The Twin Dracula – Hell Hath All Fury


Hell Hath All Fury_RingMaster ReviewAs they started the year, UK rockers The Twin Dracula end it with a ferocious slab of noise bred, punk fuelled rock ‘n’ roll. This time it is courtesy of new EP Hell Hath All Fury, four tracks which tenaciously roar and aggressively tempt as they remind all what an exciting and sadly still majorly unrecognised band they are.

Formed in 2012, the quartet took little time in arousing attention and eager appetites for their raw rock incitement through a fierce live presence and debut EP Introducing. Its success and potential was equalled and built upon by its successor TTD​/​GFY, and both in turn surpassed in sound and invention by the Death Is Our Client EP which was unleashed at the beginning of 2015. With bands such as Kid Dynamite, Wipers, Rocket From The Crypt, Propagandhi, and The Bronx potent inspirations, the encounter showed a new adventure and mature imagination brewing within The Twin Dracula songwriting and sound, one in full cry now through Hell Hath All Fury.

The EP opens up with Catholic Discipline, a seriously swift incitement which more is an introduction to the release than an individual statement, though to be fair its predatory stalking of the senses and vocal ire more than wakes an ever ready appetite for The Twin Dracula fury. The sonic wind buffets ears for a breeze over a minute before flowing straight into the quickly thrilling tempest of Liars. The track begins offloading jabbing beats from its first breath as a storm of dirty riffs blows, that the vehicle for seriously tantalising grooves and a volatile rhythmic incitement. In turn this draws in a great the blend of enraged punk vocals and a gripping web of hooks and grooves to get greedy over. The band’s sound has never seen a lacking of such attributes but here the tapestry is more creatively involved and imaginative than ever as the band entwines a broad array of noise and rock ‘n’ roll bred flavours.

From one impressive track to another as the metallic hues closing off the second track is superbly contrasted by the more punk pop/alternative rock welcome of Alura. Without defusing that potent tempting, band and track soon weave in fiercer and more aggressively tenacious elements into the infection; their punk ‘n’ roll again taking on an almost kaleidoscopic quality in its impassioned and compelling storm.

   You’ll Never Defeat The Cobras arrives to complete the EP; it another track which evolves and dances around with persistently rapid infusions of new ideation and flavours ranging from metal and melodic rock to hardcore, noise, and punk rock. The track is irresistible, its sinews veering on the barbarous at times and melodic adventure perpetually seductive as it caresses and sears ears, whilst rhythms and vocals, in their own individual ways, entrance with anthemic prowess. It is a mighty end to Hell Hath All Fury, a dramatic and thrilling finish to an equally scintillating incitement.

The Twin Dracula just gets better and better, release by release. Time for all to get bitten we suggest.

The Hell Hath All Fury EP is available now @

Pete RingMaster 22/11/2015

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False Flags – Hexmachine

artwork_RingMaster Review

Casting belligerent revelry in a tempest of hardcore, punk metal, and noise rock within debut EP Hexmachine, UK quartet False Flags quickly suggest they are a raging on the ear that giving attention to can only be rewarding. It is a five track causticity loaded with noise infested hooks and discordance fuelled enterprise that snarls and gnaws on the senses with a combination of familiar and fresh ferocity. Major surprises are scarce, originality in some ways slim, but fair to say band and release stir up a very healthy appetite for their uncompromising persuasion of sound and intent.

Hailing from Leeds, False Flags emerged from the ashes of Red Stars Parade, Whores Whores Whores, and Year of the Man some when around 2011. Drawing on inspirations from bands such as Unsane, Breather Resist, Botch, and Coalesce, False Flags saw its members exploring new avenues for their hardcore bred ideation and adventure; better explained by guitarist Charles Pritchard, “after the break-ups of our previous bands in Leeds and all previously being friends from the DIY scene here, we wanted to form a band that took influence more from the noise rock / discordant hardcore end of the spectrum.” It was an aim soon finding success and a quickly growing following to a live presence which including sharing stages with the likes of Noothgrush, Narrows, and Envy. Long anticipated, Hexmachine is their first studio unleashing, a fierce roar on broader spotlights which more than lives up to the buzz their shows have bred.

The EP erupts with Earl Black, the opener emerging from a distant sonic haze in a brawl of thumping rhythms and caustic sonic violation. It is an assault bound in an infectious tenacity and lure too even though the vocals of Chris Jenkinson are throat raw, every syllable bearing the blood of his vocal chords as around him the guitars twist a mesh of flavours from punk to metal to heavy rock. Pritchard’s fingers keep song and imagination busy with his prowess on string as too the dark bass tempting of Mark Snellgrove, his prowling invention superbly aligned to the scything swings of drummer Mike McGoran. First impression of the track is strong, second great with it further impressing with each subsequent play.

The same applies to the following Last Screen Goddess. It makes a bolder entrance, beats badgering ears from its first breath as riffs and grooves entwine in a web of temptation. More predatory in gait and energy than its predecessor, the track is a cantankerous involvement which again only becomes more compelling over time. It is probably fair to say that it lacks the same imagination as the first song in the bulk of its body but saves that for a passage where everything twists around each other in a riveting and bruising noise infested trespass of the senses. Satisfaction is only left full across its bellow and filled again by the confrontation of Fate (Has a Driver). Like a blaze seeded in Sofy Major like rock ‘n’ roll and the scarring contagion of The Great Sabatini, the track heftily pleases; its grooves and bass rabidity especially incendiary sparking an even greedier appetite by this point.

Pet Wolf sculpts its barbarous infestation of air and ears from a similar canvas to the last song but turns it into a much more volcanic and volatile proposition veined by southern hued, sludge coated grooves. Bass and drum endeavour is as bewitching and punishing as the sonic incursion courtesy of the guitar, it all led by the harsh vocal and lyrical devilment. It is a great bullying which continues in the noise/punk inferno of Namedropper. Once more contagious hooks and flaming grooves join barbarous rhythms and vocal abrasion to create an assault as addictive as it is debilitating.

From one great track to another as Phone My Wallet brings Hexmachine to a rousing and brutal end, the track a bedlam of tasty repetitive grooves and intrusive hooks amidst a raging storm of voice, rhythms, and intensity. It sums up the False Flags sound in one invasive blow and ensures the EP leaves on a lofty plateau.

With a want for a touch more bold originality and diversity to Hexmachine the only slight wish of the EP it is an impressive and thoroughly enjoyable introduction to False Flags. With their pedigree and open talent, it already feels like the emergence of a unique character to their sound is on the cards; another reason to be confidently excited by the band.

Hexmachine is available from November 20th @

Pete RingMaster 20/11/2015

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The Sneaky Nixons – Sex

LisaJamie_RingMaster Review

UK band The Sneaky Nixons describe themselves “as an angry, semi-political, semi-religious, part-feminist sloppy activist group who play riotous, steam-train guitar music.” From one song alone much of that is maybe not so obvious but there is no denying that new single Sex is one mighty vehicle of mass seduction. Sauntering through ears in a flirtation of punk, ska, rock ‘n’ swing, and vaudevillian theatre, the song is a confrontational mischief on ears and imagination, and quite bewitching.

HFartwork-2_RingMaster Review     Taken from the forthcoming eponymous compilation album from Across the Ocean Waves Productions, which features the most exciting bands active on Liverpool’s vibrant music scene, Sex is a slice of rock ‘n’ roll to incite and inflame. It follows a clutch of singles released this year and The Coup de Grace EP which spawned most of them, each offering tracks which reveal a different strain of The Sneaky Nixons’ sound with Sex the most devilishly impressive of the lot so far.

The single strolls in on stabbing riffs and crisp beats beneath a sultry sky lit by the blazing temptation of brass. Settling into a gentler canter initially, with a touch of Brit pop and alternative rock to the melodies and vocals, the track is soon rising up to eye ball the listener with its creative revelry and punkish intent, both bound in more of the thick ska bred infectiousness.

Like Libertines meets The Talks meets The Vox Dolomites, Sex is an aurally salacious treat with a hard hitting video to inflame the senses further, and another mightily impressive step in the rise of The Sneaky Nixons’

Sex is released November 20th via Across the Ocean Waves Productions @

Pete RingMaster 20/11/2015

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Various Artists -This is the sound of Sugar Town

Artwork _RingMaster Review

Not only lighting our ears this November with another thrilling Horse Party EP, Seymour Quigley of the band and R*E*P*E*A*T Records / Pure Deadly have compiled and unveiled a striking compilation offering some of the best bands helping to make the Bury St Edmunds underground DIY rock scene one of the most exciting to emerge in recent times within the UK. Twelve bands providing a dozen, without exception, ear pleasing tracks, This is the sound of Sugar Town is a magnetic and thickly enjoyable invitation to explore a host of great new bands whilst helping a great cause with all its profits going to Bury St Edmunds Women’s Refuge.

Wrapped in the artwork of local artist and musician Kate Jackson, once of Long Blonde, This is the Sound of Sugar Town opens up with the alternative rock quintet Voter Kernel and instantly has ears and attention gripped. The band covers the senses in a web of sonic guitar bait before relaxing into a vocally rowdy and rhythmic inviting incitement laced with acidic enticement from the guitars. Into its stride Unnatural Gathering Of Animals blows a punk wind with anthemic simplicity and potency, perpetually confirming itself as one of those inescapable roars that just grabs full involvement of the listener.

The same applies to the darker post punk bred What I’d Do from Horse Party. The guitars of Ellie Langley and Seymour Quigley tempt as the beats of Shannon Hope entice, each warming ears for the ever siren like voice of Langley. It is a mix that breeds the great diversity to drive the band’s releases over the past year or so, but also a unique presence to the band’s sound which is no better epitomised than in this tantalising song.

As the third track comes in view, already there is a glimpse of not only the quality in the Bury music scene but the diversity too, The Few adding to that subsequent realisation across the album, with Bury’d Alive. Not to be confused with the truck load of other bands with the same name, especially in the US, the Bury hailing proposal is an indie punk quartet which as its predecessors, soon has appetite and imagination held with an opening lure of guitar and firm beats. Carrying a tasty seventies DIY punk tone to its sound with layers of bluesy spicing amongst it, the track whips up rich bait somewhere between Swell Maps and Outcasts.

The Machismo’s has already ignited lust in these ears with their releases, and do so again with their offering Rise Again and its punk infused seduction. The trio of Sam Marsh, Rachel Marsh, and Karly Stebbings cast a web of flavours and textures bred in varying styles, creating their own temptation which again comes in varied hues as it prowls with mischievous relish through twanging bass groans, sonic sighs, and scything beats. Lyrically the open humour of the band brings a thick smile to the face as its adventure of drooping hopes and their resurrection hit, as the sound, the sweet spot.

As mentioned the variety within the album and the town’s scene is a refreshing enjoyment, continuing with the great tempestuous sound of Rats as Big as Dogs. Their track, Same Difference, is a mesh of harmonic warmth and mesmeric calm aligned to explosive raw energy and aggression. It is only around for two minutes, but a dynamically eventful and captivating time before passing the baton of temptation on to Scare The Normals and their track Tomorrow. Stalking ears with its sinister electronics and prowling rhythms, the song grows into a compelling infestation lying somewhere between Autopsy Boys and Naked Lunch; an electronic/sonic exploration also carrying an alluring scent of Fad Gadget to its creeping enterprise.

A fascinating embrace of psychedelic grooving greets ears in Sky Dance from the quartet Pale Fires next, its sultry shimmer and flowing harmonic tenacity an immersive celestial delight whilst site favourites The Vitamins saunter in with their highly flavoursome rock ‘n’ roll, The Present (Stairway) to entice with a riveting canter of potent vocals and melodic enterprise laced with a grunge/alternative rock toning. Expectations expect the trio to provide a full meal of texture and expression and the track does not disappoint with its virulent shuffle and vibrant personality.

Some growling heavy rock with punk belligerence erupts in ears next courtesy of Tryal of Witches, its Motorhead meets Kyuss meets XII Boar roar Sweating Rum, a dirt crusted pleasure contrasting well with the melodic, ambience scented enticement of alternative quintet Cathedrals and Cars. Posterity Measure is a hug of melancholy and tantalising melodic beauty becoming more energetically aroused and in turn enthralling with every passing minute.

Fortunato provide a track from their well-received Under Your Teeth EP next, Utopia a fuzzy and dynamic croon of voice and sonic imagination with a healthy line in hooks and jabbing rhythms. Its flavoursome charm parts to leave Eleanor Lou to bring the album to a fine close with Ring The Change. Hailing from the market town and currently based in Manchester, the songstress dances on ears and imagination with voice and song, the acoustic hug a mesmeric reflection further honed by the elegant tones of the singer/songwriter.

From start to finish, This is the sound of Sugar Town is a thrilling discovery of Bury St Edmunds’ underground musical heart. Some bands were familiar, many brand new, and each contributing to a release worthy of everyone’s investigation whilst at the same time helping others.

This is the sound of Sugar Town is out now via R*E*P*E*A*T Records / Pure Deadly digitally and on 12” vinyl @

Album track listing…

VOTER KERNEL – Unnatural Gathering Of Animals 03:59

HORSE PARTY – What I’d Do 03:42

THE FEW – Bury’d Alive 02:38

THE MACHISMO’S – Rise Again 02:53

RATS AS BIG AS DOGS – Same Difference 02:00

SCARE THE NORMALS – Tomorrow 06:15

PALE FIRES – Sky Dance 04:47

THE VITAMINS – The Present (Stairway) 03:03

TRYAL OF WITCHES – Sweating Rum 03:35

CATHEDRALS AND CARS – Posterity Measure 03:52

FORTUNATO – Utopia 03:33

ELEANOR LOU – Ring The Change 02:32

Pete RingMaster 18/11/2015

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Everyday Sidekicks – The Things I’ve Seen

Everyday Sidekicks _RingMaster Reviewhot

Everyday Sidekicks is another UK band emerging from the hot bed of fresh and exciting music that is Bristol, and another prospect leaving a want to know and hear more in its wake. Their sound is a fiery and gritty post-hardcore proposition and their new EP, The Things I’ve Seen, a potent nudge on national attention. Listening to the six track encounter there is the feeling the band is still on a journey of discovery with their sound, tracks often weaving in recognisable and at times expected flavours and hues to its undoubtedly inventive heart. That familiarity and lack of major uniqueness though, rather than providing a dampener on the EP’s lure, just adds more substance to the release and excitement to the potential of where the band can take their music and imagination.

Formed in 2012, Everyday Sidekicks soon became a keenly followed and supported prospect on the local scene spreading outwards, though it was with the release of the single Hometown Hero in 2014 that they began flirting with national awareness. Live the quintet has shared stages with bands such as Marmozets, Shvpes, and Coldrain; increasing their reputation simultaneously over the past couple of years whilst also drawing attention from new fans and media alike. The Things I’ve Seen is the next potent nudge to awaken thicker and stronger attention, a success easy to see coming as its sextet of tracks tempt and sear the senses.

Everyday Sidekicks Cover Artwork _RingMaster Review    Opener F.T.B is a minute long lure into the release but much more than an intro, its belly of craft and passion a potent roar on ears and indeed and already brewing appetite. Its strong coaxing is quickly matched by the punchy swagger of Mirrors. Straight away the anthemic swings of drummer Mat Capper and the dark alluring tone of Sam Hughes’ bass grip ears as a spiralling of sonic enterprise escapes the guitars of Tim Brown and Josh Pasley. It is a rousing entrance that continues to entice as the enjoyable varied vocal attack of Archie Hatfield blazes away with angst and passion. He shows a diversity and imagination in this song alone which is echoed throughout the band and song, and though Mirrors offers familiar spicery, it makes for a stirring slice of post-hardcore bred rock ‘n’ roll.

It’s All Smiles and Laughter rolls in with a lighter and brighter air, its infectiousness aligned to elegant keys and a cleaner vocal presence to Hatfield. Also embracing a pop rock ingredient, the song soon brews up a more volatile intensity and intent, its eruption stirring and when the track especially hits full potency. Across its length though, imagination and craft is a magnetic lure but it just lacks the same striking spark as its predecessor and indeed the following Pitch Black. It too merges emotive calm and beauty with a tempestuous irritability and angst, this time crafting a more balanced and perpetually stirring proposition with a healthy scent of Billy Talent to it.

The melodic enterprise already lighting tracks is given a full canvas with Rosa where guitars and keys converge in a misty coaxing before uniting for a contagious incitement which punctuates and at times inflames the emotive balladry driving the song. Beats are punchy and the bass a throaty tempting, even as their shadows become bound in the sonic tendrils spun by the guitars. It is a potent affair with moments of gripping adventure and though the clean vocals are not as impacting as they are in other moments in the EP, it is fair to say the raw charm of the song pleases whilst offering more variety to the release with its cleverly aligned textures.

The Things I’ve Seen is closed by How We Survive, a raucous and dynamic onslaught of fierce punk ‘n’ roll. it ensures the EP ends on a high, even if it lets its ferocious roar and in turn creative intensity ebb and flow a touch. Nevertheless it is a great end to a heftily satisfying proper introduction to Everyday Sidekicks. It is early days but the band has plenty going for them in sound and invention and a potential hard to dismiss.

The Things I’ve Seen EP is released November 20th through all stores.

Pete RingMaster 19/11/2015

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False Heads – Steal and Cheat

FALSHEADS _RingMaster Review

There was without a doubt a rich twinge of intrigue and anticipation when UK rockers False Heads got in touch about a new single coming out. It was a surge of excitement inspired by memories of the band’s still impressing and thrilling previous pair of EPs and soon fiercely lit again by the actual rousing temptation of Steal and Cheat itself. The single is a thumping stomp of indie rock tenacity amidst grouchy rhythms and punk seeded invention; a track which whips up ears and enthused involvement as easily as it awakens a greedy appetite for more.

artwork _RingMaster Review     East London bred False Heads made its first steps in the opening month of 2014 and quickly began enticing attention and whipping up a loyal and quickly increasing following. Around the summer of that first year, the trio released the Tunnel Vision EP, a rousing quartet of tracks more than doing its bit to lure further and greater focus the way of the band. It also provided a strong base from which the band could expand and explore its songwriting and sound, and that they had by the time its successor, the Wear and Tear EP, had leapt into ears this past April. Whereas the first encounter was a grunge hued affair, its successor revealed a dirtier and heavier rock tempest to its enterprise and invention. Steal And Cheat shows another strong twist in sound from those before it whilst carrying the increasingly distinctive False Heads character and voice.

Steal and Cheat is quickly into its punk ‘n’ roll canter, the guitars and rhythms colluding in a boisterous canter as the trio of Luke Griffiths, Jake Elliott, and Barney Nash get to work on the imagination with theirs. This time around, the threesome weaves a more restrained and minimalistic proposal of, as suggested earlier, indie and punk enterprise bound in a wind of virulent energy and vocal revelry. The bass is a hefty lure, its throaty swing and presence a cantankerous incitement alongside the sonic web of guitar and the invitingly anthemic vocal delivery. With the drums leading the tempting, it is fair to say that everything about the song is an incitement of catchiness though, and increasingly irresistible over its length and every play.

Like a fusion of Houdini, The Vibrators, and Libertines, whose Gary Powell releases the single on his 25 Hour Convenience Store label, Steal And Cheat is instinctive manna for the ears and easily the finest track from False Heads yet.

Steal And Cheat is released December 4th via 25 Hour Convenience Store @

Upcoming False Heads live dates:

November 27th – Cult Cafe in Ipswich

16th Jan – Stag and Hounds in Bristol

Pete RingMaster 19/11/2015

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Japanese Fighting Fish – U Ain’t Gonna Win This

JFF_RingMaster Review

It has been a long two years since UK psyche twisters Japanese Fighting Fish set ears and passions ablaze with their album Day Bombs; a time where the band has never been far away from ears at The RR to be fair but too long to wait for something new from a band who to that point had only brought something unique and invigorating to the British music scene. Finally the wait is over though with the extremely anticipated single U Ain’t Gonna Win This about to uncage its devilry, and guess what… Japanese Fighting Fish are still amongst the most imaginative, inspiring, and yes warped bands around today.

Really that is no surprise as their 2011 debut album Just Before We Go MAD was a bold and virulent escapade of creative devilment and sonic psychosis too; rich enslaving qualities taken to another level by Day Bombs two years later. It is a surprise that they alone have not made the Leeds-born, London-based outfit a house hold name and passion, and if you add an impressive live presence which has seen them play with the likes of Space Hog, Wild Beasts, The Stranglers, De La Soul, and UB40, as well as ignite venues in their own name and right, it is a mystery. Now with the exotic spicery and revelry of U Ain’t Gonna Win This things might and should be about to change.

Front Cover_Win This_RingMaster Review   A teaser for their next album Swimming with Piranhas which is scheduled for release at the end of March 2016, U Ain’t Gonna Win This takes all the prize elements of those previous albums and their hosts of singles, and twists and hones them into a new kind of JJF temptation. From its first step of its erotic prowl, the bass is sonically gurning and guitars splattering spots of sonic tempting on the senses and imagination. The distinctive inviting growl of Karlost is just as swiftly to the compelling mix; his unique tones courting sound and ears as beats from Al jab and probe the same. The virulent bounce to the track’s carnival-esque stalking has feet and hips involved from the off; its funk spawned gait and noir jazz air simply chains of seduction, whilst slithers of noise rock, alternative pop, and psych punk only thrill as they entangle the maelstrom of imagination and enterprise to matching success.

An exploration of split personalities whilst also making a “homage to boxing greats like Ali, and Rocky “, the song is an alchemy of devilment, an infestation of crazed ingenuity that creeps into and manipulates every pore and brain cell. The same applies in a different way to its companion on the single Queen Marilyn, the song a dirty grunge seeded blaze of desert rock with more than a scent of Queens Of The Stone Age to it, if a psychotic and bedlamic version. The track rumbles along, throwing out increasingly gripping hooks like sonic confetti, rhythms barging away within the mix too as Karlost spreads his sandy tones.

As in U Ain’t Gonna Win This, the guitars of Gareth Mochizuki Ellmer and Karlost captivate and provocatively suggest whilst the bass of Matt creeps with salacious intent through the swinging raps of Al. It is a combination united by the band’s off-kilter imagination and craft into creating arguably the best single of 2015 and an already impatient anticipation for Swimming with Piranhas.

The Japanese Fighting Fish are back and irrepressibly better than ever, and even more inventively deranged.

U Ain’t Gonna Win This is released November 13th via CDbaby @

Pete RingMaster 13/11/2015

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