Dirt, spices, and rock ‘n’ roll: getting a taste of The Sourheads

If you ever have thoughts that real rock ‘n roll is on the wane a quick listen to the new album from British rockers The Sourheads will soon make you think again. Care Plan For The Soul is a nine-track debut full-length, a skilfully and passionately woven roar of classic and fresh rock diversity which snarls as it seduces, thrills as it trespasses ears and imagination. Through our friend Garry at SaN, we had the chance to dig deeper into The Sourheads with guitarist MIK CRONE, exploring the band’s origins, digging into the heart of Care Plan For The Soul, The Sourheads live and more….

Hi Mik and big thanks for taking time to chat with us.

Can you, for those yet to be invaded by your rock ‘n’ roll, first introduce the band?

We are The Sourheads and we come from Wakefield West Yorkshire. We are a rock band who take influence from the greats and add our own twist. We like to think of ourselves of somewhat multi-genre and we don’t want to be seen as just one specific style of music. A career band like The Stones or The Who dip into different things but still stay true to who they are…So yea we are a rock band who give it our all live.

The band is said to have emerged in 2016 but does its seeds go further back?

The version of The Sourheads now is the result of many years building. Like Oasis the original version was Jake [Coxon]our singer and his brother Sid who played guitar. They had a string of musicians throughout a short period of time. I first came into the picture as a producer for the band. I had been working with various bands and the early version of the band struck me as a very different but awesome set of musicians. I felt with direction the band could be massive.  Around this time I was asked to join as a second guitarist and a month later Sid left. So at this point we upped our game and decided to focus on a solid tight band and work on the debut album. The Sourheads you see now emerged in 2016.

Is The Sourheads your first ventures in a band or do you all bring various previous experiences and explored styles of music to the mix?

Everyone in The Sourheads has been in other bands before. I had a small amount of success with a metal band I was in. Lamb [Chris Lambert] our drummer was in a relatively successful Indi band. Ben [Taylor] has played bass forever and grew up jamming with his brother Simon (Inme) and Jake has always been a creative person singing and painting. The combination of these different influences creates the originality of our band. We are what we are.

You have just released your debut album, Care Plan For The Soul. From its first breath it shares a multi-flavoured, refreshingly dirty and just a little salacious roar of sound and intent; a mix which suggests a varied range of inspirations to the band and individual members. Who particularly stands out as having an impact on your approach to making music?

We take our inspiration from different places. Jake is a massive Doors fan, Lamb is into his classic British Indi music; Ben is also a fan of different styles of music. I look up to any band that has strong songs. Stone Temple Pilots are a massive influence for me. Deftones, Queens of the Stone Age, The Cult, Shed Seven, Oasis, Clutch. We use many colours to create our art.

How would you describe your sound to newcomers?

Iggy and the Stooges mixed with the Sex Pistols thrown into a blender with The Stereophonics and Nirvana.

Classic Rock with an edge.

It feels like it just follows its nose always prepared to embrace fresh and unpredictable flavours. Is this something you deliberately set out to purposefully develop or a sound and direction which just grew and evolved organically?

We are what we are. People either get it or don’t. One review says we are original and have rewritten the rule book of what a rock band should be. The other will say they don’t get us. Why do we look like we do and why does the artwork not match the music. Well the answer is we are totally focussed and we are 100% us. Everything is totally focused and this is what we do, our sound and direction develop naturally. Luckily our label saw this and our friends like Red Spektor saw this. So it’s better to have a loyal friendship and business partnership and have loyal listeners than to be fake and try to jump on a scene.

How long was Care Plan For The Soul in the making?

We had a lot of time rehearsing and making sure we could play the songs. We could play without vocals, with vocals, without bass or without guitar and obviously all of us together…Probably 3 months of pre-production and a week to record.

It has an instinctive snarl to its air and open rawness to its energy; at times feeling like it may have been recorded live. How did you approach its creation in the studio?

We decided early on that the band has a live energy that needed to be captured so we decided to record live and then delete the guide vocal and do a main vocal later. I also overdubbed a second guitar rhythm track to fatten the overall mix. We also added congas and cello in the overdub stage.

Can you give us an insight into the trials and pleasing surprises you found when recording the album?

We worked with a wonderful producer called Matt Knee and we used an old 70’s BBC mixing desk, this gave us a warmth that we were pleasantly surprised by. We wanted initially to record full analogue but as we wanted to play live we decided it’s may be better to do it digitally but through old analogue gear. This was due to the fact that digital is instant and we knew we had to keep in budget for our business plan to be effective. We needed to make sure everyone was comfortable and the atmosphere was good. We had incense burning and lava lamps. Pretty laid back.

It was subsequently mastered by Pete Maher (The Rolling Stones, Depeche Mode, U2) and released through German Label Kozmik Artifactz. How did those link ups come about?

Pete Maher has worked with everyone and we liked the fact that he worked within multiple genres. Katy Perry, Pink Floyd, Linkin Park are a few of his varied clientele and he had just finished mastering the LA LA Land soundtrack. We knew that attracting a big name would gain us attention and Pete does great deals for up and coming bands. It seemed like a great idea and he did an amazing job. Around this time we became close friends with Red Spektor and their manager Simon. They were saying good things about us in interviews and we were starting to get noticed. I sent a private link of the album to a number of labels and pretty much instantly Kai at Kozmik Artifactz messaged back saying ‘We don’t usually release this style but we think you would fit our sister label Oak Island perfectly so we did the deal and we are honoured to be part of the Kozmik Artifactz Oak Island family. The label is having great success with bands like Church of the Cozmic Skull and of course our brothers Red Spektor.

Can you give us the inspiration for the album title and some of the themes within its body?

We felt that the title had to reflect the song content. Our drummer Lamb came up with it. The songs are pretty intense in parts and cover lots of topics such as Demonic Possession, Marriage Breakdowns, War veterans, soul stealing creatures. When you take this into consideration and then see the album cover is a lone figure stood in the middle of the beach with his dog it’s kind of like that is the care plan for his soul. He is escaping the turmoil.

Is there a particular songwriting process within the band?

Pretty much straight forward…Ben or me write a riff or two. Lamb plays a beat. We arrange the song, record it on a phone then Jake writes the lyrics.

Apart from obvious pride and satisfaction in Care Plan For The Soul is there a particular moment within it which gives you a specific personal flush of inner pleasure?

The whole thing is a major flush of inner pleasure. We set out with a goal and we achieved it on budget and we didn’t move away from our art and vision one bit. This is amazing to us. To have a vinyl copy of the album in my hands and look at the finished product gives me goosebumps. The fact that the digital streaming numbers are good too also feels good. We want to get out to as many people as possible. From the actual recording there are a few moments I like. I think some of the vocal delivery is the best Jake has ever been.  The rush created when he shouts I am the Lotus! That’s a fan favourite moment.

Give us an insight into the live side of the band?

We are told we are extremely good live. Jake is a bare chested beast of a frontman, live truly something that has to be seen and heard. We are very tight and play as close to the album as we can get. I like the idea that we are four individual characters and that as a member of the audience you can get what you are looking for from us. We put a lot into it. I’m swinging my arm in the air and running around; Jake is in the crowd or rolling around on the floor. Ben is grooving away and lam is bashing the living daylights out of the kit.  We are an old fashioned rock band. We put on a show.

Obviously the album is in its early days inviting attention but what is next on the horizon of The Sourheads?

We are hoping to tour throughout 2018 and play some festivals. Do a couple of music videos and keep writing. We have 3 songs written for the next album already. We have also experimented with slightly different sounds. Some old school style Stones vibe.

Again many thanks for sharing your time; any last words you would like to add?

Thank you for showing interest in the band. We truly appreciate every website, magazine radio station that helps us spread our message and music. We are fans of music and do this because we love playing and creating our art. People like you keep the musical torch burning bright. There is a buzz and new found enthusiasm for rock music and we want to embrace this whole heartedly.

Check out The Sourheads further @ https://www.thesourheads.com/    https://www.facebook.com/thesourheads    https://thesourheads2.bandcamp.com/

Pete RingMaster 13/12/2017

The RingMaster Review

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Noydem – A Time Will Come

A Time Will Come is the new EP from French outfit Noydem, a release coming three years after the band’s debut album. Formed in 2011, the Paris quartet create alternative rock which embraces an array of flavours for, as evidenced by their new release, a quite appetising adventure.

A year after emerging, Noydem unveiled their first EP in the shape of The Landing, its keenly welcomed release followed the next year by an even more eagerly received self-titled album. It is fair to say that the foursome of vocalist/guitarist Julien Prouveze, lead guitarist Gia Vcgr, bassist Jules Brosset, and drummer Joffrey Hebert has yet to awaken major attention outside of the French rock scene but an awakening A Time Will Come has a great chance of stirring.

Themed by “the feeling of people struck with ostracism in today’s society”, A Time Will Come offers five tracks of infectious rock starting with Welcome Home. A deep groan of bass and crisp percussion draws the equally alluring scythes of guitar and Prouveze’s strongly enticing vocals, it all uniting in a subsequent earthy stroll with flirtatious hooks entwined in infectious grooves. Immediately captivating and increasingly virulent by the second, song and sound tempt and seduce with lively enterprise, electronic additives adding to its inescapable contagion.

The excellent start is quickly matched by next up Bring Me Down. From its flirtatious start with seriously tempting rhythmic bait, the track catches alight with stoner lit grooves and industrial rock essences teasing a bold rock ‘n’ roll stroll. The electronic attributes of its predecessor come with greater voice, bringing a pop rock celebration sparking even greater infectiousness in the song’s character and antics.

The EP never quite reaches the heights of its first pair of songs again but only pleases and impresses as the likes of Stay with its calmer, reflective electronic/alternative rock grab attention. At times a suggestive simmer and in turn a dynamic blaze, the song is little short of an aural magnet with moments of major temptation.

The shimmering balladry of Your Other Self is more of a slow burner but never less than persistent captivation while closing track A Place to Live has the listener and EP bouncing with its own mix of emotive deliberation and physical dexterity. It too needs a touch more time to get under the skin compared to the first trio of tracks but worm into appetite and psyche it does.

Inspirations to Noydem include the likes of Red Hot Chili Peppers, Queens Of The Stone Age, Foo Fighters, Incubus, and Audioslave, spicing often easy to hear within A Time Will Come but theirs is a sound which is developing its own character very nicely with the prospects of major attention increasing release by release.

A Time Will Come is out now on iTunes and other stores.

https://www.facebook.com/Noydem/

Pete RingMaster 12/12/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Mammoth Temple – We’re Not Extinct

Having just been introduced to former Thirteen Shots frontman Johnny Rose’s new project in Blast Bomb we now have the new endeavour from its guitarist Lewis Manchip for you. That proposition is Mammoth Temple and they have just released their rather appetising debut EP, We’re Not Extinct. Echoing the band’s name in many ways, it is a lure of heavy boned rock ‘n’ roll worshipping the seduction of the groove and the growl of the riff, a fuzz rich proposal caked in the dirt of grunge and veined by stoner bred tendrils of melodic suggestion. It is also a potent introduction to the band and one which gets more compelling by the second.

Formed by Lewis and vocalist/bassist Dave, Midlands hailing Mammoth Temple is completed by the thunderous swings of drummer Ben. Initially taking their time to hone their sound, the trio have emerged with a live presence which is swiftly luring keen attention and plaudits, and now with a first release which is as thick in potential as it is already flourishing prowess and enterprise.

It opens up with Meat Promotion and instantly entangles ears in a flavoursome groove. With robust rhythms and throbbing bass that beginning is a sign of things to come in song and release. The blend of mellow vocals adds to a Queens Of The Stone Age like hue to the grunge meets heavy rock stroll of the track, the guitar continuing to cast wiry grooves and melodically sharp bait for ears and appetite to get hooked up on. It is a seriously infectious and captivating start which is more than matched by next up Wiping Out. Its psych rock kissed entrance is pure temptation, the skirting shadows intrigue against the vocal prowess of Dave and Lewis’ expressive melodies. With fiery flames igniting across its catchy gait and imaginative body, the song continues to blossom in imagination and craft. It might not be boldly unique but the song as the EP has a freshness and adventure to it which hints of such success ahead.

The mellower caress of Reflections is courted by the great dark shadowed throb of bass and volatility in Ben’s beats which never erupts but magnetically stalks the melancholic beauty of the song’s heart and touch. A song which just grows over time and listens, it brings another enticing aspect to the Mammoth Temple sound which only grows when the track does uncage its muscle.

The EP is concluded by firstly Promises, a distant rumble increasingly consuming ears as it looms closer and incites the imagination as blues rock ivy clings to its tenacious body and scuzzy skin. Another grower, it does not quite match up to those before it yet lingers in the memory with ease through its Jesus and Mary Chain meets Alice In Chains glaze alone.

How We Are completes the pleasure, it needing mere seconds to hook the appetite with its initial Soundgarden-esque melodic coaxing. From there, its simmering fire grows and intensifies with psych and stoner rock winds blowing across its rhythmic kindling and harmonic haze. As ever, there is a darker hue to its depths and emotion contrasting superbly with its brighter easily invited trespasses. The song is superb, a big end to a fine first union with Mammoth Temple.

It is early days but the signs are already hinting at a potent future for the band and rich adventures for us all alongside.

We’re Not Extinct is out now and available@ https://mammothtemple.bandcamp.com/album/were-not-extinct

https://www.facebook.com/MammothTemple/    https://twitter.com/MammothTemple

Pete RingMaster 05/12/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

The Night Suns – Human EP

Formed in the march of last year, UK outfit The Night Suns make their major introduction this month with debut EP, Human. It is a first look which tickles attention first time around, flirtatiously teases it on the second listen, and carries if off under its arm thereon in with three songs which are shadow clad, emotionally intense, and inescapably infectious.

Described as alternative rock, The Night Suns sound slips nicely between industrial rock and grunge, kind of like a blend of Gravity Kills and Stone Temple Pilots with an eager vein of Queens Of The Stone Age running through it. It is a mix of the familiar and unique which emerges as something openly individual to the London based quartet. The creation of vocalist/guitarist Radu Constantin, its line-up was quickly completed by the addition of ex-Telepathy bassist player Krys Turek, drummer Marky Zanna, and synth player Freddy Ciocoiu. Established as a lively and keenly supported proposition on the Capital’s live scene, The Night Suns are now ready to poke wider attention with their Tom Donovan (Foreign Beggars, Dani Filth, Animal Noise, Monster Florence) recorded EP, something not too hard to see Human achieving.

It opens up with Smoke, a track which instantly engulfs ears in rich melodies and tenacious rhythms. That grunge hue soon soaks its invitation, stoner spicing lining its lures as the vocals of Constantin entice with a warm yet darkly reflective edge. His guitar is an equally potent tempting, fiery flames searing the throb of bass, swing of beats, and the harmonic mist of keys. All together, the ingredients make for a captivating web of sound becoming more intriguing and beguiling minute by minute.

As strong and enticing as it is, the opener is quickly put in the shade by next up My Blood Is Cold. Instantly a shadow wraps ears and imagination but a dark synth and emotive shading as inviting as it is seemingly crestfallen. Easy to immerse in its noir caress things subsequently ignite in a blaze of snarling rock ‘n’ roll, the magnetic cycle repeated to great effect and pleasure as another weave of varied flavours get involved in creative drama and suggestive theatre, the outstanding song is a tapestry of adventure and real enterprise.

The EP’s self-titled closing track is just as richly appealing, its opening Sick Puppies-esque croon leading to a stroll of imagination and melodic angst lined by troubled shadows. Once more its accomplished and powerful rock ‘n’ roll is built on multi-flavoured inspirations delivered with passion and energy. As suggested, it might not be an overly unique proposition but its body and heart alone just grab the appetite and imagination, adding to an emerging individualism which flows within song and music and its potential to really ignite further down the line.

The Night Suns is a band which just calls out for closer attention and real anticipation for their next steps; the Human EP a striking and thickly enjoyable start to that journey.

The Human EP is out now.

http://www.thenightsuns.com/    https://www.facebook.com/thenightsunsofficial/

Pete RingMaster 05/12/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Bloodclot – Up in Arms

Pic Rick Rodney

Bringing together the highly recognised talent of certain individuals from various acclaimed bands does not always guarantee something special but in the case of Bloodclot, it feels a given such the instinctive union between its collective. The band is the coming together of Cro-Mags vocalist John Joseph, former Danzig and Murphy’s Law guitarist Todd Youth, drummer Joey Castillo formerly of Queens of the Stone Age, Danzig, and Eagles of Death Metal, and Mondo Generator frontman and ex- Queens of the Stone Age, Kyuss bassist Nick Oliveri. Together they confirm that given with debut album Up in Arms, a physical and lyrical roar of hardcore defiance.

Unleashing twelve ravenous slices of punk rock with more inescapable hooks than found in Leatherface’s pantry, all fuelled by raw irritability at the state of the world today, Up in Arms is a crowd uniting battle cry. It fuses familiar essences with the fresh appetite and invention of a quartet seemingly destined to come together at some point. Everything about it is as organic as it is rabid, as challenging as it is rousing; taking no prisoners but rewarding those who it devours time and time again.

The album’s title track crashes in on the listener first, springing from an invasive sonic mist with a slavery of guitar and rhythmic predation as Joseph pokes and stirs the senses with voice and word. Castillo’s beats are rapier sharp and imposing, Oliveri’s bass carries an infectious brooding whilst Youth’s riffs and hooks ensnare across four eventful minutes.

It is an ear gripping, appetite inflaming beginning which only kicks up a gear with the following Fire, a belligerent brawl of punk ‘n’ roll instantly chaining ears with a  virulent hook as rhythms jab and incite. If the Angelic Upstarts was merged with Sick Of It All, this could be their anthem while Manic infuses an even greater physical psychosis and unforgiving attitude to the torrential gait of its predecessor in its own addictive multi-flavoured rumble.

Through the sonic call to arms scourge of Kill the Beast and the Dead Kennedys scented Prayer, new twists of sound and invention force themselves through ears, each with a virulent strain of spiky hooks and body twisting grooves, while their successor has things bouncing like a dervish. Siva / Rudra is a contagion of enterprise as cantankerous as it is exotically seductive marked, as all three, by Oliveri springing basslines as funky as they are carnal. Alongside, Youth’s riffs and grooves come as primal as they are compelling whilst Joseph squeezes every ounce of uncompromising adventure and emotional incitement out of tone and syllable.

Soldiers of the New Babylon locks metal and punk together in its prickly vent, a testy proposition woven with nagging riffs and a magnetically throbbing bassline before Kali throws all those attributes into an insatiable maelstrom of punk rock temptation, taking best track honours along the way. Barely seeing the one minute mark, the track is irresistible but swiftly rivalled by the crabby assault of Slow Kill Genocide, the catchiness moment within Up in Arms and arguably the most choleric.

Pure punk rock truculence shapes the breath-sapping antics of the following Slipping into Darkness, Oliveri spawning his most addictive moment within the album bound in the searing flames of Youth’s guitar as vocals and beats vent their animosity with Life as One backing up its triumph with its mercurial but always commandingly imposing tapestry of quarrel and imagination.

The album is closed by You’ll Be the Death of Me, a slab of rock ‘n’ roll taking big chunks out of the senses as it excites with its Lard-esque espionage. Addiction has never been more vicious and seductive within three and a half minutes, certainly in recent times, as that spawned by the outstanding finale to one of the year’s biggest treats so far.

Produced by Zeuss (Hatebreed, Revocation) and mixed by Kyle McAulay at NRG, Up in Arms transcends being just a great release from another so called ‘super group’, it has given hardcore a fresh new breath and snarl which we can only hope is the first of many gales from Bloodclot.

Up in Arms is out now on Metal Blade Records across most stores and @ https://bloodclot.bandcamp.com/album/up-in-arms

https://www.facebook.com/bloodclotofficial/   https://www.instagram.com/Bloodclot2016/

Pete RingMaster 26/07/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Bottle Next – Bad Horses

Bottle Next is a hard folk band from the French music scene. It is a tag which is maybe unique to the band not having come across it before but only partially touches on their sound. Weaving seriously engaging songs from the imaginative threads of everything from indie and pop, through progressive blues and hard rock to folk and indeed any mischievous form of rock ‘n’ roll you wish to suggest, Bottle Next make for a tantalising proposition which within debut album, Bad Horses, persistently encroaches upon rich fascination and aural seduction.

There is a real sense of fun within and with the duo of guitarist/vocalist/saxophonist Pierre Rettien and drummer/vocalist Martin Ecuer; a feistiness and devilment which openly fuels their music. From the release of their first single in 2011, the pair has drawn increasing attention and support with a pair of EPs surrounded by other individual tracks and videos as well as an energetic live presence which has seen them play across France and further into Europe; sharing stages with the likes of Triggerfingers, Lofofora, Zebda, Mass Hysteria, Didier Wampas, and No One Is Innocent as well as appearing at festivals such as Rock’n’Poche Festival, The Festival du Chien à Plûmes, Musikmesse in Germany), Belgium’s Mannrock (Belgium) and the Swiss Zikamart Festival.

Released a few weeks back, Bad Horses is an announcement for a wider range of ears and spotlights of the presence of Bottle Next; the Daniel Bergstrand (Meshuggah, Soilwork, In Flames) mixed release swiftly making the most of the opportunity with its opener Break Down the Door. The initial twang twisted strums of Rettien have an instinctive striking swing to their nature, a zeal matched in the senses rapping beats of Ecuer. That energy is equally as frantic in the delivery and character of the former’s vocals; together the duo creating a body inciting, spirit dancing slice of tenacious melodic rock as garage raw as it is hungrily infectious.

It is a thickly enticing start matched in memorable heights by next up Choices, the song a swagger loaded stroll of blues tinged rock ‘n’ roll sharing a Queens Of The Stone Age meets In The Whale like adventure. There is a rapacious essence to the grooves winding around ears and an atmospheric suggestiveness to the keys which interrupts the urgency of the canter whilst emerging folkish revelry has a funk seeded grin encapsulated by the earthily sultry lures of sax.

From one mouth-watering escapade to another as next up, Running Herd, takes ears in its grips with stabby riffs and agitated beats, both entangled in a volatile web of melody and vocal dexterity. As with its predecessors, involvement in its tenacious shuffle is instinctive; voice and hips giving quick submission to its imaginative multi-flavoured dance before Revolution shows the grittier hard rock side of the band’s sound. It too though weaves in a lure of melody and pop scented indie enterprise topped by a chorus wearing sixties/seventies pop rock catchiness.

A slightly calmer air drifts over Age of beauty; the song tempting and vivaciously crooning like a mix of XTC and Be Bop Deluxe though like all songs it never settles for one idea or style for much longer than it takes the imagination to adopt one of the moments of creative chicanery.  At times it is an almost punchy encounter, the next a floating caress and consistently a captivating proposal before the outstanding Overthere grabs an already keen appetite for the release’s romp with its heavier touch and spikier climate. Again a grunge seeded essence runs alongside the song’s heavier rock instincts, colluding in a slimline, impulsively addictive temptation smoking in its shadows with a wealth of additional flavoursome scents.

The album’s title track is a more kinetic and wiry caper, guitars and drums magnetically nagging and popping as the track’s rock heart and vocals roar; pure rock ‘n’ roll its creative mantra while Machines courts a matching breeding in its mellower, blues rock tinged pop ‘n’ roll. Both offerings make swift deals with ears and imagination, More Humane matching their success with its folk/indie rock enticement brewing up from within initial suggestive smog of melodically nurtured atmospherics; funk and progressive keys born revelry growing across its enthralling body sparking canter.

The melody woven infection of The Lift off straight after is no less an inducement of physical participation, its warm and boisterous invitation a fest of inventive festivity for limbs and energy. The same equally comes with closing song The Woody Man where its folkish colour and melodic charm takes the track’s kinetic nature in hand, giving it a great layer of restraint without defusing its multi-style embracing devilry and impact on body and spirit. It is a great end to a rather fine album which it is fair to say had us leaping and grinning from start to finish, no track anything less than an imaginative galvanic romp. Bad Horses offers something really fresh in its familiar flavours and boundless enterprise in its bold and playful quest to simply rock ‘n’ roll. The best album you will hear this year, maybe or maybe not; destined to be one of the most enjoyable, without question.

Bad Horses is out now @ https://bottlenext.bandcamp.com/album/bad-horses

http://bottle-next.com/    https://www.facebook.com/Bottlenext/

Pete RingMaster 30/05/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Backtrack Lane – In Fine

Four years after the release of their well-received debut album Black Truth & White Lies, French rockers   Backtrack Lane return with new EP, In Fine. Offering six creatively robust and impassioned tracks, the EP revels in a new energy and flair of enterprise in the Paris quartet’s sound; it a mix of the familiar and the captivatingly fresh sparking rich enjoyment with ease.

Formed in 2009, Backtrack Lane has played hundreds of gigs across their homeland, moving from small local stages to some of the most prestigious venues whilst playing alongside the likes of Black Star Riders, Gotthard, and numerous more. 2011 saw the release of first EP, It’s Not Like…, the national attention stoking Black Truth & White Lies album appearing two years later. The multi-flavoured alternative rock of In Fine is Backtrack Lane poking even bigger and broader spotlights while being for many a potent introduction to a band which knows how to rock ‘n’ roll.

With its lack of real uniqueness more than countered by the passion and energy at its enterprising heart, In Fine is a magnet in the speakers swiftly grabbing ears with opener Fifteen Minutes. Straight away the steely riffs of Adrien Crestey and Stefan Gatti spark the appetite, the heavier dark throb of vocalist Raphael Gatti’s bass zoning in on the instincts for predatory sound. Their collusion is instantly joined by the latter’s vocal prowess; his energy in delivery matched in the sounds blossoming up around him. With keys melodically shimmering behind the forceful yet invitational web created by the foursome, Gui O’Crest’s rapier like beats are like a punctuation to each strand of temptation. The song continually expands and grows note by note, blues filtered grooves only adding to the creative prowess working on body and imagination while familiar hues, with a suggestion of Sick Puppies/3 Days Grace to them, simply accentuate the lure and adventure of the encounter.

Underground is no less of a temptation with a vine like groove instantly wrapping around ears as desert rock seeded melodic enticement brews around another great vocal beckon from Raphael Gatti. A definite Josh Homme air creeps across the songwriting and character of the track, its slightly tempestuous climate and energy as irresistible as its sonic dexterity and spicy melodies with Crestey’s lead enticement teasing with a Billy Idol hue. As its predecessor, the song might be missing majorly unique surprises as feet and spirit are keenly manipulated yet expectations are left empty by its adventure and fresh breath, qualities just as rampant within next up Perfect Motion. Though there is more restraint in its first touch than those before, its zeal to stomp is soon in charge and throwing rapacious grooves and boisterous rhythms at ears as vocals add their own catchy exploits. Once more Queens Of The Stone Age is an inescapable clue to the bold and potent sound inciting something which simply is a thick pleasure.

Breaking the Rules has a broader hard/alternative rock landscape to its sound, Stefan Gatti and Adrien Crestey blending their hook littered designs with infectious prowess as rhythms stroll and vocals roar. Ultimately the song misses matching the lofty peaks of those before it but thorough enjoyment and involvement is a given as with the blues lined inevitably catchy prowl of the following Stray. An energetic slice of pop rock with a broad smile in its air and nature plus a snarling bassline to get greedy over, the song saunters without distractions into eager ears and spirit with its lively romp.

The EP is closed off by After the Rain, another song with a sizzling blues rock nurtured spicing and instinctive contagiousness in its creative veins. Once more things are familiar yet full of an adventure with a seduction and craft hard to not be taken by. In Fine delivers rock ‘n’ roll which feeds all the wants; fun, energy, and passion all served with something extra driven by imagination.

In Fine is available now.

http://www.backtracklane.com/    https://www.facebook.com/Backtrack-Lane-143002764878/    https://twitter.com/backtracklane

Pete RingMaster 30/05/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright