The Slytones – Shake The Cage

slytones_RingMaster Review

There is no precise way to describe the rich sound of The Slytones and no way to stop it crawling under the skin and enslaving the psyche. This has been proven over previous releases but is at its most seductive and darkly magnetic in new single Shake The Cage. The song and the accompanying Thomas Thumb making up the release cast a kaleidoscope of ravenous flavours, styles, and warped imagination whilst their characters are as relevant to the carnival as they are to voodoo bred escapades. They both epitomise the heart of The Slytones sound whilst simultaneously creating their own new and unique imagination romancing adventures.

The British band began as a trio, expanding its line-up over time whilst quickly alluring keen appetites with their The Psychedelic Sounds of EP in 2011. It is fair to say that the Brighton hailing sextet of Ashley Edwards (vocals/guitar), Bradley Wescott (lead guitar), Chip Phillips (vocals/keys), Freddie Hills (drums), Chris Warren (vocals/bass), and Robin O’Keeffe (percussion) have drawn comparisons, in an attempt to describe their sound, as broad in the diversity of bands as the mix of ingredients colluding to ignite their individual incitements. There are few bands which can conjure such variety within a single song let alone a whole release, but as Shake The Cage proves it is child’s play to The Slytones.

The striking of a match sparks a fanfare of enticement, its blowing out the trigger to a feisty stomp built on ska clipped riffs and jazz seeded swing. Keys and guitars instantly have feet and hips involved whilst the dark tones of the bass along with the infectious hooks, simply work on the imagination. The track continues to stroll along with 12 Stone Toddler/ Mynie Moe like devilry, a flowing torrent of unpredictability lighting up and bewitching from every move taken before it all gets turned on its head for a garage rock prowl reminiscent of Th’ Legendary shack Shakers. Grisly barker like vocals leads the fresh parade of sinister carnival-esque flirtation, keys and rhythms an insatiable romp in the shadow soaked shuffle now toying with ears and brewing even thicker enjoyment. All the time the song is still weaving a virulent swing and psychotic drama, every passing minute an adventure of individual design with superbly woven styles but always leading back to the rich contagion of its original psych kissed and energetically rabid swing.

As if one irresistible treat was not enough, Thomas Thumb brings its own maze of ingenuity in sound and invention. Opening with a gospel seeded dose of harmonies and ambience around the leading edge of the main vocals and narrative, the song subsequently opens into mystique lined psychedelic scenery brimming with creative theatre and picturesque tempting. Like a blend of The Doors, Arthur Brown, Rocket From The Crypt, and Tankus The Henge, the song swarms over ears with invasive magnetism, every touch a slight evolution from the last before the track bursts into a sturdy garage rock canter which steers towards a Queens Of The Stone Age meets Faith No More/6:33 devilment.

Both tracks are glorious, a must for anyone with a taste for avant-garde and psychedelically warped adventure, but songs which flow with a natural and skilfully infectious, and wonderfully unpredictable, waltz. The Slytones is a carnival of invention, mischief, and most of all unstoppable fun so do yourself a favour and check them and especially Shake The Cage out.

Shake The Cage is out now.

Dates for The Slytones and Moulettes tour this September! :

16th September                   Southport                     Atkinson

17th September                   St Helens                       Citadel

18th September                   Halifax                           Square Chapel

19th September                     Morecambe                  Hothouse

20th September                   Ramsbotton Festival   Manchester

http://www.facebook.com/theslytones    https://twitter.com/theslytones

Ringmaster 01/08/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

 

Malka – The Constant State

Malka 3_RingMaster Review

Listening to the debut EP from US band Malka is like looking into a reflection within solidly disturbed clear water, eyes exploring a myriad of openly different but connected realms and possibilities. The Constant State is the equivalent for ears, each song revealing its own unique fusion of shoegaze, psychedelic rock, and dream pop but coming together for one intimate yet expansion flight of sound and imagination.

Hailing from New York, Malka consists of Darko Saric (guitars, synths, vocals), EJ DeCoske (guitars, synths, vocals), David Ciauro (bass, vocals), and Michael Dawson (drums).Emerging in 2013, it seems the quartet quickly began enticing support and acclaim with their sound locally and soon further afield, no real surprise when embracing the rich persuasive sounds of this their first release. The album is a kaleidoscope of immersive atmospheres, fascinatingly varied vocals and harmonies, and evocative melodies, all infused with lyrical explorations as intensely provocative as the sounds around them.

Malka - The Constant State cover artwork_RingMaster Review     A Flock Of Crows is the album’s first embrace, warm melodies from guitars and synths caressing ears whilst brewing a slightly volatile ambience for the captivating touch of vocals from across the band. Equally the rhythms have a darker, hungrier but welcoming edge too, the beats from Dawson especially enticing as the song merges a wistful dreamscape with energetic catchiness. There is no escaping a seventies /eighties feel to the encounter either but it is one woven into a tempting which also hugs broader essences from surrounding decades amidst a modern breath.

It is an enthralling opening to The Constant State backed and surpassed by the ethereal beauty of For Now We Live. As melodically meditative as it is atmospherically and rhythmically invasive, the song is like the first, a tenacious incitement which in many ways is imposing with its mesmeric glaze of post and psych rock infused with emotionally tense vocals and sultrily sonic hues. The song is irresistible, much as its successor the surf seeded Mientras Se Respira. The Spanish narrative is offered by the mellowest croon of voice with matching bewitching harmonies, whilst around them the guitars court an alternative rock colouring which is as much Pixies like as it is suggestive of a My Bloody Valentine or a Cocteau Twins. A smouldering kiss on the senses and imagination, the song further unveils a stirring diversity to the band’s sound and songwriting.

   Wolves And Sheep steps forward next with a pulsating shimmer to its almost festering hug of sonic light and melodic reflection. The track, as all upon The Constant State, provides a full beacon of light yet there are shadowy textures and tempering essences which only add to the drama and mystique of songs. Certainly this and its companions generally need time and many plays to truly open up for ears and thoughts to explore, but with a great trespass of sonic endeavour and expression brewing for a fiery climax, the song emulates all others in providing an increasingly magnetic and enjoyable trip through compelling atmospheric trespasses of the senses.

Both Diamond Girl and Corazon Sin Sangre keep the listener fuelled with adventure and diverse terrains of sound and imagination in potent persuasions, the first with its enslaving and increasingly dramatic sixties spawned smoulder of psychedelic pop and the second through its spatial yet intimate dark pop meets post rock drenched soar. Though each misses the extra ‘something’ of their predecessors, each song is pure temptation for album and ears from fresh and alternative soundscapes.

The release comes to a close with Swoon, easily our favourite track springing from the album. There is a familiarity to it from the first melodic breeze but it is an indefinable air which only adds to the thickening emotional theatre and climatic texture of the song. It is gentle but also lively tapestry of sound and invention, the perfect irresistible end to one potent introduction.

It would be fair to say that The Constant State, though making a strong first impression, grew into the thrilling adventure it is over time, an enticing and definitely enjoyable first touch evolving into the breeding of richer explorations and pleasure. The final thought is that Malka has the potential to bring major propositions to the British rock/ indie pop scene ahead and to be honest they already have with The Constant State.

The Constant State is available now @ https://malkanyc.bandcamp.com/

https://www.facebook.com/malkanyc 

http://www.malkanyc.com/

RingMaster 23/07/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

 

 

 

White Manna – Pan

WM_1Reputation Radio/RingMaster Review

There is something deeply irresistible about the White Manna sound, actually plenty of things, but definitely there is a primal invitation to their psyche rock induced spatial adventures which makes band and releases pure contagion. The Californians’ previous acclaimed offerings bear witness to its potency, each offering a blistering infestation of ears and imagination cultured in pungent riffs and searing grooves, whilst the band’s live presence is renowned for stripping the senses blissfully bare. Now the quintet of David Johnson, Johnny Webb, Tavan Anderson, Anthony Taibi, and Michael Dieter unleash their finest moment yet in the fiercely simmering shape of Pan.

As fans of the Humboldt hailing band will expect, the heart of Pan is poached in celestial explorations and fuzz sprung psychedelic breaths driven by garage rock tenacity. It offers broad and deep, almost supernal soundscapes inspired by the Northern Californian landscape; guitarist Johnson saying about the band’s sound that “…the trees, beaches, and open spaces where we live are all integral parts of our approach to music.” This time though there is a stronger intimacy to the earth we tread and emotions felt through Pan, as reflected in the title, and a new almost predacious creative appetite and energy to tracks which are aligned to expected rhythmic virulence and psychedelic ferocity.

The album’s title track sparks ears and imagination first, a sonic piercing the trigger to a smog of fuzz fuelled riffery and atmospheric causticity. Almost straight away within the smothering embrace though, there is an infectious garage rock swagger which infects rhythms and the scuzz grooves seeping from the magnet tempest of sound. The result is a song which is a brewing cauldron of intensity and scolding sonic heat, never erupting fully but providing a seriously engaging and bracing scorching of flesh and psyche.

It is potent and stirring start quickly outshone by Dunes I and subsequently Dunes II. The first of the two similarly emerges from a sonic kiss on the senses, rapidly turning into a blaze of seventies psyche rock laced rampancy driven by a tenacious rhythmic seduction. The garage rock lustfulness of the White Manna sound is again a loudly piquant source of irresistible persuasion as it consumes ears and emotions, the song after its great start an inevitable enslavement matched and contrasted in sound by its successor. The second of the two is a slow saunter through air and emotions. Its body is a fusion of surf and psyche rock with a shoegaze like energy to its smouldering tempting, and uncontrollably enthralling. There is still a dirty tint to its atmosphere though, the band as always challenging as they seduce, stirring up things as they embrace with imagination and sound.

Yet another lofty plateau is breached with Evil. The track is a proto-punk bred treat, a catchy stomp of garage rock and scuzz pop strolling through ears like a mix of The Stooges and The Hives with a dash of The Sonics, but ripe with the uniqueness that is the White Manna sound. There is relentless drive and incessant urgency to the song as well as a great repetitious essence at its core which simply leaves you wanting more. The track is exceptional, pop rock alchemy and instantly matched by Beta Travelers. A spatial climate hints this song initially, it soon becoming the suggestive backdrop to a masterfully alluring shuffle of drum rhythms courted by choppy riffs. Everything intensifies with each circle of the rhythmic rallies though, evolving and enlarging into a melodically fuelled flame of enslaving enterprise, vocally and musically. That reiterative element of the music is once more pure addictiveness within the sonic boil up; every riff, hook, and rhythm inescapable temptation bound in grooves which flirt like a temptress within the song’s skin and psyche permeating scuzzy air.

Pan is brought to a close by Eshra, a twelve minute sonic painting of instrumental adventure and craft. Crashing waves within a lonely climate builds the scene, a canvas slowly defined and pushed by guitar and keys. Every passing minute adds a new descriptive layer and tempestuous intensity to the broadening terrain until by around halfway, the song is a fascinating swamp of sonic droning, fiery melodic exploration, and rhythmic hypnotism, all within another sultry surf seeded space rock coloured atmosphere. It is a riveting end to a thrilling encounter, and the perfect way to leave a lingering mark on the listener.

The impression Pan itself leaves is indelible, the album simply one of the most memorable and provocative encounters this year so far.

Pan is out now digitally and on CD, both versions including the equally impressing bonus tracks Slow Dust and Master Of The Universe (Live), and on vinyl. All options are available through Cardinal Fuzz in Europe @ https://cful.bandcamp.com/album/white-manna-pan and Captcha Records Stateside via https://captcharecords.bandcamp.com/album/pan

https://www.facebook.com/whitemanna/

RingMaster 05/06/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

Flyying Colours – ROYGBIV EP

Flyying Colours_Reputation Radio/RingMaster Review

Like a favourite candy, the ROYGBIV EP from Australian shoegaze popsters Flyying Colours, is richly flavoursome, addictively captivating, and impossible not to treat oneself to another portion of. It is a delicious slice of aural contagion wrapped in inescapable melodic seduction, and one addiction it will always be ok to indulge in.

Hailing from Melbourne and formed in 2011, Flyying Colours cite My Bloody Valentine and Fleetwood Mac as influences to their own sonic explorations and with the former an immediate spicing and the latter becoming more apparent over listens, they make a healthy spicing to something individual to the band. Similarly the compelling beauty of a Lush and the psych pop seducing of House Of love also nudge comparisons yet there is a bolder, almost bruising texture to the Flyying Colours sound which adds stronger uniqueness to the creative theatre of songs and EP. 2013 saw the release of their self-titled debut EP, a full introduction to their attention grabbing, raw beauty clad sound which came after the first teaser of the single wavygravy. Its qualities and lures are now explored with new intensity and adventure through ROYGBIV, a success with the potential of awakening a really broad spotlight upon their presence.

Flyying Colours EP_Reputation Radio/RingMaster Review     Single songs and the EP as a whole, are as rich in aural colour as its title suggests, but an evolving kaleidoscope of sound rather than a structure of individually layered hues just lying against each other. It all has a changeable and transfixing quality which starts with I Don’t Want To Let You Down. A sonic jangle works on the senses initially with its bait quickly joined by the thick beats of drummer Andy Lloyd Russell. The persuasion of guitar expands the moment the two meet and collude in awakening imagination and appetite, a sonic smoulder with a lively underbelly casting its spell on ears as the equally magnetic vocals of guitarist Brodie J Brümmer caress. The song continues to stroll with warm intent, getting feisty at times especially in a vivacious chorus which sees second guitarist Gemma O’Connor add her siren-esque tones to the mix. The bass of Melanie Barbaro is arguably the most laid back thing on the increasingly fiery encounter, yet her strings only add thick seduction through their thickly magnetic shadows within the blaze of the song.

It is a potent and infection clad track quickly backed and surpassed by the voracious shimmer of Running Late. Guitars jangle and dance in ears, offering a feel of British eighties indie pop a la Orange Juice and Josef K, whilst both vocalists twin up their mellow tempting to stroke ears. There is an unmissable sparking between textures in the song, igniting the thick sonic haze of the encounter further and indeed a sway of bodies and movement of feet and emotions before it.

The increasingly impressive adventure and ascent of the release continues with Not Today, and straight away the song has ears and thoughts spellbound as an opening melodic mist is pierced by one invigorating and tantalising bassline. Its groove is matched by those of the guitars and also in the more low key post punk vocal delivery of Brümmer. That post punk essence is throughout the EP but especially here makes the most delicious lure, suggesting that if Joy Division had gone funky with their sound it would have been something akin to this hex of contagion. Spicy hooks and a rhythmic swagger relentlessly feed a quickly hungry appetite and impassioned lust for the incitement and it is no surprise the song is the lead invitation to the EP, and indeed a favourite across the band’s recent UK tour with Pinkshinyultrablast.

In The End emerges from the closing strains of the triumph, swiftly laying down its own virulent persuasion though reining in the dramatic urgency of its predecessor just a touch as it wraps ears in a thicker smooch. Like the last track though, it barely takes a minute before full involvement of the listener is enticed, the still tenacious energy of the song inescapable incitement to the body as feet tap rigorously and hips swerve to the flow of the proposal.

Final track Leaks almost bludgeons its way into view in comparison to other tracks, the muscular snarl of bass and matching jabbing beats a heavily boisterous lure courting a caustic yet bewitching sonic mesh of sound from the guitars, it all coloured again by the immersive vocals. It is a fiery end to the release, and another irresistible song showing, as each proposition within ROYGBIV, another twist to the sound and invention of the band.

Flyying Colours is cast as shoegaze but their outstanding EP proves that there is much more to their voraciously bubbling shimmer of sound, plenty to appeal to fans of melodic and psychedelic rock as well as those of psych and lo-fi pop.

The ROYGBIV EP is available via Club ac30 in the UK @ http://store.clubac30.com/products/548073-flyying-colours-roygbiv-ep and in the US on Shelflife @ http://www.shelflife.com/catalogue/LIFE126.html now!

https://www.facebook.com/flyyingcolours   http://www.flyyingcolours.com/

RingMaster 18/05/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

 

 

Red Spektor – Self Titled EP

Red Spektor Promo Shot Reputation Radio/RingMaster Review

There is a rich flame burning away in the Potteries, and it goes under the name Red Spektor. The UK trio are poised to release their self-titled debut EP, a blaze of psychedelic, stoner, and classic rock which fascinates as it engulfs ears and imagination, and unrelentingly thrills as it provides further evidence that heavy and fiery British rock ‘n’ roll is heading towards a fresh heyday.

Hailing from Stoke on Trent, Red Spektor emerged at the end of 2012 drawing on inspirations from the likes of Black Rebel Motorcycle Club, Led Zeppelin, and Black Sabbath. Once the threesome had honed their sound, they proceeded to hit the live scene with swift success, sharing stages with bands such as Carousel Vertigo, Attica Rage, Texas Flood, and Lawless along the way. Every step drew more eager ears to their growing fan base, accelerated by festival appearances whilst the band never letting a week seemingly go by without igniting a venue somewhere. 2014 saw the band record and release their EP via Bandcamp, a 5 track encounter recorded live and straight to tape over two days. Now it has its full digital unveiling and it is easy to expect Red Spektor stoking up a new wave of close and acclaiming attention.

The band draws on essences of “dark pre-war blues right through to the British blues explosion of the sixties and the heaviness of the seventies albeit with a modern and dirty twist” according to their bio, a mix swiftly seducing the senses and igniting the air through EP opener Hard To Please. A lone vocal guitar awakens instant attention, its rich spicy lure soon joined by a solemnly brooding bassline and crispy beats as the song quickly settles down into a feisty tempting. The guitar of John Scane virtually dances across the senses, every riff and hook incendiary and leaving a sultry residue like the trail behind Marvel Comic’s Ghostrider. Vocally he has a mellower but no less potent air, clean and alluring against the sizzling of blues/psyche invention and Rob Farrell’s dark basslines.

Red Spektor Cover Artwork Reputation Radio/RingMaster Review   It is a seriously gripping start quickly backed by the slower, more intensive presence of Transcending. The thick and freely swinging beats of drummer Darren Bowen cage ears and anticipation as an almost melancholic bass coaxing prowls; both sparking swift appetite for the song’s impending offering. A sinister seducing comes with the enterprise of the guitar, and indeed vocals, as sixties and seventies sounds collude with a modern creative rapacity to bewitch and crawl over the listener. The track is a relentless smoulder rather than the blistering eruption of its predecessor but just as persistently magnetic and irresistible.

Third song Everywhere puts a higher gear in motion for its rich persuasion of blues rock; rumbling and strolling along whilst melodic vapours intoxicate ear and air alike. Rhythms cast a dirty tempering shadow and compliment to the searing enterprise, keeping the psychedelic croon earthbound as once more the band has attention bewitched. The exploration of the dirtier textures within the song continues with greater focus and revelry within the next up Redemption, Red Spektor tapping into the purest vat of blues distilled rock and adding their own not exactly unique but certainly distinct flavouring to another transfixing and highly enjoyable proposal.

The song probably does not quite match those before it though, whilst all of the songs before also find themselves in the shadow of the glorious closer Earth Mother. From its first beat and eager riff, the track bursts into a masterful and virulent swagger. An anthemic and delicious groove leads the way, courted by similarly lively and bold rhythms aligned to a throaty bass invitation. The song relaxes a touch in urgency as the vocals add their easy persuasion to the mix, picking its knees and tempo up again between verses and around the fiery enticing which subsequently seeps from every melody, hook, and resonating bass groove. As across all songs, Scane’s solos just burn their way into the psyche, but it is the overall swing and insatiable tenacity to the song which helps it take best song honours.

Many like us missed the Red Spektor EP first time around, and indeed the band’s emergence, but its new full digital unleashing ensures there are no excuses now in not exploring band and sound. No excuses only rich rewards.

The Red Spektor EP is digitally available from May 18th via all online stores.

https://www.facebook.com/redspektorband    http://redspektor.com/

RingMaster 17/05/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

 

Abrahma – Reflections In The Bowels Of A Bird

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It is not a rare event to immerse in a release of expansive and spellbinding imagination, to be taken out of the real world into a creative adventure for an hour or so. It is less often though that you get simply lost within a proposition of such complex and unrelenting ideation that you feel trapped, caught in a claustrophobic tsunami of creative consumption where only the brief gaps between songs offers a hint of escape. Not that you will want to break free from the fascinating and suffocating glory of Reflections In The Bowels Of A Bird, the new album from French rockers Abrahma. It is an irresistible and exhausting emprise of perpetually evolving sound and dramatic atmospheres, an experience as sombre as it is bewitching and as creatively ravenous as it is emotionally disorientating.

There is no real surprise that the album is so intensively and imaginatively imposing, its predecessor Through the Dusty Paths of Our Lives when released in 2012, a similar maelstrom of sound and invention, as described elsewhere as a “heavy odyssey peppered with Hindu mysticism and voodoo convolutions”. The new album has taken that canvas to new and even more expansive and hypnotic realms; every track an individual journey uniting for one colossal and wonderfully unpredictable landscape of senses examining, thought provoking heavy rock.

Released as its predecessor via North American label Small Stone Records, Reflections In The Bowels Of A Bird makes a low-key entrance as Fountains Of Vengeance comes into view on a wave of sonic noise and intrigue, eventually stepping from its presence with thick beats and equally tense riffs and grooves. A grungy air also lines their invitation as the sombrely delivered tones of vocalist Sebastien Bismuth bring a colder subdued presence to the already mesmeric encounter. His and the guitar of Nicolas Heller increasingly entangle and merge to cast a raw and magnetic web of sound, hooks potent and melodies fiery as the song creates a tapestry of Stone Temple Pilots like tempting with invasive post rock ambiences and psyche bred exploration. The song roars and seductively sways across its ever twisting adventure, keys from again Bismuth inventively caressing the darker prowling hues of bass and the predatory beats cast by Benjamin Colin.

Abrahma_album_Artwork     The following An Offspring To The Wolves is immediately a darker imposing character, the bass of Guillaume Colin resonating with menace and toxic enticement as a doomy air colludes with stoner-esque sonic expression. There is an underlying swing to the lumbering infection surrounding the captivating and varied vocal delivery of Bismuth, part of a slow smothering of the senses sparking with flames of sound and emotion across the consuming prowl of the senses. As all tracks upon the album, it is impossible to fully explain all of the textures, emotions, and dark almost meditative radiance oozing from the cauldron of sound and invention at work, but easy to say it is thoroughly absorbing.

Omens Pt. 1 comes next, its sultry climate and sweltering melodic intrigue lying somewhere between psychedelic and occult rock, its exotic lure almost shamanic on ears and thoughts. That of course is only part of the picture, rhythms at times a rapacious confrontation whilst melodies and vocals spill an evocative croon within the explosive causticity embracing ears. It is bewildering and fascinating simultaneously, needing as all tracks plenty of partaking of its proposal to come close to exploring its world. The same of course applies to equally dramatic and engrossing Weary Statues, the track a tapestry of carnivorous intensity, volatile textures, and emotion fuelled drama. It is all, with much more, woven into another transfixing and physically stifling tempest sculpted with creative ingenuity, bold unpredictability, and mouth-watering craft.

Next is the spellbinding Omens Pt. 2, a peaceful reflection of surf rock seeded beauty shimmering with melodic elegance and a haunted breath which becomes more unsettled and agitated with every passing tangy caress and melancholic sigh, Another switching of calm and ruffled intensity eventually leads to a bedlamic finale set ablaze by the slightly psychotic flames of sax from album guest Vincent Dupuy. It is inescapable bait, enslaving attention and emotions before making way for the mystical, tempestuous flight of Kapal Kriya, the track another brooding mix of varied heavy rock sounds in one diversely layered, intimately spatial adventure.

The raging diversity and expectations ruining enterprise continues to thrill through firstly the ferocious rock ‘n’ roll stomp of Square The Circle, its charge on ears as probably assumed by now, never dawdling in one style, torrent of sound, or urgency of delivery for long. Its outstanding incitement is followed by the emotional and increasingly physical turbulence of the excellent Omens Pt. 3 which then moves aside for the equally enthralling A Shepherd’s Grief, which features guitar solos from Monster Magnet guitarist Ed Mundell. It is a squalling seduction, employing vast arrays of challenging spices and emotions in its expansive soundscape, and yes it is creatively sorcerous.

The album closes with the mournful beauty and blistering fire of Conium, a devouring sonic embrace bringing a thrilling release to a dramatic conclusion. The Abrahma /Thomas Bellier produced Reflections in the Bowels of a Bird is a virulent listen which can be as uncomfortable as it is pure seduction, but with constant attention grows from an impressive encounter into something very special.

Reflections In The Bowels Of A Bird is available on CD and digitally via Small Stone Records @ https://smallstone.bandcamp.com/album/reflections-in-the-bowels-of-a-bird

http://abrahmamusic.net/      https://www.facebook.com/ABRAHMAMUSIC

RingMaster 14/05/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

Finister – Suburbs of Mind

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The Italian rock and metal scene is ripe with striking emerging talent right now and proven by their new album, one of the most exciting of the impressive bunch of artists is Florence bred Finister. Debut full-length Suburbs of Mind is a ten track adventure of sound and imagination sculpted upon a progressive/psychedelic rock canvas and coloured with an array of diverse rock essences. It is an instantly captivating proposition with a collection of striking songs which just get more compelling and enjoyable with every listen. The band’s sound can be described as something like Muse meets The Horrors but there is plenty more to its body in flavour and originality which perpetually adds to the rich introduction of the band through their thoroughly impressive album.

Formed in 2009, Finister made a potent impression locally and within the Italian underground scene with a couple of EPs but it was their third release, the Nothing Is Real EP that they ignited stronger attention. It showed a new thrust and exploration in their sound, an evolving imagination and adventure with broader flavouring and imagination. It is a direction pushed into even greater psychedelic spiced landscapes through the progressively honed creative offering within Suburbs of Mind. Released via Red Cats Records, the album is a fascinating and immediate temptation for ears and thoughts from a band still young in years. Such its maturity in songwriting and sound though, and the impressive craft shaping it, it is impossible not to anticipate a big future for and from the band ahead.

The album opens with a wistful flame of sax against a sturdier stroking of guitar, both creating a melodic and sombre coaxing which easily enthrals ears before emerging jab of beats, a pungent dark bassline, and equally melancholic vocals. Within a few chords and seconds The Morning Star has the imagination lit, especially as it slowly expands and almost taunts the listener with its minimalistic but potent sonic tempting. The guitar and voice of Elia Rinaldi is soon holding reign over the evocative sounds which at times seem to be prowling his vocal delivery. It is a scene continually shifting and evolving though, the keys of Orlando Cialli, with his sax skills, as well as the rhythms of drummer Lorenzo Burgio providing an unpredictable and fluid stroll of adventure.

It is a strong start to the album, those Muse spices already adding enjoyable hues to the offering, but things are soon taken up a notch with the following Bite the Snake. Also the band’s new single, the track is a predatory bait of creatively agitated beats and sonic causticity aligned to a great grizzly bassline from Leonardo Brambilla. There is a primal essence to the encounter though one tempered by the mellower tones of Rinaldi and a melody rich caress of keys. Alternative rock, with an extra snarl of punk, the track lights ears and emotions instantly, but subsequently surpasses its early glories with an exotic dance of keys and sultry melodic enterprise which erupts from its contagious presence.

The Way (I Used to Know) breezes in on a melodic haze next; skittish rhythms providing a smiling additive to the opening and smouldering croon of the song. Guitars and sax soon add to 51QQyJUGhnL._SS280the sultriness of atmosphere and sound, embracing the senses whilst Rinaldi again shows endearing expression and potency in his voice and delivery. Addictive drama emerges to coat the track as it evolves; the sax of Cialli an especially inflammatory essence in the inventive theatre of the increasingly bewitching track.

Already three songs in and the diversity of sound and imagination in the album is striking and continued in the more volatile yet addictively mesmeric A Decadent Story. Feeling like it is going to explode in a muscular rage at any moment, the song instead seduces and sways with harmonic and melodic ingenuity as its progressive heart explores an almost chivalric psych fuelled canter. In brief glimpses a sense of Hawkwind makes a suggestive spice in the infectious proposition whilst its passage of pure peace midway is the appetiser to a rich Muse like ascent of voice and sound which leads to a gripping climatic finale.

Both the fiery and dramatic progressive croon of My Howl and the spellbinding Levity grip ears and attention next, the first from an understated but alluring start building to another tempestuous and enthralling confrontation with the cello of guest Lea Galasso a potent tinge to the exploration. Its successor is a glorious flight of intrigue and addictive drama. Opening with a scuzzy climate of guitar and keys it soon creates a web of sinister yet rigorously tempting hooks and melodies. They are noir lit, like moments of cinematic espionage within enticing sonic smog and accentuated by again expressive vocals and technical enterprise. The track is sheer temptation, creative intrigue for ears and imagination to immerse in and the latter to sculpt its own theatre for alongside the lyrical reflection of the song.

One of the major pinnacles of the release, it is contrasted in tone by the balladry of Oceans of Thrills but matched in appeal. The song is an engrossing melancholic yet warm embrace with shadows brought by the cello of Galasso and the bass of Brambilla entwined by the melodic poetry of Davide Dalpiaz’s violin courted by the keys and sax of Cialli. As all the tracks there is much more going on than first recognised, this song alone a maze of twists and imagination which increasingly enthrals and impresses over time.

Another exotic tempting is unveiled with The Key, the song a mix of psych pop and alternative endeavour kissed by a blues whisper and jazz bred ambience, though again that is only part of the colouring boldly seducing ears and emotions. The song is another hypnotic tantalising, maybe not as immediately persuasive as previous tracks but ultimately enslaving emotions and appetite for another big success.

Suburbs of Mind is brought to a close by firstly the classically charmed and melodically tempting Here the Sun, the keys of Cialli a play all on their own but a seamless fit in the accompanying drama of guitars and vocals. This again is a slower burner in thoughts but also with a seriously merciless persuasion before final song Everything Goes Back shimmers with psychedelic radiance and smoky atmospheres to bring the album to a turbulently enchanting close. With a flurry of dramatic and towards its end explosive textures, it is one final lingering ride into the full spectacle of the band’s sound and invention.

Suburbs of Mind is one of those unexpected treats and delights which startle from out of the blue, its creators announcing their presence on the largest stage in impressive style. As mentioned Finister is young in age but with a mature presence and craft which belies that. You can only feel there is more to come from and be discovered within themselves though, an excitement and anticipation for which is already ripening nicely here.

Suburbs of Mind is available from March 16th via Red Cat Records on CD and digitally @ http://www.amazon.co.uk/Suburbs-Mind-Finister/dp/B00UDB9WPK

https://www.facebook.com/finisterband

RingMaster 16/03/2015

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