The Hellfreaks – God On The Run

The story goes that “Hell was full so they came back!” A return sparking the beginnings of Hungarian punks The Hellfreaks so all hail the greed of the horned one to gather as many souls as he can to cram his domain. Seriously though whatever the spark which brought the Budapest band to life it has bred some of the best times for our ears here at The RR and none as glorious as now with the band’s new album, God On The Run.

Formed in 2009 by vocalist Zsuzsa Radnóti better known as Shakey Sue, The Hellfreaks soon had the local scene jumping before infesting ears and borders further afield with their psychobilly/rockabilly/punk nurtured sound. As the following year broke, the band unleashed debut album Hell Sweet Hell to swift success and acclaim around the world. Its successor, Circus Of Shame, met equal reaction and plaudits as the band found themselves touring across Europe and making a mark in the US.

As 2014 began to close up, the band split though it was a brief departure as Sue pulled the band from its temporary grave with a new line-up and a fresh evolution of their sound which saw punk and rock ‘n’ roll instincts fuelling a whole new incitement and individuality. The potency of this change was in evidence within third album Astoria, released 2016 and now in full roar and glory within God On The Run, an unbridled stomp which unapologetically puts all before in the shade.

From the moment opener Men In Grey launches its roar from the sonic lure it initially dangles, the album proved addiction is not always a bad thing. The voracious beats of Béla Budai drive the surge of temptation, nagging and biting simultaneously with a primal hunger as the guitar of Jozzy adds its rapacious riffs and claws alongside the dark grumble of Gabi Domján’s bass. As it hits its equally eager stride, Sue’s rousing tones ignite an already blazing fire, the song thick in attitude and virulence which only escalates as the chorus unleashes its roar. The track is superb, punk rock predator with garage punk and hard rock rebelliousness soaked in punk metal aggression.

From thereon in every track proceeds to infest ears with their own unique character as swiftly proven by Red Sky. Again, as rhythms pounce and plunder accompanying riffs and hooks spring their web of temptation around the compelling tones of Sue, her snarl and fire an echo of those esurient sounds and her lyrical bite. With essences which remind of bands such as In Evil Hour and The Distillers in varying degrees, the track is a rousing storm in the ears while Hello Sea! straight after matches its attitude in a calmer but no less volatile stroll. With open tempestuousness which shapes its voice and holler around a melodic enticement which alone is a magnet for ears, the song hit the spot already well attended by the album.

Doldrum Dynasty intensifies the album’s impact and the greed for it, the heavy tenacious nagging of bass and guitar grooves alone manna for the imagination though next up Witches Heal still manages to eclipse the album’s best moment yet. With Budai’s swinging beats prowled by the riveting tones of Sue, the track stalks the senses whilst gripping the body with an infectiousness which borders on the viral, again hooks a devious weapon within the slavery.

As Royal Blue and new single Adrenalized offer their own inimitable endeavours, God On The Run only took a firmer grip. Such the majesty of the previous pair, neither track quite rivalled their stature yet with their respective punk audacity and infection loaded clamour, both proved pure contagion before As Above stormed ears with its punk metal defiance and rapacity for a matching persuasion. Again within the creative hostility melodic enterprise and harmonic temptation provided, without defusing the song’s truculent heart, an evolving adventure the imagination keenly feasted on.

The album closes up with firstly the outstanding Clear Water, a track winding its wiry tempting around ears from its first breath whilst gnawing at the senses before offering rich melodic seduction and lastly the electro coated Tabby, a track declaring there is plenty more in The Hellfreaks imagination and sound for they and us to tap in to as it hauntingly consumed the passions.

God On the Run is certainly not the first time The Hellfreaks have had us lauding and recommending their devilry but there is a new vigour and urgency in our suggestion that you go check their voracious new album.

God On The Run is out February 7th; available @ https://thehellfreaks.com/shop

https://www.thehellfreaks.com/    https://www.facebook.com/thehellfreaks/

Pete RingMaster 26/01/2020

Copyright RingMasterReview: MyFreeCopyright

Her Despair – Exorcisms of Eroticism

There is no escaping that UK dark rock outfit Her Despair made a major impression critically and on a new flood of fans with their last EP, Mournography. It was a striking and arousing affair built on open craft and imagination which thrust the band before a more international spotlight. Even so, its success will surely only be overshadowed as the ascent of the London band accelerates through the magnificent Exorcisms of Eroticism.

Her Despair’s new EP eclipses its predecessor in every department, the band’s sound a more mature and even more striking proposition as it continues to embrace the essences, drama, and melancholy of gothic rock, punk, and dark metal. Each song within Exorcisms of Eroticism aligns crepuscular gloom and intimate seduction, emotion ravishing shadows and heart bred passion; all within the dark recesses of a world in turmoil.

Pandaemonium opens up the release, the song looming from the dark in a mighty tide of sound which instantly shapes its stride and trespass through the melodic intimation of Toby’s keys. The guitars of Dan and Jord cast a more rapacious side in the emerging song, its voice already rich and broad before calming a touch for the ever magnetic tones of J. Every aspect of the encounter though proved a beacon for attention, the bass of Vikki a dark throaty tempting as the beats of Lee bite yet simultaneously incite. As in previous releases, there is no denying the inspiration of bands such as Fields of the Nephilim and Sisters of Mercy to Her Despair and maybe others like The March Violets in the instinctive infection loaded virulence which soaks every note and spring of imagination but the first track quickly sets the unique tone and individuality which defines the release and each song.

 As mentioned earlier, drama is in full force coating every note and syllable of the outstanding first track, The Exorcism soon following with an equal fertility in all its textures and enterprise. Similarly an inherent catchiness is as bold as the creative theatre shaping the tapestry of light and dark sparking the imagination of band and listener alike. The symphonic lure of keys provides a seductive rapture in the turbulent heart of the song, J’s voice managing to echo both sides in his ever alluring and potent presence.

Though there is open energy in its gait and emotive roar, In That Moment is a siren of temptation, the tempered roar haunting in its beauty and enthralling in its croon while Like A Crucifixion straight after is a cauldron of sonic and emotional tenacity. Akin to a fusion of Type O Negative and Dead Register, the track simply sets another momentous lure in the EP as virulently manipulative as it is emotively invasive.

Beyond The Veil is another gentle haunting, the ballad caressing the senses and thoughts yet with an undercurrent of fiery anguish which erupts enough to scorch the elegance and beauty of the bewitching incitement before Final Rest brings things to a just as captivating close. The funereal gait of the song beguiles alone, the vocals and the words it shares a fascination matched in sound across the whole band. Melancholy is as thick as the rhythms which prowl the senses, enchantment as potent as the melodic weaving of keys and guitars and rich pleasure the result of all.

Exorcisms of Eroticism is glorious; from sound to lyrics, voice to the imagination which fuels it, the seriously impressive EP declares Her Despair as one band the world should no longer ignore.

Exorcisms of Eroticism is available now digitally and on CD @ https://herdespair.bandcamp.com/

https://www.facebook.com/herdespair/   https://twitter.com/herdespairband

Pete RingMaster 08/01/2020

Copyright RingMasterReview: MyFreeCopyright

Intimacy and the Roar: talking with Jack And Sally

Hi and thank you for sparing time to chat with us.

Could you first introduce yourself/the band and tell us how it came to be?

Prav-Like Fez from That 70s Show, I was given the name Prav by the band and yes, like Fez I am also an International student. I moved to London to play Rock ‘n Roll and met Ben and Josh in the winter of 2018. We formed the band shortly after.

Josh -I’m Josh, I’m play guitar for the band. I was originally going to join Ben’s old band but before I could, they fell apart! I went ahead and met Ben anyway, and we eventually found Prav from the musicians network group and as they say, the rest is history.

How would you define not only your sound but the creative character of the band?

Prav -The sound is probably best described as Green Day meets Rise Against. If the band had an alter ego, it would be a boy/girl in their early 20s who are at a critical point in their life. He/she would be experiencing feelings of love and loss, discovering how messed up and complex the modern world is and also finding their own passion for the good and genuine things in life.

Ben –Like Prav said, our song writing revolves around issues in real-life that regular people deal with on a regular basis –and just like everyone else, we do too.

Josh -Creatively I think we draw from a lot of disparate places but it blends well. I listen to a lot of harder stuff and I bring that into the songs we write. Ben’s vocals are mainstream sounding but he writes them into punk riffs, and Prav brings in his influences from grunge and hard rock into the drums.

You touched on previous musical experiences for band members, would you elaborate and suggest how have they been embraced in what you do now?

Prav -I used to play in a Funk Rock band back in India and played with another Hard Rock act in London for just over a year. I would definitely say that those experiences shaped what I play now for Jack and Sally.

Ben –I’ve played in bands in college. I was in a band in 2009 that was called Aisle Riot –we played one gig but my time in that band had a major influence on my life and showed me that I could be in a band –that I could actually do it.

Josh -I’ve been in bands since school but my last serious band was at university -Chance Encounter. We tracked a few songs, it was a pretty fun experience especially it was my first few times ever playing live in the U.K.

Is there a particular process to the band’s songwriting?

Prav-Ben or I write a song and bring it to the studio where we then fiddle around with our parts and start adding in ideas. Slowly but surely, the song starts taking shape as each of our styles pour in. Once we feel confident that this is how we want our audiences to listen to the song, we make a demo.

Ben -I write lyrics first, based on ideas I have in my head. The idea for our second single Macy came to me when I was on a train in Finland -from a graffiti image sprayed on a wall. It actually took me 6 years to write Tomorrow’s Revolution! Based on my influences in life, I’ve carried a lot of anger –and all of that inspired me write about a whole new world -that world is called ‘Nevernia’ –it’s what the EP is based around. Once I have finished writing the lyrics to a song, I’ll put some basic chords around it and then take it to the studio to work on, like Prav said.

Josh -We continually fiddle with our songs as well to improve it for live situations –Tomorrow’s Revolution for example sounds much different today than when we originally played it live, and it’s much better (in my opinion at least!)

Would you tell us about your latest release?

Ben –Our latest release is our EP, Who We Become!

Josh -It’s out everywhere to stream and buy from 11th November. We’ve also released two music videos for the singles on it, so check it out!

What are the major inspirations to its heart and themes?

Ben –Our EP is based on a concept, which follows the life of its protagonist ‘Macy’ who has grown up into a world plagued by issues like racism, corporate greed, austerity and oppression. It deals with how Macy stands up to these issues of modern day society.

I am always intrigued as to how artists choose track order on albums and EP’s and whether in hindsight they would change that. What has been the deciding factor for you?

Prav -The EP’s track order follows Macy’s journey. Superstar is her Father’s message to her that she doesn’t have to try too hard to make the world see that she is good. Nevernia is essentially a metaphor to describe the messed up world we live in and how Macy tries to traverse it. Tomorrow’s Revolution is about Macy’s rebellion after she realises that she needs to take drastic measures to bring about change. Long Way Home is about her feeling homesick and how she longs to go back to the people she loves. Macy is ultimately the story of how Macy’s loved ones mourn her loss.

What do you find the most enjoyable part of being in a band and similarly the most cathartic?

Prav -playing original songs that we made from the ground up on stage, touring and when people come and tell you that they had a sick time watching us play.

Ben –Being able to play our songs to people that they sing back at us is one of the most underrated achievements anyone could ever have. It’s beautiful, and seeing people believe in words that I wrote in my bedroom is truly unreal.

Josh -I’ll never get used to hearing people say they like our songs, but it’s definitely one of the best things about being in a band. Playing shows live as well -the adrenaline rush is unreal.

For anyone contemplating checking you out live give some teasers as to what they can expect.

Prav-thumping grooves, sick riffs and yes, be ready to sing with us!

Ben –We are loud, yes we are Pop Rock to the core, but you will hear Metal, you will hear Punk Rock and you will also want to dance to our tracks.

Josh -Riffs, solos, and some meaningful lyrics.

What has been your most thrilling moment on stage to date?

Prav -Probably at The Cavern, Exeter a few weeks ago. The place seemed so packed all of a sudden when we played All The Small Things. We couldn’t believe our eyes!

Josh -Yeah I’d agree with Prav -the Cavern show was mental.

Do you have live dates coming up?

Ben –We do, yes. We are booking our tour for April 2020, and some shows have already been confirmed.

What else can we expect in the near future?

Prav -More releases, probably some collaborations with other artists as well.

Ben –Definitely new music, but for now we’re focussing on our debut EP and getting a tour or two together.

What are the major inspirations to you sound wise and as a musician?

Prav -Green Day’s American Idiot, Audioslave, Velvet Revolver and Switchfoot.

Ben –Green Day is my favourite band, Linkin Park and Nirvana.

Josh -Soundwise -Blink-182, Paramore. Musician wise -Metallica, Enter Shikari.

And finally what song or release would you say was the spark to your passion for music?

Prav -Superunknown (Soundgarden)

Ben –Jesus of Suburbia (Green Day)

Josh -Master of Puppets (Metallica)

Many thanks guys once again!

Check out the review of Who We Become @ https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2019/10/09/jack-sally-who-we-become/

 

https://www.jackandsally.co.uk/   https://www.facebook.com/jackandsallyuk   https://twitter.com/jackandsallyuk

Pete RingMaster

The RingMaster Review 12/12/2019

Copyright RingMasterReview: MyFreeCopyright

The Gaa Gaas – Self Titled

There is no sense of understatement when we say that the debut album from UK outfit The Gaa Gaas has been one long awaited and highly anticipated release, to the band as much as fans, but now finally here there is no sense of an anti-climax in its arrival and triumphant presence.

We admit we have been hooked on The Gaa Gaas sound since discovering the Jersey hailing, often Brighton/ London based outfit over a decade ago, the band itself emerging from the imagination of vocalist/guitarist Gavin Tate and co in 2003 after meeting at a garage punk club night called ‘Bomp’ in St Helier, Jersey. Subsequent singles, EP’s and live shows across the UK and Europe have only brought greater acclaim by the year and richer reputation by the creative escapade but as all artists know it is a perpetual struggle to realise the next step or ignite greater attention. The Gaa Gaas have met all obstacles and hold ups with resistance as the years have sneaked by but the determination to release their album and breach major spotlights has now found its moment with the latter of the two surely to deservedly follow.

The Gaa Gaas sound is as individual in its character and enterprise as it is unique in its voice. It is bred on the nutrients of post punk, punk, psych rock, noise and much more but as suggested emerges as its own senses menacing, imagination seducing sonic virus. From within a drone enlivened nagging, hooks bite with creative rabidity as rhythms tease with serial killer like intent. That alone proves an irresistible trespass but add the infernal melodic toxins which the band just as easily conjure, it all makes for one rapacious addiction which is no more enjoyable and compelling than within their self-titled debut album.

The album opens with Close Your Eyes, a lone strum of guitar providing a lingering scent of sonic jeopardy from within which a rhythmically swinging clamour bursts. Instantaneously it is a contagious affair, the bass of Jamey Exton leading the rhythmic infection further driven by drummer Stewart Brown’s bold strikes. The sonic smog escaping Tate’s guitar smothers as it seduces, his vocals dancing with almost contempt on the wires within that enveloping incitement. Resistance to the track’s bounce is non-existent as the track manipulates limb and spirit alike, a glorious start to the release firmly declared.

In its own Bauhaus hued architectural landscape, Statues proves just as gripping, bass and beats setting a virulent lure as guitar and vocals express their twisted psych breath upon industrial and post punk honed intimation. Tate’s keys are just as invasive and animated as the ravening sounds escaping his guitar, the track as magnificent as its predecessor and indeed the following V.O.L.T.A.I.R.E. A track we devoured years back, it is still as powerful and irrepressible now, from its first citric sighs through the rhythmic stroll which invades every instinct to move, and the tart melodies which wrap its pure contagion, the song devours ears and appetite like a swing loaded creative plague.

The Type Of Mood is just as insistent in its groove and infection, the keys of Peter Hass a tangy sweetness in the more caustic but no less tempting commotion expressed by Tate’s guitar. Again there is a vocal eighties post punk air to the track, a cold nostalgic din given greater depth and adventure by The Gaa Gaas’ senses trespassing imagination while the ever rousing Hypnoti(z)ed provides a less intrusive but equally as overwhelming and manipulative not forgetting delicious incitement. The bass of Ali Cooper is at its core temptingly harassing as beats bite and Tate’s vocals holler, everything off kilter and bewitching like an especially devious cobra before it strikes.

C.U.T.S. is built of the same devilment, every aspect niggling at the senses and each strand of its web crawling under the skin before unleashing its predacious rabidity and sonic fermentation. Drowned in its tide and blissful in its maelstrom, the track just had us lost in our own physical and emotional eruption before The One Eyed Stranger took ears and imagination on a stroll through dark avenues of enterprise and addiction. The sax of Luke Georgiou lights the way with delicious drama, its enterprise echoed in the tones of Tate and the persistently swinging rhythms of Cooper and drummer Matt Maguire. Once more Bauhaus come to mind in many ways across the track and though there is no real comparison to The Gaa Gaas’ sound, Pete Murphy and co are the closest to give some inkling of its identity.

In the 2018 version of Entertainment which graces this release, punk rock is the fuel to its discontent and creative agitation, the track biting back at a landscape as prevalent now as any previous time as the beats of Maguire take lethal pot shot. It is a song which in its early writing hints at the eventual wonderfully nagging quality of the band’s sound which is fully employed by next up Perception within its scuzzy senses haunting, habit forming rapture.

The album concludes with Indian Giver, a beguiling psych rock nurtured instrumental as potent on the imagination as it is the ears. There is a Cure like scenting to the track, especially in its rhythmic saunter, and dour breath which manages to be as radiant in beauty as it is dark in suggestion. It is a fascinating and enslaving end to a release which even with our already in place eager expectations of pleasure left us basking in richer joy, invasively impressed, and expecting the band to finally find deserved recognition in far broader and intense spotlights.

The Gaa Gaas album is out now on Movement-2 Records; available @ https://thegaagaas.bandcamp.com/album/self-titled-album

http://www.thegaagaas.co.uk/   https://www.facebook.com/TheGaaGaas   https://twitter.com/The_Gaa_Gaas

Pete RingMaster 05/12/2019

Copyright RingMasterReview: MyFreeCopyright

The Tea Set – Back In Time For Tea

Like all those with horniness for music, over years of finding encounters which spark extra love, lust, and addiction within the heart there are some moments which rise even above that in the passions. It is fair to say that from the moment punk rock erupted we have discovered a horde of such essential triggers to eternally drool over but of those that reign over the passions most a certain two remain to the fore. One is the single, Sex Cells by The Table and the other was provided by The Tea Set in the shape of their 7”, Parry Thomas. The first of the two only produced two singles before their shall we say chaotic and certainly uncompromising existence finally came apart but the latter over their three years left a host of further adventures which indelibly left their mark on ears and passions. So it was major excitement that we jumped on the opportunity, thanks to our friend Andy at Perfect pop Co Op, to check out Back In Time For Tea, an album bringing all of The Tea Set recordings together in one place with two new rich brews to sup on.

Hailing from Watford, born within its art college to be exact, The Tea Set emerged in 1978 out of punk band, The Bears. Initially called Screaming Ab Dabs until they realised that was an early name of Pink Floyd they renamed themselves The Tea Set, though weirdly the guys found out that Tea Set was another incantation from which the Floyd would rise. The name stuck this time and with a line-up of vocalist Nic Egan, bassist Ronny West, drummer Cally, and keyboardist Mark Wilkins, the band quickly released the Cups and Saucers EP, upon which Stewart Kinsey played guitar.

We discovered the EP and its glorious vinyl wrapping art work after being seduced by its successor, Parry Thomas and it is the quartet of tracks making up Cups and Saucers which opens up Back In Time For Tea. The four songs revel in the punk instincts which made The Bears a well-loved proposition but more so reveal the broader post punk meets art school sound the band were developing. On Them steps up first, from its first breath the song daring the listener to jump upon its ear nagging canter for a ride of unbridled enterprise and mischief. There is something akin to bands like Television Personalities and O’ Level to the song but already and across its companions you could hear something individual brewing and across following releases standing unique to The Tea Set.

The hectic punk ‘n’ roll of Sing Song is one of those songs which just sweeps you up in its swing and antics, revelling in the creative nagging which marks out all the band’s songs, that a persistent urging which only ever led to eager participation while Grey Starling revealed the experimentation which also grew and became ingrained in their sound over future songs. The Swell Maps meets Wire-esque B52G completed the EP and already it was easy to hear the inimitable character of the band’s sound and the defiant imagination which only blossomed by the release as evidenced by the perpetually irresistible Parry Thomas single.

Its two tracks are next on the album and a release which again came bound in just as imaginative and pleasing packing, the punk DIY ethic fuel to The Tea Set’s own independence in all things, and yes we still have the tea bag which was included in its body, unused of course. The single saw Ronny on guitar with Duncan Stringer now teasing and taunting with the bass, and Parry Thomas sparking one of the major addictions in music we have spawn. Written about John Godfrey Parry-Thomas, a Welsh engineer and motor-racing driver who at one time held the land speed record, a subsequent attempt taking his life, the track’s engine idles over initially with drama lining every shimmer of keys, suspense of guitar, and low rumble of rhythms that emerges. Eventually it sets off, Nic’s vocals narrating the disaster to happen with the fascination all moments, massive and small, like that seem to trigger in us all. The song is superb and has never lost its magnificence and slavery on ears for so many.

Tri X Pan which accompanied the track is just as addict forming, it’s developing shot of choice punk hooks and manipulative rhythms another trigger to eager participation, one only further strengthened by the beckoning tones of Nic.

Though Parry Thomas is suggested as the band’s biggest moment we suggest it is their next single which is the one those outside fan love might know them for. Certainly it is the one song that outside of John Peel, which seemed to get radio airplay of some sort most often. Keep on Running (Big Noise From The Jungle) is a song written by Jamaican ska and reggae singer/ songwriter Jackie Edwards and another one of the delicious moments when The Tea Set simply refuses to let go of your ears and attention. Produced by The Stranglers Hugh Cornwell, the song strolls in on a rhythmic swagger knowing that your body is going to instinctively bounce to its throb and voice sing to its infectiousness.  As much pop punk as it is post punk devilry, the track just harasses and entices until you are hollering to its controlled yet wild endeavours and swinging with its virulence.

The single saw Ron back on bass with guitarist Nick Haeffner now part of the band, both just as tempting in their part of single B-side, Flaccid Pot, a psych pop instrumental seducing the senses around the first’s  masterfully pulsating bass before it bursts into an inescapable sing-a-long inducing punk ‘n’ rocker.

The band’s next single was no stranger to certain radio shows either, the again wonderfully wrapped two song line-up of South Pacific and The Preacher simply one more memorable and again irresistible moment with The Tea Set. South Pacific is another track which just swings on the passions like a simian tease, the song a contagion of tantalising hooks and ravishing devilment getting under the skin as quick as a blink of the eye and an incitement even a bag of bones surely could not resist the urge to swing their inhibitions aside for.

The Preacher arrives on a cosmic mist of psych rock, a spatial missionary for the imagination and again nothing less than full pleasure as the band weaves another flight of originality and captivation.

Back In Time For Tea is completed by that couple of never heard before tracks, the first being Walk Small. It is a song recorded just before the band broke up sharing the same seeds as the previous track in many ways to blossom into a fascination of ethereal pop. There is a tinge of The Monochrome Set to it but so uniquely The Tea Set and so majestic you wonder if it had been released back in time theirs might just have become a name on the lips of so many more.

Pharaohs was recently recorded, a fan favourite which we can only feel blessed has found the light of day to light up speakers and ears alike and a song which sums up everything wicked, disobedient, and wonderful about The Tea Set and their idiosyncratic sound and indeed imagination.

So that is the recording history of The Tea Set, a band which has lit up stages alongside the likes of The Clash, U2, Iggy Pop, The Stranglers, and The Skids and been one big reason why music has been essential to so many, and that is Back In Time For Tea, the biggest treat for fans and newcomers alike.

Back In Time For Tea is out now via Cleopatra Records @ https://theteasetuk.bandcamp.com/album/back-in-time-for-tea and https://cleorecs.com/store/shop/the-tea-set-back-in-time-for-tea-cd/

https://www.theteaset.net/   https://www.facebook.com/left12/

Pete RingMaster 29/11/2019

Copyright RingMasterReview: MyFreeCopyright

Mr Ted – El Dirty Sex

Amongst the mischievous and devilry loaded protagonists which help make rock ‘n’ roll so fun there is one certain rascal which is beginning to stand out more than most and that is UK outfit Mr Ted. We had a hint of their devilish manner, intent, and enterprise through a split release with Bisch Nader earlier this year on Society Of Losers and it is in full rebellious mood with debut album El Dirty Sex, again unleashed by the Liverpool label.

Consisting of Merseyside bred Peter Williamson, Mark Hughes, Phillie Collier, and Mark Charles Manning, Mr Ted create a sound embracing the best diablerie of punk and noise rock and the similarly roguish hues of grunge, alt rock, and other rapacious flavours. It emerges within El Dirty Sex as one captivatingly disobedient incitement as ridiculous in its antics as it is irresistible in its character and exploits with unbridled fun fuelling all.

Though hard to pin down with comparisons there is definitely something akin to Aussie band I Am Duckeye to the Mr Ted sound but as the album shows it develops new aspects in noise and misconduct song to song. The album opens up with Rage Quittin’, and immediately gets its bounce going as rhythms jump about with funk instincts. In no time riffs and hooks are adding their enticement with vocals matching their boisterousness yet all the while a darker, heavier edge infests the lining of the song; its doomier hue bringing thicker body to the instinctive predation of the quickly compelling encounter and its Houdini meets the previously mentioned Australians natured stomp.

It is an outstanding start to the album quickly matched by the alt rock shenanigans of The Bean Song with its animated moves and virulent hookery. Darkly hued rhythms incite and entice from the first second, guitars and vocals casting a web of temptation which effortlessly worms itself into ears and body with the inevitable involvement achieved by its monkey tricks including exploiting the equally infectious lure of The Kinks with a big grin.

The outstanding Shame is next up and similarly thrusts its inescapable hooks forward from the first breath; grooves which swing with knowing relish of their subsequent success in getting hips and lust to do their bidding. As crispy favourites fall as part of its lyrical observation, the song buried itself deep in the passions and psyche adding layers of voracious rock ‘n’ roll by each irresistible minute to seal such slavery before Sea Of Platelets shares an indie pop breeding and psyche rock shaping with matching eagerness; a touch of Television Personalities only aiding its thick persuasion.

Originally their part in that earlier mentions split release, Muscle Milk steps up next. Its lean but easily coaxing beginnings lead ears into the awaiting thick mass of dextrous sound; again grooves and rhythms inherently tempting in its rapacious but mercurial doom/sludge mixed body of contagious trespass. Still as irresistible as it was earlier this year, the track epitomises the core of a Mr Ted song and all the mischief and creative perversity found.

Through the punk ‘n’ roll ferocity of One 2 Panda, a predominantly instrumental track just as devious in its intrigue wired suggestiveness as it is predatory in its noise punk menace, and the feral contagion of the Happy Song, the album’s claws just dug deeper while Sexy Legs displayed its own funk and pop rock enterprise to take body and imagination on another energetic ride with unpredictability and misbehaviour for company.

El Dirty Sex goes out on the magnetic antics of firstly Andrew WK Party In Ireland, its title unsurprisingly giving clue to the major spice in its punk rock riot which also has a bit of Stiff Little Fingers to it with a Flogging Molly spicing breaking upon the folkish hues that emerge in the fun. Pickled Eggs and Snakes concludes the release, providing eight minutes of inimitable temptation taking essences of The Beatles, The Scaffold, Mischief Brew, and Half Man Half Biscuit in its increasingly volatile shanty. As everywhere though, it soon spreads its own unique voice and character of sound to leave us so hungry for much more.

Released in September we are a little late to the party but El Dirty Sexy has an open invitation which will never go out of date and should definitely be accepted.

El Dirty Sexy is out now via Society Of Losers Records; available @ https://mr-ted.bandcamp.com/album/el-dirty-sexy

https://www.facebook.com/MrTedLives/   https://www.instagram.com/mrtedlives/   https://twitter.com/mrtedlives

Pete RingMaster 19/11/2019

Copyright RingMasterReview: MyFreeCopyright

Impulsive Compulsions – SAMPLER 4

Another compelling issue of the In The Club Magazine from Perfect Pop Co-Op and another treat in word and sound had us basking in some of the very best independent goodness. The autumn 2019 edition of the online magazine from the label, issue 41 to be exact, comes with the fourth edition of their free sampler Impulsive Compulsions featuring artists and sounds from within the embrace of the Perfect Pop Co-Op family. It is fair to say that its three predecessors left us and an increasingly great many basking in a rich array of sounds and flavours but No 4 might be the most eclectic and irresistible mix yet meaning to ignore it would be an act of great stupidity.

Formed in 2011 by members of The Tuesday Club; Dave Worm, The Beautiful Wolf and Andreas Vanderbraindrain for the sole purpose of releasing their own music, Perfect Pop Co-Op has grown and stretched its reach to, as mentioned earlier, bring a great many other artists into the family; they regularly featured on The Andreas and The Wolf Radio Show, the in house monthly podcast, and teasing the imagination within the Impulsive Compulsions samplers.

The latest begins with Andreas and the Wolf and their track All I want is you. Its relatively calm entrance belies its pop punk instincts yet it is the melodic enterprise and drama from guitar and keys which enlists the imagination most firmly. The track is a ridiculously catchy affair, an aural romancing of ears and for us the most captivating offering from the band yet as the Sampler gets off to a potent start which continues with the mystic rock magnetism of Nashville hailing duo Hello Dearies. Like a shadow bound nursery rhyme All The Pretty Boys and Girls simply beguiled, its Wicker Man-esque spiced chant a tenebrific celebration and just delicious upon our musical palate.

Nine Day Decline is a newcomer to these ears but swiftly through their contribution to the sampler had us rushing to their social media profiles to learn more. With the likes of Altered States, Dead Heaven, Complicity, Christian Death, Counting the Mad, F.O.C., Section 3 and more in their histories, the British trio cast a goth clad post punk tempest as atmospheric as it is emotive. Decisions is a haunting slice of sonic dissonance, its raw melodic drone and impassioned breath akin to a mix of Play Dead, Sisters Of Mercy, and London After Midnight but openly unique to the London based outfit.

Inadequacy (day 197) is the track from sampler regular Reverse Family, an electro spattered piece of DIY enticement from the solo project of Dermot Illogical and a piece of soul searching reflection with its own sneaky swing while Dislocated Flowers immediately after wraps its psychedelic seduction around ears and imagination with Orange Roses and Yellow Tulips. Both tracks quickly and easily got under the skin being rapidly joined by The Scratch through their punk nurtured power pop rocker No two castles are the same. Taken from their excellent last album, Great Adventure, the song infested and resonated beyond its stay; always a sign of something rather tasty.

Equally flavoursome and a spark to greed is 50ft Woman and Psychic Hygiene. From its initial sonic squeal a devious swing erupts, the just as guileful tones of Minki riding its infectious pop punk ‘n’ roll sway. The track is another which leaves on-going tendrils of flirtation igniting continual companionship before She Made Me Do It ensured they get their chunk of the passions through their track, Fun and Games. The union of Shaheena Dax (Rachel Stamp) and Will Crewdson (Rachel Stamp, Adam Ant, Scant Regard) is one of our favourite propositions to erupt from speakers and their latest song is pure alt-pop manna, a virulent contagion defeating any ill wished cure.

One of the biggest traits of these samplers is that we have yet to come across anything which merely satisfied, no fillers ever on offer and the fourth is no different as it continues with GLUE from The Dodo, a keenly catchy post punk/punk rock stroll with a definite Swell Maps tinge and heart to it, and straight after Night of the Wild Mind courtesy of Suicide Tapes. A quartet from Ware in the UK, the band similarly has post punk instincts to a goth rock heart and upon a contagion of rhythms weave a magnet of a track which had us hungry for more. Originally formed in 1983, the band reformed a short while back and are raising a stir, no surprise with tracks like this Flesh For Lulu scented incitement.

The Tuesday Club and Venus Overload bring this particular treat to a close. The first gives us a live slice of fan favourite Lady Gargar, a track revelling in all the mischief, imagination, and uniqueness which fuels the band and its rare fusion of punk, indie and the creative devilment which shapes the best rock ‘n’ roll. The latter of the two provides Afghanistan Bananastand, a ravening dance of garage and psych rock intimation which had hips and feet as keenly engaged as ears and imagination.

That is Impulsive Compulsions 4, a release which had us basking in great sounds, fresh adventures, and new explorations of artists which like those before them deserve proper attention. The fun involved was just icing on the cake.

Check out the latest and past editions of In The Club Magazine @ https://perfectpopco-op.co.uk/magazine/  and further releases from within Perfect Pop Co-Op @ https://theperfectpopco-op.bandcamp.com/

Pete RingMaster 31/10/2019

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