Duckeye – PUCE

Three years after uncaging their most roguish, fiendishly dishonourable album yet, and their most irresistible in Songs From The Gunt, Australian reprobates I Am Duckeye have just unleashed an equally diabolical successor in Puce. Looking back across their previous three albums, EPs and singles, it is no secret that the band’s unpredictable fusion of punk, virulent metal, voracious rock, and unapologetically questionable humour has grown thicker and heavier in enterprise and weight. Now though the Melbourne outfit has dived headlong into the charnel house of noise and sludge flooded animosity whilst still embracing that initial breeding of sound and emerged with one challenging, raveningly feral, and compelling beast of a release.

Whether to mark this twist of direction in sound, though it is still very recognisable I Am Duckeye, the band has slimmed the band name down to simply Duckeye though they still use their full name everywhere else it seems. Being lazy we will use the shortened version as on Puce, a release also seeing another reduction, in the bands line-up. Duckeye has slimmed to the irrepressible trio of vocalist/guitarist Sam Haycroft, bassist Jules Medor, and drummer/producer Sean Bailey, a threesome unplugging the floodgates of sonic voracity whilst humour wise too, they have bred a fresh trespass. Certainly Puce does not hold back with a tongue hungrily pushing the cheek but it aligns to a deliberately caustic and social scowl on the world and people fuelling the chaos today; maybe some will say it is mischief which has grown up a tad but yes it still brings a ready childish grin to the face with regularity.

It is probably fair to say that Puce does not have songs which virally leapt from the speakers into our particular devilment as many of the band’s previous infestations yet all make for a fiercely memorable moment and all have attributes which just got under the skin and into our lustful appetites. Across the album riffs mercilessly trespass, grooves wickedly entangle, and hooks ensnare with nefarious ease and throughout the band’s punk metal instincts erupted to inflame ours.

Puce first erupts with Docks, Haycroft’s lone guitar casting steely strokes at ears with his just as untamed tones quickly stepping forward to its side. Then as swiftly the track stretches its muscles and strides forth, rhythms almost gleefully and definitely venomously dancing on the senses that grooves keenly infest. As suggested earlier, the contagious sound is as individual Duckeye as fans would hope but it is a new monster with no qualms about parading seductive enterprise within its voracious incitement.

In contrast to the excited gait of its predecessor, the following Stab Flats crawls over the listener; doom and gloom soaking its prowl as noise and sludge coated aspects collect in its magnetic bowels. Eventually it escapes its chains to angrily cavort through ears, with it a new wave of ravenous flavours and styles carnivorously clawing at the listener. Reverting back to its predacious drag of its irresistible Birthday Party hued sonic body it makes way for the equally examining exploits of Headlights, the senses caught on its sonic glare whilst the body is bouncing to its barbarous manipulation. Again at times there is an echo of eighties post punk to its corrosive toxicity but once more it just spices up that Duckeye uniqueness channelling through song to the pleasure it sparked.

It is often enjoyment loaded with punishment as witnessed in Dead End, the track just short of two and a half minutes of bestial incitement churning up the senses and every esurient lust you have inside through punk and dense extreme metal fired savagery. Addiction to it was inevitable with our appetites here, the song bordering cannibalistic as it devours its own virulence with just as captivating barbarity.

The lengthy trespass of the following Tree Puncher is more familiar Duckeye, initially luring attention with their established creative mischief but it too its soon flexing its grievous dexterity, the song a kind of bridge between Puce and the band’s last outstanding full-length. By its departure though, the track is all predator and simply corroding the senses, indeed disintegrating them with sonic scorching though they are soon brought back to life by the animated dissonance of Defeated. It is a song with post metal winds which absorbed if not aroused initially but then it goes and throws wicked grooved interruptions of lusty ire to raise the temptation and pleasure by multiple degrees

Both Sense and Finger deviously got under the skin, the first with its delicious initial gothic Bauhaus-esque hues and more so with its metal forged punk ‘n’ roll carousing and the second through its classic metal wired, stoner sludge stroll; again virulence flowing through netting of infectious veins.

The final pair of tracks on the album proves themselves just as unscrupulously tempting; Dead Eyes with its cold stare and predacious prowl masterfully wily and persuasive, villainous rock ‘n’ roll at its notorious best, while Blue Hand leaps on another wealth of fresh flavours to ignite its enterprise woven web.

Together they provide a richly gripping conclusion to an album which assaults and invigorates second by second, thrilling with every passing trespass. Puce only gets better and more addictive by the listen too so maybe this is the moment the world catches a dose of the I Am Duckeye virus; it would be a better place for doing so.

Puce is available now @ https://iamduckeye.bandcamp.com/album/puce

https://iamduckeye.com/home   https://www.facebook.com/iamduckeyeofficial/   https://twitter.com/home

 Pete RingMaster 09/05/2019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Cavaverman – Women, Monsters & Cazzottis

After the acclaim lured by their album Tales From Cavafistool around Europe, Italian horror punks Cavaverman release their new EP, Women, Monsters & Cazzottis. Offering three tracks as a name your own price download, their latest encounter is equally as irresistible with the band stretching their sound to embrace an even richer array of flavours in its rock ‘n’ roll stomp. It builds on the last album with relish and enterprise with suggestive hints of where the band is going next.

Hailing from Monza, the trio of guitarist/vocalist Sal Champion, bassist Apocalypse Giò, and drummer Doktor Hell draw on the inspiration of bands such as The Ramones, Misfits, Alkaline Trio, and Entombed for their own enjoyably raw yet adventurous sound. A trio of albums in Dead Brains For Brain Dead, James Dead, and the aforementioned Tales From Cavafistool have more than marked Cavaverman out from the crowd and the Undead Artists released Women, Monsters & Cazzottis is no different.

It opens with Deadly Touch, a track featuring the potent vocals of Irene from Milan punks Viboras. The song itself is the punks inside Cavaverman coming to the fore; its horror punk ’n’ roll mixing with punk metal tendencies to unleash something akin to UK’s Trioxin Cherry meeting US bands Mongrel and Calabrese. From its first breath, the track stomps with attitude and an infectious lilt, the vocal union of Sal and Irene ear grabbing with the latter just as potent when tempting alone. Instinctive grooves and nagging hooks only add to the thick lure of the antagonism soaked song before Jamie Sommers steps forward.

The second song has a calmer persona, its psychobilly nurtured stroll and hearty croon showing a new maturity in the Cavaverman songwriting. Of course there is a snarl in the belly but one restrained as guitars weave their sultry serenade within a coarser tide of riffs and swinging rhythms. As the first, it is a richly magnetic affair captivating ears and imagination with swift ease before King of Cazzottis concludes the EP with its hard rock meets horror punk stomp. There is a healthy spice of pop punk to the chorus of the song too, another flavour in its bold mix needing little time to have body and vocal involvement from the listener on board.

Women, Monsters & Cazzottis is a band doing what they do best, unleashing instinctive rock ‘n’ roll whilst involving sound and creativity in new textures and explorations. There are surprises and plenty of familiar essences colluding in a slice of Cavaverman goodness which gets better and more tempting with every listen.

Women, Monsters & Cazzottis is out now through Undead Artists as a name your price download @ https://undeadartists.bandcamp.com/album/women-monsters-cazzottis  or https://cavaverman.bandcamp.com/album/women-monsters-and-cazzottis

https://www.facebook.com/Cavaverman/

Pete RingMaster 09/05/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Turbocharged/Ragehammer Split – Enlightenment by Bloodletting

turbocharged_ragehammer_cover_RingMasterReview

There is something about a split release which has the appetite licking its lips even before a sound is heard. It is hard to define why but when you are on the end of the kind of fiercely enjoyable proposition that Enlightenment by Bloodletting shows itself to be, the anticipation for another offering is all the more understandable. The two track encounter brings Swedish death punk metallers Turbocharged and Polish black metal thrashers Ragehammer together for one merciless and exhilarating ravishing of the senses.

turbocharged_RingMasterReviewReleased via Godz Ov War Productions / Mythrone Promotion, Enlightenment by Bloodletting is opened up by Turbocharged, the trio of vocalist/bassist Ronnie “Ripper” Olson, guitarist Old Nick, and drummer Freddie Fister imposing Bloodletting on ears. From the moment a wiry groove entangles the senses as concussive rhythms begin to cantankerously stir, attention and pleasure is ignited. As the song’s blasphemy grows, so does the thick lure of bass and riffs around the grouchy tones of Olson, backed in voracious kind by the rest of the band. At its core, the track is unbridled punk ‘n’ roll, a testy examination of body and emotions wrapped in searing sonic enterprise and irritable intensity driven to greater corruption by the merciless beats and dexterity of Fister.

The track hits the spot quickly and with increasing persuasion before making way for PanzerFaustian Enlightenment and its matching persuasion and success. Consisting of vocalist Heretik ragehammer_RingMasterReviewHellstörm, guitarist Bestial Avenger, bassist Corpsebutcher, and drummer Mortar, the Kraków hailing quartet similarly launch at ears with venomous intent. Instantly, barbarous rhythms collude with bitter riffery as Hellstörm’s vocals spill squalling toxicity upon the now contagious and compelling onslaught of sound. Again it is easy to describe the core of the song as virulent rock ‘n’ roll entangled in the invasive dexterity and invention of the band, but it is a description which really does sum up the galvanic and invigorating violation on offer.

Both tracks provide one tremendous half to a thrilling encounter but equally they offer irresistible bait to check out the bands further, especially Ragehammer and their impending new album, The Hammer Doctrine, scheduled for release April 8th.

Enlightenment by Bloodletting is March 30th via Godz Ov War Productions / Mythrone Promotion on 7” vinyl @ https://godzovwarproductions.bandcamp.com/album/turbocharged-ragehammer-enlightenment-by-bloodletting

https://www.facebook.com/turbochargedswe

http://www.metal-archives.com/bands/Ragehammer/3540356536

http://godzovwar.com    https://www.facebook.com/mythroneprom

Pete RingMaster 08/03/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com/

The Erkonauts – I Did Something Bad

THE-ERKONAUTS__RingMaster Review

Having missed the release of I Did Something Bad first time around, we as so many others will be, are seriously grateful for its world-wide re-release through Kaotoxin Records. The debut outing for Geneva’s The Erkonauts, the album is a ferociously diverse and increasingly fascinating collage of genres and sound. As thick in unpredictability as it is rich in bold imagination, I Did Something Bad is one of those propositions that heavy duty recommendations swarm to. We can only join the crowd and with two additional new tracks to contemplate and devour for all, the album’s return is a not to be missed a second time treat.

Formed in 2014, The Erkonauts consists of ex-Sybreed members in bassist/vocalist Ales Campanelli and drummer Kevin Choiral, alongside guitarists Adrien Bornand and Sébastien Puiatti. Together they expel a sound which is as punk and heavy rock as it is metal, as much progressive enterprise as it is off kilter imagination. Fair to say the band made a hefty impact with the self-released outing of their debut album in 2014, the limited first and second press of I Did Something Bad greedily consumed with the band’s reputation growing in tandem through their live show and touring voracity. Produced by Drop (Samael, ex-Sybreed), the album is now poised to allow the rest of us slow coaches to dive into The Erkonauts bedlam, as mentioned with a pair of new songs recorded last year for extra rich taste.

The Great Ass Poopery opens up the tempest, a gloriously carnivorous bordering on carnal bassline infesting ears initially to be joined by the kinetic swings of Choiral. Alone it is gripping stuff but add the fiercely shimmering guitars aligned to rousing vocals and the air becomes aflame with rumbling attitude loaded rock ‘n’ roll. In some ways like Fear Factory meets Mudvayne with Suicidal Tendencies orchestrating, the punk metal assault is creative rampancy and virulent energy fired down the barrel of a dynamically hungry cannon.

art_RingMaster ReviewTony 5 swaggers in next, its body similarly spawned to that of its predecessor but swiftly sharing its own consuming tenacity. As biting rhythms and swinging grooves embrace the excellent mix of clean and aggressively rasping vocals, the song is a cantankerous affair but with a body of spiralling twists and sonic resourcefulness which makes other’s references to bands such as System Of A Down and Gojira understandable. As the first, the track is a ravenous swamping of ears with superb clarity within its smothering touch for the swarm of progressive tenacity within to equally entice and shine.

There is a greater initial hostility to the following All the Girls should Die, riffs and rhythms angrily badgering ears whilst readying them for the fluid slip into melodic pastures with emotive mellow vocals. Entwining melodic rock fire with alternative metal flirtation as other elements snarl and grumble, the song ebbs and flows in its sonic ire whilst providing a perpetually compelling persuasion. Again there is a rampant directness upon ears at times, the track managing to be simultaneously predatory and seductive before making way for the electro lit, punk fired triumph of Nola. The first invading bassline tells you all you need to know about what is to come; the track flinging hooks and rapier beats around like a dervish whilst expelling a groove infested sonic devilry around them. Vocals again are as varied and impressive as the maelstrom of delicious sound and the increasing imagination of the aural emprise.

A sultry climate comes with Dominium Mundi, its evocative air a suggestive calm for the imagination to expand upon before the heart of the storm breaks with again addictively stabbing rhythms and aggressively hued vocals. Though it brews an inferno of sound, the earlier haunting peace continues to switch and collude with the raging animosity, leaving ears ringing, emotions aflame, and the body exhausted by the persistent breakout of heavily flirtatious grooves. The latter is weaponry which increases its pull in Hamster’s Ghosthouse straight after. With irritable riffery and stalking beats, the track stalks and infests the senses. Its hardcore/nu-metal infused rock ‘n’ roll is pure temptation as it leads the listener into a following progressive garden of melodic and classic rock. As many songs, how they start is no hint to how they depart and certainly their ever intriguing journeys as superbly epitomised here.

The creeping devilment and sonic rapacity of Gog raises the greed in an already eager appetite with ease, its dark character and lively imagination awash with biting elements and imposingly suggestive textures and flavours whilst Your Wife hugs with an acoustic caress shaped by equally warm vocals. The croon does get feistier across its melody and harmony soaked captivation but never relinquishes its elegance and charm.

There is no escaping the great humour that runs through the band’s songwriting and attitude either ,with its boldest moment coming in the punk rage and fun of 9 is better than 8. It is an unbridled riot, simple as that and impossible not to get physically involved in before Machine brings its own commanding incitement to the party. The first of the new tracks exclusive to the release, it is a growling, thrashing slab of metal diversity. Hellacious in its body, infectious in its armoury of hooks, grooves, and anthemic rhythms, the track is as much punk metal as it is extreme metal toxicity and manna to the ears.

Concluded by the tempestuous Culbutos, it a merger of thunderous confrontation and seductive tempting, I Did Something Bad has all the quality and mastery to leave body and soul enraptured. As the intricately and dramatically woven final song, the album is a creative collage of sound turned into a riveting theatre of invention and fiercely arousing adventure that no one should miss out on.

Quite simply, with a new album proposed for later this year, time is ripe for all newcomers to grab your piece of The Erkonauts via I Did Something Bad.

I Did Something Bad is out via Kaotoxin Records from February 12th @ http://www.kaotoxin.com/shop/page/6/

Check out our interview with Ales Campanelli @ https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2016/03/25/exploring-the-roar-of-the-erkonauts-with-ales-campanelli/

https://www.facebook.com/theerkonauts   http://www.erkonauts.com

Pete RingMaster 12/02/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com/

Hell Puppets – Theatre of Sin

Hell Puppets_RingMaster Review

Picture the scene, after one flawed but certain success Victor Frankenstein’s ambitions go full out to feed his appetite for rabid music. So with bodies embalmed with the raw irreverence of Frankenstein Drag Queens From Planet 13, the ravenous metallic animus of Morgue Orgy, the virulent contagion of Dope, and the punk mischief of Dirt Box Disco, he created EviL-P, BeLiaL, GRavES, BeeLzEBeN, and SaTurNiST to spread the red and devour the soul. Or it might simply have been the Devil which dragged Hell Puppets from their English graves to conjure and release the lustful addiction that is Theatre of Sin.

The debut album from the Sussex bred quintet is a carnivorous vaudeville of horror and creative drama cast across a dozen songs which just thrust a knife of contagion through the heart and continually twist it with a bounty of punk ferocity, metal predation, and rock ‘n’ roll devilry. It drew a big grin on the first listen and a lustful stalking from the second, and fair to say since its release a couple of weeks or so back, we are not alone in adding the release to our cellar of favourites.

With members hailing from London, Brighton, Chichester and Lucifer’s right hand, Hell Puppets emerged in 2011 infusing inspirations from the likes of White Zombie, Pantera, Sex Pistols, Slayer, and Misfits into their swift attention grabbing fusion of punk and metal draped in horror, the occult, and Demonism. The first year saw the band solely concentrate on creating and honing their sonic infestation before setting out on their live scourge of the UK. A live session for a local radio station marked the growing emergence of the band during the next year before in 2013 they began recording debut EP No Strings Attached which was released in the following January. An increasing number of acclaim garnering shows surrounding its well-received introduction to the band and since with a support slot with The Hell later in 2014 another highlight. It was a successful year certainly eclipsed by this, as fresh from playing Bloodstock and touring with Meta-Stasis in support of their debut album, we simply have Theatre of Sin.

Theatre of Sin_RingMaster Review   From the opening carnage of Bow Bells, band and album has ears and imagination gripped. The brief track is a visceral scene setter for the following …From Hell, a blood dripping, flesh ripping introduction to the murderous streets of Victorian Whitechapel and the lust of Jack The Ripper which its successor impressively runs with. The second track to a concussive ring of bells rolls out an epidemic of inciting rhythms and growling vocals within a horde of punk riffs and tenacious hooks. All those bands initially mentioned come to thoughts as the track throws its sinew loaded attitude and mischievous insanity across the senses, yet as good as a hint that they are, the track is something demonically distinct to Hell Puppets, as too it emerges, the album. The band certainly cuts straight to the chase with the best track on Theatre Of Sin but there is no downward slope to follow, even if tracks can only closely sniff at the brilliance of the full opener.

Hung, Drawn and Slaughtered is one which runs it close, its blackened soul and horror punk fury colluding in another quick slavery of infectious hooks, grooves, and unpredictability. As many songs within the album there is a familiarity to it which seduces with the charm classic evil always has, a broad smile which captivates as djent kissed riffs and death instilled voracity works away at the senses and psyche narrated by the varied squalls of vocal animus.

From that metallic tempest another in the caustic shape of Born To Die steps forward, its body a maelstrom of glam and hard rock with punk ‘n’ roll tendencies aligned to metal ferocity. It is a stomp which seizes neck muscles and vocal chords to do its bidding before Project Mayhem uncages its primal anthemic roar laying somewhere between Black Dahlia Murder and Therapy?, and Political Diarrhoea taps into the punk beds of The Damned, The Vibrators, and Misfits for its rapacious stroll and lyrical agenda which gets the job done without fuss or wastage.

From an imposing shadow cast by the classic shark attack sound, complete with nasal secretions, the deranged hardcore fuelled roar of Drugged Up Shark excites and disorientates leaving ears prey to the clutches of Halloween, the band’s Christmas song. Only kidding, but it is a track which just keeps giving from its Carpenter inspired theme and melodic coaxing through to its grungy death infused sonic rancor. The track is glorious, another revealing new nuances and defiling attributes with very listen, much as We Are The Enemy and its whirlpool of insidious death metal, bracing rock ‘n’ roll, and juicy grooving. Imagine The Sex Pistols, Turbonegro, and Venom severely shaken until their juices merge and you get a glimpse of another big highlight amongst many within Theatre of Sin.

Morbid Mirror twists and turns like a clawed seductress next, its lithe grooves and rasping vocals bringing a mix of Grumpynators and Murderdolls whilst slipping into richer blackened spite throughout, especially vocally. Once more ears and emotions are lost to Hell Puppets and kept by firstly the bestial, mordant sound of The Decunted and finally the mouth-watering discord and sonic antipathy of Face the Reaper. The track is a bad-blooded smog of noise and sonic pollution which just brings the bedlamic acts of Theatre of Sin to a fitting ravenous climax.

The album is a wonderful desecration of body and soul and if any of those bands we mentioned as hints appeal, as well as something new and dirty to the touch, and the fact the Hell Puppets is our new favourite trespass, then hopefully we have incited you to be brave and enter the Theatre of Sin.

Theatre of Sin is available now via Hell Puppets’ Bandcamp.

Pete Ringmaster 15/09/2015

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com/

Brassick – Self Titled

Brassick band_RingMaster Review

Building on a reputation earned from their first release and a live presence which has venues aggressively rocking, UK punks Brassick have released their self-titled debut album and fair to say whatever acclaim already garnered should be outshone by all offered this anthemic snarl. Raw and uncompromising yet loaded with a hardcore roar and fierce inescapable hooks to drool over, the release is poised to put the Birmingham quartet of the broadest punk maps.

Formed in 2012, Brassick quickly sparked local attention and support with their fusion of punk, ska, and metal essences. That presence soon gripped wider recognition through the band’s unrelenting live presence which has seen them play with the likes of GBH, Cock Sparrer, UK Subs, and Subhumans amongst many, and the release of the Broke And Restless EP in 2013. Last year saw the foursome continue to ignite the UK live scene, venues and festivals coming under their fiery growl and culminating in a highly successful spot at Rebellion alongside bands such as NOFX, Street Dogs, Stiff Little Fingers, Killing Joke, and The Duel. Already charging through Britain and Europe again this year with festivals and another Rebellion appearance on the schedule, Brassick have made 2015 their biggest year yet with the release of their rousing album.

Produced by bassist Jake Cunningham and guitarist Peter Macbeth, the album opens with Hollow Cries and sirens infusing cold portentous air. Punchy rhythms splinter the scenery next, all embroiled in a sonic mist before the song strides clear with anthemic riffs and rhythms sparked further by the instantly gripping vocals of Nicola Hardy. There is a great essence of attitude and snarl to her tones to match and incite the sounds around her, a pulsating bassline and inflammatory guitar enterprise colluding with the healthy swipes of drummer Jay Jay Khaos open evidence in two riveting and highly persuasive opening minutes.

Brassick cover_RingMaster Review     The punchy exploits of Same Sound bound in next, riffs and beats a feisty lure reinforced by the vocal defiance of Hardy. The metallic edge and texture of the track reminds of US punk metallers Mongrel, whilst the scything expulsions breaking up the song midway are the trigger to adventurous twists before the assault returns to its initial confrontation and sets ears up perfectly for the outstanding tempting of Media Faces. Like early The Duel with a Ruts like reggae predation, the track prowls and roars, forcibly stirring up appetite and imagination through the magnetic guitar craft of Macbeth and the irritable infection of sound and vocals.

Fall Because They’re Blind backs up the potent start to the album though it does not have that extra spark to match its predecessors. Nevertheless with Cunningham’s alluring bass enterprise and an old school punk leaning around Hardy’s ever inciting delivery, the track hits the spot before Drown takes over to stalk the senses. Bass and riffs are a deviously intimidating nudge whilst the beats of Khaos refuse to hold back on their provocation but it is the inventive atmospheric twists and varied vocal persuasion that gives the track an extra impressing potency.

The lyrical and emotional charge of the band pulls no punches on political and social commentary, and breeds a strong and impacting landscape in Sirens where authority wails and anarchic ambience wash over ears as bass and guitar spin their evocative and dramatic web around Hardy’s spoken and accusing narrative. It is a powerful proposal which stands alone or works as the turbulent lead in to the brawling antagonism of Free For All and its UK Subs/Angelic Upstarts like old school growl. The song in turn allows no breath to be taken as it seeds the beginnings of the outstanding Cynical Ties and another stock of gripping irritancy, sharp hooks, and anthemic defiance. There is a great street punk dirtiness to the album and especially accentuates the power and addictiveness of this track and in turn its successor Let Us Go. There is a touch of The Objex to the heart and fire of the second of the two but equally a seventies breeding and modern fury come together to ensure another stirring up on the body and passions.

The grouchy tone and belligerence of Leeches nags and grumbles next, its angry belly bound in more of the unpredictable and striking imagination shaping songwriting and sound which to be honest the band does not use quite enough across the album. When they do it turns great songs into venomous enslavements as here, richly emphasizing the potential coursing through the whole of the album.

The fun and enjoyment comes to a close with the mighty Vagabond Smile. Instantly its rhythmic shuffle traps ears, the song is in control, tightening its grip and lure as vocals across the band come together in a middle finger raised defiance complete with virulent grooves, sharp hooks, and incendiary attitude. It is a riotous end to an invigorating and refreshing album. Brassick use their inspirations and the seeds of punk rock to create their own, not majorly unique, but seriously enjoyable rock ‘n’ roll. Already anticipation of bigger and bolder things from the band is ripe and right now thick pleasure full thanks to their first album.

Brassick is available now @ http://www.brassick.bigcartel.com/ and through STP Records @ http://www.stprecords.co.uk/page4.htm with CD version out September 18th.

https://www.facebook.com/brassickmusic

RingMaster 09/07/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

Silent Divide – Master Of Disguise EP

SD Promo Photo_RingMaster Review

Let us introduce you to Silent Divide, a UK quintet who has just released one stonking beast of a debut unleashing some of the best heavy, voracious rock ‘n roll heard in an introduction in a long time. It is a highly anticipated proposition from a band having already ignited their local scene and now with a national submission to their roaring sounds in their sights, and it is hard to imagine the Master Of Disguise EP failing to achieve that success.

Essex bred Silent Divide, since forming in 2014, have gigged nationwide igniting crowds at venues such as O2 Academy Islington, Barfly, and The Waterfront Norwich along the way. Even before the EP’s release, the band had been approached to have its sounds played on numerous radio stations across England, Europe, and America; that enthusiasm adding to the eagerness of the band’s fans in wanting to devour the now revealed seriously impressive collection of songs.

Silent Divide’s sound is a fiery mix of metal, heavy rock, and plenty more; every song within Master Of Disguise bringing its own individual character and flavour to the diverse yet flowing landscape of the EP. There is also a snarl and dynamism to their music which can savage and seduce or roar and caress simultaneously, and it all begins with Pieces That Bleed. The track is an attention grabbing, adrenaline igniting slab of punk metal which along with a sonic trespass opens with the gnarly barracuda bass tempting of Jonny Darko. His strings growl with bestial seduction, gripping ears and imagination as the guitars of Joe Wright and Anthony Berry score the air as they uncage their own predacious set of riffs and grooves. In full swing, the song has ears and appetite truly alive, especially once it settles into a stalking stroll of a gait around the quickly impressing tones of Marianne Harrington. Things are soon tenaciously grouchy and lively again though, the song like a mix of US band Mongrel and Britain’s dragSTER with Harrington’s superb delivery reminding of the former’s front lady Jessica Sierra.

SD EP Cover 2_RingMaster Review   It is a rousing and exhilarating start backed as forcibly and enjoyably by the EP’s title track next, followed after by the thoroughly pleasing Silhouette. The release swiftly reveals a broader canvas to its adventure, guitars casting a spicy stoner-esque toning to the steadily brewing and eventually erupting grooves. With the dramatic and skilled swipes of drummer Luke McCormick guiding and puncturing its body, the song sculpts a web of antagonistic rhythms and creative contagion, every hook, twist, and vocal incitement unpredictable and inventively virulent. Again it is a track as much punk and metal as it is intensive rock ‘n’ roll, and again quite irresistible before it makes way for its successor. The third song stalks the senses with riffs and beats before slipping into not so much mellower essences but more expansive scenery of warm melodic rock and emotional resourcefulness.

As we suggested earlier, each song is an individual in sound and ideation, proven again by Crimson Crier. A southern drawl lines the opening coaxing of acoustic guitar, a sultry twang which is emulated in the country-esque/folkish delivery of Harrington. The tantalising balladry ebbs and flows in intensity as emotional and musical crescendos blaze away within the reflective and seductive croon of the song. Fair to say the track was not as immediate on these ears as others around it but has grown to be one of the major highlights with its Heart like hues and simply mesmeric presence.

The EP ends as it began, with a thunderous incitement bringing body and emotions a feverish offering to get involved with. Broken Name is more alternative metal than its predecessors, more proof to the depth of the band’s songwriting, but again has a raw and aggressive edge which is metal bred and driven by punk attitude. Arguably the most anthemic song on the release, it leaves EP and listener on a major high.

You may have heard good things about Silent Divide previously or they may be new to you, but all the rich things said have been proven and more by Master Of Disguise, one of the most thrilling and potential thick proposals this year.

The Master Of Disguise EP is out now digitally and on CD @ https://silentdivide.bandcamp.com

https://www.facebook.com/silentdivide.uk  https://twitter.com/silentdivide

RingMaster 03/07/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net