Enemo J – Miley Virus

promo picture - enemo j_RingMaster Review

Listening to Enemo J is like being submerged in a swarm of African honeybees running amok, their sound a nagging and ferocious irritant that never desists in aggression and rage once provoked into creation by the band’s inspirations and imagination. As proven by new album Miley Virus, it also produces raw sonic nectar that ignites the appetite and through an unpredictable tempest, leaves the senses wrung out but with a real greed for more. The UK metaller’s fifth album is arguably their most adventurous and diverse yet, as again the band weaves an agitated expanse of styles and flavours into their storms, equally though it is possibly their most testing, but as that only results in being amongst their most fiercely enjoyable, it is a definite asset.

Hailing from Burton On Trent and emerging at the beginning of the new millennium, Enemo J has gone on to unleash a quartet of successful and increasingly acclaimed full-lengths and earned a potent stature for a live presence which has seen the band play with the likes of Napalm Death, (Hed) PE, Sylosis, Black Light Burns, and Korn, create a stir with performances at Download in 2010 and more recently 2014, and play with similar reactions fests such as Bloodstock. Now the core line-up of vocalist Craig Hartwell, guitarist Haydn Edwards, and bassist Mikey Wyke are ready to nudge and punch the broadest spotlights with Miley Virus, expectations after many listens to the beast leaning towards a highly positive outcome in that intent.

Miley Virus Artwork_RingMaster Review     After the vocal led Intro, band and album explode into tempestuous life with This Is Not A Toy, immediately spinning web of steely grooves and predatory rhythms led by the distinctive and as always swiftly engaging roars of Hartwell. His attack though comes with great variety from his throat and within the band, an adventure matching the winding lures of guitar and more controlled but no less imposing prowl of bass. Aligning ferocious metalcore influences with a groove metal tantalising, and subsequently cleaner textures in sound and voice, the track is a gripping and dynamic incitement to set things off and highly addictive, especially the more it evolves its rapacious body.

The album’s title track steps forward next, Miley Virus from an electronic coaxing flexing rhythmic muscles and cantankerous grooves from the already impressing prowess of Edwards. Spilling rap metal tenacity and enterprise in vocals and thick initial temptation, the track creates a kaleidoscope of uncompromising intensity and melodic tempting which at different times hints at the like of Skindred, Stone Sour, and American Head Charge across a thoroughly magnetic persuasion. Unfortunately our promo did not come with any details of guests and full personnel on the album but amongst many things, female vocals add a great siren-esque lure to the track’s robust adventure.

Five Percent slips in next, Hartwell’s voice offering its hip hop prowess as the track begins its growth into a fiery protagonist stalking ears and inciting with lyrical and physical confrontation. As bestial as it is harmoniously alluring within a volatile and climactic ambience, the outstanding track is a gripping proposal matched by This Stops Today. Carnivorous riffs court a sonic imagination straight away, vocals leaning towards a rancorous toning as they provoke and excite with the track perpetually twisting and embracing a wealth of attacks and formidable flavouring. As its predecessor, it too marks another lofty peak within the album with its Slipknot meets Stuck Mojo like voracity, a pinnacle almost emulated by the death/metalcore lined savaging of Ides Of March. The song is a predator of ears and emotions, virtually everything about it an insidious prowl led by the great malevolence fuelling Wyke’s bass but then tempered by the acidic strands spewed by Edward’s guitar and again impressive vocals.

The boldest adventure within Miley Virus starts emerging from Majora, the song a roar of rap lined metalcore which suddenly turns, with more impressive female vocals at its centre, into a melodically honed gothic proposal. This is Enemo J, so things never stay in one direction for long though; a swarming tenacity of riffs blossomed from the savaging fury and in turn swinging back into the gothic coated seducing. To be honest the track caught our ears by surprise and took a while to totally convince but overtime it wins out, as too Throughout which takes a similarly longer route in succeeding with its convincing. A thick tapestry of flavours extreme and melodic which at times flirts with post hardcore tendencies too, the song casts more great female vocals alongside the caustic squalls of Hartwell as melodies from keys and guitar provide an evocative drama. Admittedly, it fails to spark the same richest of reactions as earlier tracks but in fascination and invention, the song is absorbing and easy to repeatedly explore.

Both the volcanically intensive Sufferance and the drama fuelled radiance of Time sear the senses and light the imagination respectively, the first with its blackened wind over a swirling sonic canvas of endeavour. Its successor spins a low-key but potent acidic hook repetition within a sonically and emotionally turbulent post hardcore landscape, vocals as expected as strong as the music in revealing the depth of diversity and invention within their grasp.

Miley Virus is concluded by Drunk Lions At The Wolf Party, a ravenous ferocity of sound and presence veined by melodic and harmonic ingenuity. The song truly comes alive once all the extreme contrasts within it collude to create an engrossing flight of ire and emotive elegance, in turn providing a fine and big close to a riveting and thoroughly enjoyable encounter. Enemo J just goes from strength to strength with each release, and though for personal tastes it is a little bit a proposition of two halves, each song thrills and enthrals in their own inventive way to make Miley Virus an easy recommendation to make.

Miley Virus is out from November 1st through Digital Media Records across most online stores.

https://www.facebook.com/enemoj

Pete RingMaster 31/10/2105

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Convoluted – Self Titled EP

convoluted_RingMaster Review

Providing a potential loaded and quickly satisfying introduction to themselves through their self-titled debut EP, Convoluted is a Swedish rap metal band beginning to make a hefty stir, certainly back home. Formed in 2014 by guitarist Stefan Stajkovic, bassist Michael Bergstrand, and vocalist Viktor Brus, the band has a depth and character to their sound which is much more than that previous tag implies. Merging an array of flavours it stands somewhere between Rage Against The Machine, Clawfinger, and Papa Roach, but additionally shows an open fondness for nineties grunge amongst other spices. It is a potion which going by the evidence provided by their EP, creates a slightly fluctuating but constantly rousing incitement.

With their line-up completed by drummer Oscar Ahlbin, Convoluted have become a potent live proposition on the Swedish underground scene, playing the likes of the Emergenza Festival and with fellow local bands such as Oviraptor Club and Mazed on their growing CV. Earlier this year the single Hospital Bed sparked online attention the way of the band through fans and radio shows alike, a success easy to see continuing as the band’s EP begins sizing up and confronting ears.

Recorded at Arena 305 and mixed at Weird Pony Studios by Bjorn Stegerling, the EP opens with The Doctor, a dark and sinister bellow that is as lyrically enticing as it is vocally and musically gripping. In no time ears and appetite are brewing a hunger for what is on offer; its hefty mix of flavours colluding to create an attention grabbing brawl of sound and creative energy sculpted in metal tenacity and getting the release off to a compelling and impressive start.

cover_RingMaster Review  Decide comes next, announcing itself with a bait of tangy choppy riffs which definitely has a spice of Limp Bizkit to them. From there it expels a controlled but energetic stride; the ebbs and flows in its gait adding additional drama to the emerging feisty swagger of the song. The strong voice of Brus leads the antagonistic yet respectful attitude of the track with potent style whilst plentiful grooves and hooks line each aggressive move offered and every wash of fiery melodic endeavour. It is a raw and enjoyable challenge which at times does lose its spark but only for brief moments before re-asserting a pleasingly hostile roar.

The following Get Back Up has a bit of Bad Brains to its confrontation but equally that Clawfinger-esque quality, especially around the vocals and the understanding sounds around them whilst Hospital Bed gets its groove on early with a bluesy/grunge coating. These soon spiral into a sonic weave of enterprise around a sturdy and bracing rhythmic imposing, the blend a rousing tempest to the unmistakable RATM canvas of the song. Excellent when unleashing its volatility but also captivating in its melodic calm, though not always consistently gripping ears as it should have, the track is an attention grabber with a tremendous fury of a climax.

The EP is concluded by the predatory and increasingly adventurous proposal of If There’s A God, an encounter sculpted with tangy grooves and emotive intensity. It is the most unpredictable and thus exciting track on the EP, one which if anything does not go far enough with its unique invention. It certainly brings the release to a strong and magnetic end, with the EP top and tailed by its loftiest peaks of invention, originality, and sound.

Convoluted reveal plenty of potential across their EP and a thick dose of it in certain songs. Theirs is not a sound with its own unique voice yet and the release is not without limitations but both have sparked healthy intrigue and anticipation for what comes next from the band whilst thoroughly pleasing ears.

The Convoluted EP is out now via iTunes.

Pete RingMaster 29/09/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Smash Hit Combo – Playmore

shc_RingMaster Review

Released recently, Playmore, the new album from French rap metallers Smash Hit Combo, is a proposition loaded with familiar elements and a rugged character which seemingly wears its influences openly, yet from this breeds something enjoyably fresh and certainly fiercely rousing. It storms the senses like some recognisable tempest generating an easy persuasion without prominently feeding expectations and carries a crossover roar of sound which reminds of many, yet twists it into something that, if not majorly unique, has the Smash Hit Combo hallmark.

The Cernay hailing sextet began in 2004 with the varied background and tastes of its members creating a mesh of rap, hip-hop, and thrash lined metal. Early demo Next Level was unveiled the following year before debut album Hardcore Gamer was released in 2007, an encounter awakening stronger attention and praise from fans. Two years later its successor Nolife emerged to stronger acclaim of fans and media; the release showing a more mature and varied colour to their music which continued to grow and move on through full-lengths Loading and Reset of 2010 and 2012 respectively. Playmore shows another evolution with darker metal tones aligned to jagged djent enterprise and nu metal devilment, it all colluding with the band’s rapcore heart. As suggested it brings a familiar aspect to its body through this union of styles yet makes an invigorating proposal for ears and appetite from start to finish.

cover_RingMaster Review   Playmore opens with In Game, electro hints within a sonic mist lacing ears before the song erupts in a tenacious shuffle of biting riffs, swirling acidic guitar, and imposing rhythms, all driven by the dual vocal raps of Paul Vuillequez and Maxime Keller. As the music, the pair’s delivery shifts and turns with clean vocals additionally fuelling the warm chorus whilst subsequently gaining greater ferocity and aggression in their lyrical spits. It is a thoroughly engaging and bracing mix which continues to leap around snarling and alluring before Sous pression takes over with an initially similar regime but is quickly uncaging its own melodic and predatory mix. It does not quite have the impact of the first song yet with the guitars of Baptiste Ory and Anthony Chognard spinning an engagingly textured web made up of melodic soars of enterprise and carnivorous growls aimed at the senses, it is a perpetually enthralling offering again as impressive in its vocals and harmonies as it is in tempestuous sound.

Baka hits a major high spot for the album next; its climatic air and virulently twisted landscape complete with aggressive attitude, a bracing and throatily roaring terrain of cartilage grinding riffs and bone shuddering beats from drummer Hincker Brice. Like Meshuggah in a salacious fling with Beastie Boys and (Hed) P.E., the track is a bestial treat wrapped in sonic imagination with the bass of Matthieu Willer the most predacious element in the outstanding storm.

Both Quart de siècle and Time Attack thoroughly please, if not quite reaching the same peak as those before. The first is a melodically bred persuasion bringing thoughts of The Kennedy Soundtrack to the fore before corrupting its calm with volatile intensity then restarting the cycle over again. Its successor is a bruising seduction with an industrial like haunting to its relatively peaceful atmosphere and tortuous angst through to its primal expulsions of sound and emotion, and like its predecessor, fully captivating with new nuances revealed in every listen.

The brief melancholic and electronically sinister instrumental of B3t4 warms the imagination for the crunching touch and stark landscape of Animal nocturne, the song another ripe with volatility in its presence and heart. In certain moments it stalks the senses and in others has the psyche embroiled in a maelstrom of melodic expression and deranged djent seeded animosity, rhythms and bass enhancing the mix with their fluid swings from antagonism to gentle temptation.

An opening melodic cast serenade opens up Déphasé straight after, its opening lure soon over run by intense emotion and ravenous sound but continuing to lay its highly persuasive colours throughout the raw and oasis like calm of the excellent voracity of noise and creative attitude. Its triumph is quickly matched and then ferociously surpassed by the hellacious turmoil of Le vrai du faux, the song a furnace of scuzzy guitar, waspish grooves and barbarous rhythms, again guided by just as varied and impassioned vocals. Flirting with some Limp Bizkit contagion as it gets more ferocious, musically savage, and enterprising, the track plants another big favourite moment in the body of Playmore.

It is a pinnacle closely repeated by the technically bedlamic and compelling Irréversible, where again elegant calm and ravishing hostility in sound and energy collide in a skilled and constantly evolving union. Arguably the most involved and boldest song on the album and one of its most enjoyably fascinating, it blisters flesh and withers the senses whilst equally exciting the imagination and seizing the passions; it another best track candidate with increasing persuasion with every involvement between ears and band.

Playmore is concluded by 48H, a partly English sung offering vibrantly merging sparkling harmonies and vocal prowess with an undulating atmosphere of raw emotion and reassuring calm. It is a great end to an increasingly enjoyable release. Many tracks share closely matching tones and templates and as suggested before, each comes with sounds you can easily imagine inspirations of, but most importantly the album just holds attention and thick satisfaction in its hand from first to last note. Smash Hit Combo deserves broader spotlights and Playmore just might be the key.

Playmore is available now via Slam Disques from online stores and at the band’s Bigcartel store.

Pete RingMaster 17/09/2015

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Bonz – Broken Silence

bonz_promo

With Stuck Mojo deeply entrenched in the passions maybe it is no surprise that Broken Silence, the debut album from BONZ, immediately felt like an old friend returning to stir up trouble and the passions. Led by the original frontman of the former, and welcomingly dosed with all the recognisable tones, raps, and roars vocalist Bonz offered in the major protagonists sculpting and ferociously driving rap metal forward, band and album swiftly set a lively spark in the passions. Around him though the sounds offer plenty more than an echo of former glories; twisting rap, nu, and southern bred groove metal into one riveting and ridiculously contagious proposition. Think Stuck Mojo, Body Count, and (Hed) PE in a passionate collusion with The Union Underground and you get a colour of the creative blaze of BONZ. It is familiar in many ways but still dramatically fresh and best of all, ridiculously anthemic and instinctively compelling.

The band came about after Bonz played with ex-Primer 55 guitarist/bassist Curt Taylor in Killer in the Workplace in 2009. With the band coming to an end in 2011, the pair wanted to continue working together and BONZ was the outcome. Early demos suggested something tasty was brewing, a realisation now openly unleashed on the world through Broken Silence. Last year saw the band sign with Germany’s Eternal Sound Records and the creating of the band’s imposing full-length debut, showing in the words of their bio that “the “Mouth of Mojo” is indeed back in fine form.”

If any album in recent times has started with as potent and irresistible a stomp as Broken Silence we missed it. Opener Sinister Grin is pure virulence, from the wonderful earthy lone bassline which sets it in motion, the song is the seeds to addiction. It is almost rockabilly in tone at the start but just the simple lure into the furnace of rap metal tenacity which explodes upon the listener soon after. Grooves are as immediate in appearance and captivation as the distinctive provocations of Bonz, their united bait framed by the punchy rhythmic trap laid by drums and bass. Body and thoughts are increasingly seduced as the track romps with anthemic fury and enterprise, every lyrical spit and tangy hook the inescapable kindling to a fiery ardour for the punk infested 4PAN1Ttempest.

Such a powerful gripping entrance was bound to be followed by a slight dip, not that Comes Over Me gives it much room to breed with its mustier breath and heavier rock infused protestation. Slim but strong diversity from the vocals adds to its inviting drama whilst the guitars scrub up a great dusty atmosphere to the riled encounter. It keeps the potency of the album high as does the excellent Godshine which follows. A thick vine of southern rock flaming veins the track, infusing the stormy attitude and intensity of the encounter with a sonic colour which flames nicely against the infectious vocal conflict.

The album’s title track like the opener is baiting and binding ears and imagination within seconds, this time with another delicious toxic groove which is belligerently unrelenting in its persistence. It cores the track from start to finish, shifting its shade of colour only as Bonz almost duels vocally with the listener. The rhythmic stomp of the track is just as gripping and incendiary, beats punching ears with a middleweight’s consistency and accuracy as bass and guitar prowl and flirt respectively. There is no denying you cannot escape the Stuck Mojo comparisons but it is hard to remember that band finding the same depth of swagger and epidemic like temptation in as many songs on a single release as already shown upon Broken Silence.

30 Seconds To Swat is a punk metal brawl, the bass providing a dirty groove whilst riffs blister and inflame the air with a budding fury. Not as unique as other tracks but a thoroughly absorbing incitement to neck muscles, the song makes way for the exceptional stalking that is Take It Personal. Bass and riffs prowl around the listener, leery and combat ready. They do step back for the rap of Bonz though, the bass accompanying his vocal contention as beats equally slow their assault. It is going to erupt at some point of course and does in the ridiculously addictive chorus which has voice engaged in its call within one round of its rivalry. The track sets another pinnacle in the heady heights of the album, easily sparking thoughts that if live audiences bellow for one song it would be this mighty antagonist.

There is enough diversity to the album to make Broken Silence more than a rap metal revival, the great melodic charm and chant of Sour Diesel teasing with a bluesy groove and Insane Clown Posse like vocal sway whilst Bad News stamps and seduces with a feisty fusion of hard and melodic rock. Jared Gomes and Co come to mind during the song but equally a loud whisper of P.O.D. shows itself, both mere spices to the rock ‘n’ roll roar. Their pleasing successes are surpassed by the great punk causticity and dirty rock ‘n’ roll bellow of Bad Love, where essences of hardcore and melodically infested rapcore collide within the furious climate of the song.

Completed by a great live version of Take It Personal, it is easy to suggest Broken Silence will be sheer joy for fans of rap and nu metal, and for sure those of Stuck Mojo even as BONZ unravel their own identity with their debut. If you are looking for flaws, maybe not enough striking diversity to the delivery of Bonz could be offered, though why change something which works, and surprisingly the release never gets as nasty and spiteful in its anger as expected. When it is this much fun and thrilling though, it simply does not matter.

Broken Silence is available now via Pavement Entertainment/ Eternal Sound Records @ http://eternalsoundrecordsshop.bigcartel.com/product/ltd-cd-digi-pack-pre-order-bonz-broken-silence-ltd-cd-didi-pack-2015-release-date-13-02-2015

http://bonzband.com/

RingMaster 11/02/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Reigniting passions and fight: An interview with Yap of One Minute Silence

PIC by Stefan Ferreira

PIC by Stefan Ferreira

 Like so many the return of UK rap metallers One Minute Silence bred a big sense of excitement for us when the band announced their return after a seven year absence a couple of years ago but it was the release of their first new material which came just a few weeks back that things took on real hungry proportions. The Fragmented Armageddon EP  was an absorbing and inciting confrontation that showed the band had lost none of the fire and fight inside its creativity and thoughts. Given the chance to find out more about the returning force we asked vocalist Yap about things like the cause of the ‘hiatus’, the spark that brought the band back, and of course the new EP as well as more politically shaped questions. Here is what he shared with us…

Hi Yap and thank you for sparing time to talk with us at The RingMaster Review.

I know we were not alone in having a strong twinge of excitement at not only hearing of the return of One Minute Silence but your first new release in a decade, the Fragmented Armageddon EP. Did you have any sense of the appetite for your return and hunger for new OMS sounds?

In a small nutshell – I went on a journey to ground myself, and came back grounded. I felt more focused as a person, more grown up.  I had ideas, but everything in the OMS camp is of an organic process, so it was just all about waiting to see what would happened when we regained our collective music head.

Can we first ask about the decision back in 2003 to put the band on the back burner? What was it that brewed and led you to that decision?

Like I said, I needed to go on a journey. I felt squashed in the music industry and in life in general. I was unhappy inside

Was it originally planned as a hiatus with thoughts to return at some point?

I had no thoughts of anything to be honest. I didn’t know what planet I was on, or where I was going. I just dropped the ring into the fires of Mordor and I left.

What filled the time of OMS’s member in the subsequent seven years?

All the guys kept their heads in music. Massy spent a lot of his time learning to produce his own sounds. And Glen, being the musical madman that he is kept himself busy mastering his mile. I subsequently went on to make a couple of albums that fell under the name Pink Punk. It was hardcore slam poetry produced by John Hendicott.

So what triggered your return in 2010 and was it an idea which found a receptive response with you all?

PIC by Stefan Ferreira

PIC by Stefan Ferreira

It was a slow burner in regards to us finding our flow again. We were all fresh in our heads, but on different roads musically. It was just a feeling burning in my belly that I wanted to explore I guess, and the guys felt the same way. It was very refreshing for us in many respects too though; being away from it all for so long and so on. It didn’t feel stale is what I am saying.

Always being a band to provoke and bring political and world issues to the attention do you think the time away brought a new and inspirational fuel to your personal and the band’s fire as much as anything musically seeded to spark your return?

Back in the day I was a young man carrying a lot of internal anger, and this shaped the sound of my words. I feel I am a better fighter now mentally as I carry no anger in my soul. This gives me more focus, and so I hit harder and better than ever before. It has allowed me to throw punches in the Zen sense, and direct my words with more precision if you like.

As the new songs on Fragmented Armageddon shows you do still have that fire in the belly not only musically but lyrically and politically but do you think it is much harder now to make an impact on the younger generation with so many seemingly seduced by the inane reality shows culture and the force feeding of primetime blandness musically and entertainment wise into their psyche?

I think there are a lot of blind people out there, but as the recent student marches have shown, there is also a healthy awakening. I think people are ready now more than ever for the truth. People need to be. The ship is sinking after all, and no one can shout conspiracy when the water is almost above their nose.

Why do you think each subsequent generation over past decades arguably lost the instinct to question and fight the wrongs of society, as the likes of bands like yourselves, Amen, RATM, UK Subs, Refused, Flogging Molly etc. have not lost their snarl and passion to inform and bring things to attention.

Generations have always been a mixed bag. Some listen and take action against the corruption of the day, while others march the line.

Do you think the unrests you pointed at and we are seeing across the globe will eventually translate into something similar in size in the so called more democratic countries like the UK and wake up the sleeping generations?

Chaos is coming. The four horse men are saddling their horses. It’s only a matter of time. We can’t stop what’s coming now. All we can do is our very best in the face of it. Millions will die. There’s nothing anyone can do about that fact. All we can do is keep promoting the truth until we find balance as a species. It’s a long road.

922931_561590037195380_1533141906_nBack to the music, Fragmented Armageddon contains two new OMS tracks, Fruit From The Lie and Pandemic Schizophrenia which immediately squashed any doubts that the band may have lost any of its potency creatively and passionately. Did you have any similar questions of yourselves about that aspect when first reuniting and writing?

To be honest I felt we were ready to write our best music.

There is also open evolution in your invention and sound bringing in new flavours and imagination to the songs, what inspirations or new ideas have you explored this time around with your songwriting and music?

I am glad you noticed. I am a more rounded person now in every respect. I have been out on the circuit trying to bring some of my philosophical ideas into the world arena. I believe I have new ideas that will help open the world of philosophy to a brighter day. My work in linguistics and psychology has brought me to a new door in my head, and once it opened everything changed. Obviously my lyrics would be an extension of my new broader perspectives.

Did the different musical ventures the band’s members investigated in the ‘time off’ also bring fresh avenues for your imagination to contemplate with your new material?

Yes, in many ways. I have a much broader understanding of sound now, as do all the guys in OMS.  However, trying to incorporate our new ideas took time.

Are the two songs a strong representation of what your next album will feel and sound like, can we get excited yet?

Yes, they are a good indicator. We have many great songs in the pipeline. All we need now is the finance to get it all together. Time and timing as Massy likes to say.

Have you approached the song writing and recording of the songs any differently to your previous albums and EPs?

In some respects yes, and it other respects no. It’s very hard to corner it.

Your line-up contains new drummer Martin Davies, how did you link up with him and what has he brought to the band which is not openly clear on the tracks for us outsiders?

Martin has been working with Glen for the last few years, and so Glen brought him to the bands attention. We knew from the first best he was our man. It’s quite astounding to listen to him in action in the studio. There’s nothing he can’t do on the kit.

You are currently working on your new album so can you give any spoilers for us about it?

PIC by Stefan Ferreira

PIC by Stefan Ferreira

It will represent the zeitgeist of our times.

Other than the album what is on the near horizon of One Minute Silence?

We are waiting to see where the wave will take us. It’s all easy and in good flow. We are just a bunch of happy people, and if we get to finish another album, well then great. If we don’t, I will sit in fields pondering the universe regardless.

Once again a big thanks for chatting with us.

Have you any last thoughts you would like to leave us with?

We were touched by the response we got on our return. We hope we find our way back to the live stage. We hope we find our circle in the pit. Peace to all.

Thanks Pete.

Read the Fragmented Armageddon EP  review @ https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2013/06/16/one-minute-silence-fragmented-armageddon/

Pete Ringmaster

The Ringmaster Review 23/07/2013

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Final Trigger: Skrap Metal Vol II

FT Promo Screamers without Logo

Imagine the attitude of Hed (PE) merged with the funk devilry of Infectious Grooves and the rap metal aggression of Motown Rage fused into the swagger of The Union Underground, then those essences instilled into a vat of punk rage. What emerges from the toxic fumes of that volatile alchemy is an unpredictable and riotously contagious force, or to give it a name, Final Trigger. Formed in 2006 and hailing from Toronto, the band maybe is not a name yet instantly recognisable but with the release of the excellent Skrap Metal Vol II you can only suspect wider recognition is just around the corner.

The new release follows Skrap Metal of 2009, both coming through Boonsdale Records. The debut received strong acclaim with its single Start A Moshpit gaining particular attention across Canada and the US. Following years has seen the band play alongside the likes of Suicidal Tendencies, Marilyn Manson, Dillinger Escape Plan, Protest The Hero, Baptized In Blood, Hail The Villain, Threat Signal, Slaves On Dope, Agent Orange, Blaze Ya Dead Homie, Boondox and many more,  as well as them supporting Mushroomhead on a tour across the States. Now with the release of the David Bottrill (Tool/Mudvayne/Stone Sour/Godsmack) mixed Skrap Metal Volume II, the quartet of J-Roc (vocals/guitar), Fazio (bass/vocals), JJ Tartaglia (drums), and Profit G (DJ/vocals/keys) may just be looking at a new world hunger for their distinct and insatiable musical devilry.

The seven track release attaches itself to the senses firstly through the single Face It. Guitars entwine their fiery sonic tendrils Skrap Metal Vol II Album Cover 1600x1600around the ear initially, tempting the passions to take a look before the tumbling heavy muscled rhythms make their play for the affections. In reality as the sounds rubs eagerly over the senses and the vocals begin their tempting squalls it is the whole combination which provides the irresistible hook, the barbs of which become impossible to refuse once the grooves twist and writhe insidiously and the vocals and sound take on a Suicidal Tendencies like punk beckoning. With a deep bark to the chorus and Five Finger Death Punch like rabidity to the riffs adding to the persistently shifting stance, the song is a dynamic and explosive introduction and platform for the album to spring from, which it does in varying degrees.

Through The Darkness and Knock Somebody Out follow up with their own distinct personalities, the first a metal forged encounter which sonically claws at the ear whilst the range of vocals, growling and rapping take their bite at the senses with equal belligerence. It is a relatively straightforward track which without the continual and wealthy mix of flavours employed in its predecessor pales in comparison if still a song which energises the appetite. Its successor similarly sticks to the muscular metallic intent of the band but digs deeper to expel some tight flavoursome grooves and find an intensive confrontation which would feel at home in any American Head Charge or Static X fury.

Things leap back to the opening heights with next up Just A Freak, a track which stomps through the ear with the delicious salacious devilment of Hed (PE) and the charged schizophrenic energy of early Mudvayne. Prowling and leaping around with a thrilling mix of hip hop, metal, and tantalising anthemic urgency, the song is a virulently contagious call to primal needs and energy expelling participation, which like the first track leaves the listener breathless and hungry for much more, especially for the dramatic and potent drums and scurrying weave of incendiary riffs.

Time I’ve Wasted opens with an evocative melodic persuasion which is almost Breed 77 like before fusing in samples and dub lilted invention before the brewing storm. Into its stride the tempest is again unpredictable, an undulating intensity and energy in league with a constantly evolving vocal display. Eventually though the senses flattening might of the track wins through even though the rampant and fluid mix is still allowed to shape the direction of the excellent track. It is a song which dangerously veers towards the edge of chaos and disaster but the band managed to ride the rougher less impressive moments to create another convincing treat.

The Kottonmouth Kings sounding Everyday with its mesmeric mystique and the predatory T.H.C. impressively complete the release, both outstanding and diverse offerings with the second especially throwing the senses and passions around with the rapaciousness of a hurricane. Skrap Metal Vol II is a great release which installs Final Trigger as one of our regular playlist newcomers, something the band will achieve with a great many we suspect.

www.Facebook.com/FinalTriggerMusic

8.75/10

RingMaster 08/07/2013

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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One Minute Silence – Fragmented Armageddon

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On hearing that UK rap metallers One Minute Silence were about to rampage across thoughts and senses again after a seven year hiatus it is fair to say excitement was high and expectations hungry. Just maybe there was also a wonder and fear that the band would have lost their potency through the long break. Listening to new EP Fragmented Armageddon wiped any such concerns away, the release confronting the ear with the power and imaginative attitude sculpted sounds we are used to from the quartet and when played alongside last album, the 2003 released One Lie Fits All, and the likes of the Revolution EP or the single We Bounce, it is like they have never been away. It is an absorbing and inciting confrontation which awakens thoughts and passions and though the release has elements which do leave one a little dissatisfied in the lack of more new material, it is impossible not to  feel even more enthused from its creative tempest.

Since the hold on the band its members have eagerly explored new musical styles within projects set in the likes of folk to electronica and jazz to beat poetry. These are essences which appear to have brought influences and inventive ideas to the new phase of One Minute Silence though their core is still openly rap metal with hardcore/punk grievousness. The band on the evidence of the EP has certainly lost none of its fire in sound and politically inspired narrative neither, lyrically and in attitude but at the same time appear to have stretched into new avenues to express their passions and intrigue the mind and senses. It is hard to make a full declaration of there being new venture to their sound and enterprise and imagination from two songs of course, the planned album to be released next year will confirm if that is so, but it is easy to be assumptive in the strong possibility indicated by Fragmented Armageddon. With original members vocalist Yap, guitarist Massimo Fiocco, bassist Glen Diani linking up with new drummer Martin Davies, One Minute Silence will easily grab attention with their returning release, the collection of new material, re-workings, remixes, and an acoustic track sure to spark up and refresh the greedy appetites which feasted on the band before.

The Freeport Entertainment released EP brings opening track Fruit From The Lie into view through a compelling sonic mist but Fragmented Armageddon EP coveras soon as the recognisable voice and taunt of Diani’s bass and the vocals of Yap encroach the ear everything steps into place musically and emotionally for the passions. As spine-tinglingly distinctive as ever and ripe with that expected sense that band and song are about to leap for the jugular, the track instead takes its time, teasing with chilled atmospheric embraces and melodic dances whilst drums brew up an agitated framework to further captivate and feed on the listeners reactions. Once the explosive heart of the track does erupt air is driven from the lungs and thoughts ignited from the blaze of rapacious energy and provocative lyrical persuasion. The track continues to ebb and flow in intensity and attack but is a continual aggravator of the mind and instigator of unashamed selfishness to hear and feel more from the song, which it delivers with raging invention across its rhythmic barracking and sonically carved melodic fascination.

Second new song Pandemic Schizophrenia opens amidst street unrest and a social emergency call, vocals beginning a raw stance whilst bass and drums spear the scenery with monosyllabic punches. It is a potent warning on the ear with the guitar riling the ambience further as it leads to another contagious bruising laced in a sonic heart driven fire of intensity. Not quite corrosive but defiantly abrasive, the song tantalises and strokes the ear with addictive grooves and predatory imagination whilst the vocals of Yap prowl and incite it all, his delivery at times an acidic torrent of expression which sounds like a mix of John Lydon and Kirk Brandon. Like its predecessor it is a stunning track and ensures the wait for their proposed album is going to be impatient.

The release continues with firstly a reworking of You So Much As Move, a track from the One Lie Fits All album, and two remixes the second of the same song by Fiocco with before it a remix of Fruit From The Lie by Ben Hurd. Though they all feel like fillers to stretch the comeback release they do not hold back on providing satisfaction, the first of the trio a rampant and slightly rabid expanse of atmospheric temptation and carnivorous ravishment. It is shaped with enthralling enterprise and thought, its intent chewing on the senses whilst simultaneously bewitching them into uncaring submission. Though not a fan of remixes here, both tracks do leave a welcome taste in the mouth even if fires are not sparked by their presences, which also applies to the closing acoustic song Early Morning, though again the melodic emotive caress offered leaves sure and undeniable pleasure.

     Fragmented Armageddon is a great return from One Minute Silence which shows them to be as strong and creative as ever. It is also a rich tease for their future album and following stage return. World be warned the impacting storm has not lost its bite.

www.facebook.com/oneminutesilence.band

8/10

RingMaster 16/06/2013

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

http://www.audioburger.com