a couple of albums that fell under the name Pink Punk. It was hardcore slam poetry produced by John Hendicott.

So what triggered your return in 2010 and was it an idea which found a receptive response with you all?

PIC by Stefan Ferreira

PIC by Stefan Ferreira

It was a slow burner in regards to us finding our flow again. We were all fresh in our heads, but on different roads musically. It was just a feeling burning in my belly that I wanted to explore I guess, and the guys felt the same way. It was very refreshing for us in many respects too though; being away from it all for so long and so on. It didn’t feel stale is what I am saying.

Always being a band to provoke and bring political and world issues to the attention do you think the time away brought a new and inspirational fuel to your personal and the band’s fire as much as anything musically seeded to spark your return?

Back in the day I was a young man carrying a lot of internal anger, and this shaped the sound of my words. I feel I am a better fighter now mentally as I carry no anger in my soul. This gives me more focus, and so I hit harder and better than ever before. It has allowed me to throw punches in the Zen sense, and direct my words with more precision if you like.

As the new songs on Fragmented Armageddon shows you do still have that fire in the belly not only musically but lyrically and politically but do you think it is much harder now to make an impact on the younger generation with so many seemingly seduced by the inane reality shows culture and the force feeding of primetime blandness musically and entertainment wise into their psyche?

I think there are a lot of blind people out there, but as the recent student marches have shown, there is also a healthy awakening. I think people are ready now more than ever for the truth. People need to be. The ship is sinking after all, and no one can shout conspiracy when the water is almost above their nose.

Why do you think each subsequent generation over past decades arguably lost the instinct to question and fight the wrongs of society, as the likes of bands like yourselves, Amen, RATM, UK Subs, Refused, Flogging Molly etc. have not lost their snarl and passion to inform and bring things to attention.

Generations have always been a mixed bag. Some listen and take action against the corruption of the day, while others march the line.

Do you think the unrests you pointed at and we are seeing across the globe will eventually translate into something similar in size in the so called more democratic countries like the UK and wake up the sleeping generations?

Chaos is coming. The four horse men are saddling their horses. It’s only a matter of time. We can’t stop what’s coming now. All we can do is our very best in the face of it. Millions will die. There’s nothing anyone can do about that fact. All we can do is keep promoting the truth until we find balance as a species. It’s a long road.

922931_561590037195380_1533141906_nBack to the music, Fragmented Armageddon contains two new OMS tracks, Fruit From The Lie and Pandemic Schizophrenia which immediately squashed any doubts that the band may have lost any of its potency creatively and passionately. Did you have any similar questions of yourselves about that aspect when first reuniting and writing?

To be honest I felt we were ready to write our best music.

There is also open evolution in your invention and sound bringing in new flavours and imagination to the songs, what inspirations or new ideas have you explored this time around with your songwriting and music?

I am glad you noticed. I am a more rounded person now in every respect. I have been out on the circuit trying to bring some of my philosophical ideas into the world arena. I believe I have new ideas that will help open the world of philosophy to a brighter day. My work in linguistics and psychology has brought me to a new door in my head, and once it opened everything changed. Obviously my lyrics would be an extension of my new broader perspectives.

Did the different musical ventures the band’s members investigated in the ‘time off’ also bring fresh avenues for your imagination to contemplate with your new material?

Yes, in many ways. I have a much broader understanding of sound now, as do all the guys in OMS.  However, trying to incorporate our new ideas took time.

Are the two songs a strong representation of what your next album will feel and sound like, can we get excited yet?

Yes, they are a good indicator. We have many great songs in the pipeline. All we need now is the finance to get it all together. Time and timing as Massy likes to say.

Have you approached the song writing and recording of the songs any differently to your previous albums and EPs?

In some respects yes, and it other respects no. It’s very hard to corner it.

Your line-up contains new drummer Martin Davies, how did you link up with him and what has he brought to the band which is not openly clear on the tracks for us outsiders?

Martin has been working with Glen for the last few years, and so Glen brought him to the bands attention. We knew from the first best he was our man. It’s quite astounding to listen to him in action in the studio. There’s nothing he can’t do on the kit.

You are currently working on your new album so can you give any spoilers for us about it?

PIC by Stefan Ferreira

PIC by Stefan Ferreira

It will represent the zeitgeist of our times.

Other than the album what is on the near horizon of One Minute Silence?

We are waiting to see where the wave will take us. It’s all easy and in good flow. We are just a bunch of happy people, and if we get to finish another album, well then great. If we don’t, I will sit in fields pondering the universe regardless.

Once again a big thanks for chatting with us.

Have you any last thoughts you would like to leave us with?

We were touched by the response we got on our return. We hope we find our way back to the live stage. We hope we find our circle in the pit. Peace to all.

Thanks Pete.

Read the Fragmented Armageddon EP  review @ https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2013/06/16/one-minute-silence-fragmented-armageddon/

Pete Ringmaster

The Ringmaster Review 23/07/2013

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

http://www.audioburger.com

 

Halfling’s Leaf – High Time

Halfling's Leaf

All those of an addictive personality look away now for we are about to expose the newest curse set to consume and manipulate the youth of today, Halfling’s Leaf. A band from Stockport in the UK, this is a four man noise conjuring machine which can be best described as having a sound which teases like a mix of Melvins, Rage Against The Machine, The Fall Of Troy, At The Drive In, and Primus. To be honest they are impossible to pin down, their unique toxin of punk n funk an irresistible and irrepressible contagion released under the mask of latest EP, High Time.  Their second release following the equally impressive Ain’t No Candy EP of last year, the six track tempest is sonic and rhythmic devilment which will ignite the deepest passions for all who have a reticence to entertain normality, regular time signatures, and passionless monotony.

Formed in 2011 and consisting of vocalist Matt Franklin, guitarist/vocalist Mayo, bassist/vocalist Chid Seisay, and drummer/vocalist Andy Preece, Halfling’s Leaf teases, torments, and virulently dances with the senses through a hybrid of flavours soaked in instinctive mischief and skilled sonic anarchy. High Times is made up of a sextet of noise sculpted miscreants which simply call out to like-minded hearts and thoughts like an insidious siren, their lure and temptation insatiable but carrying an epidemic of rewards to thrill and excite let alone ignite the passions. Produced by the band alongside Dan Buxton, who also mixed and mastered the tempestuous taunt, the EP has everything and more that you could wish for in soul corruption.

Opening track Your Welcome… immediately riots on the ear with squalling vocals from Franklin and band alongside energetic High Time Coverand infectious riffs. It is an instantaneous temptress which continues its wantonness through the evolving bass croon of Seisay and fiery grooves of Mayo and equally salacious hooks. Unbridled in attitude and breath sapping enterprise the song lifts the emotions into a mutual stomp but just as you are flinging limbs in tandem it slips easily into a sultry stroll of provocative sonic sex. The rhythms of Preece chip away at the ear whilst the bass plays within with devious craft to its persuasion, the song brewing up another rampage though this time driven by persistently shifting stances and sonic slights of hand before unleashing one final punk spitting climax.

The outstanding start is continued through the following Goon Hammer, the track opening up its throat with again compelling bass bait to lure in the appetite and the excellent vocal exploits of Franklin. His jagged delivery at the beginning of the song picks and pokes at the listener with an almost Marilyn Manson like irreverence whilst the guitar matches his plotting with similarly spiky melodic incitement. With a gait which crawls and explores every inch of the psyche, the track stomps with predatory and maniacal intent unleashing a RATM grooved like entrapment before scooting and scrambling rhythmically and sonically with avant-garde bedlam. It is another enthralling and stunning rummage through one’s mind for the purest pleasure.

Scopplers waltzes through a funk spiced stroll of near discordant majesty aligned to a sonic palette of vibrant and searing colours whilst another expertly bred groove entrances the ear, this time with a stoner like breath, latched onto agitated rhythms and a raw expressive energy. As well as the quality of the release the song pushes the diversity out further as does the following pair of Hej and Hit It and Quit It. The first of the twin strikes of aural mania leaps at and quicksteps across and through the ear with a funk clad romp which comes with the swagger of Red Hot Chili Peppers and the irresistible heat of Pigbag before evolving into a punk speared roister of intensive rhythmic disorientation, guitar and bass snarling, and vocal scathing. It is another infection which would be outlawed in any other recreational past time, a tempestuous virus which could be described as System Of A Down meets Pere Ubu in the arms of the Cardiacs, and quite ingenious.

The second of this pair is different in voice but similar in unhinged construction, and arguably the one which without losing its creative psychotic charm offers a more straightforward canvas for less adventurous people to feast upon. To be fair though with a drift into a warm yet deranged ambience whilst St. Vitus dance rhythms frame the detour, it is never offering anything merely to satisfy expectations and stay at home appetites.

S.N.C. closes up the psycho party with one final torrent of rhythmic destruction, sonic scorching, and vocal scathing, a punk/noise rock exploitation which has the incendiary insistence of a pissed off hornet and the creative corrosive might of a tsunami. It is a brilliant certifiable conclusion for a magnificent release which easily sits amongst the best of 2013.

High Time is a release everyone should at least dip their sanity into before losing their mental strength to the delicious toxicity that is Halfling’s Leaf.

https://www.facebook.com/halflingsleaf

10/10

RingMaster 06/06/2013

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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K-Lacura: Portraits Of The Faceless

Unleashing their debut album Portraits Of The Faceless, UK metalers K-Lacura easily set themselves as one of the most promising bands to emerge lately. The album is a vibrant and ear grabbing beast that with strong variety and even more impressive creativity and energy is sure to greatly increase the attention they have already garnered their way. The album sees the band place claws in multiple genres to snatch up the best that is on offer and meld them into their own flavoursome inventive sound. The release rampages through the ear with a groove/progressive/nu-metal core veined with rippling strands of hardcore, melodic metal, and occasional raging extreme metal essences. Combined the result is an album that satisfies instantaneously but also have an element of growth that unveils more and more the further attention it receives.

From Didcot in Oxfordshire, K-Lacura began in 2006 when the quintet of Iann Gillian (Vocals), Stephen Stone (Bass), Neil Raynor (Rhythm Guitar), Phillip Greenaway (Lead Guitar), and Mark Lambourne (Drums), came together with firm ideas and direction of what they wanted to create. The striking combination of mighty sounds, irrepressible energy, and impressively crafted songs soon drew them eager responses through their live shows. The edgy and dynamic sound the band produces has led them to supporting the likes of Glamour Of The Kill, Chthonic, and Ghosts Of A Thousand and many headlining gigs of their own across the south of England. The band blisters the ear with sounds and structures taken from a wealth of influences openly stated by the band as bands like Parkway Drive, Killswitch Engage, and August Burns Red, through to RATM and Limp Bizkit, but truthfully their music encompasses much more. Upon Portraits Of The Faceless the band stirs these flavours up with their own ideas to consistently surprise and intrigue. Their sound is expansive without losing a tight grip on their direction and core intention making an album that pleases strongly and persistently offers up deep anticipation for what they will bring in the future.

Beneath The Buried opens up the release with contentious riffs and rhythms that squabble to pull in the most attention resulting in an attack that is lively and wonderfully demanding. The drums flatten the ear whilst the riffs trample the senses combining in a mighty first assault and alongside the vocals of Gillian cruise coarse and smooth confidently and impressively to offer a constant varied flow throughout the aggression. With its insistent grove and scorched guitar moments the song has one immediately and fully engaged in the release.

The following Carouse has a more tempered drive, its slightly meandering journey bursting with dazzling melodic invention and further heavyweight intentions. The song is great but sandwiched between the opener and the excellent title track its effect is diminished. Portraits Of The Faceless ruptures every blood vessel on its surge through to the senses, leaving one breathless and excited. The song punctures with intimidating bestial riffs and ignites the heart with an almost exotic groove that twists and winds itself around each and every synapse. It is ferocious and venomous and like all wicked things deeply mesmeric.

From this point one really feels this is a band going somewhere and fast, the next track Drop Down as mighty and brutal as its predecessor as spices of grindcore tease and taunt and rhythms treat their recipient like punch bags. As the track before it the song is near flawless with it impossible to come up with any real thought or suggestion that could make it any better. The two songs are similar in structure and intensity though distinct enough with the stronger variety coming in other songs like Severed And Silenced, a mountainous beast of a track that awakens with a wonderful and well thought out melodic instrumental intro to evolve into a totally consuming obliterating threat, and Fold. The latter of these two is a side step into melodic rock with a caustic tone and energised boisterous flow to its fine creation.

The album across its length is highly addictive and skilfully brought forth, songs like the stomping and wonderful Thirty3 alongside the muscular rampaging 7448 fuelling deep affection and leaving a lingering deep pleasure long after they have rested their final notes as does equally the thunderous and excellent Receiving End Of Bullets.

Portraits Of The Faceless is immense a real pleasure that gives more and more the further and longer time and focus it is given. K-Lacura will be a major force in the years to come; it is just a matter of time.

www.facebook.com/k-lacura

RingMaster 10/04/2012

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