Calabrese – Born with a Scorpion’s Touch

 

CALABRESE  2 (Born With A Scorpion's Touch) 2013

    Calabrese has continued to steal the passions of psychobillies and horror punks worldwide since stepping forward in 2003. Album after album, song after song, show after show, they have been a persistent magnet for those infected by their distinct sound and riotous b-movie inspired presence, and we stand amongst the legion infected. So it was with relish we dived into the band’s fifth album Born with a Scorpion’s Touch which receives its UK uncaging this month. Each of the band’s previous albums has impressed and pushed the band’s adventure but with the new contagion, the trio of blood brothers, Bobby, Davey, and Jimmy Calabrese has unlocked a maturity and exploratory enterprise which opens up a new chapter for the band in songwriting and presence. The trademark Calabrese sound is still the potent lure but it is graced and veined with a greater expanse of styles and ingenuity to create quite possibly the pinnacle of the band’s exploits to date.

     The band has always built their sound on the influential breaths of bands such as The Misfits, Black Flag, Samhain, The Damned, Black Sabbath, Danzig, and Ramones, and there is certainly no deviation from that potent well upon Born with a Scorpion’s Touch either but it is infused with a rich incitement of varied metallic and heavy rock essences within their individual sound. It emerges from this dramatic brew as an enthralling and unpredictable encounter, one which continues to make Calabrese a major force and provocation in underground rock ‘n’ roll. Now though they might just become a well-known incitement for world attention thanks to Born with a Scorpion’s Touch.

    Released via Spookshow Records, the album opens with the brief American Rebel Death Riders, a primarily instrumental Calabrese Born With A Scorpion's Touch Album Covertrack which fires up the energy of album and listener with its mix of groove and thrash metal within a juggernaut of rock ‘n’ roll voraciousness. The track rampages down the ears highway igniting imagination and emotions before departing for the following title track. From the first of expected film samples which has always coloured the band’s releases, a ravenous groove breaks free from within a blaze of riffs and thumping rhythms. It is irresistible toxic bait from which the band swings their hooks and infectious chorus to predictably irresistible effect. It is fair to say there is not many bands who can breed the virulence to their barbs and calls as the Phoenix threesome and no chance that the band will lose their lethal touch, as proven by the second track. Again there is a broader hard rock stroke to the song without removing itself from the masterful walls of psychobilly and horror rock.

     I Wanna Be a Vigilante continues the impressive start, its opening wind swept beach reminding a little of the classic Shangri-las’ song, is soon welcoming the croon of Bobby and Jimmy’s vocals and an emotively honed blaze of melodic punk spawned pop balladry with a definite Ramones like aspect to its expanding walls and lures. There is also an element which reminds of The Damned, a gothic glaze that only adds to the depths of the track’s drama. From its commanding presence the snarling bass of Jimmy welcomes in the next up At Night I Am the Warmest, a track which launches at the ears with a feverish appetite and energy once into its full charge. The rhythms from Davey thump and pummel with intimidation whilst grooves and hooks engage and seduce the senses, all held under the rein of the excellent vocal persuasion singularly and dually of Bobby and Jimmy. As epidemically commanding as a voracious fever, the track leaves appetite and emotions aflame before they are taken on another inflammatory ride by the sonic surges and hunger of Loner at Heart. The track burns and sears the sense with a predatory gait and intensity to its antagonism but tempers it with a delicious weave of melodic and addiction forging enterprise.

     Both Mindwarp and Danger leave lingering fingerprints on passions and memory, the first an almost brawling stomp of rock pop with horror rock provocation and its successor a rhythmically menacing encounter courted by sonic beauty and a cache of insidiously compelling barbed grooves and anthemic toxins. It is a brilliant trap living up to its name with ease. Its might is as good as matched by the tarmac smelling heat of Ride with the Living Dead, the song just another which sparks imagery and creative thoughts as powerfully as it does the ardour which only increases its rapture for the release.

    Only the Dead Know My Name moves in on the imagination next, another ambient setting the veil for a track which seduces with more swerves and curvy temptations than a lap dance and just as unhealthily captivating as reality fades away once up against the claws and grip of the song. It is a stylish and impossibly alluring dance with riffs and hooks instinctive protagonists to give full submission to, as are those unleashed by the brilliant I Ride Alone, though brilliance can be draped over every song on this exceptional inspiration as a trait. As with all the songs, there is a wider, richer colour and fermentation to the band’s songwriting and sound which simultaneously feeds all wants and desires for a Calabrese release whilst exceeding those needs with even greater challenging adventure.

   Closing with the rigorously catchy There’s an Evil Inside, a more singularly rockabilly cast treat, Born with a Scorpion’s Touch is a magnificent slab of resourceful and inventive rock ‘n’ roll, one unafraid to push its and the band’s formerly perceived boundaries, though they have never stood still in pressuring limits to be fair. We suggested that the album was possibly the pinnacle of the band’s creativity until now, listening to it again as this is written let us amend that by omitting possibly.

http://www.calabreserock.com/

10/10

RingMaster 17/03/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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Snarling with varied weaponry: an interview with John Robb of Goldblade

Goldblade 1

Punk has been treated to some exceptional albums so far this year and none any better than the new album from UK giants Goldblade. Their sixth album, The Terror Of Modern Life, is a masterful, openly diverse, and ferocious strike of irresistible and inciting riots of invention and enterprise. One of the most thrilling releases to unleash its triumph upon 2013 so far, the thirteen track brawl snarls and provokes thoughts and senses with pure imaginative craft. Seizing the opportunity to talk with band founder and vocalist, John Robb, we charged up our questions to ask one of the genre’s biggest creators about the album, punk itself, and his own history.

Hi John and welcome to the site, thank you for sharing time to chat with us.

Album six, The Terror Of Modern Life, has just unleashed its confrontation on the world; does the feel, thrill, and anticipation change from release to release?

Of course…and it gets to be a bigger thrill.  It’s a mixture of thank fuck we are still doing this and surviving in the collapsing music business and still have enough inspiration to still want to make music!

With this album we felt really excited. We knew we were onto something good with this record a long time ago. We got the sound we wanted from the start and we worked hard to get the songs right. We wanted a variation of styles- from fast kinda hardcore rushes to anthemic punk to dark tribal stuff to droning post black metal apocalyptic pieces. It’s like a collection of all the various strands of punk and its off shoots – we wanted something people could dance to at gigs, something full of hooks but also fuck with things a bit as well. We wanted to make a record that reflected the underlying darkness and unease of these times, times where the word ‘terror’ is the key word like the word ‘clash’ was the key word in the punk times and caused the classic band to name themselves.

We immersed ourselves in the album and pushed ourselves to the brink. We then made the sound the way we wanted, in a way we never got close to before. We wanted something darker and heavier- we wanted the bass to sound right- I had reformed my old band The Membranes for a few gigs and played bass again and it reminded me of the fundamental power of that instrument if you stick it though a rat pedal and play it with a direct venom- this cross pollinated into Goldblade and infected the album and it really places us back into the place we wanted to be- that twisted end of punk occupied by Killing Joke, Dead Kennedys, Stranglers, Black Flag, whilst continuing the great quest of the Clash but updated to a 21st century feel because we have never stopped listening to new music.

The year has already seen the outstanding new UK Subs album XXIV provoke and impress and now your scintillating encounter, it feels like the ‘old brigade’ is still driving and leading UK punk, does it feel like that for you?

There are great younger bands around- Dirt Box Disco album is stuffed full of great songs- I think it’s a case of older bands not giving up in their dotage- with discipline and concentration you can make the best and most urgent history of your history. Punk, by its nature, doesn’t have leaders- we just operate in our own space! The UK Subs album is great and Charlie is an inspiration to anyone, there have also been great albums from Killing Joke, the Stranglers and other bands from that generation- it’s like those bands have found their teeth again- maybe they also feel the urgency of these times…

The Terror Of Modern Life is as with your previous albums a collection of songs which steer through, challenge, and stand eye to Goldblade-the-terror-of-modern-life-296x300eye with injustices and social wrongs, but your most potent and venomous yet?

I think things are getting a bit helter skelter out there and it’s hard not to reflect this, the last ten years has seen things get very unsteady in the world and that’s bound to get into the music- we have no interest in lecturing people, we just reflect what’s happening- people can make their own minds up or just dance to the music- it does not concern us what people think of the words, the world seems to be in a fast forward towards several different conclusions and out album reflects this tension.

Do you feel the impact of politically fuelled songs whether on the personal, social, or world level is still as strong as it used to be within not only punk but music as a whole? Do people and especially the latest generation of young people listen to songs and music the same way as those before them?

To be honest the impact has lessened in some ways and yet in others it’s got stronger- music, the music discourse is no longer driven by the counter culture and there are many strands of thought out there, but that’s inevitable because people don’t have the time and the impact of being a political song is less than when it first came about in modern culture. I don’t think young people are less political than they were years ago- that’s a bit of a myth. Not all of punk was political and it didn’t have to be- punk was many things- it could be comic book like the Ramones or political like Crass and both were genius for me. I think people sometimes feel overawed by the world these days and feel detached from the political process and that’s creating dangerous vacuums. We don’t claim to have all the answers but we have definitely have all the questions.

You obviously grew up with and were inspired by the birth of punk and the bands sculpting its first mighty wave; do you still see and feel the same essences politically and musically in today’s punk bands outside of yourselves and the still provocative bands from back then?

First wave was important for me but I don’t wallow in there for ever- those records always sound magical and powerful but I love lots of new music as well even it affects me in a different kind of way. Modern punk bands are as varied musically and politically as any bands were back then, it has changed in many ways as well- even if it was a business then as well it seemed to be a bit more haphazard and suicidal- now it’s a long term operation and band’s gigs are very different. In some ways punk has become a tradition like jazz or blues and a way of making music or dressing- and that’s understandable – the music and the style are very attractive and create a cool- the only danger is getting trapped which is a contradiction of the punk spirit!

For those unaware of your intensive history within music could you give us the history of John Robb between say ’77 and the emergence of Goldblade?

Wow, that’s long and complex!

Born in Blackpool, formed The Membranes in the punk period and also started a fanzine called Rox. The Membranes became a big underground band with noisy records inspired by the dark zone in the middle of punk and post punk- we toured the world and were critic and John Peel faves. At the same time I started writing for Zig Zag and then Sounds and covered all the fallout of the punk generation from the goth to grunge scene to Madchester to baggy to punk itself- being the first person to interview Nirvana and also coining the phrase Britpop, formed Goldblade in the mid-nineties to fly the flag for rock n roll in the middle of the non-rock n roll decade! Wrote books on punk and the Stone Roses and the eighties underground scene as well as doing TV and radio stuff…and that all continues now with Goldblade playing all over the world etc…

As you mentioned your writing, something you are renowned, has that experience and aspect of your life impacted or brought a view upon your music lyrically and in regard to creating sounds which brings something different to Goldblade, something other bands might lack?

Of course, even for the simple reason that I hear lots of music and it also keeps me fully engaged in the culture and keeps me interested and investigating everything. I’m a compulsively creative person who keeps making, creating and writing stuff. Apart from hearing so much stuff I think the impact on Goldblade is more minimal as that is a very instinctive thing, we make the music that entertains us and the songs are kicked about in the rehearsal room till they sound and feel right to us and not to fit in with anybody, anywhere!

Listening to The Terror Of Modern Life alone, one has the sense inspirations are far wider than just the early days and sounds of punk. What does give you food for thought musically?

You got it- some people think we operate only within punk but we have a far wider listening base than that- even punk was originally about dub and other musics- it’s good to mess with things but keep the focus and the energy- sometimes it’s great to switch to fast and furious punk rushes just to get that adrenalin fix, sometimes it’s good to find a different rhythm or atmosphere- it could be from black metal or from dub reggae but it must always be put through the Goldblade mangle and made to sound like us.

Goldblade 5Did you approach the new album any differently to your previous releases?

We wanted something a bit more extreme, more heavier, and rawer; we felt the last album had been too tame and too much click track and production- we wanted the record to sound live and if the songs speeded up towards the end then great! Because they speeded up with excitement- ‘rock n roll should speed up’ as Guy Stevens told the Clash during London Calling recordings…we had to record the album twice because of a fallout with the label but the second time we recorded it in two days flat and mixed it in 2 days- the urgency was vital to the album, it gives it an edge and we are addicted to the edge…

The songs on the album strike hard lyrically and deliver them with some of the most deviously addictive hooks and grooves, which comes first in your songs as a generalisation?

It can be either- we can have songs and bash them out in the rehearsal room and work out a vocal melody or it can be a phrase or some lyrics that come with a tune and we build the song around it- it’s a very varying process.

Is there any particular moment on The Terror Of Modern Life which gives you the strongest satisfaction?

I think the playing by the band is amazing, brother Pete’s guitar is fantastic- every time I listen I hear something new, even on the songs I mainly wrote! And getting the bass sound the way I wanted it to be- as heavy and raw as it should be- that made a big difference- when we finished the album we were really happy with it, I listened to it over and over- normally you feel a bit down when it’s finished but this time I could actually listen to this as an album and felt really excited by the sound and the reaction we have got so far with all the great reviews has proved this.

And anything you would have changed or like to have evolved further in hindsight?

That’s for the next album!

I would change the way people consume music- I think it’s getting almost impossible for people to record and release music now unless they are rich- the download thing has killed it for small underground labels and studios and everyone is really struggling out there- this is our first release where most of the people listening will have not bought the record but downloaded it from the internet and from the pirates- it doesn’t make me angry as technology is part of music- but it may mean that making another album may be almost impossible for us and lots of other bands. We will have to think of other ways of making and releasing music in the future.

The late seventies and punk gave freedom and realisation to bands and people that they could make music as they wanted, on their own terms. Do you think that freedom or realisation is still as potent, has the internet and the digital world given back that belief?

In some ways yes- you can get heard more now and the consumer has the power which we love- cult bands can be heard now and don’t have to grovel to the mainstream media for attention- that’s been very important to the underground and made a real difference- this is coupled with the real problems that many studios, labels and shops are having because of the pirate thing- we felt that if you want to give your music away for free that’s up to you and not someone else but we realise that there is nothing we can do about it- the internet is young and its effect on culture cannot be measured yet- at the moment its chaos out there and like the wild west- and as punks we love that aspect of it but we are not so servile that we want people we don’t know to make money out of us!

There has always been a unity and kinship between punk bands, certainly in its origins, do you still think it exists, can you feel that Gold Blade Smallunity now?

Yes we all know each other, some bands are more friendly than others but there is a unity- I think we all face the same problems!

You have just come off a tour with the Misfits, and a band we love and feature constantly on our podcasts The Bone Orchard and The Ringmaster Review, Dirt Box Disco who you mentioned earlier. How was the tour and did you have to put those punk n roll freaks from DBD in their place ;)

DBD are good people and a great band and there songs are killer- I think they will be one of the biggest bands on the scene by the end of the year and we can then go and support them. It was great to tour with them and I had to chuckle when we played with them at the Manchester Ritz when their stomach problems were quite loud back stage. :)

You have toured all over the world it seems, any particular places other than the usual countries which you enjoyed and surprised you with their knowledge of your sounds?

Algeria was amazing- we were the first band to play there for 20 years and yet people knew our songs – that’s the power of YouTube for you- the songs that were on YouTube they were singing along- we have played all over- we have played Russia a few times and there is talk of going to China…

Once more a big thanks John for talking with us, anything you would like to add?

Join our Facebook page – http://www.facebook.com/goldbladeband

Review the review of The Terror Of Modern Life @ https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2013/05/19/goldblade-the-terror-of-modern-life/

Pete RingMaster

The RingMaster Review 30/05/2013

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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Delicious horrors: an interview with The Monster Ones

-The Monster Ones-

From within the heart of the Palma de Mallorca region of Spain there has stirred in the past couple of years, a fresh and exciting storm of graveyard rock n roll. It comes in the thrilling shape of The Monster Ones, a band which collects the essential essences of various styles and flavours to create a fusion which leaves all fans from psychobilly and rockabilly to punk and horror rock, an energised limb casting explosion of energy. The quintet is a force on the rise and one we wanted to know much more about and find what drives their obvious hunger. So we had the band tell us all.

Hi, welcome to The Ringmaster Review and thank you for taking time to talk with us.

Firstly would you please introduce the members of The Monster Ones?

The Monster Ones are:

-Carpi Malone: Guitar and Back Vocals

-V: Guitar and Back Vocals

-Cecile The Beast: Lead Vocals

-Maf: Drums and Back Vocals

-Elvis Lugosi: Bass and Back Vocals

When and how did the band come about?

In 2008, Carpi and Cecile started the band, along with Bukake Kid (bass) and the help of some friend drummers; we collaborated with them in the early shows as we still did not have an official drummer in the band.

It was so fun! In just 15 days after getting a place to rehearse, we gave our first concert. We had no idea how to play, but had a great time, and from the beginning we have had the support of our family and friends who have encouraged us to learn and evolve day by day.

Your music is a great hybrid of punk, horror rock, glam, rockabilly and more. How do you describe it when asked?

Good question! hahaha! We used to call it Horror-Glam-Punk-Rock Band.

It’s just what you say … A mixture of many things we love, and we will not spare any of them. Rock ‘n’ Roll is beautiful in all its aspects, and we love to play with them all.

From your varied and flavoursome sound one imagines your influences too are wide. Who are the major ones to Cecile The Beastimpact your sound and invention?

Many, many influences, yes! We are 5 members in the band that have musical tastes in common as: Misfits, Ramones, Cramps … But each of us, individually, brings his/her own influences too.

I am right in thinking the band has evolved from initially playing cover songs to the all original composition making group it is today?

Yes, our first show lasted only 20 minutes, and consisted solely of covers of some of our idols (Misfits, Ramones, Turbonegro, Iggy Pop  …). But immediately after, we started to compose our own songs.

Tell us about the early times of the band and how easy or difficult it was to find a place in Spanish rock music.

Well, from the beginning we have this eagerness and enthusiasm to work; we believe that’s fundamental to make a site in the rock scene anywhere. Stay there, no matter what happens … And the harder it is, the more effort we put.

Is there a vibrant rockabilly/garage/horror rock scene in your homeland?

In our home, Mallorca Island … If you rely only on the local music magazines, the predominance is for Indie Pop

But really, if you visit the rehearsal rooms or go out to see concerts, you can see that there are great bands of Punk Rock, Metal, Rockabilly and Garage.

You released the Transilvania Rock City EP in 2010 and last year the excellent I Wanna Be A Teenage Monster!! EP. How would you say the band has evolved between the two in the aspect of songwriting and the sound itself?

In “Transylvania Rock City”, we recorded with a different formation to the present and served as our first experience in a recording studio.

Now, together with the current members, we feel our sound and compositions much more defined and worked.

In 2012 we decided to start experimenting with home recordings made by Maf (drummer). We recorded our songs in his living room, it was very useful to carefully analyse our music, and in this way we can improve.

From these recordings is where “I Wanna be a Teenage Monster!!” was born. It contains four of the most simple and direct compositions of The Monster Ones, of which we feel very proud.

 How does the songwriting work within the band?

In our band we are five songwriters. We all love to create, and we always do it together in the rehearsal room. It’s fun to see how each of us brings something different than expected, but which engages perfectly with the final composition.

The Monster OnesThe songs are steeped in horror, sci-fi, and comic book imagery and essences. Are these areas the major inspirations for your lyrical imagination or do you take the ‘horror’ of every day as a provocative factor too?

Horror, sci-fi, and comics are the main inspiration. Also very useful are the dreams and nightmares.

Tell us about your live shows, I hear they are an event few forget once tasted :)

Thanks, it’s the best we can hear about our shows! :)

In our live shows, we forget the boring real world and focus on the fun.

Yes, we like to dress and make-up for every performance … It is a form of expression, and also a way to carry over our audience with us to this imaginary world of horror and Rock ‘n’ Roll. We want them to get into the story and feel part of it.

Tell us about Zombie Walk and Zombie’s Party in Mallorca which I believe you helped found in 2010. Is this now an annual event and what do they comprise of?

Yes, it is an annual event that takes place every summer, thanks to our friend Adrian Garcia, who makes the hardest work of organizing this. Each year come more zombies, surpassing the 400 undead in the 2012 edition. The route of the Zombie Walk ends with a Zombie’s Party, where we give a show, along with other friend bands, varying in each edition.

Soon we’ll begin preparations for the 2013

With the internet have you found a widespread fanbase around the world growing for your sounds?V

Yes, we have a Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/pages/The-Monster-Ones/117290895817

and also our official website: www.themonsterones.com

Both updated with latest events and news from the band.

How do you feel about the internet and its part in the rise and arguably demise of the chance of success for new emerging bands?

It is a very useful tool, both for the bands and for music fans.

Where do you hope to find The Monster Ones in five years?

Evolved, full of good experiences, with several albums behind us, and many others to record. Stay there and keep rocking!

What is next from the band and plans for 2013?

In mid-February we’ll get into the studio to record our first LP.

Of course, we will continue writing new songs, and we fervently wish to tour outside our home.

Carpi MaloneThanks so much for sharing time with us, any last thoughts for the readers and fans?

Thank you, Pete. It was a pleasure!

To all our friends and fans: Thanks for your support, you’re great! Keep rocking with us, guys!

And lastly give us five moments which shaped the destiny of your musical direction personally or within The Monster Ones.

1. – The entry of V (Monster-Guitar). Great composer, and gives better shape to existing songs adorning them with his riffs, and Maf, (Monster-Drummer), perfectionist to the limit, which always encourages us to improve ourselves.

2. – The entry of Goatboy (bassist during a year in the band in 2011). He provided great ideas and recorded with us on I Wanna be a Teenage Monster.

3.-The entry of Elvis Lugosi (Monster-Bass), now bringing his forceful and elaborate riffs

4.- Our video clip “Teenage Ramone”, by which we were chosen “COOLEST SONG OF THE WEEK” in New York’s Radio Show Little Steven’s Underground Garage. This has made known our music in many more places around the world. Thanks so much, Steve Van Zandt!!!

5. – And at the end of last year was carried out the voting for “THE COOLEST IN THE WORLD 2012″, among the 50 songs of very great bands. We got to the No. 5, we see it as a great achievement and an honor. This has also been a great help to make our music known to the world.

The RingMaster Review 23/01/2013

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

THE MONSTER ONES – TEENAGE RAMONE (official video)

Dr. Spookenstein – They Came From A World Long Dead

Front Cover

As mysterious as the shadows which undoubtedly spawned them, Dr. Spookenstein is an entity which remains in the dark but from their hidden domain unleashes sounds which equally thrive upon and incite nightmares as they surely ignite the passions. Stalking similar roads to those well-trodden by the likes of Misfits, Danzig, Michale Graves, Calabrese, and Blitzkid, the North Carolina horror punk band has conjured a stirring death drenched album in the shape of They Came From A World Long Dead which just hits the sweet spot at every turn. It challenges as much as it sends flames of pleasure shooting through the heart, the result an ultimately exciting and bruising treat.

They Came From A World Long Dead follows the well-received album Devil Clown Hunts the Town of 2010 and marks Dr. Spookenstein as one predatory and intimidating band in sound and intent. The release offers numerous recognisable influences and flavourings to its compelling and contagious night shift but also plenty of original and striking elements bred solely by the band. It is not flawless but never is anything less than compulsive listening and at its pinnacles a senses buffeting rapture instigator.

The punk fuelled Hang ‘em High barges through the ear first, it’s thumping rhythms and ear trawling basslines an immediate lure into the aggressive heart of raging riffs and fiery energy. The core hook and bass riff is a ‘plundered’ delight which is like a returning best friend though one is unsure of its original home and with the strong vocals and infectious chorus leaves only highly enthused adoration in its vibrant wake.

The album is a little inconsistent at times though mainly through the vocals which vary from excellent to ‘wobbly’. Actually as in the following Witch Bitch when the vocals are less impressive they are still good but strangely seem to be running different notes and melodies to the sounds. On this track the voice has a definite decent Misfits attack whilst the music is a more classic rock inspired fire and the two struggle to lie with ease side by side. It is just a niggle which occurs from time to time but generally a minor aspect against the strength of the album.

At the heart of the album a wealth of outstanding tracks stomp through the ear to forge the greatest pinnacles on the release. The Ramones lilted I Don’t Wanna Go To Hell is first, its anthemic breath and incendiary energy takes no time in recruiting the listener to its thrilling cause and with an excellent metallic twist and surge nearing its climax shows the invention and mischief of the band. Challenging for best track on the album You Will Burn also ripples with imagination and enterprise within its uncomplicated and raptorial presence. Another metal stoked riot of irresistibility the track swaggers and weaves around the ear with gladiatorial expertise and a devilish hunger to own the senses and beyond. With its ear stroking riffs and beckoning vocals driven by the oppressive metallic intrusions it ensures there is no defence to its immense glory.

The Fog is an equally addict forming instigator, its Misfits/Balzac like beckoning a raging invitation to join vocally and with limbs its punk rock tempest of pleasure whilst Fire In The Sky with its scorched guitar teasing and hard rock stance just treats the listener like its helpless puppet, manipulating body and passions with its magnetic incitement and melodic hooks. The track in between its most compulsive moments breaks out riotous rock riffs and sizzling guitar taunts which recall the likes of Metallica, it is a mix which intrigues and satisfies from start to finish echoing the album as a whole.

Though the occasional song does not live up to its surrounding companions it is still an enjoyable lull in the elsewhere raging pleasurable storm and with songs like the title track, a song which starts by inspiring only uncertainty and leaves behind definite satisfaction, They Came From A World Long Dead is a thoroughly intriguing and intoxicating joy.

The mighty We’ll Take Your Face also has to have a mention, another track with an impressive claim to top honours. It is a tempest of metal and classic rock invention with a punk heart which at times teases Municipal Waste realms with a Murderdolls gait, quite simply horror punk at its best.

They Came From A World Long Dead chews on the ear and heart with accomplished insatiable greed and receives an equally potent reaction in return. It is a great release and its creators Dr. Spookenstein angling to be your new favourite horror punk nightmare.

https://www.facebook.com/SPOOKENSTEIN

RingMaster 16/01/2013

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

The Creeping Ivies: Stay Wild

Having been left in rapture by their previous EP Ghost Train earlier this year, the anticipation and excitement going into Stay Wild, the debut album from Scottish rock n rollers The Creeping Ivies, was near on immeasurable. Admittedly it would have had to be a car crash of apocalyptic proportions not to have found approval, but the ten track psyche buzzbombs, to steal one of their song titles, took existing expectations and hopes and elevated them into a debauchery of passion. Stay Sick is a stunning irrepressible feast of wickedness which could grace any dance floor, riotous party, or waking graveyard.

The Creeping Ivies consists of the powerful inciting vocals and carnal riffs of Becca Bomb alongside the senses slapping, primal incendiary beats of Duncan Destruction, a duo which ignites primitive urges and raw hunger for their challenging and insatiably thrilling sounds. Together they brew up a storm which plays like the bastard sonic offspring of an illicit engagement between The Cramps, Wanda Jackson, The Orson Family, Patti Smith, and Ray Campi, whilst being violated by Alien Sex Fiend. It is an unforgettable and unique cacophony of instinctive mischief bringing the fullest most invigorating rewards.

Debut EP Rock N Roll Party in November 2011 was their first full statement of intent, though the song Shake It Up had already inspired acclaim and strong responses to the band with its appearances on a couple of compilation albums. The band also landed good airplay around the world which accelerated with the Ghost Train EP, including being featured on The Bone Orchard podcast. Shows alongside Viv Albertine of The Slits and Vic Godard & Subway Sect, as well as their own gigs have only gone to place the band as one of the most exciting in the UK, something which Stay Wild will surely turn into worldwide recognition with deserved luck.  Released on December 10th as a vinyl/download through US label Dead Beat Records, the album is a simple yet powerful trip to orgasmic satisfaction.

The album opens with the magnificent Black Cat, a track with a groove which has you scouring rooftops for the Caped Crusader and an honest swagger inviting full participation. The uncomplicated gait of the song is hypnotic enough but with the sonic scrubbing which explodes out and scorches the ear intermittently, adoration is the only outcome. The vocals of Becca demand attention as firmly as her guitar lashes, and standing side by side with the thumping rhythms of Duncan, the pair scar the air and senses with a delicious assault of lustful irreverence.

The feisty stomp of Buzzbomb rampages over the sores caused by the opener with garage punk/rockabilly energy and punchy enterprise. Carrying a spice of The Stooges, Ramones, and The Creepshow to its gait, the song is a storming treat of public disorder combined with sonic revelry and showing the variety of sound and imagination which screams out from within the album.

Madhouse Blues and Mirror Mirror step up next to fire up the passions, the first a flow of caustic strokes from Becca around her wonderfully expressive and synapse scorching vocals. The track has a punk breath to its repetitive and salty touches which steps into numerous realms of genres whilst firmly borne of the first seeds of rock n roll. It is a persistent treat taking no prisoners with its corrosive intent and sets up the second of the two with its throaty tones and ‘banshee’ squalls perfectly. The track transported thoughts to Korean horror film Into the Mirror for some reason, probably due to the The 5,6,7,8’s like spicery of the song and the sharp tingling sonics which enflame the heart throughout.

Every track on the album is a triumph and inspires the same level of wanton devotion; songs like the brilliant punk n roller Spinning, a track which is as spicy and seductive as sex, the sensational echoing tank slapper Bop Like That, the slower but equally compelling song The World, and the steamy House of Ivy, all staggering examples of the uncluttered inventive mastery and brilliance on show. The latter is a raucous maelstrom of feverish energy and body rapping beats, a sadistically teasing psychobilly binge with whispers of L7 and Bone Orchard to its striding exploits.

Completed by Rock N Roll Ghost, a song which devours the heart like a fusion of the Misfits and Horrorpops, and the final exhilarating bruising encounter of the closing title track, the sigh of deep pleasure is audible at its end and the rush to press the play button again to the whole feast of magic beyond eager. Stay Wild is simply astounding and if this was to be the only music to soundtrack the rest of our lives there would only be greedy acceptance and joy.

http://thecreepingivies.com

RingMaster 21/11/2012

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

The Panic Beats – Strike Again/Without Warning

The irresistible psychotic homage to the Ramones from The Panic Beats was one of the highlights of last year with their thoroughly enjoyable self titled debut album. Returning with not one but two releases in the space of a month, the band not only continues their impossible to refuse onslaught of one to three chord punk urgency and horror film borne malice, but have grown into an even more compulsive and blood soaked pleasure. The elements which arguably did not quite come off on the first album have been addressed and the sound has evolved to a tighter hungrier assault to make their vindictive company more welcome than ever. You still have to be a fan of the Ramones to truly enjoy the releases as the songs have taken mere steps away if any at all from their prime influence but this is what makes The Panic Beats so magnetic.

The solo project of Michigan musician Dale Van Thomme, The Panic Beats rampages through twenty five blood lusting tracks across the two albums Strike Again and Without Warning. Every song is an energetic, frenetic, and psychotic outburst and confrontation of pure punk rock with its heart firmly entrenched in the late seventies. Van Thomme continues to unleash his off kilter discord soaked vocals and waspish melodies but as the songs play there is a new twist in store without any major change in direction, leading to even more satisfaction. How long he can carry on producing what is a sound which carries obvious similarity to its driven creativity to the previously mentioned band without losing effect and appeal time will tell but that was the thought at the end of his first album and we now have two more which are even more impressive and pleasing, and as mentioned there are new things stirring. The music and intent behind the releases is honest, no attempt to fool itself it is groundbreaking or strikingly unique but given the choice of listening to what we originally called his musical interpretation of the Ramones though an aural freakshow mirror or some fartsy prog rock epic there is no contest and Van Thomme the devil in control.

The first album Strike Again immediately lets you know the terrain has not changed for the hateful venom to ensue, just some of the weaponry. The cover, as across all the albums, instantly lets you know the ride will be vindictive, violent and messy, the horror film themes and Italian giallo imagery as strong as the New York quartet soaked sound. The storm that is Red Alert opens up the riot, a rampaging thrust of chopping riffs, ear bashing beats, and punk harmonies to fall in league with within seconds. The bass has more snarl than before to add a gnarly presence and the song itself is a tight caustic gem to start things off.

The scurrying brawling intensity of Rats, the gun slinging in the face stomp They Call Him Django, and the predatory Black Gloved Killer, continue and raise the fun, all impossibly infectious and inciteful to voice and limbs. The first album was a little hit and miss at times though never to any real detriment admittedly, but here and on the third album the consistency is impressively high, going part of the way as to explain why these are a definite move forward for The Panic Beats.

Songs like the excellent Dirt Nap with its surging guitars and merciless intent, the equally contagious Phantasm, and Stranger In The Dark, the perfect anthem for any night time stalker antics, just rile up the senses to a more agitated greed for more. Closing on the outstanding drum driven mayhem of Night Of The Bloody Apes, Strike Again leaves only pleasure and breathlessness behind, it is over before you know it with every second something to savour and unleash primal punk energies to.

Without Warning is more of the same yet a little different. One sort of assumes, because of the closeness of release times, as mentioned a month apart, that the songs and recording was done at the same time relatively, yet in hindsight after listening to all three together there is an obvious evolution or shift taking place, though never far from the core sound. Strike Again is like a bridge, the obvious follow on from the debut and lead into the more melodic soaked Without Warning. If these latter two releases are borne from the same time then the track placing has been spot on without doubt.

Opening on the garage punk like instrumental They Call Me Death with Van Thomme expanding his sound into a fuller punk fire of sound, the album again leaves one in a tempest of brutal and combative punk rock. The following Killing Spree hits with pure feistiness and combative sound whilst Bash His Brains begins opening up new avenues for the sound. It is still that rampant ear crushing riot but brings a wicked barbed melodic hook in which springs from End Of The Century era Ramones but more so from bands like Buzzcocks and The Vibrators. It is refreshing, wholly magnetic and offers the promise of further inventive sparks within the future sound ahead from Van Thomme. The song is arguably the best of all across the three albums and has one joining in at the top of the voice, with returning worried frowns from those in ear shot.

Ready To Explode continues this breath, the addictive surge within rounded and sizzling upon the ear whilst Watch Me When I Kill captivates not only from is burning sonic riot and tribal beats but the great female vocals delivered with the same style and drone lilted delivery of Van Thomme. It is another brilliant treat to show the artist is growing and exploring his sound without losing what makes him already so enjoyable to rampage along to.

The Johnny Thunders spiced Junkyard Dog with excellent guitar work sparking its skies and Dead Meat with definite Sex Pistols spawn riffs, push the creativity further whilst the likes of I Gotta Kill, The Mutilator, and the great closing onslaught of Zombie Hell just show that vintage punk rock is still alive and kicking ass.

If old school punk and the Ramones light your emotional molotov cocktail than Strike Again and Without Warning not forgetting the debut, are essential listening. The Panic Beats do not come to bring new unheard sounds or to save the world, but to offer the best enjoyable and exciting soundtrack as the world destructs and burns around you.

The albums are available on vinyl or as name your price downloads from http://thepanicbeats.bandcamp.com/ …still here?

RingMaster 05/10/2012

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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The Bone Orchard Show 34

The Reputation Radio Show has a well established recognition and notoriety for finding, championing and promoting the best of the independent artists and sounds around the globe. Unrelenting and tenacious the promotions company/radio show is acknowledged as the prime source for finding the best talent of all genres with the introduction of the same followed closely. The intense and heavier world of sound is discovered and unleashed through The Bone Orchard, a show where anything with muscle and a riotous tendency is eagerly presented. From all forms of metal and industrial/harsh electro through punk and psychobilly on to noise and psyche with all in between, The Bone Orchard bears their individual shadowed fruits eagerly.

This past week saw the latest episode bringing six of the most impressive and exciting bands around as well as bringing a debate on some aspects of music. Hosted by the blue hued Pete Ringmaster and Reputation Radio Show CEO and mastermind Johnny Summers, the show cleared the sinuses and lit up the ears of all those with urges to match and compliment the great sounds played.

Opening with the traditional opening intro provided by Mr Strange of The Shanklin Freak Show, a band the hosts would talk about at length within the show giving the audience the latest developments from their carnival, the show immediately treated the eager crowd to a track from the debut album Defaced from UK rock band The Self Titled to be released June 18th. Mr Nobody is a stunning track, a metal and rock fusion with stirring vocals from frontman Mark Campbell over a brew of inventive and powerful sounds. With an insatiable thirst for gigging and an equal demand wanting them for shows, The Self Titled are one of the best bands in the country right now, their sharing of stages with the likes of Forever Never and Sarah Jezebel Deva as well as acclaimed festival appearances, leaving nothing but devoted fans in their wake.

Next there was a burst of real punk rock from another band from the UK in the mischievous bruising shape of Dirt Box Disco. With self declared influences ranging from Kerbdog, The Damned  and the Ramones to The Bonzo Dog Doodah Band and Showaddywaddy, the quintet from Burton on Trent make music which is honest, feisty, and insatiably infectious. The contagious track played, I Am Rock n Roll, was an exclusive from Legend another album to be released June 18th. The song played and the album the song comes from is one which revives the true 1977 spirit of punk meshing it with rock sounds as anthemic and voracious as you could wish for.

Before a lively debate about bands including cover songs in their live sets which saw the hosts at opposing lecterns but ultimately ended in the blue man being right, so he claims, things became intensified with the devastating aggressive sound of Amongst Carrion. From South Wales the five piece metallers woke up the airwaves with their track The Fear In Her Eyes taken from their latest EP We That Should Not Be. With a melodic groove recalling In Flames and the brutal riffage of an August Burns Red, the track easily declares the band as an emerging force in UK extreme metal. They have definitely moved on fully from their early days as a cover band, the point which inspired the following discussion.

Continuing the UK theme Leeds band Ourfamous Dead provided the next outstanding track with their forth coming single Claws At The Door. A rampant brew of hardcore, punk, and electro the song is the latest step in the vision of band founder and song writer AJ Reeves. Fresh off a UK tour with another Bone Orchard favourite The Sun Explodes, the quintet are a band on an accelerated rise pulling in acclaim and fans with each show and release persistently. Having supported the likes of The Blackout, Funeral For a Friend and Gallows, the band is fast approaching the point where others are eager to share stages with them.

As the final featured band of the night, US melodic metal band Vajra stunned and thrilled the listeners with their epic masterpiece Inside The Flame. Taken from their forthcoming album Pleroma, to be released in July, the song is a hypnotic and powerful example of the darkly melodic progressive rock fused with Eastern Indian influences which they inventively create. Led by the glorious voice of founder/producer/keyboardist/songwriter Annamaria Pinna, the band is one with a craft and imagination which is sure to find a feverish demand over the months ahead.

Closing out with Irish metallers iBURN, a band which is frequently requested since the debut of their song Where It Begins taken from their new EP of the same name, and another band which leaves you wanting more, The Bone Orchard dished up another formidable dose of new and impressive music. If anyone tells you there is nothing good or new coming out, place them in front of the podcast of the show, and they will soon be put right by this group of bands alone.

With the show primed to unveil more outstanding artists and sounds across the weeks ahead you can catch this, previous and future shows over at The Bone Orchard page at The Reputation Radio Show site as well as watching a selection of videos from a host of the bands featured on the show.

Get in touch with the show via  boneorchard@reputationintroduces.com

RingMaster 16/06/2012

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Various: We Love Trash The Best Of The Garage Punk Hideout Vol.7

Seemingly compilation albums and certainly a series of them is a rare thing these days. In the seventies/eighties they were a common occurrence as independent labels helped new bands find a platform to be heard. Possibly with the internet the need is not as strong as it was but there is nothing more thrilling than a compilation of unknown bands to trawl within and feast upon. One of the few and best series of compilations are the Hideout Comp Series. Released on GRGPNK Records, a label created by the GaragePunk Hideout trashy rock n roll social networking site to feature its members and bands, the series of releases to date have brought some of the best, exciting and openly distinct new artists around which fall within the spheres of punk, garage rock and punk, trash, psych and psycho edged sounds in their various outfits, basically anything that is wild and rock n roll.

We Love Trash is the seventh in the series and follows in aim and quality the previous sextet of releases. Each has brought an array of diverse bands and sounds to thrill and incite further investigation of to varying degrees and the latest is no different. What is good about the releases is even if a track does not ignite any burning eagerness to hear more you still recognise and respect the promise and unique breath of each band, undoubtedly the result of the good selection process at the label.

Consisting of twenty two tracks from bands around the globe the album is a full and rewarding chunk of schizo sounds and energy in their many shades. With a random selection we will mention a few of the treats to find on the release but each and every track is an eager and perfect irrepressible bedlam of ear blistering inciting sounds.

The album opens with Blackout from German band Trash Emperors, the track setting the release off with a fine brew of scuzzed garage punk and agitated energy. Leaving the senses in an awakened state of pleasure the song makes way for the excellent Ted from Brooklyn band The Amputees. Raw punk n roll at its best the song is a catchy middle finger piece of growling contempt to stir up the heart.

Swizz garage punks The Monofones and lo-fi fuzz duo The Happy Kids keep things brewing with pleasing variation and a persistent manic air with their respective tracks Alright and Seven Are The Horns of Satan. The first is an urgent psych punk grazing of hypnotic pulses and scraping discord with a sixties air of Cradle whilst the latter is a simpering electrified surge which treats every brain cell to an electrified sonic scratch, both songs further showing the diverse and enterprising talent within the ranks of the album and the series of releases as a whole.

With such a spread of styles and levels of production different parts of the album will thrill some more than others and vice versa but We Love Trash is never less than pleasing and insistently mischievous with songs like the irrepressible Cigarette from the Austrian garage punks The Shirley MacLaines and the sonic hip swaggering My Groupie from Thee Martian Boyfriends leading the ear and heart into a welcome wicked dance.

Favourite tracks from the release for us here come in the shape of the outstanding psychotically snaring Good Night, Sleep Tight from San Diego based The Bloody Hollies, the pissed blues punk Black Garage Door from The Chrome Cranks, and the Ramones infected contagion that is Turn That TV Off from Boris The Sprinkler. The trio of songs tick all the right boxes and ignite the fiercest sparks of satisfaction but there is something for everyone on what is an excellent album you just have to go and enjoy

We Love Trash and previous releases come at a real steal of a price and can be checked out at http://garagepunk.ning.com/page/we-love-trash. Join the site, make an active contribution and the treats come at an even more impressive value.

RingMaster 14/06/2012

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Track line-up:

1. Trash Emperors -Blackout (Hamburg, Germany)
2. The Amputees- Ted(Brooklyn, NY USA)
3. The Evil Eyes – Honey Please (Toronto, ON CAN)
4. The Del Lames – Feel So Lame (Albany, CA USA)
5  The Bloody Hollies – Good Night, Sleep Tight (San Diego, CA USA)
6. The Monofones – Alright(Bern, Switzerland)
7.  The Happy Kids – Seven Are the Horns of Satan(Vienna, Austria)
8.  Die Zorros – Baby Goodbye (Bern, Switzerland)
9.  Kicks – The Defeatist Beat(Toronto, ON CAN)
10. The Gooeys – Lay Down and Die (Calgary, AL CAN)
11. The Get Wets – Beat Beat (Columbia, SC USA)
12. The Shirley MacLaines – Cigarette (Innsbruck, Austria)
13. The Chrome Cranks – Black Garage Door (Hudson, NY USA)
14.  Wild Evel & The Thrashbones – Why Can’t We Be (Vienna, Austria)
15.  Thee Martian Boyfriends – My Groupie (Brussels, Belgium)
16.  The Pulsebeats – Cynical Ride (Santander, Spain)
17.  Uzis – I Wanna Go (Kansas City, MO USA)
18.  Boris The Sprinkler – Turn That TV Off (Green Bay, WI USA)
19.  Haywire – Gone for Good (Sheboygan, WI USA)
20.  The Branded – Drive Me Outta My Mind (Malmö, Sweden)
21.  Thee Witch Hazel Martinis – What You Deserve (Fontana, CA USA)
22.  Light Bulb Alley – Pepper Spray (Montreal, QC CAN)

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Dirt Box Disco: Legends

The debut album from UK punks Dirt Box Disco only has simple and direct intentions, to stomp on your testicles, kick you in the guts, and to rummage in any parts remaining whilst ensuring you have the greatest fun whilst they do it. Legends is an unbridled blast of excitable and infectious rock n roll, it makes no demands musically and has no deep intellectual musings to share, well it has no time to when it is so busy rampaging and gate crashing the lowest and most primal instincts within us all.

Released via STP Records June 18th, Legends is what all the best punk albums are, crazed, uncontrollably infectious, and a continual spasm of attitude and belligerence within the ear. The bio accompanying the release states it possibly sounds like KISS vs. Rancid vs. Showaddywaddy, we would have said The Wildhearts meets early Green Day in a salacious filth coated union with Mud and The Adicts, but you get the idea. Written by guitarist SPUNK VOLCANO and ably brought to boisterous fruition alongside him by his eager cohorts in vocalist WEAB.I.AM, lead guitarist DANNY FINGERS, bassist DEADBEATZ CHRIS, and drummer MAFF FAZZO, the album is a frenzied and irresistible ball of feistiness.

Since forming in 2009 Dirt Box Disco has riled up and incited their ever growing legion of fans to rupture joints and lose body fluids persistently with songs that are slightly tribal and always slices of agitated rock n roll. Previous EP Are You Ready? of last year marked the Derbyshire quintet as a band to embrace or hide your sons and daughters from but Legends has elevated the band into one of the best emerging punk/rock bands in the UK. Alongside the likes of Supercharger and The Duel, Dirt Box Disco bring a fresh and re-energised heart back to true UK punk whilst making it as compulsive and additive as any pop punk band.

The aggravated garage punk of The Other Side Of The Street pounces on the ear to set the album off on its belting energised mayhem. It screams and pesters with scorched guitars, intimidating riffs, and group yells. It has no intention on charming or seducing the senses just to rile them up and have them clinging on for sweet life. It is a devastating start continued by the following explosive Peepshow. The track taunts and bruises with an arrogance and proud declaration that reminds of a mix between NOFX and the Vibrators.

Already the album has convinced it is going to be one memorable and riotous fun barring a collapse in flight as dramatic as in an innings from an England cricket team. There is no chance though with songs like the Ramones fuelled Rock n’ Rolla a song that could be the nostalgic playlist of all punks and the blood pumping sing-a-long I Just Want To Be A Girl, this one as sirenesque as a pole dancer in overdrive and an easy manipulator of limbs and voice.

Every song on Legend captures the imagination and triggers the instinctive urge to join in, every slab of punk rock making it easy with anthemic hooks and contagious energy. Without a weak moment to be found on there are still certain songs which ignite the deepest uncomplicated allegiance to their high energy accosting most of all.  Smackhead is a minute and a half corruption of the ear, just how punk used and should always be, no niceties and no element left for the imagination to explore. The outstanding pop punk flourish of I Don’t Wanna Go Out With You, the UK Subs/Top Buzzer like Let’s Get Wasted!, and the scuzzed garage blistering of We All Fall Down, all leave one with a big grin inside and out but the two moments that leave the sharpest and most lingering intrusion are the brilliant I Am Rock n’ Roll and Dirtbox Days.

Both are beautifully simple and deviously infectious. Before you know it they have turned heart and voice into their puppets with joining in and littering the air with flailing limbs is a must. I Am Rock n’ Roll imply declares that I, you, we and this is all rock n roll and it is impossible to argue otherwise, the song simply  a impassioned musical call to arms. Dirtbox Days closes the album in similar fashion, anthemic generosity dripping from every note and syllable. The track sweeps over the senses with an easy pop punk enthusiasm, think The Monkees as Hagfish and a song which is fun, undemanding and again fully contagious. It builds to a triumphant climax of simplistic “This is Dirtbox Day” chanting and if you cannot resist you need to check for a pulse.

Legends is awesome, simple as. You can take all your reflective and provocative songs to bring thought and ideas to consider and be inspired by for nothing is as thoroughly rewarding, uplifting and enjoyable as punk at its best and Dirt Box Disco certainly create that. Go enjoy!

http://www.dirtboxdisco.co.uk

RingMaster 12/05/2012

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Johnny Throttle: Johnny Throttle

Infectiously nostalgic, energetically unbridled, and irrepressibly excitable the self titled album from UK punks Johnny Throttle is the perfect album. Yes if you analysed it there are edges and elements that could be ‘improved’ but the point of music is to exhilarate, inspire, and give a good time and Johnny Throttle do this in abundance. There are plenty of good punk bands out there right now but there is nothing finer than real 70s punk and with this influencing the heart and attitude oozing vein of Johnny Throttle, there is no finer a bunch of punk reprobates than Johnny Quid and his cohorts.

Released on Dirty Water Records the album is a flurry of immediate and eager stabs of punk that light up the senses and revitalise old hearts and ambitions. Formed by ex-Parkinsons front-man Afonso Pinto (Johnny Quid), and aided by guitarist Hermano J, bassist Rory Seminal, and drummer Ricky C, their pedigree as ex-members of the likes of Menace, The Shakin Nasties, the Jackoffs, the Chinese Lungs, the Stains and Urban Shocks undeniable, Johnny Throttle go straight for the throat with blistering ill tempered sarcastic diamonds of sound and attitude. The band and each track offers up twin fingered salutes to whoever is in their aim and intent, it is garage punk without complications but bursting with vibrant riffs and catchy hook laden venom.

From the opening Heartbreakers/Ramones like Lost Sputnik the album lights up the senses and heart.  Song after song high energy and brief concussive blasts rolls through the ear with contempt and belligerence. The first track though spiky and forceful is probably the least rampant on offer but shows pop punks of today more than a thing or two on how to do it. Throughout the album Johnny Throttle or songs remind of or hint at other bands but the overriding similarity they have is to The Cortinas, a sadly overlooked band from the 70s.  The vocals of Quid have a definite Jeremy Valentine sound and both bands have a defined handle on creating irresistible hooks and melodies within their barbed tunes.

This review could go on for pages there is so much that could be said about and praised upon Johnny Throttle. It has been a long time since an album has thrilled as thoroughly from first track to last and there are fourteen classics here. If you want a taster before falling into the tempestuous arms of the album than first head to songs like the incessant longing of Ann or The Vibrators like Love Me Till I Come a spattered lust fuelled two minutes and a touch. There is also the cheerful sing-a-long casting aside of I Wanna Be Your Ex or the very early Blondie/Buzzcocks/Cute Lepers eager simple melodies of Heart Of Stone available and as sure to entice. Let us be honest here, every track will grab and pull you into their siren like well of essential punk and garage rock.

Johnny Throttle as one anticipates does not shy away from the controversial either saving that for the best song on the album in the brilliant Spazztastic. It defies anyone not to join in with its addictive chorus and heart tingling riffs. With a bass from Seminal to lose fluids over the song is immense and its brevity the only complaint, but leave them wanting more right?

Johnny Throttle is an album that revives the heart of true punk music and punks, its heart a reminder of days when things had an intensity and breath that has since dissipated, well until this band arrived came along. They have not only reminded of but ignited the heyday of punk and taken it forward with an album so impressive and enjoyable that one does not need to dig out those old vinyls, the new breed is here and its name is Johnny Throttle.

RingMaster 20/02/2012

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