We Are Band Nerds – Forget Me Nots

When something is self- described as “Deftones meets Outkast” you just have to have a sniff but it was a mighty lung full we subsequently grabbed when diving into the debut album from US outfit We Are Band Nerds. That description certainly fits the Dallas sextet’s sound, though we would also suggest The Kennedy Soundtrack at times in their blend of alternative hip hop and nu metal, yet there is so much that is individual to the band that it is one imagination grabbing adventure within a debut which just demands plaudit loaded attention.

We Are Band Nerds consist of Brandon Cross (Lead Singer/Rapper), Tony Lucas (Rapper/Vocalist), Dorian “Scullie” Thomas (Guitarist), Carlos “DJ Sol*Los” Juarez (DJ/Sampler), Stephen “S Dot” Bonilla (Drums), and Santos “Sandman” Johnson (Bass). They all bring individual craft and loves into a united sound keenly embracing further diverse styles from jazz, metal, electronica, rap, and varied rock music. Within their first full-length, Forget Me Nots, it quickly proves to be a fascinating mix. Lyrically too the band transfixes, never pulling their punches whilst showing honesty fuelled insight and craft which whether with subtlety or force bewitches as firmly as the sounds around them in songs exploring the depths of everything from relationships to racism, poverty to life’s experiences.

From opener Hunger Games it grabs ears and imagination, electronics almost teasing as they suggest and lure before embracing a current of metal nurtured riffs, dancing beats, and the vocal prowess of Cross and Lucas. The snarl of the guitars is gripping and portentous; vocals matching their angst and irritability with the pair of singers and their individual styles a magnetic union.  All the while the melodic instincts of the band add a mesmeric glaze to veins of creative suggestion and the encounter’s natural rawer rapacity. It is a compelling mix of threat and contemplation in word and sound and a gripping start to the album.

The following Whore has an instinctive catchiness from its first breath of voice and bass, their natural swing controlled but bold and setting the tone for the outstanding track. Like a clock, each note ticks by with consistency and intimation, vocals matching their gait yet all the time volatility in the song’s belly is brewing and stirring, never truly erupting but adding a rousing trespass between the crystalline breaths and organically bred emotions. Like Palms meets Mudvayne in an unexpected way, it is simply glorious and reason alone to check out band and album.

Fake In You similarly has a relatively calm climate within which turbulence and intense shadows lie, essences which burn bright at times but are tempered by the atmospheric glides of the keys and the smooth blend of rap and clean vocals. That tempestuousness does take hold momentarily towards the song’s close but again is dampened down by the tranquillity and beauty of melody before Dreamer opens its heart and diminishing hopes through elegance, grace, and corrosive intensity. As with all songs, hindsight brings a sense of familiar hues within the inventive drama but there is no chance of predicting the landscape and enterprise of each encounter as hearts are shared and thoughts turned over.

Without quite stirring the passions as thickly as those before Under Water still holds attention tight with its evocative drama in sound and word amidst rapacious metal encroachments while American Trash springs from an electronic breeze of an interlude/intro into a heady windstorm of sonic manipulation and lyrical dissonance, though never breaking from its restraints to truly create a blistering tempest.  That control just makes the song though, ensuring its portentous air is a tantalising harassment behind more of the stirring blend of mellow and ire sealed vocals.

The industrial bent Hagel Trumpf is a prowling predator breeding addiction and lust for its senses preying beauty lit with nu metal stalking while Savage borders on the carnivorous, in comparison, but too holds its ferocity in an embrace of suggestion soaked harmonics and melodic intrigue. Both are mutually unique and magnificent, just two more reasons to be excited about their creators and lustfully keen to recommend the album they grace.

Forget Me Nots concludes with Fade Away, a scalding slice of rap and rock infused metal which is the band at their organically rawest on the album but once more infused into a searing irradiation of melodic beauty. It is a compelling end to an album which we can only repeat, must be checked out especially if those comparisons at the beginning hit the spot but equally atmospheric metal/rock in general.

Forget Me Nots is out now via Pavement Entertainment across most stores.

http://www.wearebandnerds.com/    https://www.facebook.com/wearebandnerds/     https://twitter.com/wearebn6

Pete RingMaster 09/03/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Andy Cooper – The Layered Effect

Like the fleet footed shuffle of a confidence fuelled, adrenaline powered boxer, the sounds of US rapper/producer Andy Cooper beguile, spar, and jab within his second album The Layered Effect and like the very best, it swings knock out punches to simply drool over.

A tapestry of old school rap and hip hop as funky and jazzy as it is lung bursting fresh, The Layered Effect is pure pleasure in the ears. It is a homage to the past equally embracing the experiences of Cooper through his part as one third of hip hop outfit Ugly Duckling but not so much a throwback as a new revitalising breath in its history, and the fact that at times it reminds us of nineties UK hip hop duo Honky is extra cream to greedily lap up. Lyrically Cooper also acclaims the core and original essences of the genres he plays with throughout his album, revelling on the fun conjured on the inside as much as the listener basks in it on the outside.

The Layered Effect opens up with Here Comes Another One. Featuring Dutch MC Blabbermouf, the track swiftly swings and flirts with tenacious beats and the vocal shuffle of Cooper, keys keeping up with their own suggestive dance. The rapid fire exploits of Blabbermouf are just as rousing once uncaged, the song’s subsequent vocal weave devilish in its lure and as irresistible in its enterprise as the magnetic alignment of brass and keys with all the track’s other enticing sounds..

The following interlude of Layers toys with the chorus of the opener before Get On That has attention jumping and body bouncing with its R&B meets Fat Boy Slim scented jazz ‘n’ hop funk. As busy and richly flavoured as it is greedily infectious, the song twists and turns like a controlled but lustful dervish, its rhythms alone are instinctive manipulation, a trait just as potent within successor The Perfect Definition. More predacious than its predecessor in beat and tone, the track is a virile invitation led by the verbal shuffle of Cooper wrapped in boisterous musical prowess.

Talking of virility, Do The Andy Puppet is sheer virulent contagion, a deceptively persuasive saunter spun from presumably The Allergies 2016 video for Rock Rock featuring Cooper and his material woven counterpart. It has the innocence of child entertainment and the machination of retail temptation but really it is one slice of sublime contagion putting a smile on the face and spirit.

Last Of A Dying Breed has ears and thoughts swaying with the essences of old school rap blessed in instinctive funk while Anything Goes with Canadian rapper Abdominal guesting, pounces on the appetite with rapacious relish and dark intrigue, the song another as shadowy as it is radiant. The vocal union of the two is animated captivation skilfully matched by the song’s less forward but no less engaging sounds.

Surely only a deceased heart can stop any body from twisting and rolling to the rhythmic pulse and jazz flumes of the superb Can’t Be Satisfied, the track a virus to hips and feet let alone the imagination, while B-Boy Blues spreads further diversity to the album with its steely breath and twang lined funk. Both hit the spot dead centre, each solely owning the listener for the expanse of their presence.

The sultry shindig of Sizzling Hot provides a sweltering festival of sound and enticement to which once more eager involvement is inescapable. Its heated swing slips into the interlude of Just One Of The JB’s, its declaration springing into the celebration of Rick Said So, a Beastie Boys toned roar riding the inspirations of rap’s spawning days from Rick Rubin forward.

The release ends with the summer energy of A New Dawn, a fascinating web of sound around a final spring of vocal enterprise and lyrical suggestion which simply draws ears and imagination into its folds. It is a spellbinding conclusion to one increasingly addictive encounter. Andy Cooper has been no stranger to attention and acclaim through his previous projects and debut solo album but maybe not as much as The Layered Effect could and should spark.

The Layered Effect is out now through Rocafort Records; available @ https://rocafortrecords.bandcamp.com/album/the-layered-effect

http://www.facebook.com/acooper75/    http://www.instagram.com/andycooper75/

Pete RingMaster 30/01/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

The LaFontaines – Common Problem

It is fair to say that the debut album from Scottish rock band The LaFontaines was an adventure of imagination and diversity which in varying degrees captivated from start to finish. Released two years back, Class was a magnet to acclaim and a new rush of eager fans but we can tell you now it was just the appetiser to a big, bolder, and more creatively eclectic triumph in the shape of its successor, Common Problem.

As maturity has grown in their songwriting and imagination loaded sound so has a darker attitude and reflective snarl upon the world and its issues. It is a tone which lines every note and word but seems to only accentuate every imaginative twist and turn going to make one striking and increasingly addictive release. Its predecessor saw Motherwell hailing The LaFontaines break the UK Top 100 and Scottish Top 10 as well as top the UK Indie Breakers chart. As mentioned, it was a potent lure for attention, receiving over three million plays on Spotify alone, but easy to feel just the appetiser to bigger success with Common Problem.

Recorded with producer Joe Cross (The Courteeners), the album immediately invade ears with sound and lyrical bite as Explosion looms over the senses. The snarl lined attack of rapper/vocalist Kerr Okan is direct and magnetic, and swiftly matched in the brooding drama of the sounds around him. The song is soon a web of intrigue and suggestion, a tempestuous aural clamour which devours as it seduces the senses. It takes no prisoners yet is a seductive invitation which fascinates at every turn with that new invention and growth in ideation at already work.

The following Too Late makes a calmer start, electronic lures aligned with Okan’s spits as it slowly but firmly entices. The melodic vocals of bassist John Gerard perfectly court and contrast the attack of the frontman, his bass and the guitar of Darren McCaughey casting their increasingly antagonistic enterprise around a rhythmic trespass cast by drummer Jamie Keenan. As the first, it is pure temptation taking the imagination to dark corners with relish and insight before Common Problem pulls them into its warmer melodic stroll with its title track. A recent single, the song flows like a sun kissed river with more intimidating undercurrents lurking through the vocal prowess and words of Okan, a combination forging one virulently infectious proposal which soon infests body and spirit.

Next up, Torture has a crystalline like shine to its melodic sheen, various facets reflecting emotion and thoughts in its harmonic embrace with Gerard’s tones a warm caress alongside the honesty bold contemplation of Okan. As with its predecessor, it is impossible not to be swept up in its creative arms, to immerse in its atmospheric depths and McCaughey’s electronic web before the harsher rock ‘n’ roll of Hang Fire grips. With flirtatious hooks and irritable rhythms, the track instantly stirs up attitude and pleasure; the two pronged vocal temptation with Gerard especially striking, irresistible. There is creative theatre in every breath and sound of the track but all born in an instinctive aggression and emotive fire which aims at and hits its target dead centre.

Through the smouldering but lively heat and angst of Goldmine and the rousing rock ‘n’ roll of Armour the hold on ears and imagination is only tightened, the first a consumption of sound and enterprise which haunts long after its fiercely pleasing presence and the second a slice of alternative cored rock which prowls and almost menaces as electronic and melodic spicing explore its rapacious climate. Both tracks push the band’s creative boundaries and the already lofty heights of the album though they are still eclipsed by the vivacious and lively antics of Atlas. Magnetic from the off, addictive soon after, the track is a kaleidoscope of sound and adventure which becomes more contagious and seductive melody by melody, twist by twist.

Raw and angry, What Do I Know makes an equally mighty impact with its ferocious punk ‘n’ roll. The union of grumpy bass and intrusive beats with Okan’s uncompromising intent is alone an inescapable draw but add the sonic fire of the guitars and the snarling vocal presence of Gerard and a major highlight is forged which next up Total Control cannot quite match though it certainly keeps things burning brightly with its own fusion of melodic suggestion and voracious heavy rock. Every song is a web of invention and sonic enterprise dosed with an array of flavours; its own an unpredictable maze with all avenues leading to unbridled pleasure before Release The Hounds springs its own powerful and voracious fire for a glorious invasion of the senses.

The album is brought to a close by the nagging exploits of Asleep, a track which has the listener feeing like it is prey to its predatory instincts and creative hunger. With a rhythmic jungle and sonic maelstrom, the track is stunning, Okan leading its hungry tango with lyrical gusto as every member and instrument within the band colludes in one beast of a temptation ultimately talking best track honours.

As potent and exciting as Class was, it has been blown away by Common Problem; as too most releases venturing out this year. The LaFontaines have grabbed one of the reins guiding the British rock scene with their new essential and unique proposal yet you just feel they have only scratched the surface of their imagination and craft to raise the anticipation for their nest move tenfold.

Common Problem is out now via Wolf At Your Door Records, available @ http://hyperurl.co/TheLaFontainesCP

The LaFontaines UK Headline Tour:

13th November 2017 – Lending Room, Leeds

14th November 2017 – Clwb Ifor Bach, Cardiff

15th November 2017 – Sound Control, Manchester

16th November 2017 – MK11, Milton Keynes

18th November 2017 – Barrowlands, Glasgow

19th November 2017 – Northumbria Institute 2, Newcastle

20th November 2017 – O2 Academy 3, Birmingham

21st November 2017 – Boston Music Room, London

22nd November 2017 – Leadmill, Sheffield

23rd November 2017 – Rock City, Nottingham

http://www.thelafontaines.co.uk/    https://www.facebook.com/thelafontainesmusic   https://twitter.com/TheLaFontaines

Pete RingMaster 31/10/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Black Jack UK – Stand Up

It has been a journey for Jack Hawksworth AKA Black Jack UK since being born in 1990, personally and musically which has now led to a new single which has the potential to firmly thrust the British hip hop/rap artist into new spotlights.

One of four children raised by a single mother on a rough council estate in Manchester, Jack found himself going down the wrong path and heading to prison as a teenager. Already though, he had found a passion for hip hop and especially New York gangster rappers Mobb Deep which helped nurture his own newly found talent and love for writing music during his final bout of incarceration. Upon release he concentrated on this new turn in his life, and started going to the studio to record his creations with subsequent videos of the recordings soon building an eager following and media attention.

Now Stand Up is poised to stoke further awareness of Black Jack UK; the song an introduction of himself to his home city and beyond but equally, after recent tragic events, an unexpected and potent call to fellow Mancunians and souls. Featuring God Father pt 3 of Infamous Mobb which is aligned to Mobb Deep and produced by Dr.G, the song quickly offers a raw and dramatic atmosphere as keys and rhythms almost prowl the imagination around, initially God Father pt 3’s introduction and Jack’s subsequent opening of heart and vocal prowess. It is a self-announcement of a new wind in the Manchester hip hop/grime/rap landscape, but equally a source of hope and emotional arousal for those growing up in similar circumstances and a possible escape with a chorus which as suggested suits recent city and national tragedies.

The track continues to pulsate and resonate, its music minimal yet magnetic around the equally potent vocal and lyrical presence of Jack. Loaded with potential and providing a thick pleasing of ears, Stand Up is the welcome to a fresh talent we might be hearing a lot more of ahead.

Check out the video for Stand Up @ https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/video-selector/

https://www.facebook.com/blackjackukofficial/    https://twitter.com/BlackJackUK_

Pete RingMaster 28/06/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

 

Wanza featuring Jhay Endless – Who We Are

Who We Are is the new single from Wanza with Jhay Endless alongside; a pair who are part of Left Wing Movement, a charitable democratic music group which is based in London and founded by Justin Benjamin in 2013. The song is the next in a line of ear pleasing, attention grabbing encounters from within the project, a track with plenty for pop, rap, and R ‘n’ B fans to get a kick from.

Wanza is serial rapper vocalist John Mwanza and Jhay Endless a talented grime rapper born Jonathon Scott; a creative pair which wraps and lyrically colours the captivating hooks of Garrett Raff within their new song. It is a misty blend in some ways to the heart of the song’s creation as you sense there may be more involved but swiftly clear that Who We Are is a magnet for ears.

The melodic prowess of Wanza soon simmers and harmonically roars around keys and lively beats before things settle as Jhay’s effect lined tones add to the blossoming drama. Melodies and harmonies smoulder as grimier textures strike and jab across the landscape of the track but it is the union of the pair’s distinctive and different vocal presence which grabs ears most potently, their enterprise matched by the increasing tension and mellow sighs of the sounds.

All combined, it is a rich enticement which even for ears that do not usually find a ready home in its style and genres provides a perpetual lure which cannot be dismissed but only recommended.

Who We Are is released August 8th.

https://www.instagram.com/endless1980/    https://www.instagram.com/1wanza/

Pete RingMaster 28/06/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Evoluzion – Changes

It is always fun when a song sneaks up on you and lures you back to it rather than you driving that urge. Changes from Evoluzion is one of those encounters, a track which certainly left enjoyment behind the first time but kept nagging away, sharing its hooks and haunting attraction in thoughts long after to spark repetitious returns to its presence.

The rap/pop seeded single comes from Australian musician/actor Cristian Saliadarre, an artist who signed his first recording contract back in 1989 at the age of fifteen and subsequently opened for MC Hammer and released the singles Bring Me On and The Right Way, the latter produced by New Kids On The Block drummer and Mark Walhberg’s producer, Derek Antunes.  Both hit the charts and sparked keen radio and TV attention and saw Saliadarre touring and appearing on numerous television shows, the latter track also finding international success.

Moving to the US to live in 1996, Saliadarre subsequently landed in Los Angeles to pursue his acting career with many major acting credits following before turning back and concentrating on music and songwriting in 2014. Eventually returning back to Australian and basing himself out of Sydney, a meeting and linking up with composer/musician/artist Viet-Van Nyguen sparked the birth of Evoluzion and now the successor to last year’s well-received single I’m a Dreamer.

Synths instantly cast a haunting melodic sky, its shadowy atmosphere crackling with sonic lightning and rhythmic whips as a portentous wind colludes with evocative melody woven textures emerging within Changes. Saliadarre’s reflective vocals are a blend of harmony and rawer rap hues, each aligning in an alluring presence subsequently joined by the floating enticement of female tones.

It is a magnetic union of sound and voice which entices first time around and brews greater enticement over time through those imagination stroking keys and the hook of Saliadarre’s vocals, both repeating in memory with or away from the song.

Changes is out now.

https://www.facebook.com/EvoluzionMusic

Pete RingMaster 02/06/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

The Final Clause Of Tacitus – Peace In Chaos

tfcot2_RingMasterReview

With a reputation ascending as boisterously as their fusion of sound infests the senses, UK rockers The Final Clause Of Tacitus make their global introduction with the mouth-watering Peace In Chaos EP.  The Reading hailing outfit create a roar of rap, funk, and metal which easily draws comparisons to the likes of Rage Against The Machine, Red Hot Chili Peppers, and early Faith No More. There is no mistaking or escaping their influences, so much so that the band’s sound is right now not the most unique yet it feels as fresh as most things out there with already glimpses of real individuality in songs and such their fiercely captivating prowess any wait for that potential to be realised will be no hardship.

Formed in early 2016, TFCOT quickly hit their stride live earning a potent name for themselves which in time saw the band gain support slots for bands such as Crazytown, Electric 6, and the Kamikaze Test Pilots as well as being invited to play the Skindred after party. Listening to Peace In Chaos, it is easy to imagine the raucous energy and exploits the band offer live and understand why they have increasingly established themselves firmly on the UK live scene.

The EP opens up with 7 Years, it instantly ensnaring ears in a web of steely grooves courted by a just as tempting throaty bassline. The rap style delivery of vocalist Matt Dunne is swift in appearance and persuasion, his expressive attack dancing on the thick grooves of guitarist Tom Burden as the bass of Andy Silva snarls. As suggested, the song’s sound is unapologetically recognisable but leaps around with enterprise and zeal to only please a quickly awoken appetite for its proposal. With the heavily swung beats of Luke Silver driving things, the song makes for a richly enjoyable start which continues with the following Give Them Blood.

ep-front_RingMasterReviewThe second track makes a sombre low key entrance, a touch of The Kennedy Soundtrack coming with it before the attitude at the heart of the track expels raw intensity in a funk infused, metal honed incitement. Riffs cut at the senses, scything across them as beats stab with precise aggravation. The track continues to twist and turn; the fire in its belly constant whilst ebbing and flowing as Dunne, backed by the plaintive cries of Burden, roars.

Without Resolve grabs ears next, its core hook pure bait for attention as the vocals and melodies scowl and sizzle respectively. Silva’s bass emulates that essential lure with its own funky groan, the song keeping its minimalistic but thick body controlled for pleasing results. A tango of a pleasing incitement, the track makes way for the impressive creative throes of Snake Town. Another rival to the first for best track, it boldly involves the band’s RHCP inspiration, infesting feet and hips with its excitable increasingly volatile funk.

TFCOT infuse some blues goodness into the agitated stroll of Your Next Click, adding a spicy hue to the funk metal honed groove the character of the track spins around. As its predecessor, there is no avoiding the track’s manipulation of body and enjoyment, a success just as readily found by closing track Hidden Patterns with its blaze of RATM attitude meets The Real Thing era Faith No More tenacity.

It is a fine end to a thoroughly enjoyable first listen of The Final Clause Of Tacitus. They are at the start of an adventure and growth already showing signs of stirring potential and invention. If rap/funk fuelled metal is your flavour than Peace In Chaos is a feast of promise and pleasure.

The Peace in Chaos EP is out now through most online stores.

https://www.tfcot.band/   https://www.facebook.com/TFCOT/   https://twitter.com/tfcotband

Pete RingMaster 01/03/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright