The Hellfreaks – God On The Run

The story goes that “Hell was full so they came back!” A return sparking the beginnings of Hungarian punks The Hellfreaks so all hail the greed of the horned one to gather as many souls as he can to cram his domain. Seriously though whatever the spark which brought the Budapest band to life it has bred some of the best times for our ears here at The RR and none as glorious as now with the band’s new album, God On The Run.

Formed in 2009 by vocalist Zsuzsa Radnóti better known as Shakey Sue, The Hellfreaks soon had the local scene jumping before infesting ears and borders further afield with their psychobilly/rockabilly/punk nurtured sound. As the following year broke, the band unleashed debut album Hell Sweet Hell to swift success and acclaim around the world. Its successor, Circus Of Shame, met equal reaction and plaudits as the band found themselves touring across Europe and making a mark in the US.

As 2014 began to close up, the band split though it was a brief departure as Sue pulled the band from its temporary grave with a new line-up and a fresh evolution of their sound which saw punk and rock ‘n’ roll instincts fuelling a whole new incitement and individuality. The potency of this change was in evidence within third album Astoria, released 2016 and now in full roar and glory within God On The Run, an unbridled stomp which unapologetically puts all before in the shade.

From the moment opener Men In Grey launches its roar from the sonic lure it initially dangles, the album proved addiction is not always a bad thing. The voracious beats of Béla Budai drive the surge of temptation, nagging and biting simultaneously with a primal hunger as the guitar of Jozzy adds its rapacious riffs and claws alongside the dark grumble of Gabi Domján’s bass. As it hits its equally eager stride, Sue’s rousing tones ignite an already blazing fire, the song thick in attitude and virulence which only escalates as the chorus unleashes its roar. The track is superb, punk rock predator with garage punk and hard rock rebelliousness soaked in punk metal aggression.

From thereon in every track proceeds to infest ears with their own unique character as swiftly proven by Red Sky. Again, as rhythms pounce and plunder accompanying riffs and hooks spring their web of temptation around the compelling tones of Sue, her snarl and fire an echo of those esurient sounds and her lyrical bite. With essences which remind of bands such as In Evil Hour and The Distillers in varying degrees, the track is a rousing storm in the ears while Hello Sea! straight after matches its attitude in a calmer but no less volatile stroll. With open tempestuousness which shapes its voice and holler around a melodic enticement which alone is a magnet for ears, the song hit the spot already well attended by the album.

Doldrum Dynasty intensifies the album’s impact and the greed for it, the heavy tenacious nagging of bass and guitar grooves alone manna for the imagination though next up Witches Heal still manages to eclipse the album’s best moment yet. With Budai’s swinging beats prowled by the riveting tones of Sue, the track stalks the senses whilst gripping the body with an infectiousness which borders on the viral, again hooks a devious weapon within the slavery.

As Royal Blue and new single Adrenalized offer their own inimitable endeavours, God On The Run only took a firmer grip. Such the majesty of the previous pair, neither track quite rivalled their stature yet with their respective punk audacity and infection loaded clamour, both proved pure contagion before As Above stormed ears with its punk metal defiance and rapacity for a matching persuasion. Again within the creative hostility melodic enterprise and harmonic temptation provided, without defusing the song’s truculent heart, an evolving adventure the imagination keenly feasted on.

The album closes up with firstly the outstanding Clear Water, a track winding its wiry tempting around ears from its first breath whilst gnawing at the senses before offering rich melodic seduction and lastly the electro coated Tabby, a track declaring there is plenty more in The Hellfreaks imagination and sound for they and us to tap in to as it hauntingly consumed the passions.

God On the Run is certainly not the first time The Hellfreaks have had us lauding and recommending their devilry but there is a new vigour and urgency in our suggestion that you go check their voracious new album.

God On The Run is out February 7th; available @ https://thehellfreaks.com/shop

https://www.thehellfreaks.com/    https://www.facebook.com/thehellfreaks/

Pete RingMaster 26/01/2020

Copyright RingMasterReview: MyFreeCopyright

Motel Transylvania – Self Titled

We have not been alone in brewing eager anticipation for the debut album of Italian horrorbillies Motel Transylvania having been infected by the sounds of their They Dig After Midnight EP of 2015 as well as the numerous appearances the band has made on various compilations. Four years or so in the making finally that first full-length has crawled from the corridors of the band’s darkest corners and we can tell you it has been well worth the wait.

Formed in 2013 as a solo project of stand-up drummer/vocalist Toxi Ghoul, Motel Transylvania swiftly became a trio which unleashed a well-received debut single in the ghoulish romance of It’s not so bad. The release of They Dig After Midnight in turn established the Savona trio as a band with a potent sound and creative character equipped with the potential of bigger bolder things ahead. Their self-titled debut album realises plenty of that intimation without exhausting all the possibilities of even greater exploits ahead. Across thirteen views from the mausoleum, the album presents a multi-flavoured proposal embracing everything from horror punk and psychobilly to vintage rock ‘n’ roll, punk rock, and other death strewn hues.

It opens up with the portentously atmospheric Called, an invitation into the album’s crypt as intimidating as it is cinematically irresistible. The piece enticingly opens the gateway to the carnal goodness to come starting with Destination. The gorgeous rockabilly groove which harkens its trespass was enough to enslave attention, a submission swiftly rewarded by Toxi’s senses clipping beats and the dark upright bass grumble cast by Fish “The Scarecrow”. The guitar of Taison Gore continues to spin a web of temptation throughout only dropping its raised adrenaline for a breath to be taken before striking up again with salacious intent before the drummer’s lead vocals share their raw scowls. It is an excellent full start to the release and taster of the band’s richly flavoured and varied sound.

The following track shares the band and the album’s name, Motel Transylvania a rousing slice of horror punk with an early Misfits lilt within a labyrinth of psycho and rockabilly taunting. The predacious trespass of the rhythms and vocal causticity steals the show within a track which quickly left its indelible mark before Her Last Boogie launched its raw rock ‘n’ roll stomp on ears with zeal and increasing enterprise. A blend of the feral and the melodically precise, the track is a slice of death boogie needing little time to get punk hips whipped up.

The outstanding Drowning gives warning enough with its bass bred jaws lure before breaking upon the rocks with its blood tainted surf rock groove and barbarous intent while The Night of the Living Dead speeds rather than lumbers through ears with its The Order Of The Fly-esque stalking though the result is still an inescapable rock ‘n’ roll nagging of ears and the imagination. Both tracks add new shades to the album’s adventure and to the unfolding tales of terror; each new pleasure to devour though both are outshone by 4 and its Mad Sin meets Tiger Army like psychobilly shimmer, the albums best track.

The ghostly plains of Beyond The Lights comes next, its unearthly throes psych rock kissed seduction evolving a carnival of fevered temptation before slipping back into its ethereal decay, while its successor, It’s Not So Bad, coaxes ears with its puckered rockabilly lures before erupting in a punk nurtured hostility, repeating the cycle with greater imagination and psychosis. At every turn the track twists into unexpected escapades increasing its magnetism every step of the way.

Continuing the great multi-textured web of sounds within the album, A Place To End embraces Latin/mariachi hues to its Koffin Kats spiced uproar while the following Dead N’ Proud howls like a psychobilly inspired Frankenstein Drag Queens From Planet 13. In turn the simply superb STOMP! Cockroaches stamps around with a great Demented Are Go inspired irritability, these three alone showing the broad landscape of sound within the Motel Transylvania bloodlust.

I Wanna Be Your Ghoul completes the release, the song another psychobilly nurtured tempting under sweltering skies; gallows rock which has the body swinging as firmly as the cadaverous romance it shares.

It is a fine end to a record which certainly pleased and had praise leaving lips on the first listen but has blossomed to far greater heights and persuasion with every subsequent venture through its sonic charnel house.

The Motel Transylvania album is out now through Undead Artists and Archetype Records.

 https://www.facebook.com/moteltransylvania/    https://twitter.com/MotelTransylvan

 Pete RingMaster 15/11/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Buzzkillz – Major Fucking Complications

Having caught the Buzzkillz bug last year after being introduced to their debut album of the previous year, there was certain anticipation with an edge of excitement when Jybe from the Finnish band got in touch to say a new EP was winging its way over. Major Fucking Complications is a five track holler of the band’s increasingly individual punk ‘n’ roll/punkabilly; an encounter which eagerly builds on that first full-length and demands greater attention goes the way of the Helsinki quartet.

Formed in 2011 by vocalist/guitarist Ultima Foole and double bassist Jybe, its line-up subsequently completed with the addition of guitarist Antti and drummer Joiku four years later, Buzzkillz saw potent praise come their way through 2016 debut album Scum Of The Earth. It also introduced them to a new wave of fans outside of their homeland. Major Fucking Complications should incite even thicker attention as it expands on the potency of its predecessor in songwriting and sound. It some ways it does not offer anything majorly removed from the album but every track has a richer character and thicker enterprise to their stomps.

Major Fucking Complications also features across its length the guest vocals of Titch from legendary psychobilly band Klingonz alongside its creators, the release opening up with its title track. Slowly but deviously swinging in with open mischief in its intent, the song quickly bursts into a psychobilly nurtured stroll within a punk bred roar. Senses clipping rhythms easily had instincts on board, the lustful slaps of Jybe on bass string appetite exciting as Foole’s growling tones backed by Titch’s distinctive tones add to the infectious dissent. Addiction teasing hooks only add to the persuasion, guitars teasing and taunting as the track’s swing mastered eager hips and limbs; it all making for a fiercely rousing start.

The following Envy, Hunger and Greed though quickly makes a demands on top track honours; it too needing mere seconds to incite the listener with rock grooves , punchy rhythms, and a punk bred ferocity. Calm and virulently catchy in its lead up to a lustfully raucous chorus, there was no stopping the track getting deep beneath the skin from its first cycle. There was definite catchy times within that first album but now that contagiousness has been honed as inescapable bait and traps within song and EP with an imagination which bordering on bedlamic never rests.

Its glorious punk ‘n’ roll hue is then merged with more punkabilly natured tenacity within next up That Shit Is Gonna To Kill You. Jybe’s bass saunter is the first mighty lure, a firmly pulsating one eventually joined by the rest of the band’s swinging escapade. Centred by an ear seizing hook, the track becomes a dirty canter of attitude lined punk rock around a rockabilly seeded rhythmic stroll. The further into its infectious trespass darker hues and bolder imagination escape to add to its increasing temptation before Lie! twists and turns with belligerence and muscle.  With a touch of early Grumpynators to its dissent, the track is punk ‘n’ roll contagion. It may be less adventurous and more invasively irritable than its predecessors but it does not stop it being a fully contagious involvement.

Completed by the psychobilly fuelled Keep On Crawling, another moment which had our appetite for the flavours the band weaves into their sound drooling, Major Fucking Complications is a declaration that Buzzkillz is ready to roar in a whole new landscape of recognition. The surf kissed shimmer of guitars within that final track just epitomises the bolder invention and imagination in their sound and why we are already eagerly awaiting its next adventurous move.

Major Fucking Complications is released July 27th via Fast Decade Records on 12” vinyl.

 https://www.facebook.com/Buzzkillzband/   https://buzzkillzband.bandcamp.com/

Pete RingMaster 24/07/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Norm & the Nightmarez – Wild ‘n’ Rockin’

There is no denying if there is a sniff of psychobilly or rockabilly in a release we instinctively lick our lips and with real zeal if it comes under the moniker of Norm & the Nightmarez. The band has been the source of tracks and albums which have unerringly ignited our appetite for those and aligning genres past and present so you can imagine we had a spring in our step when the gent behind the outfit sent over their new 7” EP, Wild ‘n’ Rockin’ containing four rich slices of what Norm and co do best.

Northern Ireland born but living in Birmingham since the age of 4, vocalist/guitarist/songwriter Norm Elliott has been stirring up the psychobilly scene long before his latest band was a spark of an idea. The eighties saw him step forward with The Phantom Zone, an outfit which supported the likes of Guana Batz, The Vibes, and The Sting-Rays in its time. Numerous other projects followed before Norm linked up with ex-Meteors/ex-Guana Batz bassist Mick White and Sharks drummer Paul ‘Hodge’ Leigh for Mickey & The Mutants, the band releasing the outstanding album, Touch The Madness in 2013. From there Norm created Norm & the Nightmarez and has released a pair of equally impressive albums in Psychobilly Infection of 2014 and Psychobilly D.N.A. two years later. There was rumours that the band might be calling it a day or at least on a hiatus but thankfully last year it was re-energised and now in fresh inspiring form as proven by Wild ‘n’ Rockin’.

The band’s sound has always been more adventurous than the psychobilly tag suggests. It is undoubtedly psychobilly bred, nurtured, and perpetually grounded in its first love but also keenly embraces the cleaner cut rockabilly from the fifties onwards as well as further diversity inspired by both styles. It is that fact which EP opener Too Rockabilly deals with; a song going eye to eye ball with all dismissing its imagination and rich flavouring as not psychobilly, presumably accusations the band has had to dismiss despite their music always doing the talking. The rousing track opens with a juicy rockabilly chord, immediately bursting into a swinging canter with rhythmic predation as melodic tendrils entangle ears and Norm’s vocals challenge. The throbbing double bass of Chrissy Royle alone had us bouncing, the ear clipping beats of Dave Prince egging on even greater participation whilst Norm had vocal chords in league and hips swinging to his melodic antics with ease. There are essences of Ray Campi meets The Sharks to the track but as always the case to date, it is a song pure Norm & the Nightmarez.

It is followed by Bop, a track living up to its name once initially teasing with a flirtatious guitar lure. Again the body was soon lost to its manipulation, its core hook infesting the psyche as rhythms again brought the bounce in body and spirit alive. As with the first, decades of rockabilly and especially its early Sun days are embraced in its psychobilly groove, the wondering if Johnny Burnette fronting The Meteors might sound something akin to this brought about by its attributes.

The B-side to the EP starts with Catwoman; its dark salacious antics immediately toying with the senses as the guitar courts and preys on the imagination. Primarily a deliciously seductive instrumental with melodic finesse and shadow clad threats crossed by almost portentous yet encouraging echoes of its title, the track needed little time to enslave.

That success was just as quickly inspired by the closing stomp of Lonely Avenue. Considering selling its soul from the off, the encounter gallops through ears reaping melodic rewards and dark temptations; the trio spinning a web of each with their inventive craft and enterprise. It might escape the clutches of the horned one but is a devil in itself and had ears hungry for more, addiction increasing with every devouring.

Among so many great previous tracks, the four within the Alan Wilson produced Wild ‘n’ Rockin’ just might be the most thrilling bunch yet from the band. Certainly with the great artwork of Sherrie Gunstone similarly flirting from the front cover, they are some of their most contagious and arousing. Rock ’n’ roll is indeed the devil’s music and Norm & the Nightmarez’s sounds quite possibly the most devilish of them all.

Wild ‘n’ Rockin’ is out now on 7″ coloured vinyl via Western Star; available @ https://western-star.tmstor.es/cart/product.php?id=37163

https://www.facebook.com/Normandthenightmarez/

Pete RingMaster 05/06/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

The Elixirs – Sin Alley

When a band provides one of your all-time fav tracks there is always going to be an instinctive excitement at news of a fresh offering. And so it is with us and The Elixirs. Back in the aeons of time, well actually six years ago, the Gas City, Indiana hailing trio unleashed debut album Long Gone. It was a brawl of a riot bred in the band’s fusion of punk, psychobilly, and country.  Amongst its rich crowd rousing escapades was one song which has especially instilled itself on our daily playlists of pleasure and featured heavily on the site’s previous podcasts; Park It On The Lawn being that lingering beast. Now the band has returned with a brand new album in the devilish shape of Sin Alley, a release carrying a ravenous horde of similarly addictive proposals.

The Elixirs formed mid-2007 as The Stumblers with its original line-up of vocalist/bassist Dan Tedder, drummer Joe King, and guitarist Dan Savage. With things not quite igniting for the band, it evolved into The Boneyard Elixirs; Dan, now on guitar, and Joe recruiting bassist R.S. Lowe. Bassist changes led to the addition to now named The Elixirs of Dewayne Hughes, a time seeing the release of first EP Gut Cuts. 2011 saw Hughes leave and subsequently replaced by upright bassist Whitt. His talent and energy as well as the new dynamic of that stand-up bass was seemingly the spark to attention, that and the outstanding Long Gone which was released in 2012. Increasingly established and eagerly supported in the Indy scene, the band was thrust into ears far further afield by the album, including the likes of us in the UK. Since then the band has continued to uncage their inimitable rock ‘n’ roll whilst seeing a couple of line-up changes. The first album saw Dave “The Dudeist” replace Joe on the sticks and skins, he subsequently leaving after two years to be eventually succeeded by the initially reluctant Nate “Big Stick” Striedinger. From simply helping out his close friends at the ‘eleventh hour’ on live shows, he has become the perfect fit for band and a rousing sound now roaring with rigour across Sin Alley, their new rapaciously rocking, stomping, middle finger raising thirteen track DIY devil.

Fair to say as soon as the opening hook and subsequent rapping on wood of Knockin infested ears we were hooked, the track swiftly showing all the virulent slightly dirty traits of our first lusty affair with The Elixirs. Dan teases and flirts with the senses through his guitar as Whitt and Nate simply incite attention with their tenacious rhythms. The track is a fiery blend of psychobilly and punk ‘n’ roll; a mischievous almost salacious incitement about the struggle of being chased by temptation and sin. In the words of their press release; “when the lord makes it rain the devil makes it pour.”

The outstanding start is quickly matched by the cowpunk fuelled Hard To Bite Your Tongue, a track line dancing on the senses whilst fingering the imagination with its sonic liquor. The metronomic prowess of Nate colludes fiendishly with the delicious dulled resonance of Whitt’s strings, Dan’s vocals backed by his band mates just as persuasive as our bodies and vocal chords quickly climbed on board.

The following Kentucky Whores reveals the dirtier edge to the band’s sound; its earthy air and uncompromising breath full of licentious temptation while Killer Custodian is punk ‘n’ roll at its most lustfully menacing with hooks to die for and rhythms to swing from. As impressive and unreservedly enjoyable as Long Gone was already at this point Sin Alley has it beat and cowering in the corner.

Its Cold Outside corrupts along next with a fevered stroll through broken romance, the threesome a senses harrying force of tenacity before Busted Flat swings its sights and punches at politics and its perpetrators. Whitt’s slaps are just sinful, Nate’s beats bordering on the lecherous whilst Dan springs hooks and riffs like a sonic libertine; the result another hellacious thrill of an encounter.

As the likes of the horror punk spiced In A Bottle and Know Remorse with its punk-a-billy meets Misfits antagonism come and go, attention and addiction to the album only escalated indeed boiled over again as the groove swinging, growl spewing Sauced had body and imagination dancing like a puppet after them. Its grumble alone was manna to the ears, its soiled groove lust brewing and rhythmic prowl irresistible; all leading to a final bedlamic outpouring before Wake Up gives every reason to holler at the top of one’s voice with limbs flung around in tandem.

The final trio of songs sees Hot Days romping and sweating with sonic boisterousness, The Bottom snarling with noise festering attitude, and Good Aint Good crooning in bold raucous style as punk, rockabilly, and simply rock ‘n’ roll unite in one anthemic roar.

Sin Alley is exactly as it suggests; every song a gateway into promiscuous sounds and inhibition free antics and each track eagerly uniting to make up one of the year’s most thrilling propositions so far. The Elixirs are ‘back’, bigger, bolder, and badder than ever; bliss!!

Sin Alley is out now via Boneyard Elixir Music; available @ https://elixirs.bandcamp.com/

http://www.theelixirs.com/   https://www.facebook.com/the.elixirs.music/    https://twitter.com/theelixirs/

Pete RingMaster 04/05/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Infected Syren – Self Titled

Nudging broad attention virtually since they emerged in 2011 and certainly since the release of a demo the following year, Infected Syren are now demanding it with their self-titled debut album. With eleven tracks of rapacious metal infested punk ‘n’ roll, the Cyprus bred outfit grab body and appetite with mischievous intent, rousing energy, and a craft honed in the heart of rock ‘n’ roll.

Nicosia bred and now sharing their time between their country’s capital and London, Infected Syren is said to have come to “finally consider a more serious and dedicated approach towards writing their own material and developing their sound while doing what they love most – performing heavy alternative music!” Certainly you can hear the passion at its heart and the imagination in its character; a proposition which roars with the invasive funkiness of Infected Grooves, the uncompromising punk attitude of The Exploited, the thrash devilry of early Anthrax, and the psychobilly predation of a blend of Grumpynators and Batmobile. It is a stomping incitement embracing familiar traits but all twisted into the fiercely enjoyable individual antics of Infected Syren.

The album opens with the sinister, increasingly intimidating carnival of Infected Circus, a hook woven instrumental easily getting under the skin as guitars suggestively dance and rhythms devilishly swing. It sets the mood and rascality of the release perfectly, the following romp of The B.B.P. similarly manipulative with its hook lined grooves and teasing metal spawn riffs. Guitarists Constantinos Lyras and Louis Syrimis cast a net of infectious exploits within the song’s boisterous body; the latter’s vocals as bold and devious as the addictive textures making up the track.

Already, the release is a swagger of thrash and alternative metal hued rock ‘n’ roll, the band’s punk instincts brewing nicely and erupting more forcibly within UnNormal. From a southern nurtured hook, the track breaks into an inescapably catchy stroll, wiry grooves swiftly entwining the animated beats of Constantinos Syrimis and the lithe canter of Miguel Trapezaris’ bass. With devilment in song and the charismatic vocal deliver of Louis, the track bounds along with the listener taking in calm and volatile scenery with equal ease whilst taking over hips and body like a puppeteer.

It is fair to say that every track within the album is rich in virulent bait and scheming manoeuvres, next up Sick springing its dirty rock ‘n’ roll with frisky buoyancy, bobbing along with attitude and playfulness as punk irritability meets heavy rock intensity, both imposingly irresistible sides entangled in riotous high spirit. The album’s best track is closely rivalled by the punk ‘n’ roll discord coated virulence of Unwanted, the track poking the listener in the chest with its bad attitude whilst toying with them as if a marionette. Heavy metal spices add to thrash instincts within the temptation though again it is the psyche enslaving hooks and grooves which seal the slavery.

Through the psychobilly lined Boogie Stick and the devious ingenuity of The Torture Brothers, the album only tightens its grip on ears and appetite, the first with fevered energy as it stalks the senses spreading aural narcotics laced with Constantinos striking enterprise. Its successor with a similar gait and admittedly flavouring brings its own individual addiction, those hues evolving into an infestation of rock ‘n’ roll which is as toxic as it is a tonic for the spirit, the song laying its hands on a share of best track honours.

Both Divide and Rule and Death After the Melody pretty much match the leading pair, as all tracks come close to in all honesty, their respective defiant groove wired stomp and hungrily swinging trespass each melding metal, punk, and rockabilly textures into one unique carnival of sound and infectiousness. They snarl and tease the imagination, taunt and spark the body into zealous involvement with every note and twist but Infected Syren show themselves just as effective in grabbing the listener’s subservience with unbridled muscle clad, animosity fuelled punk ‘n’ roll, Toothless Tigers the unassailable evidence.

The album closes with Syrens in The Opera, another insatiable imagination stoking instrumental to bask in. It is a fine end to an album we truly cannot get enough of. If Infected Syren cannot stir up real attention and praise their way with this gem of a release something is seriously wrong.

The Infected Syren album is out now on CD and Digitally through most digital music stores and @ https://infectedsyren.bandcamp.com/album/infected-syren

http://infectedsyren.com/    https://www.facebook.com/infectedsyren

Pete RingMaster 16/01/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Basementones – No ease, No rest, No mercy

There is a great nagging quality to the sound of Finnish punk ‘n’’ rollers Basementones and in fine insistence within their new EP No ease, No rest, No mercy. Easily tempting ears on its first couple of listens, the release leaves the seeds of addictiveness behind; lures which spark that just one more time repetition which in turn leads to another and more obsessive qualities.

Released on Undead Artists, the EP comes four years after the release of the band’s debut album Let There Be Noise which followed their first EP Gambler of 2012. Being introduced to the band through No ease, No rest, No mercy, with thanks to a certain Johnny Rose (Thirteen Shots), founder of said label, what the band has been up to between releases we cannot say though plenty of shows seems a good guess, that and, with hindsight, the more audible honing of a sound which instinctively gets under the skin with its mix of punk rock, psychobilly, and numerous other aspects of rock ‘n’ roll.

The quartet gets down to business straight away with opener The Call, hooks and swinging rhythms instantly colluding as vocalist Jani snarls and growls in his distinctive way. The melodic dexterity of Kinnunen matches the lure of his grooves and lively hooks whilst the string slapping prowess of double bassist Tuukka needs little time to stoke instinctive ardour for throbbing suggestive basslines. Punk and rock ‘n’ roll unite in the voracious swing of the track, Lahu’s lively beats fuelling it all with tenacious energy and urgency as the EP gets off to a flying start.

And there is no time to grab a breath as the outstanding Green Bastards steps in with a spicy groove which within another second launches virulent hooks and a pulsating flirtatious bassline from within its salacious temptation. With Jani adding his raw catchiness to the contagion, the track is pure infection and the best track on offer though closely courted by the likes of the rockabilly swinging Cellmates Of Lunacy. There is a touch of The Peacocks to the track but it is soon bound in the Basementones’ character of sound and expression as other spices adds to an increasingly compelling tapestry.

A country/cowpunk hue comes with the resourceful exploits of The House its creative rustling soon twisting things into an individual proposal which bounds along with zeal and infectious dexterity if not quite matching the heights of those before it or the outstanding antics of final track No Regrets. The psychobilly essences of the third song are even more vocal within the EP closer, their sultrily toxic hues merging with horrorpunk/punk escapades as the release is given a boisterous and increasingly rousing finale.

Given the sound and potent lure of No ease, No rest, No mercy it is surprising we have not come across Basementones before but better late than never.

No ease, No rest, No mercy is out now digitally and on red vinyl through Undead Artists @ https://basementones.bandcamp.com/ and https://undeadartists.bandcamp.com/album/no-ease-no-rest-no-mercy

https://www.facebook.com/Basementones/

Pete RingMaster 04/07/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright