Cléo – Pinball Machine

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A song which leaps through ears with all the energy and excitement of a carnival, Pinball Machine is one of those singles which simply gets under the skin. The new release from rock popper Cléo, the track with its tenacious punk like character and full on fun attitude is not necessarily a brand new adventure for the pop world but certainly makes for an enjoyable and captivating escapade.

Cléo is a Brazilian bred singer/songwriter/ actress/dancer who now resides in London. The list of inspirations on her creativity and music is long and includes the likes of Madonna, Cyndi Lauper, No Doubt, Pat Benatar, Britney Spears, Spice Girls, Green Day, Foo Fighters, and Linkin Park. These are flavours at times openly colouring her shapely sound but equally, and certainly with Pinball Machine, Cléo has her own rich vein of distinctive creativity lighting up her music too. 2013 saw the release of the extremely well-received Unlucky Girl EP, an encounter converting more fans, media, and pre-assuming critics to the visually and aurally vibrant presence of Cléo. Now Pinball Machine is poised to stir up ears and attention once again and such its charismatic and mischievous enterprise, it is hard to imagine it luring a new rush of interest.

Cléo is the initial temptation in the single, her raucous call the spark to short choppy riffs, jabbing beats, and a thickly provocative bassline. It is a potent coaxing with a great almost predatory nature to it, an edge leading ears and appetite into the swiftly looming frisky chorus where harmony soaked vocals and melodies bounce with energetic eagerness.

As it continues to flirt with its more shadowy side as well as magnetic festivity there is that constant, almost Gwen Stefani like, familiarity to the song yet tempering that, Pinball Machine offers subtle twists of attitude and latent aggression which turns the offering into something personal and invitingly individual to Cléo. Quite simply Pinball Machine is a persistently alluring proposition from a lady we can expect to hear much more of in the future.

Pinball Machine is available now @ https://itunes.apple.com/gb/album/pinball-machine-single/id959356901#

http://www.cleospage.com/

RingMaster 01/03/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://reputationradio.yooco.org/

 

 

Fashion Week – Prêt-à-Porter

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US noise breeders Fashion Week have a sound which is as scathing as it is caustic yet treats the listener like a king with regal melodies and provocative nuances within the ferocious encounters they call songs. As proven by new album Prêt-à-Porter, it is a striking and intimidating proposition but one that ears and emotions, certainly with the band’s fresh provocation, find hard to get enough of. The NYC trio prey on the senses, torment the psyche, and persistently inflame the imagination, whilst through Prêt-à-Porter provide one of the year’s most compelling releases so far.

Fashion Week consists of guitarist/vocalist Josh Lozano (Inswarm, Jarboe, Cobalt, Family), drummer Carl Eklof (Victory at Sea, Lidia Stone, Inswarm), and bassist Oscar Albis Rodriguez (A Great Big World, No Way, Nakatomi Plaza), and began its sonic explorations, if you go by the band’s bio, supposedly around the late 1980s. Three albums have been tucked under the band’s belts, though we can only find evidence beyond their words of the excellent EPs, Applicator (2011) and Coextinction #11 (2013), whilst and similarly again according to their bio, 1994 saw the death of Lozano, though this tragedy has been apparently followed by his ghost ripping up sounds and invention in bands like Family and Inswarm. There is a ripe confusion and humour to the band which certainly in the case of the latter, spreads to the music in many ways and adds to the fun of digging and exploring deep into debut album Prêt-à-Porter to reap all their inventive twists which come with the choicest rewards.

Opener Fendi Bender instantly treats ears to a sonic smooch before expelling a flavoursome blast of agitated rhythms and spicy riffs aligned to a delicious growl of a bass presence. A respite is in place as the clean tones of Lozano open up the lyrical narrative over those still highly tempting beats, a moment carrying a definite Nirvana-esque whiff to it. It is soon immersed in a wall of sonic hostility and vocal ferocity but gains a foothold again as the raw wave ebbs back readying itself for another intensive return. It is a captivating slice of diversely flavoured noise rock which swiftly has ears and appetite enlisted in the album’s potential and soon to be revealed addictive adventure.

Chorusace is the first to reinforce and feed that promise; its vocal sufferance an angst driven squall over transfixing rhythms and seductive grooves, both courted by just as magnetic shards of Pret_a_Portersonic ingenuity. Thoughts of Converge and Melvins come to mind during the track’s brief tenure, but also suggestions of the inventiveness of bands such as At the Drive In and Coilguns. It is the same with the excellent Meek is Miznabble which follows, the song’s beats and sonic tenacity, a maelstrom of unpredictable and furiously agitated ideation, though it too embraces a calmer and more relaxed passage of clean vocals and winey grooving.

The slow enticing of Summer Line keeps the fire of album and enjoyment burning next. The carnivorous tone of the bass is a thick instigator of the song’s prowling gait and oppressive shadows whilst Lozano’s guitar winds melodically around them with seductive tendencies. Again the eye of the storm moments of the provocation has a Cobain and co spicing whilst the tempestuous roar and corrosive brawl of the track is all Fashion Week designing.

The swinging sticks of Eklof provide a contagious trap as Fur Free Friday leaps into ears next, his inventive enticing an infectious lead into the melodic intrigue and creative maze of the song. Its sinews and bellow is not far from the surface though, expelling ire and antagonism within the magnetic landscape of the outstanding encounter.

The piano led Klosstrophobia explores a web of sound straight after; post and noise rock colluding with elements of death and post hardcore for an enthralling and intensive examination of songwriting and listener. It takes time to fully reveal its strengths, casting a slower persuasion compared to other songs but finding powerful success ultimately, which is not quite the same for “FASHION”=~S/(\$)/COLLAPSE/GSO. A patchwork of vocal samples over a mist of sonic distortion, the track is more an intro to the closing Haute Topic, though if not meant that way its intent was missed by our understanding. It is ok but easy to pass over after a couple of runs of the album foiled by the urge to dive into the triumph of Haute Topic. Grunge, noise, and melodic escapades all twist around each other for a thrilling and explosive conclusion to the album. It is the pinnacle of the release, helped further by the incendiary mixes of vocal delivery, sonic styles, and simply warped imagination, and almost alone gives the reason why Fashion Week should be on the catwalk of your attention.

     Prêt-à-Porter is a treat which might take time to steal your ardour but eventually will become one of the year’s favourite events.

Prêt-à-Porter is available now digitally, Cd, and 12” vinyl via Solar Flare Records @ http://music.solarflarerds.com/album/pr-t-porter

https://www.facebook.com/FashionWeekBand

RingMaster 25/02/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @  http://www.thereputationlabel.today

 

LongFallBoots – Wait For The Echo

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Though not exactly psychotic or schizophrenic, Wait For The Echo, the debut album from UK scuzzers LongFallBoots, definitely has a certain deranged edge and tenacity to its sound and character which makes it one of the most fascinating and enjoyable releases to hit 2015 so far. Brewing up a sound from a maelstrom of noise and punk to stoner and psych rock, and that barely covers it all, the Warwickshire band create a fuzzy sonic smog which almost visually ripples with ideas and imagination within its caustic surface. That again is only half the picture as rhythmically, the album is one of the heaviest predatory treats you are likely to come up against in rock music this year. It all makes for an intriguing and thoroughly exciting proposition from a band which manages to actually offer something new.

LongFallBoots is the creation of friends Alex Caithness (KOSS, Cincinnati Bow Tie) and Ben Holdstock (Paralus, Cincinnati Bow Tie), and came about by accident when the rest of the line-up in the pair’s other band failed to turn up for a rehearsal. That moment in time was filled by the duo writing first EP It Was Duke and the birth of LongFallBoots. Since its release in August 2012, the band has released a further six EPs, the first five in a 12 month period whilst the last, Good At Television was written after the new album and recorded before its completion to ‘keep busy’ as the band managed the logistics of scheduling in and recording the full-length with the numerous guests which feature on Wait For The Echo. The album was written by and primarily recorded by Caithness and Ben Holdstock, though with extended contribution from live bassist Chris Childs, who has since left the band, and vocalist Amy Smith, who has subsequently replaced Childs on bass and additional vocals, and recorded the Good At Television EP with the band. Further guests on the album include Andi Chamberlain (Eagles Born Vultures), Claudio Aníbal (Ash Is A Robot), and Marc Shinner (Those Loathsome Fishmen/Devi Ever) amongst many. LongFallBoots like to work fast when it comes to writing and creating songs, a frenetic approach to their recordings which again applies to the album yet does not in any way corrupt the quality and energy of the release, in fact it probably goes some way to make it as intensively dynamic and gripping as it is.

That strength is immediately on show as opener Transmission stirs up ears and senses; the opening scuzz of guitar and slapping rhythms a raw and feisty coaxing catching the imagination with ease, especially as it broadens with rich melodies and mellow vocals. It is a potent mix which from an early strong position becomes a much more instinctive persuasion as the band’s vocals a2819673812_2fiercely roar and bellow from behind the more relaxed delivery of guest Jonathan Martin. The track continues to grip tighter as beats get more agitated in tandem with the general manner of the song, the returning sway of Martin’s gentle caresses seeming to gain extra impetus from this for the magnetic ‘chorus’.

The 2nd Technic offers an instant increased snarl with its riffs and air, employing a post punk chilling around incendiary bursts of noise rock intensity. That alone is a compelling mix but with little flirtations of melodies and harmonic vocal mumbling, the song becomes an irresistible creative raging whose masterful heights are matched by the following False Flag immediately after. It rolls in on a contagious rhythmic enticing, a nibbling guitar adding to the exciting lure. Vocal squalls and tempestuous urgency break through soon after, not quite brawling but certainly bringing greater intimidation and thrilling rapacity to the encounter. Already thoughts of Melvins come to the fore but only as a scent of the raucous creativity being expelled by LongFallBoots.

Thoughts are thrown a curve ball in some ways by Thousand Hands, its fuzz pop breeding a warm and intriguing embrace, especially with the angelic tones of Amy Smith adding to the rosy colour of the song. Of course it is again only part of the picture as the surface of the sounds are woven with bracing fuzziness whilst throughout there is a veining of acidic heavy rock enterprise. The song is pure magnetism but does not quite light the appetite as those just before it, or the next up Loaded Question. Punk infused, the track is a thumping roar in ears with a warped mentality and design to its addictive presence and textures. There is a slight touch of The Zico Chain to it and at times Torche, and for just over a minute it provides another enslaving highlight of the album.

Both the groove bound Displacer with its rhythmic dance and the doomy prowl of Noctavia bring further diversity to the album and new adventure to ears, each in their individual persuasions worming under the skin and deep into the psyche before the riveting and infectious devilment of The Cruel Institution steals their thunder with its sonic winery and sinuous invention. It does not take long to become a firm favourite within Wait For The Echo, though the sultry twang and spicy croon of A Peculiar Hell gives food for thought before the bedlamic By Design hits with its Converge-esque vocal attitude and continually shifting landscape. At times it is a brawl on the senses and in other moments a sweet seduction; a post-hardcore like fury which as all songs is ultimately hard to pin down.

The Sham basks in a heavy rock predation as a Mastodon intensity mixes with a Kyuss like melodic blazing driven again by caustically delivered vocals. It is a slow burner compared to other tracks but has ears and appetite enthralled whilst Simultaneous Man simply has each turning somersaults of pleasure with its voracious and uncompromising punk raging equipped with a deliciously throaty bassline and sinister sonic endeavour.

A final piece of expectations defeating excellence comes with the closing An Apology, the band again slipping into mellower waters with charming melodies and the siren-esque voice of Smith; anticipation is already expecting special things ahead with her voice now a regular feature of the band. The final incitement cannot leave without a trespass of the senses though, guitars and hoarse roars adding to the increasing intensity and inflamed climate of the song as it brings the album to an impressive close.

   Wait For An Echo incites and delights in equal measure. It is an album for all fans of heavy and noise bred rock music to explore a healthy new adventure with, and whilst LongFallBoots is still a secret to a great many right now, the new release could change that privacy as it ignites more and more ears and emotions. And if it falls short, let’s be honest there will probably be another tasty EP or two right around the corner reinforcing its fine temptation and fighting the cause.

Wait For The Echo is available digitally and on CD now via http://longfallboots.bandcamp.com

https://www.facebook.com/LongFallBoots

RingMaster 24/02/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.thereputationlabel.today

The Permanent Smilers – One Real Big Identity Crisis

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One Real Big Identity Crisis, the new album from UK band The Permanent Smilers, is a release with no apparent direction or framework to its intent and enterprise; a release which basically lives up to its title but boy is it a slab of irresistible fun. Through thirteen songs, band and album take on a torrent of different styles and nostalgic flavours which really should not work alongside each other as coherently as they do, and all come with a humour and mischief which adds to rather than overrides the adventure of the individual characters. It is slightly deranged but not chaotic and thoroughly unpredictable yet not messy considering the vast sounds employed from song to song. Most of all though it is simply a compelling proposition which comes from left-field, keeps its heart there, and leaves the most enjoyable experience in its wake.

There is little we can tell you about the band itself, though The Permanent Smilers is fronted by Richard Lemongrower who was the songwriter behind Norwich band The Lemongrowers, a band releasing two albums on Noisebox at some point in time. Produced with Jonny Cole and mixed by David Pye, One Real Big Identity Crisis takes little time in lighting ears and imagination, though it opens with maybe its weakest song. That is a little misleading as it takes a song to get a handle, or try to, on the release anyway but certainly Identity Crisis did not really grip attention as much as elsewhere and left thoughts with a slight wondering of what have we got ourselves into. Strongly swung rhythms and similarly intensive riffs clasp ears within the first breath of the song, their bait a jabbing lure against the unpolished yet engaging tones of Richard. It is an easily flowing and energetic slice of rock ‘n’ roll with the bass of Jonny Cole pungent bait at the centre of the stomp. Truthfully there is little wrong with the song but it lacks a spark in its presence which evades the reaction it probably deserves and is easy to imagine being found with others.

The good if unsure start is soon a thing of the past as Uh-Oh takes over with its festive folk swagger and emerging carnival like devilment. Sporting a splash of Tankus The Henge to its relaxed but vibrant stroll, the song is a constant swing of melodic hips as it moves towards an unexpected and mouth-watering slip into a Dukes of Stratosphear like ethereal psychedelic charm and climate, returning back into festive mood soon after as if it had just emerged from a dip in the sea. The song is fascinating and bewitching, and just the first of numerous adventures into different landscapes, as shown next by the punk pop devilry of You Know Where To Go. Bred from seventies power pop and carrying a mix of The Flys and The Lurkers to its hookery, the song just hits the sweet spot with its insatiable energy and mischief, before making way for the more relaxed melodic embrace of Elastic. The keys and guitars of Richard weave another enthralling web of sound here, this time with a sniff of sixties pop to it which is punctuated by the crisp beats of drummer Pete Fraser and dark bass lures of Cole. By its close, the song somehow becomes a thumping anthem without losing any of its melodic and gentle elegance, a potent feat for any song to offer.

Both Just No Good and It Doesn’t Work Anymore keep album and ears bouncing with energy and pleasure, the first using a garage rock spicing again teased by a sixties almost Doors like toxicity, whilst the second again spawning from the same kind of seeding brings a rawer punk grouchiness with its presence. Each has feet and emotions joining their rigorous coaxing before Ghosts allows a breather for the body if not the imagination with its Simon and Garfunkel meets Burt Bacharach like embrace. The brass persuasion of Dave Land seductively flames over similarly captivating keys and vocal caresses through the song but as always there is a scent of devilment to the song with thoughts wondering at times if they should be enjoying this as much as they are. There is no escaping its thick charm though.

The next pair of songs brings a rich sense of XTC to their enterprise and persuasion, Rebel broadening that over time with a seventies kissed soar of progressive fuelled psyche rock whilst its successor, Voodoo has the stamp of Andy Partridge to its flirtatious pop and virulent enterprise. The pair leaves nostalgia glazed lips licked and, through the latter especially, ears basking in psyche pop of the most delicious kind complete with jazzy brass and funk spirited unpredictability.

You Know When To Go dives straight back into punk infused rock ‘n’ roll for its brief but sparkling instrumental before Unforseen manages to conjure an encounter which recalls the quirky indie pop of The Monochrome Set and the plainer but no less tasty essence of Tom Robinson. The song alternatively stomps and swirls around ears, every passing hook and melody it conjures an intriguing and quaint yet voracious tease before it moves off into the distance allowing the outstanding See Through You to make its lingering mark. Acoustically shaped with an avalanche of panzer gun delivered rhythms, the song initially is a smouldering and majestic sway of sound. It subsequently explodes though into a tempest of energy and revelry which only lifts a great song to a heady plateau. Imagine the volatile energy of De Staat at their most devilish with the epidemic hunger of eighties punk/power pop and you get a sense of the glorious treat.

One Real Big Identity Crisis closes with the acoustic lullaby of Sleepyhead, the album ending as it started with a track which does not catch the ardour triggered elsewhere but certainly graces ears with tantalising propositions. This album is one unexpected and seriously enjoyable adventure; not breaking down boundaries or venturing into the unknown but never providing a moment when you are not surprised or wrapped up in its refreshing simplicity woven by skill and invention. There is only time left to lick lips all over again as we close off and dive straight back into The Permanent Smilers’ irresistible arms, something we suggest you do too upon release.

One Real Big Identity Crisis is released in April via IRL Records with new single Identity Crisis out in March.

http://www.thepermanentsmilers.com/   https://www.facebook.com/pages/The-Permanent-Smilers/1539697962929725

RingMaster 23/02/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from http://www.thereputationlabel.today

Horse Party – Out Of Sight/Receiver

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The exciting thing about UK band Horse Party is as much as they have openly grown in songwriting and sound, they have lost none of the instinctively raw and organic essences which made them strikingly leap out with debut single Back To Mono almost two years ago. Their new single is bound in majestic raunchy charms as both Out Of Sight and Receiver show new striking steps in craft, sound, and sheer creative adventure, but each still seduces with that primal spice which brought the trio to life.

Hailing from Bury St Edmunds, the threesome of vocalist/guitarists Ellie Langley and Seymour Quigley, alongside drummer Shannon Hope, have persistently garnered acclaim and an increasingly growing and devoted fan base with their gripping and at times sinisterly devilish sounds. From the Scarlet & Blue EP to last year’s debut album Cover Your Eyes, released through Integrity Records, Horse Party has gripped attention and increasingly greedier appetites, including those of 6music’s Lauren Laverne and Steve Lamacq, Shell Zenner at Absolute Radio and XFM’s John Kennedy. Live too the band is no stranger to eager responses, last year seeing the band successfully playing Latitude Festival’s Lake Stage at the invitation of Radio One’s Huw Stephens and BBC Suffolk Introducing. Now Out Of Sight/Receiver is poised to push the band on again, and as it is without doubt their finest hour to date, it is hard to see it failing to tempt the broadest spotlights upon the band.

Out Of Sight starts things off and is instantly prowling ears with thoughtful yet predatory riffs from the guitars matched by crisp beats. The darkly seducing tones of Langley queens over the 10847766_768484469911623_4136520996259037093_nentrance, her delivery sure and intense yet wholly seductive from the first breath. Widening its expression without leaving its shadowed scenery, the track proceeds to tease with small burst of melodic light and anthemic vocal unity whilst steely hooks only add to the addictive bait of the song. Fizzing up further into its presence with psychedelic lit sultriness and smouldering emotion, the adventure continues to be unpredictable and inescapably addictive with a chorus which similarly becomes more virulent and entrancing over the length of the outstanding song.

It is a glorious temptation but even with its might cannot help being surpassed by the delicious alchemy of Receiver. More energetic from the first second, the track is also an even darker and more sinister provocation, riding in on an irresistible post punk rhythmic baiting of ears and imagination. It is wonderfully repetitive from hereon in, riffs and hooks recycled with compelling effect as the dual tones of Langley and Quigley croon with sobering yet magnetic persuasion. That post punk essence is a constant treat within the song too, essences of bands like Au Pairs and Joy Division merging with the darker side of a Morningwood or Yeah Yeah Yeahs, but coming out as something ingeniously unique to Horse Party.

The song as the single is outstanding, both songs easily the best things to emerge from the imagination of the trio and they have some treats already under their creative belts. Horse Party is a band ready to join the frontline of the UK garage rock/rock scene and with releases like this drive it to new heights.

Out Of Sight/Receiver is available from February 23rd on limited edition 7” black vinyl as a co-release by R*E*P*E*A*T Records and the band’s own Pure Deadly imprint @ https://horsepartyparty.bandcamp.com/album/out-of-sight-receiver-7-single

Horse Party are also on tour right now with upcoming dates at…

Friday 27th February – Ipswich Steamboat Tavern

Friday 27th March – London The Garage

Saturday 2nd May – Bury St Edmunds Fringe Festival

Friday 15th May – Cambridge Junction

Saturday 13th June – Norwich Open

https://www.facebook.com/horsepartyparty

RingMaster 22/02/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from http://www.thereputationlabel.today

 

 

Damn Vandals – Mad As Hell

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The British rock scene is not short on some rather exciting prospects and artists right now, bands which are stripping away its current landscape to create new primal and instinctively imaginative adventures. To the front of these propositions for the past few years, certainly since the release of their debut album Done For Desire in 2012 is Londoners Damn Vandals. They are the source of raw and aggressively inventive rock ‘n’ roll which seems to increase in virulence and creative rigour across every release, a success proven and reinforced once again by the band’s new single Mad As Hell. It is trade mark Damn Vandals yet again finds the band pushing new twists of sound and enterprise whilst providing another heady temptation into their warped sonic world for all newcomers.

Mad As Hell and its B-side, This Music Blows My Tiny Mind, both come from the band’s second album Rocket Out Of London, which as its predecessor was no stranger to widespread acclaim. In fact all Damn Vandal releases earn eager praise and it is hard not to suspect Mad As Hell doing the same. From an opening muscle bound grouchy bassline, the song has ears and attention firmly gripped ready for the distinctive and highly expressive tones of vocalist Jack Kansas. Just as swiftly his and Frank Pick’s guitars are weaving their flaming sonic seducing, a temptation ripe with spicy blues flavouring within a climate which shimmers and sizzles with melodic drama and fiery enterprise. Right away impressive on the album, the song has grown in stature and persuasive weight over time and now as a single, Mad As Hell sets the imagination and emotions sparking with pleasure. Within the embrace of the whole stunning full-length, its potency as a single initially might have been questioned but any doubts are soon tossed aside as the song revels in its spotlight proving that Rocket Out Of London in many ways is nothing but potential singles and essential slabs of rock ‘n’ roll.

The irresistible rhythmic frame of the single, cast by bassist Adam Kilemore Gardens and drummer Chris Christianson, is emulated in the equally contagious success of This Music Blows My Tiny Mind. Stretched sinews drive an even paced gait loaded with thick drum swipes and throaty bass riffs as vocals and guitars flirt with their caustic swagger. Littered with abrasing hooks and dirty melodies, the song is soon immersing ears into a unique tapestry of garage punk, psyche and raw punk with a stoner-esque tang, and swiftly infesting senses and psyche like a sonic virus. Charmingly psychotic and addictively feverish, the song is a creative brawl which again is only the strongest enticement into the ingenuity of Damn Vandals.

If you have yet to discover the quartet either Mad As Hell or This Music Blows My Tiny Mind provide a doorway to a theatre of original rock ‘n’ roll, and together make an inescapable sonic tempest. Though not labelled as such, the Julian Simmons (Midlake, Ed Sheeran, Guillemots, Goldheart Assembly) produced single is really a double A-sided offering in quality and striking impact, and proof that Damn Vandals still lead the current march of real rock ‘n’ roll.

Mad As Hell is released on 23rd February

http://www.damnvandals.co.uk/

RingMaster 22/02/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from http://www.thereputationlabel.today

 

 

 

Ligaments – Ligaments (Eat Pizza EP)

Ligaments Online Promo Shot

As soon as learning that the armament within punk ‘n’ rollers Ligaments involved a double bass, intrigue and excitement, as we are suckers for the throaty seduction of said instrument, was rife. It was an anticipation swiftly satisfied by the London based trio’s excellent Ligaments (Eat Pizza EP). With throaty bass slaps in tandem with roaring vocals and voracious riffs, the four-song encounter proved itself to be an imposing and impressive introduction to the band.

Formed in 2012 after Napoli hailing Nicola Itro (double bass, vocals) and Londoner Jake Maxwell (guitar, vocals) met at the 12 Bar Club in Soho, Ligaments create a sound which is part ’77 punk, part old school rock ‘n’ roll, part rockabilly rapacity, and all 21st Century ferocity. Last year saw former Pettybone member Zel Kaute join the band on drums, bringing a passion for pizza with her which humorously themes the visual side of the new release. Already Ligaments have supported the likes of Pure Graft, The Meteors, The Vibrators, and GBH, and made Europe a regular playground for their thumping live presence, but it is with their debut EP that it is easy to expect a new spotlight shining on the creative bellow and potential of this exciting band.

Recorded with Wayne Adams (USA Nails, Death Pedals), the EP takes little time grabbing attention as opener Precinct 13 brews up an immediate dirty hard rock coaxing. Initially held in a Ligaments covermore distant embrace, it is soon bursting loud and anthemically upon the senses, and straight away Itro’s moody basslines are claiming an eager appetite. Equally the blaze of riff causticity and swinging punchy rhythms from Kaute are stealing their share of the focus. Minor Threat has been offered as a reference to the band’s sound but similarly here essences of Living End and AFI make a potent flavouring to the riotous proposition.

The great start is right away eclipsed by 4th, and again bass slaps and tenacious beats provide inescapable bait for the guitar of Maxwell to blaze over. Into its stride, the track marries a melodic ferociousness with a whiff of The Bronx to it, to a bruising yet captivating Peacocks like punk rumble. It is raw, unfussy, and magnetically anthemic but just an appetiser itself for the closing pair of treats starting with the Tiger Army like swing of Turn To Acid. Sultry in air and contagious in rhythmic enterprise, Itro again laying down virulent temptation, the track is stripped down rock ‘n’ roll providing an unpolished but craftily lean musical narrative almost revelling in its addictive nature.

Final song In The Black Lodge emerges as the favourite, again the dark charms on Tiger Army and AFI seeping into the psychobilly kissed landscape of the song. An anthem for feet and voice to instantly consume, the track stomps through ears, jabbing the senses with every swing of its epidemic energy. With thick basslines and insatiable melodies adding further primal tempting, it is a roaring blaze of the song.

Whether a fan of punk or rockabilly, in fact for anyone with a taste for any shade of rock ‘n’ roll, there is great pleasure to be found in Ligaments first release, and a ripe potential fuelling their impressive debut which suggests the band is going places.

The Ligaments (Eat Pizza EP) is available through all digital platforms from Monday 16th February and on ltd edition (250 pressed) CD @ http://theligaments.bandcamp.com/

https://www.facebook.com/TheLigaments

RingMaster 16/02/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from http://www.thereputationlabel.today