Hung Like Jack – She’s Not Dead

HLJart_RingMasterReview

A band sows its seeds with their introduction and debut songs from whence you hope to see their qualities grow into bigger and bolder blossoms. That is exactly what has happened with British rock ‘n’ roll bruisers Hung Like Jack. Last year the Darlington quartet tempted attention with the AA-sided single Fire beneath me/ Life’s first sign of rage, a pair of songs which, though actually not their first offerings by a long way, grabbed a fresh horde of eager ears with a new spark in their sound and invention. The two tracks were raw and intrusively confrontational slices of punk ‘n’ roll carrying the suggestion of bolder things to come. That promise has now blossomed and more in new single She’s Not Dead, a seriously rousing and stirring slab of incitement hard to tear ears away from.

HLJ2_RingMasterReviewLast year’s offering seem to mark a turning point in the adventure and stature of the band who had already uncaged a trio of EPs and in 2014 the seven-track White Powder mini-album. Formed in 2007, Hung Like Jack quickly put their mark on the local live scene under the drive of John, Tim, and Hakim. Their current line-up was completed by the recruitment of drummer Denz, a union in place before the release of last year’s potent pair of tracks.

As suggested, as good and highly enjoyable as that last single was, She’s Not Dead is in another league and quickly gets a grip on ears and appetite with its opening shuffle of beats and the great lure of the growling bass. That early tempting only increases as raw swipes of riffs show their face within a few more seconds; it all colluding and creating a boisterous almost cantankerous stroll of sound as Johns vocals add further infectious confrontation. Without a lull, riffs and that glorious bass hook continue to entice and enslave as lead and backing vocals emphasise the anthemic pull of a track still taking bites at the senses with Denz’s uncompromising swings.

A great old school punk/new waver essence escapes moments of relative calm which inventively show themselves whilst fiery grooves reveal the heavy rock ‘n’ roll aspect of the band’s sound and invention; hues joined by a definite early Therapy? like roar. It is striking and invigorating stuff from a band which, even if using just one song as evidence, seems to have creatively come of age. The hints were there last year and now makes a hearty roar within She’s Not Dead, the kind of song that incites mass celebration.

She’s Not Dead is out now. Check it out @ https://soundcloud.com/hung-like-jack

https://www.facebook.com/hunglikejack

Pete RingMaster 22/04/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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The Machismo’s – Share One With A Friend

TM's_RingMasterReview

At times listening to Share One With A Friend, the new album from The Machismo’s, it is hard to decide whether it is a kaleidoscope of its author’s talents and imagination or a bedlam of the same. It is one of the most eclectic and unpredictable escapades you could wish to be confronted with and one of the most inescapably enjoyable.

The album consists of fifteen one of a kind slices of creative exploration and mischief, and the first new songs from the band in eighteen years. Its sound ranges from indie and alternative to punk and noise rock with experimentation at every turn. The band itself probably described their music and release best via their Facebook page where it says they are “Putting the Punk and the Weirdness back into Indie.” with “Now includes added poetry….” as an extra essence. It is a suggestion that they certainly live up to within Share One With A Friend.

The band itself is the brainchild of Sam Marsh, once of the compelling and irresistible Jacob’s Mouse. Initially a solo project, The Machismo’s formed in 1995 and recorded two full albums in Sam’s home cassette portastudio. Recruiting additional members for their live exploits, the band never really exploded into serious action though and disappeared with many recordings put aside unreleased as Sam moved onto other projects. Almost two decades later though, he relooked at those songs and releases that lay awaiting attention and realising their quality and worth, released the 1996 recorded debut album Good Things About To Happen in 2013 whilst also reviving the band with Rachel Marsh and Karly Stebbings. The album was a striking invitation for those of us missing the Bury St Edmunds hailing band first time around to explore, and it seems a spark for Sam himself to push The Machismo’s on with new zeal in what is a very exciting music scene within his home town right now. As mentioned, Share One With A Friend offers the first brand new tracks from the band in a long time whilst equally offering reasons to suggest that The Machismo’s is one of the most compelling propositions within the British music scene, past and present.

The album opens with the warm and fuzzy indie pop of The Loveliest, the song a sizzle of melodic guitar jangle and robust rhythms around the expressive tones of Sam. It has an echo of the tracks within that debut album as a raw and unfussy elegance captivates as potently as the catchy swing of the song. It is a straight forward start, in comparison to things to come, and an alluring one with its additional folkish hues before the unpredictable tango of Vrrrm! takes over. Beats throw their agitated lures all over the place from the start, though finding more restraint as punkish flames of guitar align with the great dual vocal persuasion. The further ears get into it, the more volatile and thrilling things become; all the time a debut album era Squeeze essence adding to the off-kilter indie punk attraction of the song.

cover_RingMasterReviewThe outstanding Collapse To Be Rebuilt grips ears and imagination next with its garage punk infused punk ‘n’ roll. With an addictive swagger as riffs and rogue voices add their unconventional roars, the Iggy Pop meets Pere Ubu like stomp has ears and body bouncing, and an already awoken appetite licking its lips and greedy to indulge in the following dark theatre of Bad Dreams.  Straight away a grumbling static storm crowds and rumbles around vocal poetry as a single slim guitar melody adds its own melancholic emotion to that of the vocals within the thickly compelling piece.

It is hard not to think of Jacob’s Mouse a little as the sultry sway and bewitching climate of When You Know It’s Real seduces ears next, its bulbous rhythmic swing the spine for flirtatious melodic vocals and the percussive imagination making equally irresistible advances within the excellent track. It has a brilliance of presence and fun which is emulated instantly by the punk devilry of Rise Again. Snarling guitars opens up and a flirtatious noir lit hook pushes on the irresistible encounter; the latter swiftly joined by the swinging vocal persuasion which as much as anything urges hips and spirit to get involved. Twanging bass groans, sonic sighs, and ear clipping beats only add to the smile inducing adventure of drooping hopes and their Viagra crafted resurrection; whilst the combined festivity of all creates one of those moments that only lingers.

Through the likes of the muggy aired and sonically bracing Should Recognise and in turn the folkish canter of Plastic Surgery, with Sam again leaning on his poetic craft as much as his musical prowess, band and album surprise and enthral, using the following Belvia to stir up an even stronger hunger with its scuzzy pop punk trespass. It has an old school punk tone to its rapacious character and energy too, a hue which only adds to the dirty and inviting bait rushing through ears.

Post punk meets indie discord is maybe the best description for the ear grabbing, pleasure giving lo fi stroll of Gotcha!, bands like The Three Johns and Swell Maps coming to mind for certain essences of the song. To be fair though, any references are hints to portray the individuality of song and The Machismo’s free and rebellious experiments of sound and imagination which continue to evade expectations with the folk laced croon of A Better Man and the addiction forging shuffle of The Storm. Like The Jazz Butcher meets Mark E. Smith but not, the latter track is manna to ears and passions; the kind of stripped back rock ‘n’ roll with a grin in its heart that all music should be bred from.

The album concludes with the trio of firstly, the melodically salty and slightly Cajun scented However Nice You Are, There’s Always Someone Who Think’s You’re A, the Pixies-esque garage punk rumble of Class A High, and finally the nursery bred and chimed ingenuity of Machismo’s 4 Tha Kids!; all three songs offering yet more fresh twists in the album’s tale to feel stimulated and refreshed by.

The Machismo’s is not exactly a new band but their presence and invention within the album feels like something that is, which of course the album’s songs are.  So if you are looking for the unconventional but something damn good too, then go Share One With A Friend.

Also worth noting as treating yourself with is The Poets Pendulum: Is It Good Or Is It Shit?, an album of Sam Marsh’s poetry which he has been bringing to the band’s live shows for quite a while to eager responses. Both albums are available as Name Your Price Downloads @ https://themachismos.bandcamp.com/album/share-one-with-a-friend with Share One With A Friend also available on very Ltd Ed vinyl.

https://www.facebook.com/TheMachismos   http://themachismos.tumblr.com/

Pete RingMaster 21/04/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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The Velvet Hands – Trains

TVH_Trainsshoot_RingMasterReview

Creating a sound somewhere between punk, garage, and indie rock, The Velvet Hands has begun to stir up a bit of a fuss around their emergence on the British rock scene. The release of new single Trains can only add to the Cornish band’s attention luring success, its two tracks of highly flavoursome sound and temptation something to easily get a taste for.

The Velvet Hands is the creation of Toby Mitchell and Dan Able, a pair who began writing and playing together in 2014. Inspired by the likes of The Stones, Strokes, Beatles, Stone Roses, and The Clash, the band quickly drew eager ears and attention from fans and media their way with a live presences which has seen them share stages with the likes of Wild Smiles, Lost Dawn, Saturday Sun, and The Bluetones over time as well as make a handful of successful festivals appearances. The first pair of singles from the band, Games/Who Cares last October and Habit this past TVHTrainscover_RingMasterReviewMarch, stirred keen praise and support into action which Trains can only stoke up again for Mitchell and Able with Louis Willbourne and Sean Nichols alongside.

Released on 7″ white vinyl for Record Store Day through Easy Action Records, Trains opens on a swiftly potent and virulent bassline which quickly entices melodically spicy guitar and crisp beats to come and play with ears too. It is a great blend of raw pop and stylish enterprise matched by similarly textured vocals and harmonies.  The band has been suggested as being “in the grand tradition of great British bands like The Libertines and The Buzzcocks” in the past and both of those bands do come to mind a touch throughout the song; the first in its vocals and unfussy character with the latter through the nagging hooks and swinging infectiousness shaping the song.

Accompanying the track is Curtains Close, a delicious seducing crafted with surf scented melodies, acoustic enchantment, and vocal expression. Though a more relaxed character than its predecessor, the song is just as addictively catchy and beguiling; to be honest it was our favourite out of two highly enjoyable encounters.

Trains shows why people are crowding round the emergence of The Velvet Hands whilst equally pushing the band’s reputation on again to suggest this is definitely someone to keep a close ear on!

Trains is out now as a limited edition (300) white vinyl 7″ single through Easy Action Records in all good independent record stores with a digital release following April 29th.

http://thevelvethands.co.uk/   https://www.facebook.com/thevelvethands

Pete RingMaster 18/04/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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BIGG – Lock Up Your Daughters

BIGG_RingMasterReview

For us, all the best bands have an essence of off-kilter, bordering on loco imagination to their sound and creativity; an unconventional take on conjuring ideas and distinctive noise which certainly seems to be present in the invention and adventure of British alternative rock band BIGG. The suggestion of they having that potent essence comes through debut EP Lock Up Your Daughters. It is three tracks of devilish rock ‘n’ roll as infectiously catchy and hungrily punk as you could wish for that is unafraid to weave in many more highly flavoursome and individual spices. It is a success in our experience which sees the EP capture ears and imagination by song one, has them seduced by its second offering, and by the third sets them drooling hungrily for more.

Rising from the ashes of successful indie band Beat Magnets, when its vocalist left, Reading based BIGG soon revelled in the chance to explore new directions and sounds.  Consisting of brothers James and Thomas Wade alongside Pearce O’Keeffe and James Smith, the quartet have drawn on inspirations ranging from “Grime and Pop Punk to Frank Zappa and Electro” as they developed and honed the next evolution in their creativity. Swiftly they have become a potent live draw which Lock Up Your Daughters should push to national awareness given the opportunity.

art_RingMasterReviewThe EP opens with How Do You Sleep and needs little time to excite ears with its opening rhythmic shuffle soon joined by sand textured vocals. Across their songs BIGG use a great blend of alternating lead singers in the band, the first here easily adding to the inspiring of swinging hips on a bouncing body as dirty riffs collude with funky grooves and hooks. The grouchy prowl of bass also potently adds to the irresistible persuasion worming under the skin, though the song’s efficiency is soon shown to be less pacey than that of Man Overboard if just as successful.

Whereas the first is a sawdust and rock ‘n’ roll like stomp, the second track is a more devious blend of indie and punk rock mischief merged with a Queens Of The Stone Age like seducing. Bass again is a great growling proposal courted by the firm swing of beats as vocals come at ears with a catchy swagger. Hooks and slim but spicy groves align to increase the magnetism, a draw which blossoms even further with that fuzzy stoner laced roar reminding of Josh Homme and Co. Taking best track honours, the song alone makes BIGG a invitation not to be ignored, even more so when forcibly backed by the opener and closing song Nobody.

The perpetual distorted surface of guitar invention and grooves seems to be even more scorched in the final song whilst harmonies and melodies have richer seduction to their intent and sultry lures. Vocally too, there is a fresh sense of revelry in their delivery as the song shows another twist in the BIGG sound. Muscular and incendiary heavy rock with gentle sonic flirtations and unpredictable twists best describes the track, and an instinctive tempting providing a gripping end to one outstanding debut.

We cannot say that the band name has us particularly enthused but the band’s sound, well that just lights the fires.

The Lock Up Your Daughters EP is out April 15th via TakeControlCo Records @ http://bigg.bandcamp.com/

http://www.bigg-band.com/   https://www.facebook.com/BIGGband   https://twitter.com/BIGG_Band

Pete Ringmaster 15/04/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Headsticks – Feather and Flame

Headsticks_RingMasterReview

Whichever angle you come at Feather and Flame, the new album from UK quartet Headsticks, it is a seriously rousing incitement. Offering eleven diverse and eventful slices bred in the band’s fusion of folk and punk rock, the release gets the body bouncing, thoughts sparking, and the spirit racing. The breeding of serious pleasure is not low on successes triggered either as Feather and Flame not only reinforces the reputation already earned by the band but confirms Headsticks as one of Britain’s most irresistible and essential punk ‘n’ roll adventures.

Formed late 2012 by former members of bands like Tower Struck Down, Jugopunch, and The Clay Faces, the Stoke on Trent hailing Headsticks quickly whipped up potent interest in their sound with a debut three-track E.P in 2013. Their live presence was just as rapid in stirring up of support and fans, the band over time playing shows across the UK as well as numerous festivals whilst sharing stages with a host of well-regarded names in both the folk and punk/alternative genres. The summer of 2014 saw the release of first album Muster, a proposition highly acclaimed by fan and media alike and again backed by the band’s persistent live hunger. Now it is Feather and Flame seriously stirring up ears and attention with its socially and politically charged and challenging songs fuelled by a delicious diversity of sound and dramatic adventure.

The album hits the ground running from its first second, jangling chords and beef rhythms grabbing ears as opener What Do You Want leaps into view. Vocalist Andrew Tranter quickly has the imagination hooked as he lyrically opens up an insight into the lives of the working man and the importance of and habit for things that possibly warrant neither. It is a provocative and swiftly contagious encounter, at times a thumping canter of sound and energy with moments of sweltering funk spice which only adds to its virulent drama.

featherandflame_RingMasterReviewThe thrilling anthemic start gets swiftly matched by the evocatively aired Cold Grey English Skies. Here the rhythms of bassist Nick Bayes and drummer Tom Carter hold a touch more reserve in their framing of a similarly reined urgency shared by Steven Dunn’s guitar, but all easily cast a catchiness which has hips swaying to their movement and the descriptive prowess of Tranter. With a gloriously melodic and addictive chorus, the song has a rich hint of Flogging Molly meets Violent Femmes meets Fatima Mansions to it, further flavouring to seduce ears and appetite before Go Move Shift uncages its own individual virulence. Straight away the song infuses country-esque revelry to its quickly tenacious folk honed rock ‘n’ roll, this time around thoughts picking out Midnight Oil as a hint to the hues working away within another forcibly persuasive track. The flavouring is just another example of the great variety within the album already showing its bold face across the first trio of treats.

The excellent Old Folk Songs has feet and voice soon involved with its punchy mix of folk and punk; a blending of sound around honest appraisal in some ways carrying a scent of Paranoid Visions to it whilst its successor Foxford Town brings a Pogues like lilt to its just as inescapable infectiousness and enthralling drama. Again an array of rock strains collude to create an emotive weave of sound around similarly nurtured syllables and once more Headsticks sculpt a chorus which demands eager participation. Tranter’s harmonica charms bring further colour to the proposal as they do in the traditional folk seeded Mississippi’s Burning where, as you might expect, bodies are induced to bounce and voices inspired to call out along with the band’s rousing croon.

Pay the Price matches it in persuasion and core sound, and subsequently success whilst Tomorrow’s History offers a more rugged affair with its anthemic arousal. The first of the two is an easy coaxing with its successor adding more boisterous attitude and energy to a shared quality of temptation, it bringing a tinge of bands like The Tossers into play before the compelling Every Single Day flirts with fifties rock ‘n’ roll for its power pop/folk punk romp. All three tracks leave the breath short and an appetite for more, greedier; that want more than fed by the outstanding Burn the Sun which follows. Creating a shuffle soaked in sultry seventies funk devilry and seventies new wave devilry, the track swings and flirts like a unique mix of King Trigger and New Model Army.

The album closes with the acoustic tempting and open heart of Falling Out of Love Song, a final folk caress to hungrily embrace before pressing play on Feather and Flame all over again. The album has that addictive quality, one listen leads to another or more almost every time whilst Headsticks is a band for punks, folksters, and rock ‘n’ rollers alike; for anyone who likes being aroused and provoked in equal measure by music that just gets under the skin.

Feather and Flame is out now across most online stores and @ http://www.headsticks.co.uk/shop.html

http://www.headsticks.co.uk   https://www.facebook.com/headsticksmusic   https://twitter.com/HeadsticksMusic

Pete RingMaster 11/04/2016

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Humans The Size Of Microphones – Human Crop Circles

cover_RingMasterReview

Human Crop Circles is an album which just highlights how difficult it is to be noticed in the music scene. Released by SuperFire Records in conjunction with De Graanrepubliek, the album comes from Humans The Size Of Microphones, a British hardcore/noise rock band around in the first years of this new century. Their reputation and presence did not carry too far outside of the South coast area of the UK it is fair to say and maybe without any expectations of success at some point called it a day, a disbandment we are assuming as no search came up with anything active from the band or, to be honest, about them at all. As Human Crop Circles quickly reveals, this is a crying shame as its songs simply provide one furiously thrilling and rousing incitement of ears and imagination.

At one point slated to do a split with Electric Wizard, it is hard to imagine that HTSOM did not make some major impressions on someone somewhere. An early self-released five-track demo did appear in 2002, though it too probably got lost in the mists of criminal neglect. Recorded by the band’s drummer John T Baptist in his own studio, where the likes of Electric Wizard, No, Facel Vega, Hunting Lodge, and Field Boss have also recorded, Human Crop Circles has thankfully been uncaged to right some wrongs and introduce a new wealth of ears to the rather wonderful and mercurial tempest of sound that is Humans The Size Of Microphones.

The album bursts into life with Pissing Like A Racehorse where climactic guitars and tenacious rhythms crowd ears for an incendiary start which is soon an even more enjoyably volatile affair as vocals cries and a bedlamic character expose themselves in the mix. The early urgency settles a touch without defusing the now psychotic maelstrom and air of the song, but rises again as seriously addictive bass and guitar enterprise casts a web of sonic psychosis which in turn breeds greater ferocity in the noise punk tempest. It is glorious stuff, like a mix of Melvins, Neurosis, Halfling’s Leaf, and Dope Body; the kind of comparisons which occur often across the release.

The brilliant start is as potently backed up by No One Gets Out Of Here Alive, another magnetic slice of noise imagination and punk attitude as raw and seductive as it is magnetically and antagonistically inflamed. From the first pair of sonically intricate yet bullishly demanding songs alone it is hard to know how the band escaped attention but equally just an example of so many other stories of now lost to the world special bands.

The post-hardcore textured Middle England (Eats it’s Young) steps up next, its initial emotive wash the prelude to a tantalising weave of mystique soaked grooves and bolshie yet anthemic group vocal tempting amidst muscularly tenacious rhythms and mesmeric sonic devilment. It is more than a match for the already established pinnacles of the album and almost equalled by the following flirtatious seducing shared by The Smell of Wet Leaves. Sludgy and predatory but also alive with veins of sultry melodic grooving, the track shares an early dark and catchy lure which subsequently gets turned on its head by caustic energy and creative ferocity before re-establishing itself in another smouldering passage within the eventful encounter. Without quite having the final spark to turn personal tastes lusty, the track still leaves pleasure full in its presence before being over shadowed by the outstanding Fucking Tsunami.

The fifth track just grips and thrills ears from its first bestial bassline and swiping rumble of beats; bass and drums becoming puppeteer of body and passions whilst leading both into the concussive and hellacious exploits of the song’s full body and heart. The sonic and emotive turbulence is exhausting and breath-taking, as too the twisted melodic resourcefulness which lines every twist in the track’s dervish like shuffle. As in all songs, drama comes with every moment and unpredictable turn too; here devilishly enhancing the punk meets post punk meets noise rock triumph of the song. The bass and rhythmic unity of James Hasbeen and Baptist respectively ensures the track has instincts involved, the almost corrosive sonic endeavour of guitarist Pete Sake (all names as fun as the sounds fair to say) just reinforcing the persuasion.

The final quintet of tracks come from that aforementioned demo, each a harsher and more abrasive proposal but all carrying the inventive and multi-flavoured traits that give character to all tracks. Not Exactly Rocket Science is a rousing affair of aurally poisonous punk rock whilst Limitless Stupidity is an insatiable deluge of barbarous rhythms aligned to hostility flamed riffs and vocals further blessed with spicy hooks. The pair ensures ears and appetite continue to be well fed though maybe not as dramatically as the outstanding sonic invasion of I See The World Through Rose Coloured Testicles, an uncompromising and bewitching instrumental that just gets the tongue licking lips.

The pair of Dying For An Audience and Not In Our Name bring the album to a close; the first a fibrous net of riffs and acidic grooves which wraps ears before closing ranks for another bruising and inhospitable storm of hardcore whilst its successor with matching sonic antipathy, spews a tangle of punk hooks and spiky grooves around a battlefield of rhythms. With vocals just as agreeably rancorous, the duo provides a fine end to a great and welcome surprise introduction to a band we had no idea existed.

Maybe they will again as Human Crop Circles invades more and more ears but even if that optimistic hope is not realised, punk and noise rock enthusiasts need to have Humans The Size Of Microphones somewhere in their historical landscapes.

Human Crop Circles is out now via SuperFi / De Graanrepubliek and available @ http://superfirecords.bandcamp.com/album/human-crop-circles-lp or https://graanrepubliekrecords.bandcamp.com/album/human-crop-circles

Pete RingMaster 08/04/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com/

Nervous Mothers /Art Of Burning Water – Split 7”

cover_RingMasterReview

Creating a union of ferocity sure to see walls tumble and bodies scarred, SuperFire and Vleesklak Records are joint unleashing a Split 7” featuring the raw hardcore animosity of Nervous Mothers and Art Of Burning Water. It is a four track fury taking no prisoners as it rages and abrases the senses. It is also a thoroughly agreeable slab of carnal punk from two bands not too hard to fancy hear plenty more from.

The first three tracks upon the split come from Belgian quartet Nervous Mothers. More about the Antwerp hailing quartet of Bart, Hans, Jim, and Rik we cannot find but opener Op Nul reveals all needed to keenly welcome the band to ears. A sonic wash with intimidating hues opens the track, a vocal sample soon wrapped in steely tendrils of guitar as beats prowl within the brewing animus. There is also a great resonance within the stalking of ears, a dulled yet throbbing essence from the bass which sparks the appetite even more before spiteful voice and song descend with raw animosity on ears.

Following track, Born is similarly set up but swifter into its sludgy punk infestation of the senses with vocals and vicious rhythms to the demanding fore. Though the opener remains the band’s pinnacle, its successor is a rapacious and invigorating trespass as it leads into the thirty second tempest of Waves. The grizzly growl of the bass steals the show but with a frenzy of rapier beats, flesh scorching riffs, and sheer vocal spite, the song is a short, blunt, incitement of punishment and pleasure.

The final song is provided by UK based Art Of Burning Water, a trio described in its bio as “a steroided immigrant noise punk outfit that does not need to be loved to live.” Being musically liked is probably not on the agenda either but as Oppressor soon prompts, embracing their sound is not too hard as Geith, Kunal, and Mike craft it to worm under the skin and venomously blister the senses. Rhythms are hypnotic, the guitars toxic, whilst vocals spill rancor with every syllable; a blend which just hits the spot as it nags, intimidates, and stirs up another twang of hunger in the appetite.

Both bands are new to our ears and now the source of plenty of retrospective attention via their bandcamp profiles. As for their Split, that is another infestation of punk violence to heartily recommend.

The Nervous Mothers /Art Of Burning Water – Split 7” is out now via SuperFi / Vleesklak @ https://superfirecords.bandcamp.com/album/split-7-11

https://www.facebook.com/nervousmothers   http://nervousmothers.bandcamp.com

https://www.facebook.com/aobwmusic   http://artofburningwater.bandcamp.com

Pete RingMaster 08/04/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com/