Alexanred – Non-Stop Non-Stop

alexanred pic

Just in case in the Christmas rush you missed the release of the debut single from Alexanred, we thought we would give you a nudge to one contagiously addictive track. Non-Stop Non-Stop is pure industrial virulence, a pulsating infection soaked song which pounds the senses with anthemic temptation and captures the imagination with arguably not ground-breaking but fresh and magnetic irreverence. It is not a release which will have your thoughts and emotions stretched and lost in contemplation but unashamedly a song which skilfully and mischievously goes straight for the primal and rhythmic beast inside with a bait of tub thumping rhythms and coarse electronic wantonness.

Formed last year Alexanred is the creation of Aleksi Susi, guitarist/synth player of Finnish industrial metallers 2 Wolves. Listing influences which include the likes of Rammstein, Lacuna Coil, Type O Negative, Cradle Of Filth, Paradise Lost, Septic Flesh, Rob Zombie, Prodigy, Autopsy, Nile and more, some which you could almost guess from the single, Alexanred makes an undeniably impressive entrance with the Inverse Records released Non-Stop Non-Stop. It is never wise to make a full judgement of a band upon one song, every artist more often than not having one acceptable gem inside them whoever they are, but it is hard not to anticipate and suggest richly promising and thrilling things to come from the project ahead.

Still from 'Non-Stop Non-Stop' video

Still from ‘Non-Stop Non-Stop’ video

The opening seconds of the song alone incite full attention; they maybe clad in a simple rhythmic lure and a restrictive pulsing electro rub but there is immediate intrigue and temptation which takes hold. Barely another moment passes before the track is in full muscular stride, synths stomping with devilry dripping from every note as vocals taunt from the surrounding shadows. Once Susi makes his full vocal appearance the sounds show a restraint to allow his almost whispered provocation to wash smoothly yet sinisterly over the senses. Soon though, the song is thrusting out its imposing chest within a riveting rhythmic caging, exploding into an anthem of sound and epidemic vocal incitement to confirm the seduction of thoughts and emotions.  As mentioned the track is not really setting new boundaries but with a raw threat and empowering intent to its vocal and rhythmic barracking, and a virulent toxicity to its electronic suasion the single is pure irresistible temptation.

Like the bastard inventive son of a union between Rammstein and Rob Zombie, Non-Stop Non-Stop is the perfect appetiser to band and their horizons, something it is hard to wait for with patience.

http://www.facebook.com/AlexanredFinland

10/10

RingMaster 08/01/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Cold Cold Ground – Lies About Ourselves

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Having been enlisted into their dark rock sounds with the excellent Blue Light Circus EP of 2008, Finish industrial punks Cold Cold Ground have continued to whip up our passions here but now really gone to town on them with their new album Lies About Ourselves. An intensive brew of seductive atmospheres around a carnivorous predation which stretches and pushes the release the release is a riveting mouth-watering furnace of energy and startling noise sculpted invention, an industrial punk/metal fury with a devilishly twisted intent. It is the Helsinki quartet’s finest moment to date, ten rapaciously ravaging slices of heavy, dark, and exhausting brilliance.

Cold Cold Ground was formed in 2004 by Hauptmann D, NooZ, Mr. Bunny, and John Paul Jr, and was soon grabbing attention through their trio of EPs, the Lamb and Custom Built EPs of 2005 and 2006 respectively as well as the previously mentioned Blue Light Circus. With an all senses engulfing live show and their well-received debut album This Side of Depravity of 2010, the band only enhanced their stature and fan base which Lies About Ourselves now takes to another level. On their second album the band quite simply is at its most inventive, volatile, and furiously impacting yet.

The album instantly is savaging the ears with opener My Fist And I, the track a tornado of energy and aural spite from its 1460209_10152038643995903_1113209224_nopening second, and though it has moments where it takes a step back in aggression it feels like it is merely taking closer straighter aim for the next tirade of thrilling voracious intensity. The vocals of Hauptmann D prey on every syllable given, fuelling them with a venom which matches the hunger of the riffs from Mr. Bunny and the prowling bass of NooZ. With the unforgiving rhythms of drummer Hoker Dine puncturing the punk storm brewed, the track is a stunning slab of intensive defiance and industrial antagonism. It rampages like a blend of Pitchshifter and Rabbit Junk with essences of Rammstein and Lard, but equally has its own rabidity driven uniqueness.

The following Welcome to Hell has a less intensive and more electro based presence but is still fuelled by a punk voraciousness which snarls at and chews the imagination excitingly. Less instant and commanding than its predecessor the track still grips a wildly attentive appetite for the varied and inventive sounds offered. Its successor Suck and Pay feeds that same hunger with its exceptional fire of cantankerous energy and invention. Like Fuckshovel does Fear Factory whilst on a sonic hallucinogen, the track is a glorious charge of ingenious enterprise and daring, unpredictable and wholly addictive.

The pleasure and ravenous craft of the album continues to excel, through firstly Model Citizen where thumping rhythms frame an intensive brawl of riffing before taking centre stage whilst coaxing in further scythes of guitar and electronic teasing. The bass also finds a new darker growl which excites the ear and helps create a Marilyn Mansion toned presence as the track hits its stride. It like the following venomous We Are the Sun slip a little below the plateau set by the album but with bodies of inventive hostility and imaginative provocation neither leave satisfaction or hunger wanting, the same as the contagious Tourist, another song which cannot quite match the highest pinnacles but forges its own memorable dark rock heights.

The brawl of the insatiable punk fuelled Cocaine In My Ass slaps another major highlight down on the senses and passions, the great bass taunting and esurient challenge of the riffs and rhythms colliding for an illustrious aggravation which is viciously anthemic and barbarically addictive. The song puts up a real test for those following to equal which none do but certainly they all make valiant impressive attempts, Drive the first stepping up to take the listener on an exhausting and highly satisfying charge of caustic rock ‘n’ roll to be followed by the stalking and compellingly imaginative title track, a song with melodic flames and bold textures as gripping as its extensive intensity, and finally the smouldering electro embraced Things Fall Apart. The last offering continues the great diversity across the album, its melancholic beauty and seductive balladry mesmeric if maybe lacking the wonderful addiction brewing toxicity of previous songs.

     Lies About Ourselves is a scintillating confrontation, a thunderous and greedy assault of industrial seeded punk and rock excellence. Cold Cold Ground just gets better and better.

http://www.coldcoldground.com/

9/10

RingMaster 18/11/2013

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Unzucht – Rosenkreuzer

Unzucht_Bandfoto

Unleashing their second album on a generally unsuspecting world, German band Unzucht take little time in showing themselves to be a formidable and robust provocation, and more importantly a thoroughly captivating one. Creating a rapacious brew of industrial and gothic metal which as easily seduces as it can chew upon the senses, the Lower Saxony based quartet with Rosenkreuzer, have primed themselves to be an undiscovered presence for a great many no longer. Consisting of thirteen songs which romance and invigorate the passions, the release is a fiery and magnetic tempest of sonic causticity and metallic antagonism wrapped in a smouldering electro glaze which soaked in enthralling temptation makes band and album one of the must listen escapades of 2013.

Formed by De Clercq (guitar, electronics, vocals) and emerging around 2009 with the line-up of vocalist Der Schulz, bassist Blaschke, and drummer Fuhrmann alongside its founder, Unzucht unleashed debut EP Engel der Vernichtung the same year. Numerous appearances on a wide array of compilations followed before the release of the Deine Zeit läuft ab EP in 2012. Bringing a strong attention and reputation their way simultaneously, the band in September of last year uncaged their debut album, Todsünde 8 , a record which went hand in hand with an intensive length of time touring which saw Unzucht on the road firstly with Mono Inc., followed by Megaherz and then a eager participant at the Dark End Festivals 2012. Their album drew good acclaim, stretching the recognition of the band to greater lengths which Rosenkreuzer will ignite further. With a very successful co-headlining tour alongside Lord Of The Lost under the belt this year, Unzucht stand poised to truly explode a full awareness around them with their album an irresistible weapon.

The NoCut Entertainment released Rosenkreuzer takes mere moments to have attention and anticipation alert with its title track. Unzucht - Rosenkreuzer - ArtworkOpening up the adventure with instantly contagious electro grooves and an enticing atmosphere, the track is soon teasing and dancing around the ears with unchecked energy and a brewing rapacious intensity which ebbs and flows pleasingly around the excellent vocals, theirs a clean delivery with scowling and melodic harmonies alternatingly taunting the imagination further.  It is a compelling introduction to the album, a fiery mix of industrial and gothic endeavour which is soon matched by Kind von Traurigkeit. Less forward at the start but more intimidating in its breath than its predecessor, the track roams senses and thoughts with an accomplished and engaging prowl, the vocals an emotive narrative which as in all songs defies its German language delivery to paint an evocative picture upon the enticingly crafted canvas of the song.

Triebwerk stalks the ear next, its opening predation soon accelerated into a dark hearted crowding of the senses with raw riffs and caging rhythms. With menace and danger continuing to guide the track, and pop kissed flames exploding across its bow to increase the potency of the resourceful evocation throughout, the song keeps the thrilling presence of the album going before passing the baton on to the absorbing Nur die Ewigkeit. There is a seemingly familiar presence to this track from the start, the vocals again inviting full attention to the Numanesque sounds which stroll with respect and inciting success around the imagination. It does not quite live up to the heady levels set but leaves the appetite for the album boiling nicely.

Through the feisty Feuersturm with its incendiary electronic stimulation and metallic aggravation, and the smouldering croon of Zwischen den Welten, the album continues to grip purposely and effectively, the second of the pair a seductive and sinisterly inventive treaty for the passions to submit to. There are at times elements which bring thoughts of Rammstein into play though they are fleeting moments to be fair, except on the outstanding Angst which is very much in their countrymen’s territory, and though there is an easy to access and commit to feel to the songs it is all distinctly Unzucht.

There is not one track where you find yourself looking forward or reluctant to indulge in numerous time but further pinnacles come through the excellent Das dunkle Tier, a track which dares to involve a delicious stoner/hard rock groove into its expressive tantalising, and the wonderfully inventive and powerful Der Untergang where the band again draw out a call which is pure contagion whilst sealing it in an emotionally blazing pool of sublime beauty.

An impressive cover of the Héroes Del Silencio track Entre Dos Tierras also stands out with its inventive and melodic head held high before the album provides a deliciously sculpted ballad in the shape of Nymphonie and finishes with the exhausting electro/metal stomp of Mit Dir oder ohne Dich. Coursing with a rhythmic rabidity which often has to relinquish its grip throughout to the equally fascinating hues of the keys and electronic weaves which eventually take the song into stronger evocative depths, the track is a melancholic sunset to close Rosenkreuzer. The album is a refreshing incitation from a band you can expect to be on a great many more lips and exploring a greater well of eagerly attentive ears here on in.

http://www.unzucht-music.com/

8/10

RingMaster 24/10/2013

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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The Devilzwork – A Dead Horse

the devilzwork pic

Australian industrial metallers The Devilzwork set senses and fears cowering last year with their album Floodlights, a carnivorous sonic pestilence which gnawed and seduced the emotions with lethal  yet compelling severity. Now the band returns with its successor A Dead Horse and another tempest of virulent devastation hell bent on consuming and reshaping the synapses.

Hailing from Australia’s Capital Region, the 2009 formed quartet of guitarist Whiskey (also in Chud), vocalist/bassist Tobias, guitarist Kvlt and drummer Postal, has built an incendiary reputation across the regions of Melbourne and the Australian Capital Territory with their impressive live shows which has seen them stare stages with the likes of Voices of Masada, MzAnnThropik, Tim “The Ripper” Owens, and Mnemic. The self-produced demo Bad Moon Rise equally sparked concentrated attention though it was the eight track release Floodlights which stretched the bands presence much further afield as certainly an online presence and temptation. Now A Dead Horse is primed to accelerate that growing awareness. You suspect such its harsh and caustic devilry that the release will send as many running for the hills as finding those unable to resist its scourge driven charms, but if unbridled spite coursing corrosion is your idea of a treat than The Devilzwork has a nasty rewarding one lying in wait.

Opening track Obey The Worm… immediately scorches the ear with a sonic piercing before riffs and rhythms conjure up a death metal 1016963_626992130646833_1762260211_nseeded malevolence. It instantly has the hairs on flesh wilting before its vicious blaze of noise rock/industrial ferocity with the great duel vocal attack driving the aurally scurrilous fire of sound to greater depths. From the first track alone you can openly see the evolution in the songwriting and intent of the band. Whereas Floodlights was one carnally bred lime pit of intensity and noise soaked irreverence its successor has a more defined purpose and invention to its claws. A strong spicery of metal and rock adds further potency and imagination to the song and as it emerges, A Dead Horse as a whole.

The outstanding Kalifornia comes up next, its confident swagger and teasing wantonness leaving a tasty flavour of horror rock to the Ministry sounding torch of sonic animosity. A twisting feverish taunting on the senses and imagination, the track despite its too soon coming departure is the first of the major highlights on the album and ultimately the best track.

The Godflesh/Marilyn Manson lilted Prick, a track with labour to its attack but captures the passions at a glance without any resistance, and the more electro venomous Big Man follow to continue the strong start of the release if without quite matching their predecessor whilst the insidious corruption that is Hardware suffocates and invigorates simultaneously to ignite the mind and emotions. Bringing an acidic blistering groove which would rest easily in a Kyuss/Queens Of The Stone Age rage, the track pushes the diversity of the album yet again. Admittedly some work is needed to unveil some of the unique rewards to be found within the songs beneath the surface severity and taking that plunge head first only rewards all the more. The previous album was debatably short on individuality between songs in hindsight but there is certainly no issue with A Dead Horse as each track reveals given close attention.

From the pernicious Corrosive, a more than decent track which is as its title suggests, and the dark intensive exploration Vast, the album reaches another pinnacle with Insect. Thumping rhythms open up a cage of virulent toxicity, a wash of sonic itching wrapping the skin whilst vocals and restrained electronics rattle the bars and another epidemically addictive groove frequents senses and passions. The track will have you scratching the brain and emotions for hours after whilst the short burst of instrumental after its departure soothes the sore need.

Enthralling expels a raucous heavy rock fury, vocally and melodically, within another breath and atmosphere of poisonous sonic mercury to again push the envelope of invention whilst Virus Installer is just a rapacious pathogen of angry and malicious noise honed into a riveting protagonist. Both leave the senses exhausted and wondering what hit them yet thoughts alive with interpretation of their magnetic intensity.

Concluded by the tender, well in comparison to what came before, Push Yourself Around and the sinister soundscape Desolate, the album leaves a hunger for much more. The first of the final pair has a scintillating toxic swing to its pestilential might whilst the closer is just an evocative passage of sound and menace which leaves the mind exploring its own black corners. Both add further absorbing ventures to A Dead Horse, an album which shows no mercy but strikes with an intelligently sculpted persuasion offering depths of melodically spawned venom. With only the shortness of some of the most enthralling violations a niggle, the album is an impressive leap forward for The Devilzwork and a must investigation for all fans of the likes of Ministry, Godflesh, Rammstein, Marilyn Mansion and those of industrial and death metal… though are they brave enough though?

https://www.facebook.com/thedevilzwork

8.5/10

RingMaster 10/09/2013

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Mono Inc. : Nimmermehr

     MONO INC._Bandfoto

     Nimmermehr sees German rockers Mono Inc. follow last year’s acclaimed and successful album After The War with another slab of expansive gothic rock that takes the listener on an eventful and thrilling ride of sound and adventure. It is an album which employs the essences of numerous eager styles and their dynamic devilry whilst creating a fun and ultimately pleasing romp of invention and imagination.

Formed around 2000-2001 by then drummer Martin Engler (moving to lead vocals in 2006), guitarist/vocalist Carl Fornia, and original vocalist Miky Mono, three musicians who had played together previously in  both Wild Thing and Mono 69, the Hamburg band soon built a strong reputation for their stadium rock type of gothic bred sound. Albums such as debut Head Under Water of 2003 and re-released a year later, Temple Of The Torn in 2007, and Pain, Love & Poetry the following year all earned the band strong attention and impressed responses. The previously mentioned After The War set the band upon another level of world awareness which the vibrant Nimmermehr (meaning Nevermore) will only cement. Released via NoCut Entertainment it is a collection of tracks which tease with unpredictability and persuade with open passion and distinct charm, the line-up of Engler and Fornia alongside bassist/vocalist Manuel Antoni, and drummer/vocalist Katha Mia creating a shadowed sun of melodic and atmospheric breath with darkly emotive and tantalisingly provocative enterprise.

Opening track Heile, Heile Segen instantly cups the ear in roaming keys and a romping bassline, guitars brewing a scratchy invitation MONO INC - Nimmermehr - Artworkwhilst the German sung vocals of Engler bask in the great electro embrace punctuated with a breath of elevated energy. It is an infectious stomp which seizes the senses from the first second and leads them into a potent dance of electro contagion and pop rock urgency guided irresistibly by not only the vocals of Engler but the teasing sultry tones of Mia alongside. Arguably there is nothing particularly new going on but when it sounds this good and enjoyable there is not issue to be raised, the song a great mix of Konstrust and Hanzel Und Gretyl.

The following Seligkeit continues the great start, its muscular electro pulses a potent incitement going hand in hand with the cracking beats of Mia which vein the magnetic weave and drama of the keys, they driven hard by the sinewy riffs which spark up in mini crescendos throughout. As in its predecessor the vocals are a warm hug within the sturdy presence of sound, the combination an incendiary call for the passions. Again as the first song and across plenty of the album, there is a familiarity at seductive work which whilst pointing to an absence of ground-breaking ingenuity going on undoubtedly makes an imaginative use of existing and diverse rich spices.

The excellent My Deal With God is an irresistible anthem for the passions, the surprising seemingly Irish lilt to chorus and even the vocals at that moment just scintillating whilst the dynamic weave of melodic and electronic sound with a gothic emotive embrace, are pure virulent infection. A plea to limbs, voice (luckily it is sung in English to enable a full persuasion), and energy, it is an early major highlight of the album but just one in many as shown by the following Kein Weg Zu Weit with its sultry air and ambience washing a stern rhythmic pulse and evocative guitar narrative. As in evidence now the ability of the band to create choruses which resonate and ridiculously tempt is almost regal, this song a slow evocative walk with refined elegant twists as contagious as the riotous devilment of the previous song.

Both the outstanding Euthanasia and its mighty equal The Clock Ticks On cast accomplished fusions of symphonic winds within gothic rock expanses, the first a bewitching chalice of glowing melodies and enriching imagination whilst the second is a heavyweight stomp bringing the intensity of a Rammstein into the pop suasion of an Ace Of Base or Propaganda. It is a riveting melodically fuelled waltz smouldering with eastern mystique and driven by insatiable revelry, and in league with the first and the melancholic beauty that is Alles Was Bleibtnergetic which splits them, makes for another stunning stretch of triumph Nimmermehr.

The great gravel kissed vocals of Engler marks the impressive sorrowful croon of A Better Way To Die next whilst the invitingly busy lures of Herzschlag and the impossibly contagious Days Like This leave the senses and passions exhausted but invigorated, The third of the trio is a stirring and galvanic blaze of rock and pop. Like a union between Bryan Adams and the more pop spiced era of The March Violets, and much better than that sounds, the song is a fire of glorious anthemic enticement, quite irresistible and totally enslaving.

Completed by the electro rock pop provocation of Ich Teile Dich Nicht and the decent enough piano and vocal led title track, Nimmermehr is a powerful treat which shows no mercy in its capturing of the imagination and emotions. It is one of those bait loaded releases which simply leaves you full and basking in deep satisfaction.

www.mono-inc.com

9/10

RingMaster 09/08/2013

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Brewing melodic fire: an interview with MiXE1

mixe1 pic 2

   The journey of electro rock pop band MiXE1 has been a striking and thrilling rise for it and its fans; from a solo project of founder Mike Evans to a full line-up with the addition of Lee Towson and Lee O’Brien, the band has brought a fresh and vibrant breath to the UK electro scene as confirmed by the excellent just released new EP Lights Out. With an album in the works and the new EP lighting up a hunger, it was time thanks to the members of MiXE1 to find out more about the band and its members. So pry we did…

Hi Guys and thanks for letting us explore the world behind MiXE1

Mike: “Our pleasure, Pete! Fire away :)”

Shall we start right at the beginning…give us some background to yourselves before MiXE1.

Mike Evans: “Before MiXE1, I was the guitarist in an alternative metal band called Broken Butterfly X. I’d been involved in a bunch of bands and projects before (most of those with Lee T), none of them actually got to the gigging stage apart from BBX though. We got a stash of recordings from those projects somewhere (a lot too embarrassing for public consumption)! But yeah BBX was my last band; I basically wrote the music and contributed some vocal melodies.”

Lee Towson: “I’ve actually known Mike since pre-school and we’ve been writing music in some form or another for the best part of about 12-13 years now. We started off, I think, just as secondary school was coming to an end; so we were about 15 or 16 years old and we’d regularly meet whenever we could (including class time) to write and record together.

This continued into College and through University and gradually expanded to include more outside musicians. Up until this point, while we were putting together music that was coming from a serious place, most of our lyrical output was built up around all these incredibly personal jokes or references to specific situations we’d experienced, particularly during school, and it just didn’t make sense to include anybody else. A lot of my most favourite songs of ours are completely nonsensical in subject matter and often spiralled into some of the craziest stuff you could imagine; maybe one day we’ll get the bright idea to release some of it somehow (and then promptly regret it!).”

Lee O’Brien: “Self-taught drummer. Practice!? What’s that? Just don’t have enough time! Played in a few bands over the years… My last band Load went through numerous line-up changes. We managed to record an album which had a few tracks featured on Classic Rock (Track of the day) and some cover mount CD’s for their monthly magazine. In the end we split due to lack of commitment and enthusiasm.”

What sparked and inspired not only the project but your experimentation with electronics and songwriting?

Mike: “Songwriting in general – I can’t even recall how it started! A love of music, a desire to create :) What inspired the project was wanting to try a different sort of music. In terms of how MiXE1 started…Well a few years ago I was in BBX which was alt-metal. The vibe in general was heavy and some darker vibes, influenced by bands like KoRn…Dir en Grey. It had come out exactly how I planned it but I wanted to try some electronics and the big factor for me – the lyrics were quite dark, melancholy, angry – which worked and sounded great in the songs. With my changing life views and stuff, I wanted to try something more uplifting though…More positive and with a hint of romance. So I fired up Sonar and wrote the first MiXE1 song :) And from there MiXE1 has just grown and grown. I feel the songwriting is only getting stronger. Fast forward to now, we’ve got the Lee’s adding their guitar and drum input to the songs. It’s always exciting to see how a song will evolve.”

Lee T: “It just felt like a natural progression really. Though I’m actually a bass player by nature, playing guitar for MiXE1 felt like a comfortable shift due to the amount of music we’ve written together before; the familiarity in the recording environment was a big deciding factor, I think. To be honest, I’m fully aware of my lack of guitar playing knowledge and if it were any other band asking me to take up the same role for them I’d probably have refused! As for the electronic side, we had tried our hand at a fair amount of synth driven rock in the past so slotting into this project was easy enough and I do feel like I can use my more rhythmic, bass-playing tendencies to my advantage in a genre that generally demands these driving low-end parts. That said though, as we push on with recording beyond the EP, we’re adding a lot more lead guitar parts too – which is really pushing my boundaries and has been a pretty fun challenge so far!”

Lee O: “I love to keep busy with music especially writing. I’m a drummer so not very musical. I didn’t want to rely on people to come up with stuff for me to add my drum parts… end up sitting round waiting for ages (although I can’t say that for MiXE1 as we always seem to have something on the go). I decided to have my own little project MiNiMAL FiLTh. It’s all electronic, samples and stuff. I got great enjoyment out of this and it helped with my song writing skills.”

What were/are the strongest inspirations to your creativity either musically or personally? mixe1

Lee O: “For me I’m really inspired (for this type of music) by Linkin Park, Pendulum, Prodigy, Leftfield, Celldweller and Rammstein. It’s their samples, synth sounds, vocals and song writing ability that makes me want to bop :)”

Lee T: “I guess my very first influence was my parent’s record collection! I grew up listening to bands like The Damned, UK Subs, The Clash and a hundred other bands across the punk spectrum; add to that a healthy dose of reggae, new wave, Sabbath and Zeppelin and that was more or less my start in life. I still remember thinking I was the coolest kid in primary school singing Guns n Roses songs in the playground! These days my inspirations come from a wider variety of media; films, books and life experience, the people around me and of course music is always there. The palette is ever changing really! It’s a lot more fun that way, I find. Over a bunch of genres across the board, 2013 so far has been amazing for music in particular for me.”

Mike: “I’m inspired by life, my wife, my family and friends all sorts :) My wife in particular and things we’ve gone through has been a bit inspiration for the songs. In terms of other bands, too many to say really – a lot of music inspires and sometimes influences come from unexpected places!”

The band initially was a solo project for yourself Mike, was this always the intention or even early on were you looking at expanding the band, as you have since of course.

Mike: “At the time of starting the project, I thought it was always going to be a solo thing! I had no real intention of it becoming a band or even playing live – I was quite attracted to doing my own thing and not having any of the creative concessions you can find in bands. But this really was fuelled by wanting to go in a more electronic and lyrically positive direction than the main band I was in at that time. Since setting the foundation of what MiXE1 is, what it’s about and particularly with these guys – that’s not a problem at all. Everyone’s really open about the music and how it comes out.

How we became a full band… Essentially I was looking for some live band members to play a gig or two. The Lee’s joined the mix and I encouraged them to put their own spin on the songs, add their own stuff to their parts and not just to follow the recordings to a tee. We actually played some album songs in rehearsal and what they were adding was really cool and most importantly really fitting to the songs. I remember thinking that I’d love to have this stuff on the actual recordings! From there, it just made sense and felt right to become a band. We’re fortunate in that everyone really adds something positive to the songs. We were looking for a live bass player for ages too afterwards and we finally found Marcos who tears it up live. He’s really talented too but the important thing is everyone gets along. It’s a laid back atmosphere when we’re all together, fun times…exactly how it should be ;)”

Your previous bands were more guitar based how did you find creating music different with electronics, apart from then obvious, and did it open up a more expansive field to explore than before?

Mike: “Oh for sure! Even in my BBX I was using a lot of guitar FX pedals, so it wasn’t always a straight guitar sound – I was always looking to modify the sound to give it atmosphere and diversity rather than driving every song with the same sound. Moving to electronics just gives you a much wider palette. With synths, there are so many different sounds which can give each song a unique texture. The songs have more layers and get even more epic!”

Lee O: “Mine were also more guitar based. I wanted to move more into the Electro scene, maybe creating a British Rammstein. For me, being an Electro group, I can write more as I have the use of midi programs where I can create synth tunes as I’m not very good at playing the keyboards… hey it’s all creativity at the end of the day ;)”

mixe1 pic 4 Your debut EP was Module 1, tells us about it and what you learnt in its creation which helped with subsequent releases.

Mike: “My attitude for Module 01 was kind of experimental! It laid the foundations of the project – the theme which is essentially all based in a futuristic city called MiXE1. There are some references to that in the lyrics and more in the general sound of the music. But yeah it was very much a case of just seeing what I could do on my own with synths and my vocals on the first EP. I learnt a lot actually. The main thing I learnt was what my voice can do, discovering how to use it and what I can do. That was exciting. I learnt a bit about the importance of mixing through the process too. After I wrote the first MiXE1 song, my attitude was very much like…I have this song I think is cool but it’s just gonna sit on hard drive, I’ll release it so even if it’s not the most polished, people can actually hear it and maybe be affected by it. So I wrote and released the EP. These days I’m more picky about having a good mix to represent the songs well but still have that mentality of if I don’t release it, no-one’s gonna hear it so get it out there!”

There feels like your songs hold a deep personal core lyrically and musically especially in Module 2 your second EP, is that the reality and what inspires your songwriting?

Mike: “Yea definitely! Module 02 is a very specific story with four specific songs/chapters of a couple being separated, dealing with a long distance relationship, remembering a time before and finally being reunited – and the story stems straight from my personal life. The reality (without going in to the long story…or trying not to!) is that I’d met the love of my life, Amie – we were super happy but she was on a student visa and when it was about to expire, she had to leave the country (day before Valentine’s Day if you can believe it). We spent a year February to February doing the long distance thing before I finally got her back and she’s now my wife. So it all worked out well but that year was mental…All the emotion, money, stress of immigration, life changes and long distance relationship-ing etc. We communicated every day, some teary phone calls to boot. We kept positive and it’s all worked out! It was a lot of hard work but infinitely worth it. So yeah that situation comes in to so many songs – those on Module 02, Lights Out and Starlit Skin for sure.”

You have just released your new EP, Lights Out, for us your finest and most mature work yet, though I believe the songs were written between your previous pair of EPs. Did you revisit them or take them further on from their inception on the EP?

Mike: “A bit of both really! The songs were all there structurally – with the exception of ‘Find You’ which was written up to the first chorus. I initially thought of it as a ‘band revamp’ – get everyone on the recordings and see what happens. I mean again, a song like ‘Find You’ for example, it originally had an extremely simple beat and Lee OB came in with this really dynamic and involved rhythm – basically stamping his style and personality on it. Similarly on guitars, the song had none and now it’s soaked in atmospheric leads and chords. Suddenly a song has a different vibe or something unexpected has happened and we’ll feed off of it.”

Lee T: “If you were to go back and listen to the demo versions of each track (good luck tracking them down!), it’s actually mind blowing how far some of them have come.

Largely the structures remained the same throughout, but sonically you could just sense each song coming to life and taking on these whole new personalities as everyone found their groove and these new ideas started bouncing from one person to the other. It was a pretty global affair actually; each part was written and recorded over a number of days, in completely different places and then attached at the end of the day into a group email session we had set up, where we proceeded to nit-pick each song to death before shipping it on over to Lawrie at Studio X in Australia. So the whole recording process was this great experience of finishing a guitar part off one day and then receiving a new drum layer the next, maybe followed by a new vocal idea or synth and just layering this crazy musical Jenga as we went along – I must have about 8-10 versions of every track on the EP sitting on my computer with something SLIGHTLY different about each one.”

Lee O: “From what I know the basis of the songs was already there (which made our lives easier). It was just a case of adding, changing and tweaking to get them to where they are today.”

The release is the first with you all involved.  Do you think this expanded line-up and mix of ideas played a big part in why the songs have lights-out-ep-coverarguably leapt above your previously released songs, though they themselves have all help make impressive releases?

Lee O: “Without a doubt… ha-ha!  :^o ===(   trumpet, blowing :)

Mike: “Ha, yeah I would say so for sure. I mean the songs were always there – the synths, basic structure, vocals, the basic riffs…The core of the songs. What we have now is a bigger sound, a more ‘live’ one thanks to some big drums and big guitar.”

Going back a bit for clarity how did you all meet and how has the additional skills and instrumentation impacted on the songwriting?

Lee O: “At The Pink Flamingo Club, we were wearing our crop tops and chaps…. oh wait, I’m getting confused! “

Mike: “Lee T and I have been friends for years like he said earlier – think we met in the school playground playing Ninja Turtles or something! How we met Lee OB, we put an advert out for another Lee I think, right? “

Lee T: “Yeah, we felt the dynamic of communicating with each other wasn’t QUITE confusing enough so we had to actively put an end to it. So, like many relationships these days, we found O’B via the internet, on the shadiest musician network we could find and then eventually met in person in the practice room one day. The rest is, as they say, geography… or something.”

Lee O: “I suppose I’d better come clean now…. my name isn’t Lee, its Rupert………….. I’ll get my coat!”

Lee T: “You should have said Richard – we could have called the new album The Crystal Dome!”

Mike: “But yea these guys have taken the songs to the next level! Lee OB is coming in with all these creative drum ideas that blow my mind. He gives the songs so much life and added dynamics. His ideas aren’t always restricted to drums – for example, having that extra bit of verse 2 guitar without vocals on Find You was his idea. Same with Lee T, he’s coming in with some amazing guitar ideas – lots of weird chords, lots of lead guitar stuff. I never really saw MiXE1 as having much lead guitar, I always wrote riffs very rhythmically in the past. It totally works; it’s a different vibe and stamped in his style/personality. On the EP, Find You and Pulling You Back To My World had no guitar written for them at all on the demos so it was a clean slate. Now guitar is a bit part of the songs.”

Is it a three way writing creativity for new songs now or still Mike at the core of that aspect?

Lee O: “I would like to say 3 way, but I would always want Mike (The Overlord :)) to have the final say as he has driven the sound and style to a certain place and wouldn’t want to upset that. He has done a good job in getting MiXE1 where it is today.”

Mike: “Yeah everyone is contributing for sure. I would say at this exact moment in time, I’m writing the core of the songs. That’s because we haven’t really tried writing anything from scratch as a band yet, it’s all been working on existing songs and demos penned before we became a band! There’s been plenty in the backlog :)

Lee T: “Plus a bunch of rough demos and random recordings we keep finding from about 10 years ago!”

How do you personally approach your songwriting?

Lee O: “On tippy toes whilst wearing my lucky pants…..oh wait, I’m confused again!!”

Lee T: “In regards to Lights Out, I suppose we approached the songwriting in the same way we have always done and that’s with an open mind and a good sense of humour! The advantage of the way we work is there are no preconceived notions on how things should be done and there isn’t a certain standard expected from one another, so it leaves room for a real casual, yet productive atmosphere. This actually helped a lot for me over the last year, being the admittedly amateur guitar player that I am…

A huge majority of the guitar sessions for both Lights Out and the upcoming album have been in burst of about two hours at a time, 2-3 times a week and in a way I feel like it really helped shape some of the sound of everything you’re about to hear over the coming months. It was this real quick fire situation where ideas could be made or broken in the space of minutes and there was a hell of a lot of improvisation throughout, where we’d find ourselves picking out a great sounding part and building sections around these tiny sparks of ideas.

One of my favourite recording experiences so far was actually with an album track where I tried my hand for the very first time at soloing (spoiler alert!), and we literally had this one section of song repeating for nearly 2 hours while I repeated the same part with slight tweaks over and over again. It’s that level of fun and sheer patience that I really can’t imagine finding recording with anyone else.”

Mike: “Note – not all 2 hours of solo are on the album! ;) Yeah, as a band we are very relaxed, in the rehearsal room or recording. My personal approach to writing… Well I always have the music first and that will spark off the vocals. I’ll usually cycle through various synth presets until a sound speaks to me or some songs I’ll start writing on guitar and later convert to synths – the 2012 single A Spark In The Air was like that. I just write songs that I want to hear, music I’d love to have on my own mp3 player and blasting out my stereo! I do have a self-imposed lyrical rule that I try to keep things positive or if there is some subject matter on the darker side, lace it with hope. For sure MiXE1 has always been quite open in terms of what sort of songs. “

mixe1 pic 3There is a certain harder rock element and snarl to the electro sounds of the band now, was this something you ha in thoughts for a while or a thrilling consequence of the full line-up?

Lee O: “I don’t know, but I like it :)

Lee T: “Good answer.”

Mike: “I’d say for sure being a band brings out the rock elements though I’d say it’s happened very natural rather than as a conscious decision. There’s always been rock vibes to some of the tracks – listening back to ‘Module 01′ there’s rock guitars there. The majority of synth parts on the EP were already written so I wouldn’t say the intention is brand new as a result of becoming a unit – what’s happened is the band have amplified this hard and it’s come out naturally. There are more guitar parts and these are more prominent. Having an actual drummer typically means you’ll be getting harder hitting rockier drum kits more often than the very electronic ones. It gives us an even bigger sound. I definitely feel the EP has a bit of a darker tone sonically than the previous material though as said, the core songs were written a while ago so the direction isn’t a result of that – however the band definitely accentuate the rock and edge of the songs. Balances nicely with synths to my ears :)”

Has the quality of and acclaim upon the EP changed your intent and thoughts  of the direction of MiXE1 or is it still on course for your original intention?

Mike: “Acclaim-wise – It’s a fantastic feeling to get positive feedback from reviewers and fans – we’re really appreciative and super grateful for it! In terms of impact on songwriting direction – there is none. Personally speaking I always write the music I want to write and be true to myself and what sort of songs I want to make, which is a very wide range and quite open. But it needs to feel right. If anything, the EP doing so well is an indication to keep doing that :) There’s nothing greater than hearing from a fan that the music has connected with them and has been with them through times in their lives. Those messages keep me smiling for days on end!”

Lee T: “In light of the positive feedback we’re getting about the EP so far, I just wanna say a quick, but huge thanks to anyone and everyone out there who has taken the time to check it out, review it, spread the word or simply messaging positive vibes back via social media. The reaction to Lights Out so far has been way above and beyond what I expected and as my first “proper” release, the ride so far has been mind-blowing.”

Does the Lights Out EP give a strong taster of what to expect from the album you are currently working on, Starlit Skin?

Lee O: “No, not really. The album is becoming a beast. We have played more of the songs from the album in the studio than the EP, so I think that helped shape it into what it’s become.”

Lee T: “For me, I’ve gotta say that it doesn’t. The songs themselves are definitely coming from a similar place and space in time, but each track we finish up at the moment is just leaps and bounds ahead of Lights Out. That’s not to take anything away from the EP, of course, but I get a real sense of pride that I didn’t quite get with the EP. The best way I can describe it, I think, is in my own performance; not being well-versed in the art of guitar, I think my style can best be described as “winging it” and I definitely play with a ‘heart-not-head’ mentality. I think it works to our advantage, really – but you’ll have to decide when the album drops!”

Mike: “Yeah the songs on the album are sound huge. I’d actually say yes it’s a taster in the sense that we have big drums and big guitars and of course my voice and style. It’s very much MiXE1 with the new MiXE1 band vibe. So for me, it’s a taster in that respect for sure. Although I do feel the same as the guys in that the songs are coming out even better than Lights Out definitely! I’m proud of Lights Out but the songs on Starlit Skin are some of our best yet. There are a couple of more chilled songs on the album and a couple which are our heaviest yet, there’s a lot of emotion and exploration.”

Can you tell us more about the album, any spoilers ;)

Lee O: “Spoilers shmoilers…. it’s gonna have 10 original songs…. there ya go! ;)”

Lee T: “Expect to be head banging one minute and holding your hands aloft and swaying the next.”

When can we hope to see it?

Lee O: “That’s the trickiest question so far :) Well it’s nearly finished…. we have a video shot for one of the tracks (just waiting for that to be completed). We’ve only just released the EP so wouldn’t be wise to release the album too soon. Think we were really going to promote, review and tease this album before release… so at a guess, towards the end of the year.”

Mike: “What Lee said! The plan is most likely the end of the year – we’ll be sitting on the album for a while sorting promo ideas for it and things for the next release. We need to give Lights Out time to air first ;)

Certainly the songs on Lights Out at times give suggestion of inspirations from eighties and nineties artists and sounds, we mentioned being reminded of the likes of Modern English, John Foxx and even Blancmange, as well as more current people like Celldweller and Static Distortion stable mates Ghost In The Static, but is that older period one which has impacted on you most to spice your music would you say?

Mike: “Y’know what – I can’t actually think of any bands that come to mind as a big influence on the EP… At least not intentionally. I listen to a lot of music and I have so many influences – over time they become so integrated it’s sometimes hard to tell what influences are being channelled! So for sure older stuff has had an influence on me in some way and possibly on the EP though it wasn’t conscious ;)”

Lee T: “I’m similar in a way. While there were wasn’t any particular road map to writing these songs, I guess you’re always going to be influenced by whatever you’ve enjoyed previously whether you consciously want to or not. My music collection is so chock full of bands that make me say “I’d love to be involved in something like this”, it’s no doubt having some effect on my own output and it’s interesting so far seeing how other people are interpreting that. Being mentioned in the same sentence as some of the bands that people are reminded of, while listening to Lights Out, is just crazy to me I can tell you that!”

Lee O: “I feel I’m more influenced by current music, but who knows whether 80’s / 90’s music / bands like Duran Duran, Nik Kershaw, Pet Shop Boys, Adam and the Ants, Madness and Genesis influence me sub consciously. They probably do in a small way.”

You have and probably are involved in other projects and collaborations, can you fill us in on those too?

Lee O: “Maybe…. maybe not :)”

Mike: “Those which are public are ‘DEP featuring MiXE1′ – a project with Mark Haigh of Draconic Elimination Projects which we started last year. We shot a video as well for one of the singles earlier in the year, currently being edited. And also ‘M3SSAGE’ which consists of myself, Gary from Defeat and Steve from Ghost In The Static. The songs are sounding great though we’re very slow as we have our main projects as priorities. Some seven string guitar action in that one!

In terms of collabs, I’ve done a few guest vocals! I don’t really get to talk about them so I’ll talk about each of the public ones! Ghost In The Static’s song ‘Lost’ was the first. A kick-ass song, I was very honoured to be on their album (it’s awesome check it out). Steve had all the lyrics and vocals written I basically sang them and added my style and threw a few extra bits in there.

Cease2Xist’s song ‘Still Not Dead’ – that came out amazing, Dayve Yates absolutely nailed that song. He told me the lyrical theme he had in mind so I just sang some bits with the idea in mind, did a few backing screams and wrote the chorus – though only Dayve is singing that bit and added his embellishments (e.g. mental high scream :D)

Most recent is Cryogenic Echelon’s ‘From Comatose’ – basically Dayve linked me up to one of Gerry Hawkin’s releases which sounded really great and we got talking. Next thing you know I was working on a track with them. The track is awesome and Gerry was really encouraging to let me do my own thing. Really great bunch of guys, seriously talented and I’m proud how the song turned out! Bonus of that collab was Gerry introduced me to Lawrie (of CE and Studio-X) who mixed Lights Out.”

What apart from finishing the album and working on the EP promotion is next for MiXE1?

Lee O: “World domination of course. Oh, and a cup of tea with a nice biscuit on the side.”

Lee T: “Next on the agenda for me is a remix of one of the album tracks. Should be interesting as I’ve never really put one together with the intention of it actually getting out there so it’ll be an experience working on it knowing it’ll be promptly ripped apart by all the guys out there who are actually good at it! ha-ha.

Other than that, we’ve been toying with the idea of how to promote the future album release when the time comes. I produced the Lights Out trailer with my video production venture: Shooting Satellite and we didn’t really want to rinse and repeat that idea for promoting the album; so we’re currently bouncing some ideas around for something far more interesting…”

Thanks so much for sharing time to talk with us guys, anything else you would like to add?

Mike: “Thanks for the interview, Pete. We just want to say thank you for all the support – every listen, every share, every purchase, every bit of feedback. It means a lot and we are very grateful!”

Lee T: “Also thanks for the great review!”

Lee O: “This is going in OK magazine, isn’t it?”

And finally, it is becoming known that I do not get on with or understand the need for remixes, though the one of  your track Part Of Me on the new EP by the great band Defeat  did impress. So finally try to convince me of the worth of remixes as a valid proposition alongside original writing J

Mike: “I feel it serves two purposes – firstly a reimagining of a song, maybe taking it in a direction not explored in the original. A good remix for me takes the song to a new place but also very much has the sound of the remixer. Secondly, it gets bands names out – if you find a remix you like, you can check out the band who remixed and maybe you’ll like their stuff. So I feel it’s a way to promote your project as well. Personally speaking I do very few remixes, I’ve only done two. Takes me a bit of motivation as with my music time, I’d prefer to just blast new material! ;)

Lee O: “I had a crack at a remix, it was my first as I can’t say I’ve ever been a fan of remixes myself…. but boy it’s hard. I found it harder than writing an original song. You have to do the original justice (even though it’s probably never going to be as good as) and feel like there is a pressure there for it to be real good. People think it’s easy as the song is already written and all you have to do is jig it about a bit. It’s like redesigning something that is good and functional…. it can be done, but will you come up with a better design than the original? Hmmmm!”

Lee T: “Oooh, controversial subject! This is where I’m gonna plant my foot firmly in my mouth after telling you I’m working on one myself but I’ve gotta say it’s not often I actively seek remixes out to listen to. That said, I understand their importance in certain circles, especially in the genre we find ourselves in, as they widen the potential audience while serving as a sort of dragnet for people to check out the originals! Defeat did some awesome work with Part of Me and turned it into this awesome, dark, dance-y number that I’m sure everyone will really enjoy. It definitely sounds killer in my car!”

https://www.facebook.com/mixe1

Read the review of the Lights Out EP @ https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2013/07/22/mixe1-lights-out-ep/

Pete RingMaster

The RingMaster Review 05/08/2013

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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Machine Rox – Activate Your Anger

Machine Rox

© Alex Cooke Photography

After struggling to catch a breath after the riotous, energetic and overwhelmingly exhausting Activate Your Anger EP from UK industrial/electro band Machine Rox, you can only sit back with a satiated hungry appetite and contemplate basking immediately again in the feast of satisfying sounds. Like that favourite meal you may constantly choose in a restaurant, the release is a familiar and arguably unadventurous encounter for the palate, but one which brings the deepest and fullest senses ravaging pleasure.

Machine Rox began in 2007 as the solo project of Richard Kaltenhauser (aka Richard K), a member of industrial bands Meat Machine and Global Noise Attack (who supported the likes of Rammstein, Napalm Death, and Covenant). His ideas and sounds blended the potent essences of electro, industrial, and ebm with a corrosive metallic guitar bred attack for as subsequent releases show an impacting and incendiary brawl of a magnetic encounter. The arrival of Aga in 2010 on backing vocals and keyboards brought the project into a band stance with two years later joining Aga and Richard (electronics, vocals, guitars), drummer Nuj Farrow and guitarist Valerian Oproiu added their presence for the live aspect of the band. Since then Machine Rox has supported bands such as Leaetherstrip, V2A, and Deviant UK, and played numerous successful and acclaimed shows and festivals. Activate Your Anger follows a quartet of well received EPs which has increased their stature rapidly but with the new Static Distortion Label EP and its increased aggression, intensity, and contagious energy, expectations are of this being a trigger point to even greater awareness.

The London based band immediately coats the ear in a static cursed electro rub instantly joined by heavy caustic riffs, predatory 175430660-1beats, and burning sonics as opener Move Your Body (Until You Die) winds up its lethal dance. A thumping pulse driven rampage with devilment and rhythmic belligerence in tow is an easy persuasion especially with the dual vocals of Richard and Aga offering a devil and angel seduction. Whether from the acidic melodic venom of the guitar or the bewitching wantonness of the electro spotlights and their spearing shafts of warmth, the track is an unrelenting tempest which incites a full engagement and compliance to its irresistible call.

The following Night Riots is not just content to follow in the wake of its compelling predecessor without making its own contagious declaration on the ear which it does by initially provoking and caging the senses in commanding and synapse resonating throaty beats. Hitting the primal target which leads again to capitulation before the forceful and greedy energy as well as the infectious temptation beckoning and grinning from every note and corner of the track, the band without quite matching the potency of the first track holds the passions in its grasp and takes them on an invigorating irresistible ride.

Next Nothing steps up to offer a snarl to the release which reminds of Ghost In The Static, its bruising and scuzzy sound and intensive sinews the most imposing and threatening part of the EP. It like all the songs has hooks which deep root themselves in the listener for the most potent contagion though up against the following Where You Are still looks like a novice in that department. Taking centre stage with an instantaneous swagger and impossibly catchy lure, the new song is an intoxicating hypnotist with sparking crystalline seduction and an authoritative cogent rhythmic web which enslaves the senses and passions. Virulently infectious with a presence which is like Dead Or Alive meets Hanzel und Gretyl with Marilyn Manson and Angelspit in close attention, the track is electro manna for which there is no defence.

Bringing the release to an equally riveting and explosive conclusion is firstly Time To Survive, the track bringing back a thicker muscular wall of sound to further tease and exploit the now brewed ardour towards it with insidiously entrancing sonic enticement and ravenous heavy duty rapaciousness, and finally a remixed version of Next Nothing. Though Activate Your Anger does not offer anything dramatically new, it and Machine Rox unleash a tempestuous energy exploding experience which few recently have rivalled.

http://www.machinerox.com/

8.5/10

RingMaster 28/04/2013

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Explosion Technology – Proiavlenie

Explosion Technology Проявление

With a name which more than represents the contents of its creativity, Ukraine band Explosion Technology has an energy and sound which is a blazing fire of thrilling imagination. They make their world bow with debut album Proiavlenie, a release which is a tempest of styles merged into a bruising seductive invention and equally captivating ingenuity. Tagged as alternative/electro metal to which you can add industrial and nu metal as well as a punk fuelled passion, the trio from Balakleya has brewed a storm of enterprise which easily stands with the best of industrial and electronic metal releases this year and makes the case for  being one of the most impressive debuts anywhere.

Formed in 2009 by the threesome of Andrey Slon (vocal, bass), Artiom Lukienko (guitar, programming) and Vladislav Alandarev (percussion), the band and music is soaked in the essences of numerous sounds and genres distilled to flavour their own distinctly contagious creations. Their first demo Voshod (Sunrise)in 2010, was well received upon its digital release whilst the band also grew strong acclaim for their live shows around the Ukraine. In August of the following year Explosion Technology began working on their first album which went on through to November of 2012 with the resulting nine track riot not only reflecting the band’s personal attitude to the modern tendencies of hard music industry but emerging as one of the highlights of the year so far.

The album opens with the rampant energy and strength of Звуки (Sounds), a track which immediately seizes the ear with sinewy electronic lures before opening up its full musculature forcibly driven by ear crowing riffs and combative rhythms. Now in control the song dances on the senses with heavy booted drums and intensity whilst the electronic spawn melodic persuasion swerves around and lures in the passions with a sizzling radiance and toxic kiss. Thoroughly contagious and almost able to defy being sung in Russian to recruit the listener in all capacities including voice, the song is a hungry and inviting sprawl of exhilarating enterprise and impacting provocation.

From the immense start the album ensures its tight hold on the appetite is secure if not tightened with both Плохое Кино (Bad Movie) and Больше Не Нужна (No Longer Needed). As throughout the album tracks are connected by atmospheric instrumentals in the style of thrillers and horror movies which adds its own intrigue and pleasing invention from which the songs spring from with ease and greater ingenuity. The first of the pair continues the Rammstein spicery bred in the opener but adds extra flavouring of the likes of Celldweller and Pitchshifter to its towering presence. Keys and guitars exchange glances and malicious teasing as they entrap and enthral whilst the rhythms from bass and drums stomp their own primal branding upon the senses to offer greater shadow and intimidation to the barbed melodic confrontation.  Its successor is another and greater pinnacle of the album, its punk energy and metal attitude a twisting and exhausting triumph. Creating a storm of irresistible aggressive challenges and antagonistic invention, the song is a mix of Korn, Combichrist, and Biting Elbows which snarls, provokes, and riles the senses for a fury of potent pleasure sparking instinctive ardour.

Across the likes of the electronically caustic and metallically biting Импульс Жизни (Pulse of Life), the rapacious and darkly pulsating cyber expanse offered by За Пределами (Outside), and Триллер (Thriller) with its raging fire of electro vehemence and savage intensity, the album just consumes thoughts and emotions with striking craft and predatory efficiency, every note of every song loaded with spite and imaginative fascination in exchange for only the strongest and hungrily devouring responses in return. As found elsewhere, the brass seeded flames upon the last of this trio of songs carves out additional and distinct temptations to be bewitched by, as do those evocative links, pieces of music even in their brief breaths as thoughtfully engineered and crafted as the songs themselves.

Before its closure Proiavlenie confirms the might and stature of the album with the outstanding Замкнут В Пустоте(Closed In the Void), the equally stunning На Той Стороне (On The Other Side) its blackened symphonic air a suggestion which without being realised wraps its emotive grandeur around the erosive touch of the song, and the closing title track, translated as Manifestation, which exploits the now firm subservience of the emotions for further addict like rapture with its Numanesque instrumental persuasion. Proiavlenie is a magnificent introduction to a band which is sure to shape further similarly impacting moments in the future, something anticipation has already developed a lust for.

https://www.facebook.com/ExplosionTechnology

9/10

RingMaster 23/04/2013

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Neaera: Ours Is the Storm

NEAERA_Promo_2012_Woods

    Fired with a tempest of sonic abrasion, the new and sixth album from German metallers Neaera is a furnace of aggression and intensity which has been stoked up into a confrontation which is as punishing as it is compelling. Whether Ours Is the Storm is the band at its most aggressively creative and destructive yet can be discussed in length as they have unleashed numerous onslaughts of impressively violent creativity, but certainly the new album shows they have not lost one ounce of invention, malevolence, and sonic spite.

Since forming in 2003 under the name The Ninth Gate, the band from Münster, Westphalia has triggered constant attention with their distinct maul of death metal with thrash veining, the quintet within a year being signed to Metal Blade Records. Changing their name to Neaera, after a character in Greek mythology, the band released their debut album The Rising Tide Of Oblivion in 2005 to a tide of strong positive reviews. The following years saw four more enthusiastically received albums all garnering strong acclaim in varying degrees and the band igniting stages in shows, tours, and festivals around Europe alongside the likes of Kataklysm, Caliban, Rammstein, Earth Crisis, Sworn Enemy, All That Remains, Soilwork , Bleed From Within, Callejon and many more. With their new album again released via Metal Blade, the band has continued to hone and evolve their sound into a full brutal expanse of imagination, energy, and passion. The release is a carnal devour of the senses which leaves you breathless, sore, and blissfully satisfied.

Opening track The Deafening is a inciting intro to the ferociousness to follow, its brewing corruption and blistered ambience a Neaera - Ours Is the Stormshort breath of oppressiveness before the title track runs with the in place intent to unleash a primal rage upon the ear. With rhythms slapping the senses with muscular persistence and riffs gnawing with rabid hunger whilst sonic spirals of intrigue and enterprise ignite the air further, the song consumes and ravishes person and emotions. It is a stirring bruising encounter which ignites the passions with ease, the varied growls and insidious squalls from Benjamin Hilleke a magnificent cry and scour as impacting and voracious as the sounds colouring the air black and blue around him.

Decolonize the Mind and Through Treacherous Flames both concentrate on the already deep sores ripped open by the first track, the guitars of Stefan Keller and Tobias Buck flattening defences with merciless riffs and branding with sonic flames whilst the skilled drums of Sebastian Heldt make no attempt to hide their hostility and malice. Between the songs and across the album there is arguably a similarity to the corrosive surface which threatens at times to overwhelm the continually challenging imagination and diversity within songs though it is never enough to deflect their intrigue and power, whilst looking each storm directly in the eye and searching its core reveals the depth of invention at work and

Deeper into its heart the album unveils a hunger driven by serpentine maliciousness locked in thrash savagery within Ascend to Chaos and a volatile grooved invidiousness in the outstanding Walk with Fire, a track which tears and violates with contagion and irrepressible craft. The song is one of the major highlights along with the title track though both are challenged seriously by the melodic fire of My Night of Starless and the thundering predator Black Tomb where bassist Benjamin Donath reveals his deepest grudging menace on the album.

Ours Is the Storm continues to deliver impressive storms of scorning anger and sonic antagonism with the likes of Slaying the Wolf Within and Back to the Soul igniting further strong pleasure. It is a release which is hard to say is inventing anything new or startling but at the same time it is a consistently invigorating and inciting fury which is impossible not relish with greed. Neaera shows no sign of losing their potency or vitriol for which we can be very thankful.

http://www.neaera.com

8/10

RingMaster 06/03/2013

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Project Silence: 424

Proj silence

    A new scourge to confront extreme noise fans, Project Silence is a Finnish band which is a brawl of intense promise and in 424 has unleashed an album equally as powerful and striking. Though not without flaws, the release is an immense conviction of brutality and bewitching enterprise, in fact that its only real prime issue in that it offers so much in diversity and ideas it risks confusing the listener into indecision over its impressive contents.

From Kuopio, the quintet of Delacroix (vocals, programming, keyboards), Mr. Sanderz (guitar), J (guitar), Silve R (drums), and Sturmpanzerjäger (bass), combine a ferocious furnace of industrial metal, dark electro, trance, aggrotech, and black metal, setting the band somewhere between God Destruction and The Browning with primal essences of Mortiis adding their serpentine malevolence. Formed in 2008 as originally a solo project of Delacroix, the band released its first songs soon after as a free download before working on their debut album and releasing a pair of preview songs in 2010. Obstacles and delays held up the album until the powerful collection of invention and aggression was released at the tail end of 2012. Now with its experimental muscular confrontations open to the world there is an expectation, after listening to 424 that Project Silence is on the first major step of an impending forceful ascent.

The title track wraps around the ear first, the electronic instrumental a warm expanse of electro warmth over slightly blistered 424coverambience whilst keys evoke a tender yet firm invitation to the heart of the release. The piece gives no indication of the destructive intent to follow though its brief minute and a half is merely a pleasing slight-of-hand as the malice of Pressure Revolution takes its place. The track plunders the ear initially with electronic teases and riotous shouts before gaining a stride of rampant electronics and hungry riffs. In full flight the song is a storm of brawling intensity, grazing acidic vocal squalls, and transfixing sonic rain of melodies and electro shards of infection. It is an undemanding yet sinewy encounter which has essences of Houston! and Celldweller within its heated stance.

The following My Reality immediately invades the ear with a darker ambience and invading shadows leading to a malicious caustic vocal and predatory black metal flavoured persuasion. Whereas its predecessor was a relatively direct offense the songwriting here is an evolving and senses searching journey which ravishes and seduces with equal hunger and effect. A guitar power metal infused temptation is just one seamless escapade on the insidious encounter whilst the symphonic caresses in the latter part of its presence is an extra fire of unexpected pleasure to add further diversity to song and release as is Stardancer (Raven’s whore). The track opens with a trance soaked wash which persuasively leads one right into the furnace of rampaging energy and riffs driven by a ravenous breath. Once more it is a song which into its onslaught skilfully and passionately merges a distinct spicery, the track a raptorial tempest which shifts from bringing loud whispers of Rammstein and The Kovennant to those of Firewind and Enter Shikari.

The corrosive Keeper with its dramatic keys, euphoric ambient symphony, and riveting electronic grandeur, is a powerful and compelling slice of symphonic metal imagination but again as with all songs employs a weave of provocative textures and sounds which crosses genres and appetites. As mentioned at times you feel there is almost too much going on, though everything is with a craft and inventive sculpture it is impossible to refuse its addictive lure and the more you immerse within the album the more its persuasion is dominant.

From the singular techno presence of Sky, Space and Twilight Zone, a track which perfectly accomplished did not manage to spark any fires without that viciousness that pervades throughout the rest of the album, and the black metal malignancy of the again strong but ultimately uninspiring Alone (Crushed by Your Lies), the album is soon preying on the passions once more with firstly the feral BEAST and its successor Cage of Hate. The first of the pair fuses black and pagan metal into a voracious devouring of the senses with dazzling yet shadowed industrial magnetism whilst the latter is an incendiary soundscape of spiralling elements and ideas from again a wealth of genres and styles brought into a contagious slightly suffocating maelstrom of imagination.

424 is completed by the dark electro metal revelry of Everything where again the likes of Rammstein stalk thoughts and the short evocative instrumental Promise to bring a rounded closure to the release. It is an excellent release which impresses from start to finish whilst breeding an even more powerful promise and anticipation of the band in the future when they find their unique voice, which suggested by the album is still a search in progress. The bottom-line is Project Silence left us enthused and breathless, enough said.

http://www.projectsilence.info

8/10

RingMaster 27/02/2013

 

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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