6:33 – Deadly Scenes

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Entwining an extensive mix of styles and psyche exploring sounds is a carnival of fun in the hands of the most inventive and accomplished bands but loaded with the uniquely flavoursome imagination that is 6:33, that bold daring becomes pure musical alchemy. The French avant-garde metallers had us hooked with their Giggles, Garlands & Gallows EP of 2012, an introduction to our subsequently feverish ears backed up a year later by their formidable second album The Stench from the Swelling (A True Story), both featuring CinC/Carnival In Coal/ We All Die (Laughing) vocalist Arno Strobl. Now the Paris quintet have turned up the lust with new album Deadly Scenes, a tempest of invention and sheer aural ingenuity which sees the band at its loftiest pinnacle of creativity yet and surely the most exciting incitement in music today.

The Kaotoxin Records released stomp consists of nine tracks romping down dark avenues of psyche igniting drama and heavy, almost vaudeville like creative emprises. It dives into ravenous shadows, through blood strewn scenery, and across the darkest corners of mind and soul, leaving smiles and bruises as a token of its salacious esteem. Like an anarchic tempest of sound grown from the creative sap of Faith No more, Pryapisme, Polkadot Cadaver, and Mr Bungle, the perfectly formed and fluidly sculpted Deadly Scenes is a tapestry of intrigue and unpredictability casting unbridled pleasure. It carries a lyrical derangement and musical maelstrom across every one of its truly individual offerings, each sublimely and voraciously igniting every cell of those drawn into its inventive hex.

The album starts it’s ridiculously compelling spell with the ‘gospel’ of Hellalujah, certainly it starts that way with a richly resounding choir announcing “Lord Jesus!” It is a great wrong-footing coaxing, even for 6:33, which is soon opening up its invention through a building crescendo of flavours which unite in a sturdy footed stride. It is a bedlamic revelry of sound with a show tune essence to its invention, but as is the norm for the band a mere moment in the travel of a song. Bursting into a ruggedly flirtatious and body swerving blaze of swing and melodic rioting, the song is afire with hooks and metallic lures, all courted by the drama of the keys and the show-pop tenacity of voices and similarly inflamed sound.

Ego fandango comes in next, soaring keys and preacher bred samples the bed for the subsequent muscular and antagonistic stroll of the song. In many ways a Mike Patton essence is never 760137674726_TOX043_6-33_Artwork_480x480far from the band’s music, here helping flavour the rampant vocal and inventive swagger flirting with an Oingo Boingo like vivacity and enterprise. Female vocals, as in the first song, provide a magnetic companion to the ever striking and gripping delivery of Rorschach whilst spices of Queen and Five Star Prison Cell bring further strains of sonic colour to the ever evolving terrain of the brilliant encounter.

A tribal and shamanic rhythmic canvas provides the landscape for the following brilliance of The walking fed, its hypnotic bait a constant persuasion as a low key Yello like electro and vocal beckoning lures ears into a sinister weave of progressive metal and funk infused exploration. The dark bass conjuring of S.A.D. works masterfully with the beats to cage the fiery endeavour within their walls but leaves his strongest most potent tempting for the closing stretch of the song where he unveils an addictive steely web as medicine man chants dance with the keys.

The furious intensity of I’m a nerd escapes another choral welcome straight after, its hellacious rage of metal an imposing roar before everything moves into a country kissed pop ramble with 12 Stone Toddler like pop ingenuity and Kontrust spiced mischief. To be honest as with every song, words can only give a hint of the depth and invention of the superbly blended flavours and ideas escaping the heart of the sonic incitement, and even listening in person, further twists only reveal their lures over numerous plays.

Through the theatrical noir of Modus operandi and the psychotic stalking of Black widow, 6:33 continue to paint new provocative pictures of musical drama and virulence, the first a kaleidoscope of again Faith No More ferocity with the worldly rock essences of Les Negresses Vertes, but as expected honed into something mouth-watering and unique to the band. Its successor is a furnace of creative and rhythmic fury sculpted into a virulent dance of sonic mayhem and deliciously cultured harmonic beauty; a Mr Bungle meets Toumaï seduction for want of a better clue. Their brilliance and exhaustive presence is followed by the gentle acoustic caress of Last bullet for a gold rattle, a country seeded night around a crackling campfire evolving into a melodic shuffle of Cajun/Latin sultriness.

The smouldering Lazy boy croons and bawls impressively over the senses next, it’s raging fury and warm lingering seductions a battlefield of gripping unpredictability. The song is as contagious and as vicious as any song you are likely to hear this year, but there will few which fuse the extremes as imperiously as this. Its sensational bellow brings the listener to the epic title track. Deadly scenes has a theatre all of its own as it narrates, soundtracks, and relishes a clutch of dark tales and spoiled souls. Atmospherically pungent and musically deranged, the track as the album blows ears and imagination away, leaving the passions exultant. Imagine every sound and musical spice you would wish in a soundtrack to your day and it will probably be in the enthralling and feet manipulating track.

     Deadly Scenes is another stunning triumph from 6:33. With every release we ask how they will top their new pinnacle but they do as evidenced by this front runner for most exhilarating if not important releases in 2015.

6:33 Deadly Scenes is available via Kaotoxin Records from 12th January as a limited edition (1,000 copies) DigiSleeve, bundled with a free 26-track label sampler, a special cassette version limited to 100 copies @ http://www.kaotoxin.com/product-category/kaotoxin-releases/ and digitally @ http://listen.kaotoxin.com/album/deadly-scenes

http://www.633theband.com/

https://www.facebook.com/6h33official

RingMaster 12/01/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Fahran – Chasing Hours

Fahran Online Promo Shot

Their second album but our introduction to UK hard rockers Fahran, the band easily gives potent reason to the busy acclaim around them with new album Chasing Hours. Made up of thirteen impressively accomplished and melodically fired tracks, the release awakens a rich intrigue for the quintet. It is not an encounter which manages to ignite a fire in the belly of passions, though it has moments where it takes them on a lustful dance, but certainly from start to finish it sparks and encourages a healthy appetite for the band’s potential and magnetically flavoursome sound.

Fahran was formed in 2012 after emerging from the ashes of Toxic Federation. It was not long before the Breaston five-piece unveiled their self-titled debut album to strong and keen responses from fans and media alike. Infusing inspirations from the likes of Queen, Iron Maiden, Shinedown, Alter Bridge, and Black Stone Cherry into their expressive hard rock sound, the band has also built an attention grabbing reputation with their live performances, which has seen them successfully play the Bloodstock and Download Festivals. Last year saw the departure of bassist Alex Stroud and vocalist Nick Whitcroft but the band swiftly bounced back recruiting Josh Ballantyne and Matt Black on bass and voice respectively, before creating the crowd funded Chasing Hours. With the pair alongside guitarists Jake Graham and Chris Byrne, and drummer JR Windsor, Fahran are poised to wrap up the attention and emotions of the nationwide rock scene with their second album, and it is hard not to imagine the band finding an intensive spotlight upon them from its release.

Chasing Hours is a refreshing treat for all hard and melodic rock fans but even if those genres generally are not the staple diet of ears the band offers plenty within the album to fire up attentive interest. Opening track Long Gone Fahran Cover Artworkinstantly flirts with the imagination through a delicious and slightly melancholic strum of guitar, its tone soon assisted by the darker breath of the bass and resonating swipes of drums. A sonic bred atmosphere rises around the masterful coaxing next to fill senses and thoughts with poetic drama and emotive suggestiveness. It is a fascinating introduction to the song which brews to a greater intensity before parting for equally enticing grooves and rhythmic enterprise to stake their claim on the passions. In no time the track is launching into a feisty and melodic striding of sound and intent which without the potency of that glorious beginning still inspires a highly satisfied and eager reaction.

Straight away the band’s songwriting craft and technical skills are open within the first song, showing a maturity and invention which belies their still young years. These qualities are right away reinforced by the next up Take This City Alive. Equipped with an eighties bred vivacity and infectiousness, the song bounces along with an absorbing weave of sonic endeavour and antagonistic rhythmic aggression. It leaps at the ears and taunts them to embrace the swing and boisterous familiarity of its body, which even with an aversion to its seed era is not easy to refuse. A Thousand Nights is one of those classically fuelled rock songs where again the band do not hide their inspirations as it flames around ears. It does not come up to the same levels of the first couple of tracks but with riveting guitar enterprise and ideation from Graham and Byrne locked within the intimidating rhythmic bait of Windsor, the track offers increasingly inviting bait within melodic rampancy.

Current single I Heard A Joke Once unloads a muscular and sonically alluring proposition with riffs a contagious beckoning across the track. It is a forceful suasion though again, for personal tastes, lacks the spark of the opening pair and many of the subsequent tracks on the album, including the following title track. A sinew sculpted slice of rock balladry with a whiff of country rock and classical seduction to its emotive narrative, Chasing Hours is a smouldering slice of enjoyment which maybe does not set emotions raging but has them simmering very nicely before making way for the boldly pleasing pair of Cased In Steel and You Could Be Mine. The first of the two finds more rugged scenery to soak in earnest vocals and melodies whilst the second is a similarly sturdy with a raw canvas of persuasion coated in evocative sonic hues and the persistently impressing vocals of Black. The song also reminds forcibly that the band really know how to cast enslaving grooves and rhythmic baiting.

As good as those songs and the highlights before them are, they are mere appetisers for the true pinnacles of the album. First up comes the brilliant Some Kind Of Family, a storming stomp of a track which from its first riotous breath also entwines ears in emotionally coloured melodies and sonic adventure to enthral and potently feed the imagination. Hooks and grooves are short yet deeply entrenching whilst Black and band find their most mesmeric vocal strength yet, all within the ever spicy and gripping rhythmic web of Windsor and Ballantyne. Its magnificence is swiftly equalled by Are We Free, a fiery rampage of scorched grooves and menacing beats all honed into a blaze of seductively bruising rock ‘n’ roll with more than an air of Black Stone Cherry and Seether to it. The bass of Ballantyne stalks with predatory instincts across the song for his finest moment but again it is the pleasingly nagging grooves and their irresistible toxicity which seal the deal with a greedy appetite.

Back To Me with its wonderful almost folkish opening suggests it is a rival to the might of the previous pair, guitars and vocals a spellbinding union. But without admittedly losing its hold on attention and satisfaction, it does slip into a more formulaic hard rock offering, though with it continually flirting with those initial lures it finds a ready welcome anytime. Prison is similar in that success, its elegant melodies and emotive hues a transfixing enticing which gives the song its tightest grip on the passions yet the powerful and climactic expulsions, where Black shows his richest delivery in the song, despite making a striking impression still lose the early hold the track had. Nevertheless it is a potent and continually growing proposition but soon left pale against the metallic enticement and melodic rock invention of the outstanding Black Mirror. Another major moment of the release, the song proves the band can merge gentle caresses with raucous intensity for an exhilarating incitement.

Completed by the highly agreeable if underwhelming Storms We Ride, the album is a persistently engaging and rigorously captivating encounter. Chasing Hours has moments where it ebbs and flows in its success, though to be fair that is as much down to personal tastes as anything, but also dramatic moments where Fahran show they have the potential to take UK hard rock to a new world awakening level. It is hard not to be excited about the future of this band.

Chasing Hours is available from Monday 11th August through all digital outlets.

http://www.fahran.com/

8/10

RingMaster 09/08/2014

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Liquid Meat – In Meat We Trust

LM

Want a slab of rock ‘n’ roll just to lose yourself in and let inhibitions slip away with, then try out In Meat We Trust the new album from German rockers Liquid Meat. The thirteen track riot is from start to finish an honest and mischievous fusion of heavy rock, metal, and punk rock with extras, which simply leads passions astray and body into an unbridled stomp of instinctive devilry.

The creation of German born Rocker Freddie Mack, Liquid Meat was formed in Los Angeles in 2004 and was soon playing a horde of gigs around Hollywood. Two albums followed before in 2011, Mack returned to his hometown of Munich which meant a new line-up was needed. This led to the recruiting of drummer Manu Holmer and bassist Max Horch, and unsurprisingly soon after the trio was back into the swing of playing shows, drawing attention, acclaim, and notoriety musically all over again. Earlier this year the band began recording the Indiegogo crowd funded In Meat We Trust with legendary producer Reinhold Mack (Queen, ELO, Led Zeppelin, Rolling Stones, Black Sabbath, Deep Purple, etc.), the result one mouth-watering rock ‘n’ roll party which enjoyably wears its warts and influences like a badge.

The album opens with Liquid Meat Anthem, an uncomplicated bruising of choice riffs and crisp rhythms aligned to a great bass sound which probably grabs attention most of all on the track. The growling vocals of Mack instantly reveal the grin in his delivery and the song, whilst the backing calls of the rest of the band lays swift anthemic bait. It is hard to ignore the Motorhead like causticity and charm of the track as it provides one strong and inviting entrance into the album.

The following song right away shows the unpredictable and diverse flavouring to come across the release. They Lied sways in front of the ears with a sultry blues haze to its sonic enticement before prowling around the imagination with a IMWT Cover_1funk bred swagger which has the markings of Infectious Grooves. Equally there is a punk air to the blend which only increases the persuasion, especially when provides urgency through the chorus which brings another tasty spice, this time a Rage Against The Machine colour. It is an infectiously flavoursome track with twists of drama and an increasingly addictive groove. Its triumph is immediately matched by the outstanding Punch The Clock. Its opening intimidation of bass and predatory rhythms makes for an intense affair though that is soon lost to a big smile as the track starts flirting with what can be best described as Macho Man does Pantera. Mack does his best wrestler vocal impression as a groove certainly related to the one in Walk binds attention and appetite. It is insatiable in its luring and delicious in its devilment with Holmer providing her most magnetic rhythms yet alongside the throaty bounce of Horch’s bass.

The best song on the album is followed by the smouldering blues revelry of Double Standard Blues and then the punk joy of Black Out. The first also has a swagger which grips imagination as well as ears, whilst as with most songs lyrically it brings a devilish tone to climb on board with. Though not at the same heights of the first songs, it still provides a pleasing proposition which its successor soon over runs. Teasing and exciting ears with a riff stolen from The Ramones songbook, so much so that you just are waiting for the “Hey Ho! Let’s Go!” chant, the song is punk ‘n’ roll at its most contagious; hooks and beats as potent and greedily devoured as the driving riffs and bursts of caustic intensity. The track is another which makes claims on that best track title.

Both There Is No God and Guilty As Charged keep things strolling along nicely, the first with a dark blues whisper to its almost psychobilly kissed blues breath, which reminds of Joecephus and the George Jonestown Massacre, whilst the second puts a lighter shade of the first to a raw and incendiary classic metal canvas. Each song leaves a dose of keen pleasure behind whilst the next up Rock N Roll Will Never Die from a reserved but alluring opening melodic flame, breaks into a virulently catchy stomp of old school rock toxicity with a fevered rhythmic energy. There are no surprises with the song but a flood of hooks and inescapable trappings which leaves ears and emotions on a high as lofty as that forged by the groupie salaciousness of Up Against The Wall, never has rock ‘n’ roll romance been so aurally addictive.

The decent enough fiery rock sounds of classic/blues rocker Road House comes next before another pinnacle of the album arrives in the shape of Fuck That. The track is a return to a more punk led rampage, its jabbing rhythms and scything riffs again offering a slight rockabilly flirtation whilst the bass roams around like an adulterous predator. Revealing a parade of impossible addictive hooks and grooves blessed with a Dead Kennedys temperament, it is another glorious encounter which leaves the remaining pair of songs a task to match and leave the album on a high. That they do with consummate ease though, Smoke ‘Em a grizzled protest and confrontation of bruising raw rock ‘n’ roll and final song, The Devils Music is a noir cloaked stroll with sinister intent and psychobilly/blues intrigue. As all songs the tongue in cheek honesty is as infectious as the great sounds and adventure it rides in upon.

It is fair to say that In Meat We Trust is not going to be the greatest album you are going to hear but it will be one of the most fun and irresistible.

In Meat We Trust is available now @ www.liquidmeatlocker.com

8.5/10

RingMaster 25/07/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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EMPEROR CHUNG announce ‘I Vow This Day’‏ with new video single.

Emperor Chung Online Promo Shot

UK ROCKSTERS EMPEROR CHUNG SET LOOSE NEW VIDEO SINGLE THIS SUMMER!

 

Rising skewed rock crew ‘Emperor Chung’ continue their climb with the national release of their new video single ‘I Vow This Day’, out now and taken from their hugely acclaimed self-titled debut album.

 

Possessing a sound that pitches infectious grooves, pounding riffage and alluring vocals, Emperor Chung are continually growing in stature. Pulling influence from Alter Bridge, Coheed & Cambria and Queen, the Midlanders are set to raise the bar yet again this Summer with an explosive new single.

 

Born at the end of 2011 and coming at you from Ilkeston, Derbyshire, the members of Emperor Chung individually served their time in the local scene by playing in an assortment of bands, but to limited success. When the quintet collectively hit the rehearsal room, however, everything clicked into place and Emperor Chung was spawned. After a string of successful shows and festival appearances that included Download Festival, as well as playing alongside the Darkness and Tesseract, the band amassed a killer set along with enough material for their debut album. The record hit stores at the end of last year and racked up many accolades and high acclaim with Classic Rock, Rocksound, Scuzz TV, Total Rock and Team Rock Radio, all firmly supporting the release with glowing coverage.

 

The rock crew now release their stunning new single ‘I Vow This Day’, which includes a mesmerising animated video that is sure to light up the senses. The track is a stout piece of engaging modern heavy rock that first rattles and then buries itself deep inside your cranium. Look out for festival appearances and shows throughout the Summer.

 

 

– ‘EMPEROR CHUNG HAVE RELEASED ‘I VOW THIS DAY’, VIEW THE VIDEO HERE https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lsoC9o5n3ZY

https://twitter.com/emperor_chung      https://www.facebook.com/TheEmperorChung

 

The Idol Dead reveal their ‘Dark Little Hearts’, on 5th May‏

The Idol Dead Online Promo shot

 

UK ROCKERS THE IDOL DEAD RE-RELEASE STUNNING NEW ALBUM!

 

Leeds rock crew ‘The Idol Dead’ spit out a heady amalgamation of infectious Rock ‘n’ Roll and spiky punk which tips its hat to the likes of Guns ‘n’ Roses, Foo Fighters and The Wildhearts. Pinning sledge hammer riffs against gargantuan choruses backed by thunderous drumming, The Idol Dead are poised to bring their sound to the masses in the shape of their blistering new album ‘Dark Little Hearts’, which is rebooted on 5th May, through the band’s own RAAA! Records label.

Born out of a mutual love for blistering riffs, The Idol Dead sport a varied collection of influences stemming from Rachael Stamp, Foo Fighters and Sex Pistols, to David Bowie and Queen. It’s no wonder that, given their eclectic tastes, the 5 piece offer something different – their own brand of big booted rock n roll!

Formed in 2008 and consisting of Polly Phluid (Vocals), Nish Gonsalkorale (Drums,) KC Duggan (Guitar), Tim Jeffs (Guitar) and Dan Sugden (Bass), the five-some soon became the best of friends. After honing their live set, the quintet began to play throughout the UK and swiftly earned a hearty reputation for delivering explosive live performances. The band have gone on to share stages with the likes of Killing Joke, Sebastian Bach, Buckcherry, Evil Scarecrow, Blackfoot, Warrior Soul, Molly Hatchet, Hatebreed, Pitchshifter, Laika Dog and Spear of Destiny, to name just a few.

The Idol Dead also have a strong DIY ethos which led them to form their own label, Raaa! Records. The label spawned the release of their debut album ‘Die on my Feet or Live on my Knees’, which was totally self-funded. However, the band decided to utilise the pledge platform for their sophomore album ‘Dark Little Hearts’, and within six weeks, they had what they needed in order to complete the album. Needless to say, The Idol Dead were simply blown away by the dedication and support of their fans.

Now with ‘Dark Little Hearts’ recorded and prepped for a national release, the sky is the limit. The band’s album certainly delivers on all fronts. From the urgency and cut throat riffery of ‘Blue Skies’, to the buoyant vigour of ‘Hey Girl’ and the radio friendly melodic brilliance of ‘I’m Drowning’, the five piece have everything in line and are set to battle it out for their place as one of the new breed of Brit Rock bands set to break in the UK!

 

Check out The Idol Dead live: 21st March – Sitwell Tavern, Derby; 30th April – The Duchess, York; 3rd & 4th May – Noize Level Critical, The Maze, Nottingham; 9th May – 360 Club, The Library, Leeds; 24th & 25th May – TBFM 5th Birthday Bash, The Snooty Fox, Wakefield; 31st May – The Riverside, Selby.

The Idol Dead Cover Artwork

www.facebook.com/theidoldead

Gifted Kings – Lose What Makes You

gifted kings pic

    It is hard to say that Lose What Makes You, the debut album from Scottish rockers Gifted Kings, ignited a fire in the passions for their accomplished and soulful sound, but certainly the 2012 formed band sparked an appetite and satisfaction with their enjoyable release which many emerging bands can only dream of. Consisting of eleven impressively crafted and expressive songs, the release makes a potent and promising introduction to a band we are sure to hear and enjoy a lot more of in the future.

    Hailing from Glasgow and consisting of two sets of brothers, Derek (guitar/vocals) and Andy Murray (lead guitar) alongside Gary (drums) and Paul Smith (bass), Gifted Kings build on the undeniable potential and presence of first single Dead End Road, which has just received its video release also, in fine attention grabbing style with the album. It is not unfair to say that the band’s sound has a rich familiarity to its presence right now, not of any specific band but in general which defuses some of its ability to surprise and stoke those emotional flames, but there is little else to raise a quizzical and disapproving eyebrow over. Recorded with producer Nick Brine (Oasis, The Darkness, Bruce Springsteen) at the same studio which housed the making of Oasis’ What’s the Story Morning Glory and Queen’s Bohemian Rhapsody, and mastered by Pete Maher (U2, Depeche Mode), the album proves its case with a stirring presence and potency which easily awakes positive reactions and attention to match that already brewing as far afield as Russia, Ukraine, Thailand, and India over the band. With their music already gracing several shows on Channel 4, S4C, ITV1, and Sky Sport as well as being adopted for advertising campaigns by Ripcurl and O’Neill Sports targeting the USA, Australia, and Asia, the quartet are on a rapid visible ascent which What Makes You Lose has all the qualities to accelerate.

     The album makes an instantly engaging and gripping start with Rains Will Come, its opening a sonic intrigue of guitar which expands with a rhythmic jabbing and fiery melodic glaze as company. It is not a startling entrance but one which secures full focus especially as the expressive vocals of Derek Murray joins the already pulsating lure of the song. Thoughts of Bristol band Mind Museum offer a suggestion whilst essences of Placebo also hint throughout the increasing emotive brewing of the track; all to a positive effect. The only strange thing about the song is that it never explodes, just simmers as if an intro to the album rather than a stand-alone proposition. Nevertheless it is a great start matched right away by The Last Time. A heavy throaty bass sound and imposing rhythms make the initial temptation as the guitar’s thoughts crowd around in a sonic breeze before making inviting weaves of melodic endeavour around the incoming vocals. Again there is something recognisable about the encounter, though it just makes it an easier ride to immerse within, which with its especially persuasive rhythmic enticement just infects.

     Both No One Knows and Drive keep the album bubbling in thoughts and emotions if missing the heights of the previous pair. The first is embraced by powerful emotive melodies and crescendo like rises in energy and passion as melodic veining arguably inspired by the previously mentioned Mancunians works away, whilst the second strolls with a reserved and enticing alternative rock weight and texture to draw in the imagination. Neither sets sparks to tease the passions into major action but definitely each provides a healthy offering for the appetite to chew over and enjoy, as equally does Dead End Road with its alluring and richly expressive narrative and sound. Though definitely not the best song on the album it is still easy to see why it has drawn such eager responses the band’s way since being released as the first single from the album.

     The following pair of Tell Me Something and Fortune In The City return the release to the commanding and contagious levels it started on, controlling rhythms and rich melodic fire rigorously and anthemically tempting the senses within the first whilst its successor explores another evocative climate with an inventively gripping groove and an infection clad chorus within an unpredictable exploratory landscape. Both tracks alone reveal the depth and potential of the band in sound and songwriting, reach easily lighting keen anticipation for future endeavours.

   From the pleasing and very decent creative exploits of Last Trace Of The Sun and the sonically colourful, not forgetting contagious Wait, the album’s best moment is brought with Neon, a song built on addictive nagging riffs and crisp rhythms which persist until full submission is given for their vivacious bait. Once more the band casts a virulent infection over the ears and imagination which is impossible not to find a lingering hunger for, it’s dramatic touches and blues kissed strikes quite irresistible. Alongside the closing and strong if underwhelming in comparison Written On The Wall, the pair bring Lose What Makes You to a thoroughly entertaining conclusion.

     Gifted Kings has laid the strongest base with their debut, the first of many potent and impressing encounters ahead you suspect.

http://www.giftedkings.com/

8/10

RingMaster 23/02/2014

 Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Stranger than brutality, bloodier than fiction: an interview with Morgue Orgy

Morgue Orgy Dispose-of-the-evidence

If you have not come across UK metallers Morgue Orgy yet, then you have missed out on one scintillating violation of your psyche and person. But it is never too late to catch up on the brutal beatings especially as the Birmingham sextet has just released their debut album The Last Man On Earth, to savage the senses and all for free. Creating a malevolent pestilence of inventive and melodically blackened death metal, the band is one of the rising forces in British metal, a mischievous scourge to tempt the deepest passions. Offered the chance to delve deeper into the mayhem and creative bloodshed, we greedily gathered up questions to feed Carter, Tris, and Ben from the band, subsequently learning about the beginnings of Morgue Orgy, the new album, live exploits, a passion for a certain American punk rock band and much more…

Welcome Gentlemen and many thanks for taking time away from the mayhem and brutality to talk with us.

Tell us about the history of you guys pre- Morgue Orgy through to the early days of the band.

Carter – Gray, Prok, Ben and I were in a thrash/punk horror band before Morgue Orgy. Gray and Prok asked me to join the band in 2000 and Ben joined in 2005. We got a large following in Birmingham, but we only played a handful of shows outside our hometown. The band was a lot of fun, but when our drummer quit in 2007 we decided to start something new. Gray wrote a couple of songs (that would end up as The Black of Hearts and The Arkham Waltz from The River & I EP) and suggested we name the new band Morgue Orgy. Gray used to sing and play bass in the previous band, but he wanted to concentrate solely on vocals with Morgue Orgy, so he asked Tris to join on bass. It took us a year to find a new drummer and when we auditioned Tom we knew immediately he was the man for the job.

What was the spark or intent in the band at the beginning and has that original ‘purpose’ of the band remained the same or evolved over the past five years?

Carter – The main intention for us is to have fun, and I think we’re enjoying being in the band more than ever! When we started Morgue Orgy, we wanted to write heavier music than we’d done before, and just focus on metal, instead of the endless genres (including ska, drum & bass and funk rock) we’d bounce between with our old band. Our sound has definitely evolved as we didn’t really know what we were doing when we wrote The River & I, we were experimenting and learning.

What are the inspirations you have taken into the band musically and lyrically?

Carter – We all listen to a wide spectrum of genres, none of us are metalheads, as such. We are inspired by a lot of different artists, for example Gray takes a lot of influence from rap artists, as he tends to write quickly-bellowed lines with a shit-load of syllables to fit in. Of course we take a lot of inspiration from bands such as At The Gates, Anaal Nathrakh and Dissection, but we also influenced by the likes of Queen, Rancid and Bartok.

Am I right in thinking some of or the band as a whole has a bit of a passion for Bad Religion?

Carter – HAHA yeah they’re fucking awesome! We give free merch to anyone that comes to our gig in a Bad Religion shirt.

Musically you are tagged as melodic death metal but as the new album shows there is much more in your maelstrom of invention Morgue Orgy 1and sound. How would you describe it to newcomers to give the closest representation?

Tris – I don’t think we can tag ourselves specifically as melodic death metal, we end up with all sorts of sub-genres in there but maybe because of ignorance of these ridiculously specific sub-genres on my part I have no idea how to even class it. People seem to think we genre hop a lot and don’t seem to be able to comprehend what they’re listening to sometimes but we’re not exactly Mr Bungle! There’s shouting, d-beats, blast beats, minor bar chords, shredding, keyboard melodies, the odd proggy(ish) bit and if you listen closely enough – I got my bass to sound satisfyingly like the bass tone on the recent Sick of it all re-recordings album! The album is free on our website anyway – download it and make up a genre for it!

Your first pair of EPs The River & I and Murders Most Foul made a potent statement musically for the band and were seemingly greedily received; with your debut album freshly unleashed this month how do look back at them in comparison to The Last Man On Earth?

Carter – We think the River and I is a bit shit now, to be honest. Maybe it’s because they are our oldest songs and we’re bored of them. As I’ve mentioned, the first couple of years for the band was a learning period and there’s a massive difference in quality between The River and I and The Last Man On Earth. I still enjoy Murders Most Foul and I especially love playing 70 Dead and Scared To Death Of My Own Face, I think they’re great songs. Our new album though is much better in my opinion. Each member has improved vastly over the last couple of years and our progress is evident when you listen through our discography.

So how has your sound and presence changed then in the period between your first release and the new album in your eyes/ears?

Tris - We’re still kind of the same band but we’ve improved so much at playing our instruments that we’ve basically ended up a lot faster and heavier. A constant evolution in music taste also plays an effect without you even necessarily realising. We’re all getting back into punk now which I know I haven’t really listened to in a good few years. Just wait for the next album we’re going to end up sounding like the Descendents.

The Last Man On Earth as we mentioned has just been released, an album we said was ‘a toxic torrent of maliciousness fuelled by a rabid expanse of intensively magnetic flavours and styles from within a brutally predatory imagination’. You must be proud of its invention and impact as well as what seems to be a full on soak of acclaim from fans and media alike?

Carter – We are immensely proud of this record. We worked long and hard to create this beast but we never imagined it would be so well received. It has filled us with confidence and justified our direction.

Please give us some insight into the evolution of the album from its first seeds to the final impressive scourge?

Carter – We definitely took our time with putting the album together; the first song that was written for the album was 4 Days, which Tris wrote shortly after recording Murders Most Foul. We used Guitar Pro to demo the riff ideas and would upload them to SoundCloud for the rest of the band to listen and give feedback. Once a song had a rough structure, we’d take that track into the practice room and go from there. We recorded with Ow Davies of Loud Noises Production, who recorded our previous EPs too. We love working with Ow because he gets the most out of us in the studio and he enjoys a good laugh too! He’s got better and better over time and you can hear that on this record, the production quality is outstanding and that is all down to Ow.

1535704_454685597971479_1209997831_nDid the album emerge from the studio exactly how you envisaged going into its recording?

Ben – YES! We had nailed each song from start to finish in the recording studio and as a rhythm section knew exactly how the songs were to sound. The synth/keys were put down later on and tied it together in the way that Carter wanted them to, and it works!

So you are a band which has songs as good as finished before their recording or still prefer to let them develop in the studio?

Carter – The bulk of the songs were fully written before going into the studio, but some vocal deliveries from Gray were altered at times, and he’d improvise recording random noises to add atmosphere/comedy. The sound effects were all put down in the studio once the instruments were tracked. Our guest sax-player, Colin Mills, came in and improvised on Barnum & 399 and the title track, which was fucking awesome. Dunc from Fukpig co-wrote the lyrics for Castle Freak, but we hadn’t heard his vocals for the song until he recorded them.

The Last Man On Earth can be described as psychotic, schizophrenic, and masterfully vicious; three traits you were aiming for or simply the natural emergence of the band’s characters? ;)

Ben – We were all really really angry. Not really! We don’t actually know why our music comes out so brutal. We are all stupid idiots who go out dancing to 90s pop and listen to Bad Religion so why we are even a metal band is beyond any of us. It seems to work though!

You released the album initially as a free download before Christmas, what was the thinking behind the decision and giving what is sure to be a top contender for best of year lists in twelve months so generously away?

Ben – When an audience of people don’t even want to part with £2 for your 5 track EP’s you know you are in a fickle scene. So when that happened several times it was time to think outside the box.

 Carter – Free music is so easily accessible now it seems naive to fight against it. If you can’t beat them, join them. Our main focus during this release is to gain awareness of the band, and charging for the album would have been a limitation.

We also mentioned in our review a mischievous or maybe that should be rascality to the band and the album in our review, this is a major part of your intentions as a band to have fun and grin in the sonic bloodshed?

Tris – Absolutely! Basically we’re a bunch of idiot mates who decided to form a ridiculous metal band with a bit of inspiration from the horror films that we (well actually just Gray) watch. Somehow I think we’ve managed to put that across in our music. People seem to think us pricking about is a gimmick but it’s just what we’re like. We recently released a dildo because we thought it would be funny – If anyone gets irritated and thinks we’re not metal enough for doing so…that is also funny. If you come and see us play a gig we definitely don’t take ourselves too seriously. You’re more likely to see me do squats at 220BPM with a smile plastered on my face than headbang, act like a serious rock star and pretend I’m not enjoying myself.

Tell us about your live shows then and why people need to join the orgy.Morgue Orgy We-play-in-a-band

Carter – Our live shows are all about letting loose and having a good time. We act like idiots on stage and encourage the crowd to do the same. If everyone is smiling by the end of the show, we’re happy.

What has been your stage highlights so far as a band and personally?

Carter – It would have to be playing Bloodstock Festival in 2010, we worked really hard to win the ‘Metal To The Masses’ competition in order to play the festival and the turnout for our set was amazing. I really enjoy playing hometown shows, in front of friends and fans that have watched us for years. We’ve played a couple of really fun gigs in Rugby, Leeds, and Torquay, but I don’t think there are many stand-out shows for me… as long as the audience are enjoying themselves and the sound guy isn’t a prick, I have a great time!

Your bio describes the band as ‘the UK metal scene’s last hope for melodic death metal.’ Do you feel that it is as that suggests on its last legs or maybe it just has not really erupted from a relatively sleepy state?

Ben – We do tend to be one of few bands in this scene who actually think of melody as being important. Perhaps the trend to revolve a song around a beat down has killed off peoples’ brains. We come from the Pantera/Bad Religion/Take That end of the musical scale, where melody is as important as crush!

2014 looks like being a busy and major year for the band, what is next for Morgue Orgy?

Ben – We hope to push our album out to labels and to find a good booking agent to push us further than we could possibly do ourselves.

Once again big thanks for putting aside the bodies for us, any thoughts you would like to leave the listeners contemplating?

Carter – A female bed bug doesn’t have a sexual orifice, so the male has to traumatically inseminate the female by piercing her abdomen with his penis. So if you ever feel depressed remember it could be worse, you could be a female bed bug being fucked in the belly.

Ben – Bad Religion

Morgue Orgy Little-shit-dogAnd finally give us your top five ways in the disposal of bodies.

Now we’re guessing in this scenario you’re assuming we’ve done the killing? Because if you just happen to stumble across a dead body you should probably alert the authorities who can launch a full investigation into what has transpired. Also, we are not actually morticians and couldn’t give you advice on disposal if you are looking to start your own morgue. Again you should alert the professionals who will be able to give you proper advice. But if you’re asking for actual murder tips I suppose we can take a guess but don’t take this as an excuse to start doing it…

Carter – 1. Grind them up and mix them in with the kebab meat 2. Use their bones to make a go-kart and their skin to make a nice coat, throw the rest in the bin 3. Leave them outside a hospital with a note saying ‘for science’. They’ll be grateful for it, honestly 4. Drill them into the sea 5. Package them and label it with any address, Royal Mail will just lose it in the post!

 Ben – 1. Feed them to the ducks 2. Kill them twice 3. Horses 4. Find a keen worm 5. Sit on them until they hatch

 Tris – 1. Drill it over the fence 2. Drill it into the sea 3. Leave it out with the dirty dishes in the kitchen and eventually someone will get annoyed enough to clean it up for you 4. Seal it within a mattress and leave it on the drive for your local council to fail to collect 5. Get Prok to discuss his guitar solos with it and it should get up and leave of its own accord.

Get Morgue Orgy’s debut album The Last Man On Earth @ www.morgueorgy.com and read the review @ https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2014/01/13/morgue-orgy-the-last-man-on-earth/

Pete Ringmaster

The RingMaster Review 11/02/2014

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