The Senton Bombs – Phantom High

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If there is one thing predictable about UK rockers The Senton Bombs, it is that they will persistently offer feisty dirt encrusted, punk fuelled rock ‘n’ roll. You can always assume a fresh fiery breath driving each and every offering unleashed by the Blackpool hailing quartet too. It has so far been that way since the band’s first album, Sweet Chin Music of 2009, and it continues with new EP Phantom High. Consisting of five diverse songs all bred from punk ‘n’ roll aggression and carrying a hard rock swagger, the encounter is quite simply an attitude loaded stomp of raw and feverishly flavoursome rock ‘n’ roll.

Formed in 2004, The Senton Bombs has been a regular draw of praise and increasing attention thanks to their passion driven live performances and trio of albums, of which Chapter Zero in 2013, brought the thickest wave of acclaim yet. You know what you are going to get with the band; sounds and songs which devour the energy out of the body and feed the instinctive rocker in us all, but equally each of their releases to date has pushed the band’s music and invention in bold strides and ahead of the band’s fourth album later this year, Phantom High is exactly the same. It suggests a new strength of diversity emerging in their songwriting but similarly an even more potent roar and snarl of the rock incitement which sets them apart from most.

The EP opens with its title track, and from the initial sonic scythe of sound, swiftly has ears, feet, and emotions engaged in its adrenaline soaked charge. Vocalist Joey Class uncages his recognisable and alluring tones almost as soon as riffs rub invitingly on ears and rhythms jab with eager intent. Guitarists Damien Kage and Johnny Gibbons proceed to weave a bait of aggressive riffery and spicy enterprise as the track continues its contagious stomp, a solo especially tangy on the ear, whilst drummer Scott Mason and the bass lines of Class sculpt a frame to it all which is anthemic as the roar of the song itself.

10520105_10153295061197281_6683385127408093904_nThe track is an irresistible persuasion and straight away matched by the similarly outstanding Lights Over Phoenix. Whereas the first song was a riot of dirty hard rock and aggressive punk tenacity, the first single from the EP is a more pop punk seeded infection. Small but potently coaxing riffs are aligned to the equally mellower delivery of Class’ sandy tones, a tempting entrance which instantly has ears keen and toes tapping. Bass and beats need little prompting to add their punchy contributions soon after whilst the guitars flame and entice with gripping eagerness and temptation. A more restrained but no less addictive romp to the first, the track strides with unbridled infectiousness and tantalising enterprise creating an encounter sounding vaguely like a mix of Turbonegro and Hagfish, but ultimately all Senton Bombs.

   Black Chariot slows the energies down if not the enthusiasm for the release next. It is a blues rock spawned prowl, employing more classic and southern rock flavouring than anything they have bred before. The vocals are impressive, cleaner and clearer than those usually offered by Class and just as compelling, and  easy to hope they are used more ahead, but in tandem with the dirtier delivery.

The excellent croon of a song allows a breath to be taken by the listener too, enabling a restocking of energy before Passions of the Passive Aggressive unveils its own blues rock inspired bellow of aggressive and chest thumping, belligerent rock ‘n’ roll. Actually the song does not really explode at any point but through its taunting stalking of ears and urgent eruptions of intensity and scorching voracity, it again has limbs, neck muscles, and emotions inflamed.

Phantom High is finished off by the excellent Surf 6-66, again hard and classic rock thrust into incendiary punk ferocity. Think The Ramones embroiled with Mötley Crüe and you get an inkling of the lingering devilry bringing it all to a mighty close. The excellent song epitomises the EP as a whole, The Senton Bombs sound we have come to eagerly devour navigating new variety and insatiably captivating waters.

Phantom High is not a stop gap release before the band’s new album but a massive teaser of bigger and bolder things to come from the band giving further evidence that The Senton Bombs are one of those shaping a new heyday for British rock ‘n roll.

Phantom High is available from March 23rd via Holier Than Thou Records

http://www.sentonbombs.com/bio   https://www.facebook.com/thesentonbombs

RingMaster 23/03/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

https://holierthanthourecords.bandcamp.com/track/lights-over-phoenix

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The Bricks – Here We Come

CD Cover for Print

     Here We Come is an album which might not be stretching existing boundaries or ideas of invention, indeed you would suggest it is not even trying to, but it is an encounter which introduces us to a potential soaked band with a sound which simply leaves satisfaction and enjoyment full. The release comes from Nebraska punks The Bricks and is receiving its broader unveiling courtesy of Raven Faith Records this month. Consisting of ten memorable if a little formulaic punk anthems, it is a proposition which leaves ears and attention wanting more of its old school punk rock.

Consisting of vocalist/guitarist Jimmy Hobbs, lead guitarist Chris Smith, bassist Kelly Turney, and drummer Mathew Lewis, The Bricks as mentioned has an old school feel to their raw rock ‘n’ roll but equally and in varying degrees infuse essences of oi, hardcore, and Street Punk amongst many spices, into its rebellious nature and sound. It is a faith based proposition which is not backwards in coming forward with the band’s personal emotions and praising but equally does not make it a focal point. This results in an offering from the Omaha quartet which will easily appeal to all punk fans and leave them with an appetite for more.

Recorded at Two Bird Dog Studio in Sioux City, Iowa, Here We Come opens up with an immediately delicious hook within the first few seconds of Just Like You. It has a ring of The Ramones to it which only adds to the instantly attentive hunger of ears and emotions. It is a familiarity which captivates with ease, continuing its potent lure as rhythms thump on the senses and the raw tones of Hobbs, backed by group shouts of the band, bellow engagingly. Like all good punk songs it is an easily accessible stomp for the listener’s body and voice, no demands or surprises being launched just magnetic punk revelry.

The strong start continues with the excellent Punk’s Not Dead, a song which stands toe to toe with ears like a mix of The Lurkers and Dead Kennedys given a healthy dose of US oi. Again the listener is enlisted within seconds to its boisterous persuasion, something all songs achieve with little defiance coming their way to be honest, and shown again straight after by Same Old Story. Not quite having the same spark as the first two, its character a little more dour, the track still provides an infectious and captivating proposal. Its midway slip into a more restrained and melodically aflame passage also reveals a stronger twist of invention adding to the enjoyable incitement.

Yahweh has a pop punk contagion to its otherwise simple and addictively persuasive offering, again a familiar tone soaking hook and riffs but once more leaving only highly satisfied ears and a greedier appetite. Whether in their next release or further down the line we will have the same feeling of satisfaction at being offered recognisable influences and flavours we will see, but right now it works a treat with its nostalgic charm. Proof again coming in the punchy Revolt and the masterfully anthemic Omaha Punks which follows. The first of the pair brings a more metallic essence to its riffs whilst vocals and rhythms lay down a great confrontation of punk persuasion, whilst its successor dips into the essences of The Clash and Angelic Upstarts for a predatory and gripping call to arms.

We Live flirts with whispers of ska and street punk next for an inescapably catchy coaxing of Rancid meets Social Distortion like tempting. As the last track, it easily has ears and feet engaged, and emotions basking in its old school and anthemically alluring intimacy. The same can be said about the Ramones bred Red White and True which strides resourcefully in next. Early touches have a more Clash feel but as the song hits its stride and chorus, it all courted by a great rhythmic antagonism and scything riffs, the NYC legends come to mind

The final pair of tracks ensures the listener is left energised and wanting more. Small Few is a middle finger defiance, driven by crisply jabbing beats aligned to a moody baseline and belligerent backing vocal calls, and inescapable addictive whilst the closing Some Day with less rigour lights ears with abrasing energy and inviting enterprise. More of a slow burner in persuasion compared to earlier songs, it still triggers pleasure fuelled reactions and brings a thoroughly enjoyable album to a strong close.

The Bricks openly wear their influences and passions in their music and it only rubs off on the listener. There are few new things to devour but plenty to provide one highly enjoyable encounter.

Here We Come is available now via http://www.ravenfaithrecords.com/#!product/prd1/3580537951/the-bricks-here-we-come

https://www.facebook.com/TheBricksOmaha

RingMaster 17/03/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://reputationradio.yooco.org/

Treedeon – Lowest Level Reincarnation

Treedeon_Vinyl_test

Surely bred in the depths of hell, Lowest Level Reincarnation is the ultimate seduction. Like a Hieronymus Bosch painting, the new album from German noise abusers Treedeon is a visceral kaleidoscope of vibrant addictive aural colours and inescapable temptations within a landscape of sonic and emotional torment. It is bestial, it is carnally intimidating, and it is an all-consuming swamp of savage confrontation but most of all it is one exhilarating trespass of the senses.

Treedeon emerged in 2012 when vocalist/guitarist Arne Heesch and vocalist/bassist Yvonne Ducksworth linked up after the almost simultaneous demise of their respective bands Ulme and Jingo de Lunch. Initially Treedeon was an acoustic proposition and made its live debut at 2012’s South Of Mainstream festival filling in for the by now disbanded Ulme. At this point Christian “Boomer” Böhm linked up with the duo, pledging himself as “the missing link” as he offered to play drums in the band. As songs were written and created, leading to an early demo, there was no escaping the heavier voracious element fuelling their sound, fury audiences soon heard at events like the infamous Roadburn Festival, where the band played as part of Exile On Mainstream’s 15 year anniversary showcase. The digital unveiling of the demo swiftly brewed up attention and buzz around the Berlin trio though it was a mere taster of more corrosively impressive things to come. Recorded at Studio Wong in Berlin last November, Lowest Level Reincarnation sets a striking marker for not only Treedeon but doom/sludge spawned noise punk in general.

The eight track sonic tsunami begins with Love Turns Liquid and immediately has ears and attention on board as the punch of Böhm’s premeditated slow swings rock the senses. It is not hostile bait he lays down but it is imposing and highly anthemic as each incessant jab awakens a keen appetite which is swiftly fed further by the grouchy voice of Ducksworth’s bass and the abrasing causticity of the guitar. Hooks are already flirting from within the building tempest of noise, leaping out on the subsequent sonic smog as Heesch’s grizzled vocals croon expressively and angrily. The rhythmic persistence of the eight minute plus track creates an inescapable trap for instinctive and primal needs whilst the doom soaked crawl of the song simply ignites ears and imagination; the encounter the perfect blend of erosive persuasion and addictive invention.

The following Blankapitation similarly attacks on two fronts, its rhythmic and grooved taunting a commanding contagion whilst the thick sludginess of the guitar’s enterprise is a suffocating and alluring raw embrace. It is the vocals of Ducksworth, who takes the lead this time, which strikingly ignites the track though, her delivery pure punk with an attitude to match. It is a thrilling contrast to the highly pleasing caustic attack of Heesch in the previous song and in his backing here, a creative aural stabbing of ears at times from the lady and a constant roar of belligerence.

Satan’s Need takes over next and within seconds consumes the senses in a tempest of fiercely heavy riffs and matching intensive rhythms, all bound with inflamed heavy grooves. The two singers share the track, duelling rather than dueting across its ravenous and exhausting turbulence. It has a harsh and acerbic canvas but also reveals an underlying swing to beats and grooves which does not temper the tempestuous nature of the encounter but certainly makes its punishment bewitchingly palatable.

Through the superb Extinction with its a rhythmic tempting, which is almost like a call to arms for body and emotions, and a sinisterly hued grooving, and the snarling Wendigo, band and album only heap on further corruptive influence and pleasure. The first of the two is the kind of flirtation you know will only lead to destruction but with the deepest carnivorous bass growl and tart grooves, not forgetting exceptional vocal endeavour, the track is the master of lustful submission. Its successor again embraces a stronger punk rancor in its erosive sonic squall. Ducksworth vocally is a fiery temptress and with basslines predatory confrontation as Heesch creates a warlike maelstrom of antipathy with voice and riffs, the song is an animus which flows in all ways into the equally venomous and scarring Venus With Teeth. There is no shelter from its sonic and intimate enmity or from the transfixing rhythmic craft and enticing of Böhm. It writhes like a plague ridden scavenger, spilling and spewing sonic spite and magnetic invention with every intensive and exciting twist.

The album’s title track worms into the psyche next, its insidious crawl of sound and malevolent emotion encroaching ears like a tar thick virus, consuming every pore whilst immersing the senses and thoughts into the darkest pit of depressive and oppressive toxicity. The song is spellbinding, an infestation of sound and intent you only want to devour more of, even if it provides the longest and darkest twelve minutes of your life.

Lowest Level Reincarnation is completed by the outstanding Terracide, another imaginative torrent of crippling and gripping rhythms aligned to incendiary grooves and impressive vocals from both Ducksworth and Heesch. That imagery of a Bosch composition again seems to fit the track, its presence and premise a sonic opening of hell’s pits.

Treedeon is that nightmare you can never be rid of but truthfully you look forward to, its challenge and adventure a dark and dangerous endeavour but cathartic and seriously rewarding. The same applies to the magnificent Lowest Level Reincarnation, an album sure to expose one intensively exciting prospect to the fiercest spotlights.

Lowest Level Reincarnation is available now via Exile On Mainstream digitally and on CD/vinyl @ http://www.mainstreamrecords.de/shop with its US release in April.

https://www.facebook.com/Treedeon

RingMaster 12/03/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://reputationradio.yooco.org/

Rapture –Trials

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   Rapture is a Christian hardcore band from Los Angeles, a quartet making a rather striking introduction to themselves with debut album Trials. Recently signed to OnTheAttack Records, the band has also made their first proposition a name your price download, which with some stomping punk bred tracks the reward, is an invitation hard to turn down.

The band was formed last year by four friends who wanted to create and explore the music which excited them whilst also sharing their faith and love of Jesus Christ, an inescapable but not over imposing aspect of their enjoyable first release. 2014 as a musical year was a low key affair, the band only playing a couple of shows, but as this year broke the band decided to concentrate on their music and hit Birdcage Studios to record Trials with Allen Falcon. Approached by On The Attack Records who wanted to be involved in the album’s release, Rapture now make their first potent persuasion on ears with a full year of shows planned to back its unveiling.

The release is opened by Intro, though it is a little more than merely that. From the great growling bassline starting it off, it aggressively snuggles up to ears with abrasive riffs and vocal squalling, providing an unsurprising but swiftly anthemic and pleasing proposal all within 51 seconds.

Its fine start is matched by the fiercer but no less gripping Legacy where again the lively beats of drummer Tony Rangel demand keen attention whilst the grizzly basslines of Isaac Guerrera Rapture_Trials_albumcovershow themselves to be quickly compelling. The song is a confrontational prowl of ears, though as lyrics show, is more face to face with its own personal angst than solely challenging the listener, a showdown further driven by the accomplished riffs and enterprise of guitarist Garrett Gutierrez and the furious tones of vocalist Richard Haro.

Kingdom Crew steps in next with a rawer air and rhythmic chest beating. The band has been referenced to bands like Terror, Dynasty, and, xLooking Forwardx but certainly this track suggests a merger of early CIV and Shelter as a starting point in its bracing texture and sound, whilst Enemy Lines next rumbles and snarls with a slight air of The Bronx in its rapacious hardcore incitement. Though again surprises might be said to be low, everything about the track from its tenacious rhythms and grainy riffs to the vocal fight and group calls leaves a healthy pleasure and appetite in place.

The tempestuous Deceiver bellows and entices next with magnetic enterprise and attitude before the outstanding Nothing Else brings it all to an impressive close. The final song features Joel Muniz of Dynasty, and treats the listener to a rampaging march of inventive rhythms from Rangel aligned to the ever tempting bass endeavour of Guerrera. That is just the creative spine though of the most inventive track on the album, guitars alternatively spearing and spreading through the air with spiky imagination whilst Haro and band raise voices to their faith. It is Rangel which steals the show here to be honest but as elsewhere it does not work without the rest of the band’s impassioned enterprise and impact.

Without forging something strikingly original but avoiding anything majorly predictable, Trials is a promising and pleasing entrance by Rapture. This is a sure fire recommendation for all raw punk fans from a band with undoubted big potential.

Trials is available now via OnTheAttack Records as a name your price download @ https://ontheattackrecords.bandcamp.com/album/trials

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Rapture/1403442699960183

RingMaster 12/03/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://reputationradio.yooco.org/

Come The Spring – Revive EP

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   Come The Spring, come the roar, certainly on the evidence of the UK band’s new EP Revive, a creative bellow which simply ignites ears and emotions. The six track encounter is a tempest of alternative and punk rock, a feisty and impassioned encounter which from a decent but strong start emerges as one fiery and memorable proposition. The EP comes with a snarling attitude and aggressive nature but around its confrontational jaws, band and songs unveil a resourceful and melodic tenacity which is as alluring as the intensity within both is ferocious.

Brighton bred Come The Spring formed in 2012, its line-up including previous members of bands like Rydell. It was not long before locally and subsequently across the UK, that the band’s live presence was earning them a potent reputation and loyal following, The sharing of stages with artists such as Hot Water Music, Green Day, Braid, Texas is the Reason, Appleseed Cast, Piebald, No FX, Samiam and numerous more only accelerated their ascent and reinforced their reputation for having a striking and uncompromisingly stirring sound. Released via Engineer Records, Revive is the band’s new assault on a broader attention, an encounter easy to see earning rewarding success.

EP opener 24 makes an ear pleasing and imaginative introduction to the release, its initial stroke of guitar the prelude to an emotive melodic caress and potent rhythmic enticement. It is welcoming coaxing also carrying a rawer edge, a provocative texture just as keen in the swiftly impressing tones of vocalist Sam Craddock. The song slips into an increasingly rigorous stroll whilst a volatile energy and causticity brews in the heart of vocals and the expanding sound. The snarling bassline is a constant intimidation in this but it is the following blaze of angst in Craddock’s delivery which finally ignites the air, expelling agonized tones against the magnetically radiate enterprise of guitarists David Gamage and Simon Goodrick. The track provides a highly satisfying incitement, the bass of Mark Wilkinson almost persistently carnivorous as it backs the rampantly skilled swings of drummer Jamie Donbroski, but lacks that final spark which would turn an undoubted impressive proposal into a great one.

The brief chilled ambience and sonic ire of the following Winterlude is the same, an accomplished and intriguing offering but pleasing rather than exciting before things really kick up a gear in CTS.Revive.CDcoverappeal and invention. Memory and Resonance is next, launching another deliciously throaty bassline and fiercely expressive vocals at the listener from its first breath. To this guitars swiftly add their vibrant and spirited endeavour to the shadowed heart of the increasingly gripping post hardcore seeded track too. It all breeds an anthemic potency which was less pronounced in the first pair of songs and gains even greater contagion from the next up Air That I’m Breathing onwards. The fourth track of Revive is a wonderfully turbulent yet melodically engrossing tempest of emotion and craft, a tempting fusion of alternative and melodic rock with punk antagonism, and another rich roar that inescapably gets under the skin and into the passions. The EP started in fine fettle but by this point is really revelling in a fresh creative prowess and the potential of one increasingly impressing band.

Maps comes next and from a charmingly subdued and melodically evocative start, courted by great bass sculpted shadows, explores an intimate and increasingly expansive bellow of emotion and sound. The guitars flame with sonic flair and inventive enterprise whilst vocally once more Craddock shows the power of his voice and expression. It is hard to day that the track allows a breath between the more voracious characters of the songs around it such its intense passion, but it is fair to say that it is a less agitated storm amidst its predecessor and the closing might of Home, Sick and Tired. The final track has the biggest punk heart and hostility of all the songs but is still unafraid to exploit the rich hues of searing melodies as it provides a dramatic and thrilling, fully rounded creative storm.

It and Air That I’m Breathing steal the show, suggesting the future capability of the band to create inspirational songs and templates for fierce rock ‘n’ roll is ripening nicely. They are tracks strongly backed by the rest of the collection of highly enjoyable songs though, so much so that Revive leaves only excited and impressed thoughts on Come The Spring.

The Revive EP is available digitally now and on CD from on 22nd March 2015 via Engineer Records

https://www.facebook.com/ComeTheSpring3

RingMaster 13/03/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://reputationradio.yooco.org/

 

 

 

Inca Babies – The Stereo Plan

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From the days when the devil thrust his evil designs into music, dark rock ‘n’ roll has been a persistent and endearing temptation. From the leather clad hip and vocal lures of Sweet Gene Vincent to the modern psychotic seductions of Dedwardians, it is a delicious trespass of ears and imagination that continues to evolve rich adventurous psyche twisting pastures. The likes of The Doors, The Cramps, The Birthday Party, Bone Orchard, The 69 Eyes, Eighties Matchbox B-Line Disaster, The Dropper’s Neck to name a few, have continued to expose the senses to new ravenous depths of sinister sonic exploration over the decades. One band which from their emergence in 1982 has also sculpted a perpetual warped seduction is Inca Babies. Their almost serpentine invention and dark musical incitements have continued to inspire and invigorate, even during the near on twenty years they were absent from the music scene, but since returning in 2007 you can only suggest that the UK trio must have shaken hands on a new deal with Lucifer as they have risen to truly become one of the leading lights and template setting protagonists of British rock ‘n’ roll.

The evidence is already boldly apparent in their two albums since reforming, the acclaimed Death Message Blues and Deep Dark Blue of 2010 and 2012 respectively. Both releases ignited an already ravenous gothic rock scene and duly deserved all ardour given but each in many ways was just an immense but leading appetiser for the glory of The Stereo Plan. Released towards the end of 2014, the band’s seventh studio album is a masterpiece of the dark aural arts. The third instalment of their death blues trilogy, its fourteen-track proposal twists and turns through the primal essences of post punk, surf, garage punk, trash blues, and every other dark flavour available, but bred in the imagination of Inca Babies transforms into a recipe of ingenious alchemy. It is a transfixing and slightly menacing proposition which has everything from feet to the passions ablaze.

Listening to The Stereo Plan is almost like immersing in a greatest hits collection of songs, every encounter of such irresistible and impressive invention and contagion that there is no time to take a breath and reflect until the final note of the release drifts away. It all starts with the album’s title track and its opening tangy lure of surf bred toxicity. It is an instant inescapable invitation for ears and imagination, the percussive shuffle which soon adds its bait only increasing an enticement which deepens again with the thick bass prowls of Vince Hunt. Continuing to bind ears in his guitar’s delicious spicery too, Harry Stafford pounces with his vocal and lyrical dance, as everything in the song colludes to create satanic rock ‘n’ roll majesty, especially as rhythms grow in intensity and devilment with the vocals to arouse an even lustier persuasion.

How to follow such a magnificent start would have many bands in a cold sweat but not Inca Babies as they match its majesty with a just as compelling incitement going by the name of Scatter. Stereo Plan Front 1The swinging beats of drummer Rob Haynes recruits eager attention right away, swiftly adding appetite as riffs and bass grooves unite with his anthemic beats and the incoming catchy vocal delivery. Into its stride the song expels a punk causticity around its driving rhythmic spine, the fingers of Stafford continuing to dance over the strings of his guitar to create a web of sonic addiction. The aforementioned Dewardians comes to mind as the song bounces with venomous mischief and also Eighteen Nightmares At the Lux with its scuzzy textures.

The salty smoulder of Damnation comes next, an Orson Family like countrified shimmer fuelling the temptation of guitar and rolling beats. As the opening pair of songs, psychobilly bred rapacity coats the song but also here a more garage punk tenacity emerges and grows to an even more potent persuasion in the following River To the Centre of the World. A haunting slice of upbeat balladry with a chorus which simply infests the senses, the track is dark poetic manna for ears and imagination. It also continues the mouth-watering diverse landscape of the album, each song a blossoming of individual and unique gothic theatre bred in sinistrous ideation.

The Cajun cast spell of Stand Down Lucifer keeps listener and album in lustful realms next, its sinuous shimmer and invention a creeping and inescapable seduction whilst Feast With Panthers strolls in with stalking rhythms and demonic hooks within again a fine and alluring vocal proposal. Like Th’ Legendary Shack Shakers meets The Screaming Blue Messiahs, the latter a band easy to offer varying degrees of comparison to across the album, the track swings it frame and flirtation with mischief in its eyes and a wicked lick on its melodic lips. The Stereo Plan began on a lofty pinnacle and this pair again sublimely ensures that there is no slip from such heady heights.

   Last Flight Out of Saigon with its pulsating bassline and acidic sonic veining croons suggestively in ears next, its minimalistic yet cavernous presence a mesmeric hex before the garage pop feistiness of Absolute Leader of the World leaps at the senses. Holding a great raw seventies/eighties punk essence to its contagion, the song is a sweetly caustic roar of blues rock which re-ignites body and energies after the resourceful ‘rest’ found in its predecessor.

Returning to the insidious charms which festered wonderfully in the early songs, Devilfish Anarchy stalks and romps with that gothic blues meets psychobilly predation and devilry. Beats and basslines are the instigator to lust fuelled whiplash as vocals and melodic toxins work away on thoughts and emotion. It is an exhausting pleasure whose rigorous nature is swiftly tempered and contrasted by the funereal stance and classical elegance of Still Mountain, a bewitching ballad wrapped in imposing and provocative shadows.

A dirtier yet restrained heavy rock pushes the walls of Damn Our Hides next, its persuasion not as instant as elsewhere, though swiftly a captivating companion for ears, but slowly burning away behind the scenes and repeatedly nudging thoughts after the event, as so many other songs on the album. Its enduring temptation is another striking aspect of The Stereo Plan, each twist of its design able to return at leisure and with potency, just as the heated jazziness of Ghost Ship. The track is ablaze with sultry trumpet flames, filthy basslines, and delirious sonic enterprise combining for a fiery musical sunset on an apocalyptic landscape.

The album is finished off by the excellent psyche/ surf rock stomp of Blacktop Speedway and finally the garage rock serenade of Late Night Frankie Brittle, a croon which simply grows in weight, intensity, and sonic rabidity with volcanic imagination. The pair makes a thrilling end to one irresistible encounter.

Admittedly having a soft spot for the type of sounds Inca Babies revel in went in their favour, but also it brings more demands but once again the Manchester trio stand tall over them as they again help lead British rock ‘n’ roll into new and exciting explorations.

The Stereo Plan is available now via Black Lagoon Records

http://www.incababies.co.uk/   https://www.facebook.com/incababies/

RingMaster 11/03/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://reputationradio.yooco.org/

Fawn Spots – From Safer Place

Pic Ben Bentley

Pic Ben Bentley

Though it will not be the fiercest most hostile offering you will come up against this year, there is definitely a visceral rawness to the debut album from UK trio Fawn Spots which has the senses curling up like paint on a wall under extreme heat. From Safer Place is a furious yet creatively magnetic seduction which rages with a belligerent hardcore and punk voracity whilst smouldering with a noise rock and post punk invention. It is also a massive grower, from a strong and captivating first impression becoming one inescapable proposition drawing ears back again and again with growing eagerness.

Hailing from York, Fawn Spots emerged in 2011, originally as a duo with the intent to “push how much noise two people could make.” One or two line-up changes has led to vocalists/guitarist Jonathan Meager and Oliver Grabowski alongside newest member, drummer Paddy Carley, now standing before the world with From Safer Place in their creative hands. Written and recorded in sheds located in an abandoned Georgian garden and lyrically inspired by T. S. Eliot and Jean Paul Sartre amongst others, the album is a stirring foraging of the senses and sparking of the imagination. It retains the intensity which has already fuelled the band’s sounds and sonic assaults but explores even greater twists of invention and twisted enterprise, its songs barbarous but also ingeniously unpredictable.

New Sense stirs the blood first, its opening sonic yawn the prelude to a maelstrom of aggravated rhythms and caustic riffs raged over by bracing and instantly appealing vocals. Hooks are just as swift a lure too, almost taunting from within the smoggy air of the track. It has to be said that initially the closed in, claustrophobic air to songs took a while to acclimatise to. It did not defuse the success and weight of the persuasions but certainly distracted for the first couple of tracks before slipping into place and becoming part of the inventive furniture of From Safer Place.

The strong start is matched by I’m Not a Man; I Never Will Be, its more controlled entrance just a deceit as it too is soon a tempestuous storm of riff and rhythmic confrontation. Barely safer_place_layout_ideapassing a minute in length, the track throws in the irresistible hook or two also, successful bait courted by a great heavy bassline as the temperature and temptation of the album continues to rise through it and find new heights via the spicy causticity of A Certain Pleasure. The band has understandably been compared to the likes of Rites of Spring, Husker Du, and Mission of Burma, but the third track, and not alone in this, sparks thoughts of older bands like The Fire Engines and Wire, if lost in the blistering causticity of At the Drive In. The track sparks new greed in an already contented appetite for the album, its potency emulated and surpassed again by the outstanding Black Water. Sinister in its melodies and vocal harmonies, toxic in its sonic enterprise, the track is post punk at its most addictively inventive and predatory.

Natural Vision returns to the smoky and oppressive texture of the beginning for its persuasion but turns in on itself with minimalist hooks and melodies which vein the intensive rhythmic and abrasing examination of the senses. Though the track leaves a satisfied smile in its wake it lacks the striking spark of the songs around it, as emphasized by the album’s title track. There is a feel of Josef K in some ways to the next song, as well as a brawling punk ferocity which vocally and rhythmically pulls no punches. It is an exciting peach of a bruising on ears and psyche, and almost poppy in its infectiousness.

The heavy rhythmic entrance of Remains sets the scene for an agitated dance of psychotic beats and brawling vocals bound in a tapestry of toxic melodies and piercing hooks next. It is a glorious violation and imagination sparking incitement which has to bow a little to the superb In Front of the Chesnut Tree which follows. Its start is ripe with choppy dark bass pokes whilst the soon joining melodic winery is pure XTC, though it all evolves swiftly into an even more apparent Joy Division blossomed tempting. The instrumental is bewitching, seriously addictive, and given the clarity which the vocals are not across the album, becomes a lusty seduction on ears and the passions.

The album is completed by firstly the hellacious tempest of Recurring Face, a hardcore spawned furnace of vocal and sonic spite infused with cold post punk ingenuity. At its conclusion it is impossible not to draw a deep breath in recovery before the closing Basque Knife consumes ears with its psychotic and predacious, but controlled swamp of sound and enterprise. It is a fine end to a great release if not living up to the previous peaks on the album though to be fair the strength of all songs seems to grow with every single dive into their corrosive beauty, this no exception.

     From Safer Place is a treat of primal and instinctive noise delivered with a similar inbred passion and animosity. It tests, stretches, and excites in equal measure and makes for a very easy recommendation.

From Safer Place is available now via Critical Heights @  https://itunes.apple.com/gb/album/from-safer-place/id943965796

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RingMaster 10/03/2015

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