Born to Burn – Welcome To Reality

btb_album_2016_RingMasterReview

Savaging the ills of the world we live in as well as the senses, French antagonists Born to Burn have just released their debut album, an encounter which challenges and impresses in equal measure. Welcome To Reality is eleven raging trespasses born from a fusion of 90’s hardcore and various metal bred influences. It is also a persistence of aggression and animosity bound in a sound which weaves familiar textures into the band’s imaginative invention in an encounter which only and increasingly grabs attention and an eager appetite for its ferocious presence.

Formed in 2013, the Tours hailing quintet release their first demo the following year, which with their intensive live shows soon placed Born To Burn as one of the vital ingredients in the local metal/hardcore scene. Linking up with Dooweet Agency earlier this year for its release, the band have just unleashed Welcome To Reality to further their presence and reputation across their homeland and into wider shores. Such the raw power and creative tenacity of the album alone, it is hard to see the band failing to ignite wider and keener interest in a sound which rampages through ears while despoiling and exciting the senses with extreme bearish irritability.

The album opens up with Welcome and waves of warning sirens, their portentous calls sending clues to the threat to follow. All the time building in intensity and drama, the track eventually breaks into a predacious prowl with its instrumental intrigue and danger leading the listener into the waiting trap of Who Are You. Initially the song carries on with the restrained but imposing nature of its predecessor but eventually uncages its muscular venomous intent while still continuing to stalk the senses and imagination. With open distrust and ire in the imposing presence of the great vocal growl, a character matched by riff and rhythm, the track invades and persuades with an easy to embrace potency; winding sonic enterprise and toxic grooves a delicious topping.

btb-wtr-front_RingMasterReviewHammer quickly takes over and soon reveals a bolder tempestuousness and urgency in its attack as thrash scented riffs collude with rhythmic spite whilst vocal and lyrical causticity bears down on thoughts. As bullish and adversarial as it is, there is a swing to its gait and catchiness to its design which makes the punishment so easy to devour whilst revealing more of the swiftly showing invention in the Born To Burn songwriting and imagination.

Its inescapable qualities are matched by those of the blunt force trauma that is Seven, a track punching and jabbing its way with raw brutality but exposing subsequent wounds to another array of invasive but captivating twists and turns. The guitars spin a web of melodic and sonic adventure throughout, never diminishing the force of the attack but giving it additional striking appeal before Finish Him offers its own predatory sonic conflict with a rhythmic violation of scything beats and bestial bass which almost single handed ensures a greedy appetite. With threat loaded vocals and biting riffs bound in the inventive tartness of the guitars adding to the rancor, the track is irresistible as too successor The Shield which from its opening darkly alluring bassline just increases the enslaving enticement layer by imaginative layer.

Through the acrimoniously infectious storm of Pigs, with its more classic heavy metal spicing, and the rapacious tapestry of Warm Up, the album only tightens its grip on ears and appetite. The second of the two is an unpredictable and eventful fusion of punk and alternative metal wound in fiery grooves and dirt encrusted vocal harmonies. It is constantly evolving and exploring dark shadows and boisterous ideation before Dark Walk and its shamanic quarrel envelops the senses to relentlessly bewitch and bruise. All the time though it’s hardcore heart is blossoming, subsequently taken control and driving the still relentlessly contagious tempest.

Welcome To Reality is concluded by firstly Loud, another creative predator at ease prowling or savaging the listener and lastly Mars which entangles ears in blissfully corrosive grooves from its opening breath and only proceeds to turn that pleasure more lustful with every passing adventurous incursion.

The way the album is set up, with each subsequent song it becomes bolder and more inventive, in turn unique with the potential of greater things to come just as open. Born to Burn has something different about them which is already marking them out as a very promising proposition but once further realised there could be no stopping them becoming a major violation and treat on the senses.

Welcome To Reality is out now across most online stores.

https://www.facebook.com/btoburn

Pete RingMaster 23/11/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

WEAK13 – They Live

photography-by-squishflash-images

photography-by-squishflash-images

WEAK13 is a band which demands attention; through their in your face DIY attitude and a creative attack driving a sound, which in the shape of their first album, is most likely to have you rocking like a dog before a bitch in heat. Three years in the making, They Live is a prime slab of the British band’s raw and rousing rock ‘n’ roll, a lyrical and physical confrontation which takes no prisoners while confirming the Kidderminster trio as one of the most striking and creatively honest outfits within the UK underground scene.

Founded in 1999 by vocalist/guitarist/songwriter Nick J. Townsend, WEAK13 has been a constant nagging of the establishment, world and musical, backed by a multi-flavoured brew of sound as aggressively punk as it is dirtily grungy and uncompromisingly rock ‘n’ roll. With the current line-up of bassist Wesley Smith, drummer Neel Parmar, and Townsend together from 2010, WEAK13 has constantly stirred things up and continue to with a first album which infests body and spirit.

Produced by John Stewart (Eight Great Fears) and mastered by Henry Smithson (Foo Fighters, 2 Unlimited, Stereophonics), They Live opens up with the irritable My Last Summer With You, a track which seems to have a distinct crabbiness running through its creative veins. As riffs and rhythms assault and pound as Townsend plaintively roars, the song makes for a potent and steady start to the album. Things swiftly kick up a gear though as Down On Me quickly begins the trend of inescapable hooks and anthemic rhythms which continue to blossom across the album. In no time Parmar’s beats and Smith’s cantankerous basslines grip ears and appetite, being more than matched by the rebellious air of riffs and Townsend’s magnetic vocal presence; a combination creating a gripping slice of punk ‘n’ roll.

Its success is more than matched by that of Joke, the song sharing its own web of imaginative wiry hooks and grouchy riffs aligned to another great crotchety rhythmic incitement. Breeding further inventive enterprise and rousing twists, the track is pure addictive manna for a rock ‘n’ roll heart which like its predecessor lingers and returns in thought whenever it wishes.

weak13art_RingMasterReviewThe equally outstanding Sex Pest is more of the same temptation, casting its own individual creative baiting of ears and attention with a prowling stance and a character carrying a touch of Amen to itself. The predacious air of the song in word and music is as infectious as the instinctive twists and turns spun by Townsend’s songwriting and the threesome’s prowess at wringing every last tempting ill-tempered note and slap from their creative weapons. Closing with Nirvana-esque calm before a final rousing roar, the track makes way for the melodically spun Ashes In Autumn, a track just as much of a raw snarl as anything before it but showing the warmer if still invasive musical hues the band also has in its arsenal.

By now it is fair to say that band and album are in full compelling flow, the ‘poppier’ exploits of Closure coming next with its grunge spiced infectiousness to again engage and inflame an already eager appetite for the release while its successor Cameras Are Everywhere soon surrounds and trespasses the listener with its cyber toned touches and predatory manner within a more restrained stroll. Both tracks reveal more of the great variety shaping the album and the WEAK13 sound with the rhythmic imagination and virulence of Smith and Parmar as addictively riveting as the invention escaping Townsend’s throat and sonic endeavour.

The song is yet another highlight of They Live swiftly backed by the infectious quarrel of Here Come The Drones but subsequently eclipsed by the mighty persuasion of The Happiest Undertaker. The first of the pair swings and growls from the start, only increasing in potency with every passing magnetic minute while the second, strolls along with a knowing swagger which alone ensures increasingly eager ears. Fuller participation is drawn by another chorus which just lures vocal chords as rhythms take care of boisterous hips and neck muscles. Another track which seems to just become creatively broader, physically heavier, and more predatory through its bold body, it just whips up thicker pleasure in the album.

It is a pleasure which is only ignited again by the melodically bewitching, infection carrying Loyal Coward. With acoustic guitar and great harmonies arm in arm with tenacious rhythms and a bass tone bordering on bestial against the funk enterprise of the guitars, the track is sheer magnetism.

They Live closes with the fractious might and invention of Obey The Slave, the song as much of a brawl as a calling for ears and emotion, and a great end to one stirring and increasingly impressing encounter. The album shows that WEAK13 have no qualm about going for the jugular in attitude and sound yet breed something which is as catchy and galvanic as you could wish for; a release very easy to recommend.

They Live is out now and available only through http://weak13official.com/

https://www.facebook.com/weak13fanpage/

https://twitter.com/weak13

Pete RingMaster22/11/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

The Simpletone – Angels’ Share

the-simpletone-band-pic_RingMasterReview

There are some releases which just demand success. Whether they get it in the increasingly fickle attention of the modern music fan is never a given but Angels’ Share, the new album from British rockers The Simpletone, does all the right things to make that commanding statement.

There is little we can share about the 2010 formed band other than its line-up is made up of John Davison, Craig Seymour, Glenn Eastoe, and Tom Cahill, it hails from St Neots in Cambridgshire, and has previously released the albums, Rampenny in 2012 and Dark Matter two years later, both seemingly well-received propositions. A UK tour with New Model Army in 2014 has been one of many live highlights for the band built on their stirring fusion of heavy and melodic rock with grunge, stoner and numerous other essences. It is a mix of flavours making for a striking proposition and imaginative proposal in Angels’ Share and songs which just roar with anthemic majesty and fiery enterprise.

The first of the ten cuts gripping ears and an early appetite for the band’s invigorating rock ‘n’ roll is Outta Control. Instantly a spicy groove winds around ears, leaning in closer as tenacious rhythms and riffs join its opening bait. Effect coated vocals equally lures keen ears as the song swaggers along with steady but rapacious grooves and a suggestive melody. The restraint stopping the track from exploding as it hints it might throughout is an inspired move, the song teasing and almost taunting along its enterprise shaped body. The heavier throb of bass and flames of harmonies only add to the lure of the song with guitar craft similarly as magnetic.

The following Love Street (Modern Mystery) keeps the rich enticement going with its punk folk lined stroll, simple but potent riffs colluding with swinging beats as vocals paint a suggestive picture. Its catchiness is a swift persuasion rapidly backed by the boisterous antics of the guitars as the track carries on the great variety already showing in the band’s sound, diversity more than confirmed by their mighty new single Storm Chaser. At over eleven minutes it is an epic persuasion which serenades the senses with melodic and harmonic caresses initially before building a bolder energy amidst an addictive rhythmic prowess. Weaving strands of space and progressive rock among other textures into its ever evolving adventure, the song is a kaleidoscope of melody heavy rock drawing on an array of decades while creating its own fresh, individual, and ever changing landscape of imagination. Like a mix of Skyscraper (the nineties UK band), Life of Agony, and Voyager, the track barely feels like its length and relentlessly has the listener compelled.

angels-share-cover_RingMasterReviewThe fact that next up Black Box still manages to eclipse it slightly shows the quality of its own exceptional design. A spirit stoking beast from its first touch, the song canters with muscular tenacity and fiery invention bred to virulent proportions as its mix of hard and heavy rock consumes ears and imagination. The track is exceptional, as punk in many ways as it is feisty rock ‘n’ roll with a drama of character and craft that demands attention and involvement.

Fire in the Sky steps up next with a growl in its basslines and a contagious swing in its rhythms, guitars and vocals dancing within their addictive tempting as soulful blues lined grooves bring an incendiary heat to the proposal. Like a seventies inspired union of Therapy? and Reuben, to try and offer a comparison, the song forcibly hits the spot before making way for the slower stoner-esque prowl of Nehemiah, an incitement pulling sludgy textures into its increasingly exotic and suggestive theatre. It is seriously compelling stuff, another song blossoming through an array of twists and flavours as it grows in ears.

The melodic charm of Day by Day is a similarly riveting proposition, the graceful yet sinewy instrumental finding a place between XTC and Tool as it seduces the imagination, setting it up for electrified air and nature of As Above so Below. Courting ears with a rapaciously formidable core in its raw riffs and bold rhythmic, the track wraps it in a melodic spiciness and mellower harmonic seducing which echoes elements of bands like Bush, Alice In Chains, and Sick Puppies yet sounds little like any.

If we tell you that Easy Come lacks the same galvanic sparks of its predecessors do not mistake it for a weak link within Angels’ Share; the song a highly persuasive slice of rock ‘n’ roll with guitar craft which shines like a beacon as the bass uncages a funk inspired personality. The fact the track is outshone by others is down to their might, a strength revelled in again by album closer Hunters. Whether by coincidence or design, there is a Horslips feel to the song certainly early on, and of fellow Brits KingBathmat but as across the album, things are soon woven into an addiction of sound and creative hooks roaring The Simpletone.

It is a glorious end to one treat of a release which deserves all the praise and attention it should and surely will get. Angels’ Share is another rousing encounter to add to our lustful favourites of 2016 list and no keener a recommendation we can offer.

Angels’ Share is out now across most online stores and on iTunes @ https://itunes.apple.com/album/id1169473074?ls=1&app=itunes

http://www.thesimpletone.com/    https://www.facebook.com/thesimpletoneband/

Pete RingMaster 16/11/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Suicidal Tendencies – World Gone Mad

suicidal_tendencies_-_world_gone_madSuicidal Tendencies - World Gone Mad

Many elements make up the success of legendary punk/thrashers Suicidal Tendencies, an array of qualities which has gripped and thrilled across three and a half decades and eleven previous studio albums. One potent trait is, within a sound which roars Suicidal Tendencies from its first breath, unpredictability; an essence which in varying degrees has made all of the band’s offerings memorable and easy to devour. New proposal World Gone Mad is no exception; a seriously rousing and thunderous affair of crossover ferocity inescapably Suicidal Tendencies which twists through new adventures while flirting with the imagination.

The successor to the well-received 13 of three years ago, World Gone Mad is a tempest of infectiously aggressive and creatively imaginative escapades equally drawing on the kind of punk fuelled exploits which marked out the band from its early days as one of metal and punks most vital propositions.  The new album also sees the band’s newest line-up in place with founder and vocalist Mike Muir and guitarist Dean Pleasants (ex-Infectious Grooves) linking up with guitarist Jeff Pogan, bassist Ra Diaz, and master drummer Dave Lombardo (Slayer, Phantomas, GripInc, Dead Cross). It is a unit which across the board has forged a new aspect to the Suicidal Tendencies personality without losing its prime character and appeal. Produced by Muir alongside Paul Northfield (Rush, Dream Theater, Queensrÿche, Ozzy Osbourne, Hole, Marilyn Manson) who also engineered and mixed the record, World Gone Mad snarls and stomps, providing an incitement as bruising and confrontational as it is a riotous funk grooved infestation of ears and body.

Latest single Clap Like Ozzy sets things off; its fuse and explosion prime Suicidal Tendencies. Lombardo’s catchy beats first catch ears, a grumbling bassline quickly adding to the thick coaxing as guitars send sonic scythes across the lure. Swiftly the song uncages a venomous yet ridiculously catchy assault, wiry grooves and rhythmic tenacity an anthemic roar of punk ‘n’ thrash virulence ridden by the unmistakable presence and tones of Muir. As hooks collude with the flirtatious antics of the bass, Pleasants winds trails of melodic lava around it all, his strings a heated siren within an already irresistible calling.

The New Degeneration takes over finding even more irritability in its tone and individual elements. Riffs and rhythms almost stalk the senses as Muir leads the defiance; group calls a great backing to his instigation. An undercurrent of animosity brews throughout the attack, eventually igniting as Lombardo flicks the switch to a full-out ravaging of ears with his magnetic swipes. Again the track is ‘typical’ Suicidal Tendencies but rippling with fresh twists and turns to leave satisfaction rich and full before Living For Life appears to eclipse its success. Unsurprisingly moments of Infectious Grooves like juiciness appear within World Gone Mad, the third track unapologetically embracing their funk metal swing for its initial flirtation before crashing ferociously upon the senses with its punk scented epidemic of ravenous riffs and on rushing rhythms again led by the twisted beat alchemy of Lombardo. The track is glorious everything you could wish from a Suicidal Tendencies encounter and more as it seduces and inspires body and spirit

The gentle melodic opening of Get Your Fight On! is a suggestive pull next which intrigues more than ignites the imagination but soon leads into the waiting rhythmic prowess of Lombardo and the sonic enterprise of Pleasants and Pogan. It too works its way from a relatively calm tempting to an incendiary blaze where it really grabs the appetite and passions as heavy metal flames unite with punk and thrash dexterity for an anthem which might not hold all the sparks of its predecessors but leaves only an eager want to delve into its cauldron all over again.

The album’s title track is another which takes its time to convince to the same level as the opening tracks, showing itself a slow burner which by the fifth or sixth lessons is one of the moments of the album which lingers the longest. A perpetual prowl which ignites onto a consuming fire of sound and aggression, the song has a touch of Insane Clown Posse to its most intense fire and Red Hot Chili Peppers to its relentless groove but as expected roars with nothing other than the voice of its creators.

The excellent Happy Never After fingers lustful reactions next, its gait also a prowling incitement crossed with sonic tendrils and pushed by steely riffs courting militant beats. Muir is the ringmaster to its determined intent and nature, whipping up the heart and imagination of track and listener alike as the rest of the band spins a riveting and increasingly addictive web.

From one major highlight to another as One Finger Salute stands bold and aggressive with punk rock insatiability and thrash driven intensity straight after to create a deliciously imposing and hungry proposal. Diaz’s bass is a treat of a bestial lure, its resonating flirtation aligned to the jumping beats of Lombardo, both enslaving attention soon bound in the sonic potency of the guitars.

Straight after Damage Control is a threatening infestation of wonderfully toxic and gripping grooves as rhythms again take on a preying animalistic potency whilst Muir and riffs stir with their punk ‘n’ roll cattiness. The outstanding track keeps the album’s pinnacle point going in feverish style, bass and drums especially irresistible though all parts of the incitement leaves a new hunger installed in ears and appetite for the release.

The sonic metal tapestry of The Struggle Is Real equally sparks a zeal for song and album, its punk call and rhythmic swagger a captivating irritant on peace and clam while successor Still Dying To Live sees the quintet embarking on a smouldering melodic venture equipped with alluring throaty bass tempting and psych rock shimmers around the warm coaxing of a kaleidoscope of magnetic hooks and surprises. At over seven minutes, the track is a masterfully invasive seduction romancing ears and imagination and a compelling finale to World Gone Mad capped by the stripped down magnificence of This World and its evolution and continuation of the closing track of the same name upon 13.

The track is a fine end epitomising the growth and riveting blossoming of sound and imagination between the two albums seeing World Gone Mad a powerful and thrilling new turn in the band’s history.  Whether it will be considered the band’s best release will down to the individual but without doubt the album is destined to be right there as a true favourite.

World Gone Mad is out now across most online stores through Suicidal Records.

http://www.suicidaltendencies.eu/   https://www.facebook.com/suicidaltendencies   https://twitter.com/OFFICIALSTIG

Pete RingMaster 15/11/2106

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Thirteen Shots – Self Titled

13 Shots_RingMasterReview

Though the band is no longer active, the hunger and want for Thirteen Shots continues to be vocal. The new release of a self-titled compilation album is a dose of their raw and voracious horror punk sure to be devoured and earn many more belated fans as it treats ears to the best of the band as a free proposal. Bringing together fifteen tracks spanning the band’s releases, one previously unreleased track, and an irresistible live take of the band’s mighty track Graveyard Stomp, the album is an offer no fan or horror punk loving newcomer to the British outfit should and will be able to resist.

Formed by the now Hamburg, Germany residing Johnny Rose and featuring Lewis Manchip, George Chick, Joe Dempster, Chelsea McCammon, and Tom Fenn in its line-ups, the Birmingham hailing Thirteen Shots unleashed a distinct and rousing form of rock ‘n’ roll as seeded in sixties garage rock and blues as horror punk itself. From debut album Vaudeville of 2012, through subsequent releases such as Tales That Start With A Whisper the following year, the 2014 White Noise EP, and their final outing through second album Black Smiles last year Thirteen Shots pushed their boundaries and expanded their sound without losing the incisive rough diamond roar which marked them out from day one. The new compilation brings it all into one thrilling place; all together for one final stomp.

First track is the fiery rock ‘n’ roll of Cobradeer, an encounter which flies from the traps, drops into a predacious prowl before bursting into a rush of fiercely slapping rhythms and ferocious riffs led by the distinct vocals of Rose. It provided a rousing introduction to Black Smiles originally and makes the same attention grabbing impact here before passing ears over to the flesh dropping infections of band classic Zombies From The USSR. Cored by a delicious Caped Crusader like hook, the track expels raptorial grooves and vocal incitement in a battle cry/warning rising up against undead hordes which just gets under the skin and into the psyche.

cover_RingMasterReviewThe variety in the band’s sound has been an open book and illustrated in the garage blues blaze of Nekrosexual and the following drama of Bewitched as well as across the album. The first is a scuzzy roar while the second again uncovering a hook which just fits an eager appetite, uncages predatory basslines and irritable riffs as Rose scowls in the colourful horror punk confines of the excellent encounter.

Within the Thirteen Shots catalogue numerous tracks were like beacons to their presence and sound, arguably the most tempting being Danzig. A tribute to the obvious, the song is a swinging punk brawl wearing its influence clearly but casting is own horror punk ‘n’ roll character with more hooks and temptations than a stripper at a fishing convention.

Punk rock in varying degrees is also an ever present in the band’s sound, Get In My Crypt for example simply fuelled by it in its virulent charge wrapped in metallic flames while other songs like Night Of Sin infuses it into their own individual imaginations, it a liquor soaked blues rock proposal with searing grooves and restrained but heavy rhythms. The outstanding Dead Girls Don’t Scream takes the vital essence into a psychobilly spiced romp, like Misfits meets Resurex while wearing a New York Dolls t-shirt. It is also another of those songs which the band is particularly memorable and noted for, a rock ‘n’ roll stomp to get lustful over.

Through the writhing blues grooved Padded Cell Blues, the scuzzy heavy metal Sabbath-esque riff loaded crawl of Doom, and the severely infectious rockabilly lined stroll of First American Sweetheart, the album does what all good compilations should do; reveal and celebrate the depth and invention of its focus. The last of the trio especially whips up the spirit with its hard rock grooves and garage punk contagion offering something akin to Turbonegro meets The Heartbreakers.

Grooves are equally a major tempting within next up Tales That Start With A Whisper, twisting within ears with salacious intent as the track shares classic/glam rock misbehaviour equipped with the spiciest hooks before Black Eyed Girl enters with a flirtatious and slightly sinister prowl like a dark dusted feline seductress swinging melodic hips to blues bred flames.

There have been a few songs from the band too which have blossomed to greater heights over listens rather than with an instantaneous convincing; the raw shuffle of Black Smiles being one which proves its point perfectly amongst its companions on the album though gaining its first ever outing here, Creak’n The Coffin needs little time to grab ears and the passions. A contagious punk driven slab of rock ‘n’ roll, it stomps and roars with all the flavours the band has consistently shown itself so adept at weaving into their raucous proposals.

The album is completed by the sultry blood red romance of Lost Soul with its mariachi laced smoulder and finally that stomping live roar of Graveyard Stomp, which while drawing eager participation, reminds us what we are all missing from the band at each and every venue they graced.

There are certainly tracks we would have added to the album, This Looks Like A Job For Batman for one, but Thirteen Shots is undoubtedly the life and creative voice of the band to a tee and a certain must for all punk ‘n’ roll fans. Go check it out and grab a rare and free treat @ http://thirteenshots.bandcamp.com/ with a possible very ltd edition CD possible if demand is high and similarly a final UK tour from the band if they are wanted; so go tell them @ https://www.facebook.com/thirteenshotsband

Thirteen Shots is also available for FREE from Google Play and available to stream from Spotify and Deezer from Undead Artists.

Pete RingMaster 09/11/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Skinny Girl Diet – Heavy Flow

SGD_RingMasterReview

Raw and defiant, unashamedly honest and forthright, British trio Skinny Girl Diet have a sound and heart bred attitude which refuses to pull its punches or tow the party line lyrically or musically. It is a combination which roars with anger and informs with uncompromising zeal and now fuels a debut album which just demands attention. Heavy Flow is a punk infused slab of grunge confrontation as lo-fi and rapacious as it is often melodically engaging and masterfully seductive; an incitement for ear and thought which perpetually hits the spot.

Consisting of sisters Delilah and Ursula Holliday, vocals/guitar and drums respectively, and their bassist cousin Amelia Cutler, London hailing Skinny Girl Diet has increasingly been talked about and covered over past years with Heavy Flow according to the band “a body of 6 years of work”, adding “it’s basically us as a band in its entirety.”

From it’s in the face cover featuring the ladies clad in white dresses inflamed by the natural showing of periods, Heavy Flow invades the senses with assertive pride and confrontation. Its songs are emotionally intensive flying in the face of suppressive attitudes towards women and numerous other injustices shaping the world.  It is a roar of frustration and uncaged ire which stirs up air and emotions from its first breath.

Opener Comedown Intro is a sonic entanglement of solemn nicely caustic guitar alongside an alignment of a pulsating bassline and crisp beats courted by enticing harmonies. Its relatively brief coaxing leads the ears towards the awaiting antagonism of Yeti, the band’s recent single. With a tinge of The Distillers meets Babes In Toyland to it, the track rumbles and grumbles on the ear while encasing it in sonic toxicity and vocal dispute as feverish twists add to the rousing melee.

cover_RingMasterReviewIt is an outstanding full start matched by the musically more even tempered Okay. Instantly catchy with its low key but virulent stroll, the song soon brews up a tempestuous climate around the increasingly engaging tones of Delilah, further switching and embracing the contrasts across its forceful endeavour. As its predecessor and those to come, the track is a lyrical poke which makes you stand back and think even as the imagination is eagerly accosted and beguiled by its twists and turns.

The scuzzy touch of next up Lazy Eye is impressively tempered by vocal harmonies which manage to snarl and seduce simultaneously while Eyes That Paralyse is an invasive rock ‘n’ roll grievance deceptively and cantankerously anthemic. The first of the two unites the rasping prowess and causticity of guitar with a kinder caress of vocal and melodic provocation, the second the raw emotion of voice and sound to an abrasive smoulder, both further igniting ears and an already lively appetite for the release.

Already noticeable is the imaginative structure and enterprise of the band’s songs within their ever scathing provocations, next up Bored the most bold yet with its wandering bass twang and sonic espionage around the primal beats of Ursula and Delilah’s standoffish vocal trespass. The song is a riveting tapestry of multi-flavoured adventure, as punk as it is grunge and noise rock seeded as it taps into another exciting aspect to the band’s songwriting and imagination before the corrosive punk ‘n’ roll of Wolf Pack just preys on the senses.

Another pinnacle within the loft heights of Heavy Flow is forged by the acerbically grooved and voiced Silver Spoons, the track a fuzz ball of emotionally trenchant, sonically bracing discord which just sparks within ears. Its unpolished beauty is contrasted by the warm clarity bringing successor Fix Me into view, its mellow calm breeding a Breeders toned predation subsequently bringing stronger turbulence to the song’s captivating atmosphere.

Through the venomously contumacious Pretty Song and the punk familiarity of DMT, Skinny Girl Diet reinforce their command of ears and a hunger for more, the second of the two arguably the album’s least unique track with its Hole/L7 like swing but as addictive as anything involved in the success of Heavy Flow.

The biting shimmer and growl of Forget equally stirs the passions with a far more inventive design soon taken further within the stormy majesty of Wasted Smile, a track which baits the senses with melodic and emotive elegance and within the flicker of a twist unleashes a blaze of sonic and rhythmic raging upon them.  It is a superb end to the album with Comedown Outro providing a melodically raw epilogue which only urges a need to press play all over again.

Heavy Flow impresses on first listen but truly grows and inspires with further investigations. It might not be declared the best album of 2016, though it just might too with a great many, but Skinny Girl Diet has provided one of the more important propositions to be embraced.

Heavy Flow is released November 4th; self-released in the UK and through HHBTM Records in the US.

https://www.facebook.com/skinnygirldiet/   http://skinnygirldietband.tumblr.com/   https://twitter.com/skinnygirldiett/

Pete RingMaster 03/11/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Art Of Burning Water – Between Life And Nowhere

cover_RingMasterReview

It is fair to say that any proposition from Art Of Burning Water is not for the faint hearted or anyone looking for melodic refuge. The trio’s sound though, and indeed new album Between Life And Nowhere, is something that a passion for ruthless noise with a penchant for violent infectiousness should and will eagerly embrace.

The London based threesome of drummer Mike, guitarist/vocalist Grief, and bassist Kunal create hardcore sandstorms of sonic intolerance and rhythmic barbarity; twisted punk ravages which are as pestilential as any plague but built on grievous grooves and piercing hooks ridden by the rawest of throat ripping vocal squalls. It is a trespass which has fuelled a host of releases from the band since 2003 and provided one half of an impressive split 7” with Nervous Mothers earlier this year. True to say, the band’s sound may have alienated as many as it has befriended but those hooked on their creative hostility come with zeal many bands would pay for.

A fury of ten songs over twenty minutes, Between Life And Nowhere has no times for niceties and flies at the senses from its first breath. A sonic lance and sample triggers Rambo Survival Techniques into life, the guitar an intrusive wave of sound backed by the thumping beats of Mike and Kunal’s grievous bassline. With Grief’s flesh wilting vocal spite soon infesting all, the track grumbles and rumbles like a bear with toothache, searing the senses whilst teasing them with an underlying catchiness which in turn lines the even more hellacious heart of Prime Example Of A Lonely Child. The track ebbs and flows in its intensity, never releasing ears from a sonic abuse but taunting the imagination with its primal instincts and another sampled incursion as spicy grooves and hungry riffs join in cantankerous intent.

The excellent Barbara O’Reilly comes in on the final sonic twine of its predecessor; swiftly uncorking its caustic toxicity with a punishing persuasion before the twenty odd seconds of You simply erupts in primal cancer upon the listener which in turn is followed by the less nasty but just as intrusive adventure of To Be Brave. With swinging beats linking up with a growling brooding bassline, the song makes a calmer entrance, the guitar teasing and inviting before the full tempest of emotion and rage at the track’s heart ruptures into its virulent sound. Twisting from raucous hostility to predacious stalking across its irritable body, the song quickly hits the sweet spot.

The acerbic melodic nature of Voivodian Solutions To Die Kreuzian Problems just as rapidly ignites ear though any kinder essences are lined with their own venom and soon involved with unbridled rancor as shown again within the infectiously woven drama of Alesha and the scathing rapacity of Prone To Bouts Of Hopelessness. The first of the two entices and brutalises with every harsh rhythm and heavy metal infused grooves, its punk ‘n’ roll almost welcoming but only to an awaiting destruction while its successor crawls over the senses with its poison on full show before savaging with full malevolent energy.

A handful of seconds is all that Baby Without Your Love has and needs to share its distorted enmity, leaving the quarrelsome and increasingly violent punk ‘n’ roll of Kindness Is Strength to bring the album to a fine and feverish close.

As suggested earlier, Between Life And Nowhere is not going to find a home in everyone’s ears, something it and the underrated Art Of Burning Water seem to revel in. Both offer punk/hardcore which leaves the kind of scars which sorts the men from the boys and both deserve a portion of your flesh and attention.

Between Life And Nowhere is out now via Bigout (France), Sleeping Giant Glossolalia (USA), and SuperFi (UK) and available @ https://artofburningwater.bandcamp.com/album/between-life-and-nowhere

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Pete RingMaster 21/01/2016

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