Raizing Hell – Monsters Prefer Blondes

RH_RingMasterReview

If you have found the ground rumbling under foot in recent weeks, it is not the earth in rebellion but the dead rising to join the living in descending on the long and eagerly awaited second album from Romanian horror punk n’ rollers Raizing Hell. Providing devilish slices of graveyard boogie fuelled by punk rock attitude, Monsters Prefer Blondes is a carnivorous incitement from the crypt and quite irresistible.

Raizing Hell emerged in 2010, formed by vocalist/guitarist Liv Decay (ex-Howling Saints), guitarist Mr. Zombie, and drummer Oly Sinn. The line-up was soon completed by bassist Demented Vlash with the band laying down their live presence from 2011 and going on to share stages with the likes of Blitzkid, The Silver Shine, Tazmanian Devils, Fancy Dolls, The Argies, A Wilhelm Scream, Koffin Kats, Daily Noise Club, Orlok and the Rockin Ghouls, The Irradiates and many others over the years. Drawing on inspirations from bands such as Motorhead, The Plasmatics, Wendy O. Williams, Misfits, Nekromantix, Blitzkid, Demented Are Go, Horrorpops, and The Meteors, the Bucharest quartet soon evolved their own distinctive shade of horror punk which fuelled debut EP Psychoholics Unanimous in the December of that year and in turn provided a tasty part of the excellent Chainsaw Ballads split EP with UK bands Thirteen Shots and Trioxin Cherry via Psycho A Go-Go Records in 2013. First album Of Ghouls And Men was an even bigger attention grabber when released later that year; thirteen tracks which pushed the band into the full spotlight of the European horror punk and rock ‘n’ roll scene.

2014 saw Raizing Hell sign with the excellent Germany based label, Undead Artists Records, which quickly brought Of Ghouls And Men to a broader expanse of ears while last year the departure of Sinn, after the recording of their new album, brought the stick swinging corpse of Marky B. Morbid into the Raizing Hell mausoleum. Unleashing Monsters Prefer Blondes a couple of weeks back, Raizing Hell has not only provided a bigger and bolder slab of their horror gripped sound but also brought a real feel of their live energy and aggression to the recording and presence of the album. At times it borders on predatory and throughout is a constant blaze of contagious intensity coated with the organic rawness so many bands only manage to create on stage.

Raizing Hell Cover_RingMasterReviewIt all starts with I Like It Wrong and the resonating hefty beats of Sinn. Swiftly they are joined by tangy grooves with a hint of blues toxicity to their invitation. The distinctive tones of Decay are soon adding their dark flirtation and defiance to the mix too, her snarl climbing all over the virulent contagion of the hooks and grooves which are still working their temptation. It is a potent slab of rock ‘n’ roll with maybe few surprises yet making up for it with heart and attitude before Sold My Soul For Rock ‘N’ Roll saunters in with its punk ’n’ roll incitement. There is a touch of In Evil Hour to the song, an irritable hue which adds to the great blend of melodic enterprise and the grouchy snarling of voice and sound.

Two songs in and already it is easy to hear the fresh blossoming of the qualities and craft the band had already shown and the maturity and realisation of potential found in previous releases. I Am The Damned is quick confirmation as it eclipses its predecessors with its psychobilly swagger and flirtatious hooks. Vlash’s bass reveals its most cantankerous growl yet as it stalks the swinging lures of guitar and beats, a bestial essence echoing the edge in Decay’s otherwise clean and infectious tones.

Time Of A Killer Flies brings some delta blues scented enterprise to its robust and fiery body next whilst This Is It flirts with garage rock ‘n’ roll as it prowls of the senses to echo the creature crawling within its sci-fi themed narrative. As usual, Raizing Hell draw most on horror movies and dark tales for the lyrical seeds of the album, very often crafting their sound to echo and reflect the actions of the protagonists within their stories and here turning that first wave of stalking into a rabid devouring of ears and appetite by its finale.

Through the sultry Django-esque climate and landscape of The Sun Is Down, the band has the imagination as forcibly involved as the body whilst Dead Girls Don’t Cry kicks up a feisty stomp with its punk rock. The dark harmonies and lone whistling within the first of the two simply adds to a compelling theatre of guitar and rhythms while a tinge of folkish temptation lines the spicy veining of the second to similarly magnetic effect. Both are further examples of the new adventure and imagination in the band’s songwriting and sound, laying down new pinnacles within the album for a success soon matched by the smoky dark seduction of Trouble where Decay is the kind of temptress you know you should escape but cannot resist.

I’m Not A Monster is a grizzly stomp of an encounter; one again maybe feeding expectations a touch but with a chorus impossible not to join in on as the body bounces throughout, it matters little as it leads ears to the equally captivating antagonism of I’m Not Evil (I’m Just Bad). The next song is appetite pleasing punkabilly with a whiff of Trioxin Cherry meets Midnight Mob to its thick pleasure giving; another energy rousing persuasion more than matched by both the excellent old school punk infested Braindead, a track spinning a web of punk and horror rock strands  from recent decades, and Killing Time. The last of the pair is the kind of romp which has the feet engaged almost before ears; commanding body and attention with scything rhythms and punchy riffs as the band vocally rouses the spirit.

Monsters Prefer Blondes is completed by its title track, a predacious tango again aligning an array of punk rock with further instinctive rock ‘n’ roll diversity. We always like an album to end on a bang, and this anthemic infestation of ears and the passions certainly provides. As for Monsters Prefer Blondes the album, it provides a rich and thoroughly enjoyable blood soaked rebel rousing with adventure and creative fun. It is high time that Raizing Hell is recognised by the broadest rock ‘n’ roll spotlights; this album just might be the key lure. If not it is only a matter of time.

Monsters Prefer Blondes is out now via Undead Artists @ https://undeadartists.bandcamp.com/album/monsters-prefer-blondes

http://www.raizinghell.com   https://www.facebook.com/Raizing.Hell

Pete RingMaster 10/05/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Hells Fire Sinners – Confessions Of the Damned

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As rampant and hungry as a single Katie Price (non Brits feel lucky not knowing who we mean), Confessions Of the Damned from hillbilly rioters Hells Fire Sinners is one of those bruisings you just cannot get enough of. Consisting of ten tracks which refuse to take a step back from vigorously seizing and rampaging across ear and senses, the album is a thrilling and devious instigator of and conspirator with the passions.

The Columbus based Hells Fire Sinners began in 2006 going through different members alongside the constant, vocalist and guitarist Alan Dude. Bringing together a blaze of rockabilly, punk, country rock and plenty more psychotic teased flavours, the band from a first show which according to their bio was in a ‘a piss smelled, burned out basement on the OSU campus’, have tirelessly exhausted the east coast with their energetic live show, playing for anyone who will listen. It has been a steady unrelenting ascent which finds a pinnacle with the excellent Confessions Of the Damned.

The Psycho A-Go-Go Records re-released storm begins with the outstanding Ninety Nine, a track which leaps for the throat gripping tightly whilst screaming through the ear with abrasive riffs, crisp rhythms, and the excellent expressive slightly scorched vocals of Dude, who is also not averse to throwing a great guttural squall into his assault. It is a direct and uncomplicated confrontation with a great emerging bass groove and fiery riffing all wrapped in a contagion which refuses to be told no as it takes feet and voice on a recruitment drive into its scintillating brawl. The song provides one of those starts to a release where you instantly think it is going to struggle to follow it up without slipping in standards such its impressive first engagement, but no such worries here as of A Little Gone A Little Crazy and Muddy Water Murder lay out their feisty temptation.

The first of the two is a cowpunk lilted stroll with delicious twang to the vocals and a greedy appetite to the roaming guitar enterprise both accompanied by the bass with its flavoursome prowl adding extra depth to the brief but again easily recruiting suasion, whilst the second reaps the essences of heavy metal to drive its adrenaline soaked rock ‘n’ roll for an intensive charge of high octane rockabilly. To be honest you can cast many spices as references to the song, all valid and all just showing the tasty tempest of enterprise it is.

As it continues to chew on ear and thoughts with attitude and at times middle finger raised belligerence, the release leaves stronger epidemically laced hooks in the passions to cement the need to regularly return to its raucous embrace. Every track spreads their irresistible toxin upon those barbs to ensure full subservience but of course there are some with more potency as with Psycho and Almighty Dollar. The first of the pair like the opener has an uncompromising intent to rile up the senses and take them on a dirt track ride of mischief and sinew clad devilry. With a murderous breath to its air and a sense of ruin coating its fingertips, the song stomps and swaggers to spark the fullest satisfaction and hunger for its psychobilly rustling. Following this glorious moment the second of the two puts on its country boots to open up a bottle of liquor fuelled riffs and melodic flaming which simply inspires another blaze of greed.

     Thick Of It walks the highest plateaus of the album too, it’s virulently catchy hook and searing sonic riffs a spicery of enterprise and invention which rages with veins of passion and is only surpassed by the opener and closing song Zombie Killer. The last track assaults the ear with a muscular hold whilst riffs assisted by talons of rhythmic rabidity rampage, though the song has the delicious skill of reining it all in and then unleashing the barbaric attack in spasms. It is an excellent track which perfectly ends an equally impressive album, its psychobilly core generously enhanced with some blues seeded imagination and blustery intensity for a scintillating tempest.

Hells Fire Sinners is a name which suits the band and their creative ferocity well whilst Confessions Of the Damned is the natural title for a collection of songs you can imagine the devil having a horn or two in. A must have release for all fans of rapacious rock ‘n’ roll.

https://www.facebook.com/pages/hells-fire-sinners/156090107896

http://www.hellsfiresinners.com/

9/10

RingMaster 23/05/2013

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The Elixirs – Long Gone

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With a re-release via the excellent Texas independent Psycho A-Go-Go Records, Long Gone the debut album from Indiana cowpunk/psychobilly band The Elixirs returns to exhilarate and exhaust the world with its riots of passion driven energy fuelled rock n roll. The release is a nineteen track bonanza of contagious eager to devour slices of often bruising, occasionally provoking, and always thrilling adventure, the songs seeded in the devilry of horror, outlaw infamy, and salacious rock n roll roguishness with an impossibly infectious temptation from start to finish across the whole album.

The sound of The Elixirs brews up a 100% proof fusion of rockabilly, punk, country, and psychobilly with plenty of other rich additives such as punk and blues bringing their potent flavourings to play too. It is a sound which has marked the band out since forming with the album set to be with justice the trigger to the widest recognition and awareness. The beginnings of the band began with The Stumblers in mid-2007. Formed by vocalist and then bassist Dan Tedder (moving to guitar later in the story) with drummer Joe King and guitarist Dan Savage, the band progressed without really getting anywhere. The following year saw Tedder and King step forward with a new bassist as The Boneyard Elixirs, the trio playing as often and as hard as possible. A seemingly constant battle to find and hold on to bassists followed whilst highlights in their live events accompanying the period as well. The band by now simply The Elixirs next released the EP Gut Cuts with help from Gas City Records. This was followed by the departure of another bassist in Dewayne Hughes who had been with the band for well over a year over their most successful time to that point. 2011 saw Whitt join the band with for the first time an upright bass entering the equation. The recording and mid 2012 release of their debut album followed to strong responses and acclaim which the re-release this year will only accelerate. The story is not quite settled as since the album King left the band to be replaced with the sticks by Dave the Dudeist in the late fall of last year. Hopefully a settled period in members will allow the band to exploit and leapt forward from the might of what will be the first impressive introduction to a great many in the stirring shape of Long Gone.

The album opens up its charms with Water and Bread, a track with psychobilly sinews and melodic rock n roll endeavours speared by the delicious bass call of Whitt. Though it is not the most urgent charge to start the album, the song has a bite and prowl to its hunger which intimidates and seduces with pure primal potency. The vocals of Tedder drip expression and passion from every syllable passing his rapacious lips whilst his guitar equally sculpts an enslaving temptation proving irresistible not only here but across the album.

The following title track swaggers in with a vibrancy which awakens the senses even further whilst its catchy swing and anthemic chorus badgers a full compliance from the listener. It is an easy to ride song leading into firstly the wicked tease of the loping country punk hooked Tits Deep and the first of the highest pinnacles reached by the release in Cry For Me. The latter of the two walks into view on a Cramps like abrasive discord, the building stroll niggling mouth-wateringly on the ear whilst the beats and bass persuasion is a merciless repetitive invitation  to song and heart to which there is no defence. The core of the song would not be out of place on the classic Songs The Lord Taught Us release with the Gas City trio bringing their own unique extensions for an individual flame of excellence.

Across the likes of the country twanging Pleasure N Pain, the sixties punk spiced 17-12, and the darkened rockabilly crawl of Soul, the album ignites further fires of ardour towards its presence even if the tracks compared to others are only merely outstanding in comparison to the genius like statures of the two songs sandwiching the third of the three mentioned as an example. These tracks, Torn Rose and Sea of Lies are two more overwhelming beacons within the album, the first bursting from a gnarly confrontation into a roaming charge of biting riffs and enslaving rhythms, a near runaway train of Gene Vincent like garage punk, whilst the second is a horror punk/psychobilly blaze of raucous and coarse grained rock n roll, and both a match to the passions.

Every track deserves a mention to be honest, songs such as Dangerous Ways with its Sex Pistols riffs and Cramps squall, and the predatory death dance of Cowboy Rot feasts to devour but with the closing stretch of the album it’s most impressive, songs such as Park It On the Lawn shout for attention. The track is a carnivorous stalking of the ear with insatiably rubbing riffs and matching ravenous intent from drums and bass, its virulent groove and consuming energy illegally addictive. Its staggering presence is closely matched by the likes of the smouldering croon of Misery, a fifties seeded rockabilly siren of a song, and the brilliant Faster Than Hell, the string plucks and slaps of Whitt the bait for another full on enticement of epidemic proportions.

Long Gone is an exceptional album, a skilfully crafted seizure of the heart with nothing less than undiluted pleasure and inciting rascality in tow, as evidenced by a final boost of potency with the voracious Loser, another contender for best track, and the closing cowpunk stomp of Asshole. Thankfully we have all got a second bite at grabbing this outstanding album, only a fool would pass on or miss out on The Elixirs a second time.

http://www.theelixirs.com/

10/10

RingMaster 26/04/2013

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Angie & The Car Wrecks: Boozed And Bloody

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    An album which may have like us passed you by until now but undoubtedly worthy of attention is the psychobilly miscreant Boozed And Bloody by the equally devilish Angie & The Car Wrecks. It is a release which dances with the devil through a feisty merger of psychobilly, rockabilly, and whispers of country rock n roll, and an album which ignites the passions into naughty thoughts and complete satisfaction.

From Onalaska, Washington USA, the quintet of Angie Ball (vocals/acoustic guitar), Kc Maukl (upright bass), Dale Ball (fiddle), Pigpen Spear (washboard), and Dustin Beck (drums), has earned an impressive name for themselves through their Bender Bound EP of 2010 as well as their irrepressible live performances which since forming has led them to playing events which include the Pacific Northwest Brewcup, the 4th annual Jake the Alligator Man B-day Bash in Long Beach, the Kustom Kulture Festival in Silverdale, Reno Rockabilly Riot, the 7th annual Seattle Psychobilly Brawl, and across WA with The Rocketz, Graceland Five, Big John Bates and the Voodoo Dollz, James Hunnicutt, and Three Bad Jacks, as well as being hand-picked by the founders of the Kurt Cobain Memorial Committee to open for Soul Asylum.

Released via Texas-based Psycho-A-Go-Go Records, Boozed And Bloody opens with Intro, a sizzling instrumental of rockabilly front2(2)candy and invitingly crafted elegance which romps like a pole dancer on viagra and is just as mischievous. The magnetic start explodes into an immediate lust thanks to the tarmac tearing Draggin ‘Down. Instantly rocking like a Chevy in cruise mode the track stirs up the dust and ignites the fuel of the heart with infectious rhythms and delicious skilled guitar flames all wrapped in the irresistible vocals of Angie.

Rolling rhythms and a sultry blaze of harmonica harken in the thrills of Moonshine, a southern coated stomp of psycho country contagion exploiting every instinct and passion for a fevered riot of insatiable enterprise and the continuation of a sensational introduction to the album. From such a heightened start a slip or lull would be expected but with crafted diversity the band just deliver the delicious insatiable romance with the simmering emotive sunset of Some Kinda Hate and the boiling ambience of Hellriders. The first is a tender embrace which smoulders within the ear and the second a brewing storm carved by a wonderfully carnivorous upright bass sculpting veined by a kindling of spiralling guitar mastery and harmonica sparks which light the canvas below the feisty alluring tones of Angie. It is an inspiring and seductive blend which is impossible to ignore or avoid drooling over.

The same can be said of the whole album and especially Junkyard Blues, a white hot fusion of rockabilly fermented in a brew of country rock with a hint of rhythms & blues.  The song lures you into its inferno with expert temptation and rewards with an unruly yet deviously crafted explosion of incitement and inflammatory rock n roll. In its own distinct way Iron Horse II also latches onto an inner ardour to leave one basking in unrestrained pleasure, in its case with a shimmering ambience around a scorch of guitar bliss and gently prompting rhythms beside as it is automatically expected at this point, sirenesque but commanding vocals.

     Little Willy’s is a track which if feet and blood is not pumping then a mirror to the mouth for sign of life is needed. The song just dances with the passions like a teen at a hop whilst the following ’31 Coupe is an orgasmic inducement to rampage the streets with intent and headlights blazing. Both songs offer the fullest primal bait through the sensational almost bestial slaps of Kc Maukl whilst once more the harmonica sends tingles across the spine.

Finishing on the country liquor jiggery of Have Another One, the swells and intemperate warmth of instrumental Surfin ‘Tucson, and lastly the graveyard serenade Necrofella, a Horrorpops meets Richie Valens amongst the tombstones finale, Boozed And Bloody is one of those treats you just cannot get enough of. It is a hunger we will be satisfying as soon as possible, a suggestion we offer you after you tuck into this outstanding offering first of course.

http://www.angieandthecarwrecks.com

https://www.facebook.com/angiecarwrecks

http://psychoagogorecords.com

8.5/10

RingMaster 27/02/2013

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