Falling Stacks – No Wives

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No Wives is one of those album’s you can imagine being described as anything from a glorious disorderly revelry to a cacophonous irritant, but for those with an appetite for psychotic rhythms, abrasing discord, and virulent noise it is easy to suggest that the Falling Stacks’ debut album is going to be one of the highlights of the sonic year. Like a highly agitated union between early Wire and eighties post punks The Diagram Brothers infused with healthy, or maybe unhealthy, essences of bands like The Fall and Fugazi, sound and album provide a raw and lingering magnetism. For sure No Wives is a proposition some may hate but be impossible to ignore but for those with experimentation in their genes, it is a mouth-watering dissonance to get fully involved in.

The UK trio formed in 2011, emerging in Bristol with an appetite for the likes of Sonic Youth, Fugazi, Pavement, and The Wedding Present. Falling Stacks’ music suggests there are many other likes and influences involved in the band’s own invention, whether intentionally or not, and it all makes for web like songs which catch ears and attention with a babel of sound and imagination. As the band soon revealed in a trio of EPs after their first steps, all sonic squalls and rhythmic trespasses, along with vocal incursions, come veined by an understated but potent order. In previous and enjoyable encounters it was swamped by the free hand given to riots of sound but with No Wives, the band has seized such structures and worked outwards resulting in their finest provocation yet.

The album opens with the quickly spicy and rowdy Pool Party, a sonic welcome the lead into a volatile shuffle of jabbing beats and throaty basslines courted by bracing vocals amidst a tangy guitar clamour. Once hitting its full and irregular stride, a contagion soaks ears and attention, the lure of disorder subsequently providing two minutes plus of inescapable virulence. It is a riveting start continued by the just as eagerly inventive sonic chatter of Dust Motes. Hooks and rhythms barely stand still long enough to cast a shadow within the song, the guitars dancing with almost autistic tendencies over rolling beats and a bassline which moves from moody to carnivorous and back again on a whim. The vocals across the release are a more straight forward proposition yet they too lyrically and in delivery are mischievously unpredictable and a thick hook here especially.

Sections And Sub-Sections restrains some of that turbulent energy next, an opening saunter of bass resonance posing as a riff and caustically delivered vocals the spark to similarly reserved but jabbing rhythms within guitar varied jangles. Overall the song does lack the spark of its predecessors but there are moments in its imagination which are almost sinful in their rousing invention and inimitable tempting.

Both No Stops and Los Ticos get ears and emotions over excited, the first with its persistently evolving landscape of time disruptions and seductive discord, Swell Maps coming to mind at times, whilst the second is a prowl with a devilish glint in its eye. It strolls with a deliciously compelling bassline and a mesh of guitar intrigue around gripping rhythmic bait which as every element, has a distrustful feel to its roll. The song is made up of confrontations sharing a tantalising collusion and fair to say the song is probably the only schism that is in truth the perfect union of discontent.

A darker more predacious place is explored on A Fly Would Slide, the track a hug of sonic tension and imposing ambience but coloured with further clashes of melodic and vocal discordance. Its intensity ebbs and flows as energies and emotions revolve with restraint and roars, but whilst the track takes longer to trip the switches than those before it, full persuasion is inevitable over time.

Seven Cuts is a far quicker success on ears and emotions, its caustic tapestry of snarling bass, punchy beats, and kaleidoscope of guitar endeavour, a swift fondling and thrilling of the imagination before its successor Silverware uncages a similar but individual psyche twisting dance on the senses. Rhythms and hooks have as many grasping teeth as a zip as the song shows itself to be a temptation of invigorating disunity aligning in one jungle of infectiously deranged harmony before taking its leave. It is replaced by the tinny beat loaded opening of Double Scull. Magnetism does not do the track’s start justice or the subsequent slim lead into the inevitable busily disharmonic heart of what is another slow but fiercely successful persuasion.

Closing with the physically and emotionally turbulent New Dog, the song like the shadow to the previous track in many ways, No Wives is an enthralling and exciting incitement for ears and thoughts. At times it does not go far enough with its adventure and clangor of sound, an exploration for the future, and some songs just miss the final ingredient of those providing the major peaks of the release, but Falling Stacks has given noise and rock one thoroughly fulfilling stirring.

No Wives is available from June 8th via Battle Worldwide Recordings through http://battleworldwiderecordings.com/battle/album/battle023/

https://www.facebook.com/fallingstacks/

RingMaster 08/06/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

 

Fleshworld/Gazers/Viscera/// – Split CD

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This October seems like it is the month of split releases, many compelling link-ups sharing some striking sounds and bands. Unquiet Records are releasing one of the more notable encounters in the shape of a split release between Polish hardcore bred post metallers Fleshworld, French blackened post-hardcorers Gazers, and Italian psychedelic metallers Viscera///. It is a gripping collection of songs which come from different angles of sonic consumption but unite in a mutual heavy and depressive examination of senses and imagination. It is an enthralling proposition, a release which can devour ears and emotions in a nihilistic landscape of intensity and sound but also treat them to contagious and just as toxic refreshing enterprise.

The first three tracks are provided by Kraków quintet Fleshworld, a band drawing on inspirations from the likes of Opeth, Neurosis, Cult Of Luna, and Deathspell Omega in their sound. They have already awoken attention through previous 6-track release Like we’re all equal, also released on Unquiet, and here get the split off to an imposing and potent start. Their first track Krąg grips ears with a sonic lancing before bulky rhythms twist over the senses. It is a tasty start added to by the melodic groove wrapping around the initial bait of the song. With a vocal sample adding to the emerging shadowed drama, the track flirts and intimidates with equal success, the guitars of Mateusz Szczurek and Kuba Leszko sculpting a captivating design within the increasingly darker and oppressive rhythmic provocation bred by drummer Szymon Łuczyński and bassist Łukasz Klamiński. The song continues to threaten and seduce, as the raw vocal squalls of Tytus Kalicki rage and spill venom across the bewitching consumption of ears and emotions. Acidic melodies and barbarous hooks are never far from the surface of the growing tempest though, it all making for a scintillating start to the release.

   The band’s other pair of songs never quite match up to the first such it’s might, but Pętla with its heavy resonating bass lure and similarly magnetic rhythmic enticement certainly comes close. It is a captivating entrance which spreads a blackened and caustic breath across its spine through evocative melodies from the guitar and a raw hostility to the vocals respectively. It emerges as a brooding and increasingly chilling erosive wash which leaves thoughts lost in a barren corrosive soundscape and emotions exposed to a stark sonic climate. Its successor Rezygnacja, which features guest vocals from Alex Stjernfeldt and Victor Wegeborn from The Moth Gatherer, is similarly drenched in uncompromising and oppressive textures within a destructive atmosphere, but again shape its scenery with an impressive and attention gripping display from drums and bass. The rawest uncomfortable track of the three, it reveals more of the immersive depths and skilled composing of Fleshworld and their ability to lock the listener willingly into a scarring embrace.

Hailing from Paris, the 2012 formed quintet of Gazers has also earned a potent reputation through their self-titled EP of last year and live shows where they have graced stages alongside the likes of The Rodeo Idiot Engine, Cowards, Loma Prieta, Code Orange Kids, and Twitching Tongues. There first contribution to the split comes in the intrigue drenched Rash, a track taking its time to seize the senses. From a cold and raw ambience also infused with sampled vocals, though a distant whisper here, the song erupts in a blaze of hardcore, crust surfaced animosity. Spiky hooks and cruel grooves emerge as vocals roar with malcontent, a greater anger and maliciousness coating each step of the song’s evolution. It is a potent track which makes for a keen but uneasy listen before the stronger weight and adventure of The Decline takes over. Firm beats and rugged scythes of guitar are met by a deranged flame of riffs, everything at odds but fitting masterfully to ensnare ears and appetite. Further in a mellower but no less stark and intimately imposing passage plays with the imagination too, it adding to the great unpredictability of song and the band’s engrossing enterprise.

     The following Epilogue is the same, a song never allowing thoughts and emotions rest as it roams and permeates the senses with a revolving rage of gripping rhythms, sonic abrasing, and vocal ferocity. The best of Gazers’ trio of offerings, the track is a maelstrom of creative spite and imaginative turbulence worrying and igniting the senses for an intensive and flavoursome examination.

The final two songs on the release comes from Viscera///, a band employing essences and experiences in styles like post hardcore, space rock, ambient, and drone, gained by members past and present of bands such as Morkobot, Blanca Division, Malasangre, The Drop Machine, Mount Piezein Circle, Edema, Wicked Minds, The Vendetta, and Self Human Combustion. With two albums, many splits, and tours all across Europe under their belt, the trio now turn their attention to the split and unleash their gripping mix of metal and psyche rock. Versus swiftly tightens its steely grip on ears with rigid beats and acerbic grooves, they a spring board for subsequent waves of rolling rhythms, ravenous blackened pestilence, and in turn voracious tsunamis of sound and malevolence. It is a hellacious mix but one where very turn is complete with sparking twists of invention and sonic radiance.

Its successor Nobody’s Diary, a cover of the Yazoo track, ignites ears and imagination with even more triumphant ingenuity next. The track instantly storms the psyche with virulent and scathing riffery as sonic blooms break out around its tempest, but it is the unexpected display of clean vocals which tips the balance and inspires a delicious multi-flavoured landscape of warped and imaginative endeavour to steal the passions. With its sound aligned to a thick sludgy furnace of hostility, the song is an outstanding end to a rather impressive and thoroughly enjoyable encounter.

Personal tastes dictates which songs stand above others but every track and each of the three bands, make a compelling and richly satisfying persuasion impossible to resist.

The Split release is available now via Unquiet Records @ www.unquietrecords.com/product/fleshworldgazersviscera-3-way-split/

https://www.facebook.com/fleshworld

https://www.facebook.com/Gazersband

https://www.facebook.com/viscera3stripes/

RingMaster 16/10/2104

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Allusondrugs – Self Titled EP

Allusondrugs Promo 1

UK rockers Allusondrugs has been working away at the imagination and passions for the past couple of years, laying down a bait of three diverse and increasingly impressive singles which has led to a hungry anticipation for the prospect of something bigger from the West Yorkshire quintet. That sizeable offering comes in the enthralling shape of their self-titled EP; a six-track revelry for the passions and tease for the psyche. The band’s last single showed the increasing maturity and immersive expression of the band’s songwriting, now it is in full swing within the suggestive technicoloured seduction of the EP. At times it is tenderly mesmeric, in others psychedelically psychotic, and from start to finish it is a magnetic captivation to reinforce thoughts that Allusondrugs is about to ignite the British rock scene with their raw edged fusion of grunge and warmly warped psychedelic rock.

The band began in 2012, its members coming together out of the Leeds music scene. Taking influences from the likes of Nirvana, Deftones, My Bloody Valentine, and Sonic Youth into their unpredictable adventure of sound, the impressive entrance of debut single Plasters and the following twisted teasing of My Cat/Fruit of 2013 soon thrust the band into a certain underground spotlight whilst earning attention from mainstream ears. Earlier this year, third single Nervous woke up a wider expanse of attention with its masterful presence and call to the imagination. Released on Clue Records, as the singles, the new EP embraces all the essences of the individual delights that came before and casts them into a new inventive drama and virulent persuasion to unapologetically steal the passions.

With the core of the release recorded live over a week in Greenmount Studios, Leeds, the EP immediately flirts with ears and thoughts through the opening beats of I’m Your Man. It is an instantaneously coaxing sure to awaken a3102663430_10attention; a focus soon fed by sonic waves of acidic guitars and the excellent group harmonies we have already become accustomed to. The song is soon holding a bold stride as enticing melodies wrap their temptation around the rhythmic spine of the song whilst rawer rubs of riffing and the creative sonic web crafted by guitarists Drey Pavlovic and Damo Hughes dance with ears and a growing appetite for the rich invention of the song. The track though is a full seduction, the excellent vocals of Jason Moules supported by Hughes and the punch packing beats of drummer Connor Fisher-Atack alongside the rich darker tones of Jemal Malki’s bass equally as impressive and persuasive.

The band is constantly being, and understandably, being placed under comparisons to the likes of Nirvana and Soundgarden, two references easy to bring forth with the following Ted, What’s The Porn Like In Heaven?, but the opener is more Pixies-esque in its immersive and discord kissed ingenuity. It is a flavouring and spark to appear across the whole EP, though as said the second song is firmly spawned from a grunge haze. It roars from the first second, riffs climbing over ears with anthemic purpose whilst the bass of Malki simply roams with a predator’s heart into the imagination. The guitars continue to sling caustic notes and riffs with a freedom and raw intent that puts the listener right there in the studio whilst the vocals and rhythms stir up the sense with their own raucous lures. It is hard to avoid that Nirvana suggestion, especially from around the Bleach album, but there is always that undeniable uniqueness which turns it all into another invigorating original encounter.

The pinnacle of the release comes in Cherry Pie, a song which from the opening grumbling bassline sets ears and passions aflame. It is soon swiftly and provocatively striding with a determined directness as post punk like guitar stabs spear its intent. A brewing sonic potency grows around the irresistibly addictive hook of the song, its groove which would not be lost in a Joy Division intrusion bringing a hunger and resourcefulness which is as punk as it is noise rock. The song is glorious; a thrusting of rhythms and toxic invention, not forgetting that insatiable groove, which across its contagious trap has whispers of Public Image Ltd, Cardiacs, Queens Of The Stone Age, and the St Pierre Snake Invasion, yet still emerges as a distinct beast owned by Allusondrugs.

Nervous caress ears next, its swarming temptation draped in a melodic coaxing, instantly holding ears in a tight embrace to which jabbing beats set a firm punctuation. The grip relaxes soon after though as warm vocals and melodies soak the senses, their kiss aligned to the darker mood of the bass and a new vein of sonic invention. It is riveting, a mesmeric croon with the outstanding dual vocals adding a Walker Brothers like suasion within at times a tempestuously stirring emprise of evocative sound which again offers that Pixies like flavouring. An air of surf rock also adds its wash to the psychedelically fuelled beauty of the song, an elegance ignited further by the eruptions of grunge rapacity which reinforce the depth and insatiable persuasive alchemy of the song.

The release is completed by firstly the emotive climate of Sunset Yellow, a shimmering flight of melodies and haunting harmonies veined by melancholic basslines and slightly bent out of shape, distortion lent sonic ingenuity where again with that Frank Black and co leaning shows its face. It is a smoulder of sound and adventure which just gets more potent overtime, setting up emotions and intrigue perfectly for the final track Thingio. With almost grudging respect from its primal riffery and bass taunting from the first moments, the track stalks and preys on the senses, stroking them with a melodic seducing as the string manipulation of the band brings a raw rabidity to the imposing leer of the song. It is a stunning slice of musical entrapment, the entrancing vocals and weaving melodies a rein on the predacious heart of what is an exhilarating beast.

It is fair to say that we like so many were expecting big things from the band when news of the EP broke and we have not been disappointed, in fact such its might those hopes and expectations were almost an insult to its glory. Watch out UK, Allusondrugs are coming for your souls.

The Allusondrugs EP is available via Clue Records 21st July @ http://cluerecords.bandcamp.com/album/allusondrugs-ep on download and Ltd Ed CD as well as an Ltd Cassette via Pinky Swear Records.

https://www.facebook.com/Allusondrugs

9/10

RingMaster 20/07/2014

Allusondrugs Tour Dates:

JULY

25th July = Tramlines Festival, Sheffield (Millenium Galleries)

26th July = Lounge 41, Workington

27th July = Clarence Festival, Wakefield

AUGUST

1st August = The Puzzle Hall, Sowerby Bridge

2nd August = Temple of Boom, Leeds

7th August = Bar Bloc, Glasgow

14th August = Wharf Chambers, Leeds

SEPTEMBER

11th September = The 13th Note, Glasgow

12th September = Downstairs, Aberdeen

13th September = Pickett, Liverpool

14th September = Think Tank, Newcastle

15th September = Static Bar, Swansea

16th September = Red Rooms, Nottingham

17th September = The Garage (upstairs), London

18th September = Sticky Mikes, Brighton

19th September = The Crauford Arms, Milton Keynes

20th September = Huddlefest, Huddersfield

21st September = Boiler Room, Guildford

22nd September = Joiners, Southampton

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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Zaleski / Ugly Zoo Split

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Fleeting Youth Records brings the year another striking and attention grabbing split uniting the debut releases of two potently emerging US bands. Combining the Void EP from Ohio grunge gaze band Zaleski with the self-titled EP of Pennsylvania post-hardcore quartet Ugly Zoo for one pleasingly unhealthy and compelling intrusion on the senses, the release is an exciting introduction to two potential drenched bands. Raw and uncompromising, both bands savage attention as they ignite a strong appetite for their caustic persuasions of sound and intent, their endeavours resulting in one bruising and intrigue soaked experience.

Athens trio Zaleski open up the furious engagement with five tracks of abrasing and predacious imagination. Their sound is enthralling and pleasingly unpredictable, the songs a corrosive blend of punk, grunge, and shoegaze which still only hints at their unruly and unpolished swarm of sound. Opening track Red Walls from its first breath lays a sonic hand on ears, a harsh coaxing soon joined by a further thickening of the guitar’s abrasive enticement within a belligerently antagonistic rhythmic assault and heavily throated bass lures. The song is a scourge of sound but with a melodic yet doom filtered mellow breath which tempers and invigorates the enterprise and senses equally. The rawness of production and sound adds to the seductive intensity squalling around ears for an enthralling and intriguing first and lingering impression.

The following Snake Eyes Baby flames with a brooding intensity and melodic caress with thoughts of My Bloody Valentine and Birdland brewing initially before it expels a riot of feverish energy and resourceful incitement for an incendiary climax. The impressive track fires up the passions which its predecessor in comparison just tickled for a brief but provocatively incisive proposition. Its more elegant seducing is contrasted by Where Are We?, a track with a ferociously shimmering surface to another sway of melodic coaxing melodically and vocally. That gentleness is soon swamped by a voracious tide of sonic rabidity and a more hardcore edged vocal delivery for an instantly appealing but intimidating incitement. Whereas some tracks like the previous one make an immediate success others like this take longer to build their suasion but in varying degrees achieve their welcome goal.

Zaleski complete their side of the spilt with the atmospherically haunting instrumental Silent Hills and the smouldering seduction of Ghosted, a track much like their second which slowly winds around senses and emotions with a searing yet soothing croon of melodic expression within a tempestuous sonic surface driven by an enjoyably varied vocal delivery and expression. It and Snake Eyes Baby take best track honours on this side of the release with ease, each fuelled by the promise which lights all Zaleski’s tracks whilst providing an extra inventive adventure which ignites a hungry appetite.

Ugly Zoo create a sound which is garage punk and noise rock spliced with psyche devilry, and within seconds steals a march on its co-contributors with an irresistible charge of carnivorously predacious riffs, rabidity drenched basslines, and a discord flushed wash of riotous vocals as Westboro Deepthroat erupts in the ear. As soon as its roars provocatively there is a similarity to UK band The St Pierre Snake Invasion which is never a bad likeness to have. The track swaggers and taunts with imaginative bait forged by the punk inspired guitars and crisply swiping rhythms, but it is the demonic snarl of the bass and the mass scythes of vocals which seal the impressive deal.

Jawbreaker takes the outstanding start up another level, its opening gnaw of that great bestial bass sound with matching rapacity from riffs alone a gripping enticement. Fusing a rawer blaze of rock crafted spiky grooves and again dual vocals, the song brawls with and inspires the senses for a potently flavoursome fury which sets up an already greedy attention for the exceptional Jesus Sneakers. Their third song slings a contagious net of pounding beats with another ridiculously riveting bass lure at the ear; that alone addiction sparking but once the guitars spew their sonic ingenuity lined ferocity and vocals squall with vivacious revelry, the song becomes an insatiable stomp with energetic wantonness. It does not end there though as imagination grips the song further with shards of crystalline sparks and crazed warped tempting which adds a truly unpredictable beauty to the encounter, a track which feels like it is inventing itself as it goes.

The final Ugly Zoo track If We Don’t Succeed We Run the Risk of Failure reinforces the striking first look at the band, its body driven by a garage punk stride with boisterous sinews and combative rhythms, The outcome is a protagonist which is unsure whether to party or create havoc but in the end plumps for the former with unrelenting enthusiasm and devilish creative intensity. It is a thrilling end to an exhausting and thoroughly enjoyable release.

Feeding the primal personal wants of our desires, Ugly Zoo provide the most thrilling and exhilarating slices on the release but both they and Zaleski lay down a quality foundation recruiting long term attention upon the pair whilst suggesting big things ahead for both their invigorating presences.

The Zaleski /Ugly Zoo Split is out now digitally and as limited edition cassette @ http://fleetingyouthrecords.bandcamp.com/album/zaleski-ugly-zoo-split

http://zaleski.bandcamp.com/

https://www.facebook.com/uglyzoo/

Zaleski 8/10

Ugly Zoo 9/10

RingMaster 15/07/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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Subset: new hints and ferocious horizons

 

    SUBSET London shot March 2014

    Subset has been to the fore of the UK underground scene almost from their initial emergence in 2009 through their continually inventive and diverse noise bred encounters. Each of their eight releases has been dramatic in not only presence but the continuing evolution and sparking imagination charging through their sound. Last album Loverdose is a fine example, the naggingly intriguing and explosive release as unpredictable as it was resourceful, fusing thick essences of rock, metal, and punk into tracks which left expectations floundering and passions hungrier. It took the band’s reputation to yet another level, providing one more major step in their ascent but we have the confidence to say it was only the appetiser to even greater glories.

The reason for that claim is a track called Roughened, a brand new song from the band which we have the pleasure and honour of getting a sneak preview of. Such its potent and striking impact we thought we would look at a comparison between the track and a couple from Loverdose, looking at another twist in the growth of Subset and their incendiary songwriting as well as a potential breakthrough into international recognition which the song alone suggests is possible, yes it is that potent.

Between them Carnage and Bayonet from Loverdose give a full picture of the album and Subset’s sound at that moment in time. The first of the two flies at the senses on a surge of punk and grunge infused rock with a melodic seducing which wraps sensuous persuasion round senses and imagination. Guitars and bass offer a persistent snarl and insatiable predation which the rhythms whip up into a greater frenzy, All the time though a Buzzcocks like lure winds its bait around ears and imagination. The song merges a further raw and caustic breath into the mix, inciting the senses and imagination into assuming you think the band was at their pinnacle. That was until Roughened infected body and soul.

As rhythms thump down with a strength and intent which arguably has never been more dramatic and imposing from the band, and Romain Daste’s excellently expressive vocals combine with rich predatory growling riffs to steal a greater slice of an instantly awoken imagination, the punk heart of the band roars as never before in the new track. That is only part of the story though as the previous grunge and rock pop elements of the band which have certainly not been abandoned find themselves redefined as a fiercer noise and psyche rock charge of invention. Contagion is as virulent as ever but courted by a definite post punk temptation and an overall greater voraciousness which has been thickened and almost carnally fortified in the songwriting.

Bayonet from the previous album showed a harsher side of the band, merging melodic rock and punk infused metallic essences into a scuzz blessed provocation which was unafraid to entice with rapier tendrils of sonic noise whilst preying on and snuggling up to the senses with raucous noise and tempting melodies respectively. It was a proposition which gnawed and flamed at ears whilst teasing them with pop rock wantonness and now Roughened employs much of the same web of sound but twists it into a more incisive and riveting furnace of raptorial ingenuity whilst adding richer strains of garage punk and alternative metal. It is crafted and delivered in a greatly maturer blaze of craft, invention, and instinctive devilry; Subset and songwriting at their most inventive and exploratory it is easy to say.

As much as the two older songs and Loverdose as a whole impressed, hindsight showed they only hinted at the new mouthwatering and breath-taking alchemy that runs through Roughened. The track is quite brilliant and just the start as the band has numerous more juicy provocations waiting to mark a new horizon in the journey of Subset. We cannot wait and suggest you keenly watch this space as fans and newcomers to the band are in for something special we suggest, Roughened our undeniable evidence.

http://subsetband.com

www.soundcloud.com/subset-1

 

Pete RingMaster

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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BulBul – Hirn Fein Hacken

EOM57_PromoWallet

Ok I will admit I had not come across Austrian band Bulbul before being handed their new album Hirn Fein Hacken, a release which sees them returning after six years from not sure where, but from here on in after the intensive psyche examination presented by their latest, a backward investigation is sitting high on the list of musts. An insatiable and mischievous, not forgetting criminally addictive, exploration of every delicious element you can imagine to rile, ignite, and seduce the very core of the mind and senses, Hirn Fein Hacken is quite simply sonic irreverence and quite brilliant.

The first sign of Bulbul we can find is the release of their self-titled debut album in 1997, Bulbul a one man project of guitarist/vocalist Raumschiff Engelmayr at the time. With Derhunt linking up on bass, the band released second and again self-titled album in 1999, via as the first via Trost Records. Drummer Ddkern joined not long after as the band continued to experiment with sound, imagination, and their fans minds through their third and fourth albums in 2003 and 2005 respectively, again under the same monikers as the others. 2006 saw fifth album BlllBlll unleashed whilst the Patrick Pulsinger produced 6 was uncaged via Exile On Mainstream two years later to strong acclaim and attention. Hirn Fein Hacken is as mentioned the band’s return, again via EOM, and takes little time in slipping under the skin of the senses and psyche as well as giving the passions an irresistible creative toxicity to feast upon.

The Vienna hailing band’s influences according to the press release include the likes of The Kinks, Cpt. Beefheart, Rhys Chatham, Django Reinhart, Abner Jay, Fats Domino, and Bob Dylan, but as the album seduces with its ingenious seductive dementia we would suggest artists such as Kontrust, De Staat, Yello, and Fantomas as a starting place. Opener Fire offers a wide groan before bringing all of its thought and energy into a concentrated rhythmically driven nagging of ears and senses. Riffs gently niggle as the bass provides a fuzz kissed tonic to greedily swallow whilst all the while strong vocals dance over the bait with devilry in their tone and relish on their lips. The song continues to swagger and weave across the imagination, enterprise of the guitar as boisterously naughty as it is creative and the bass an irresistible growling incitement impossible to tear emotions away from.

It is a magnetic start which has little difficulty in making slaves of thoughts and passions, leaving the following Uhu a willing canvas to play with. An electro simmering ebbs and flows initially, its voice slightly smothered but eager to break free to greater clarity. That aspect is taken by the funk bred grooves and suasion of the guitar matched by the vivacious vocal delivery. The song smoulders, never lifting its gaze or energy from a wanton sway of its body and sex infused melodies. Not as dramatic as its predecessor but equally as enthralling, the song makes way for I hea eh scho lång nix mea, a song which like the first secures its initial conquest through repetitive coaxing before exploring an industrially inspired realm with clanking tubes, concussive temptations, and unpredictable almost maniacal imagination. The track pushes the earlier thoughts of De Staat to the fore, the song a cousin of their Sweatshop track without the same feverish urgency. It is a glorious trap for the passions warming them up for the even greater infestation to follow.

That virulence comes in the shape of the ridiculously addictive and epidemically infectious instrumental Kanzla. From its first second, guitars respectfully grind against the ears whilst the bass again adds a barracuda like tone to the abrasing lure of the song. The rhythmic restraint with punctuating twists of the drums only reinforces the delicious irritancy as the track persists with its rub through sonic rises and falls. The dip into a brief sultry teasing only inflames the senses more before the track reverts to its feverish meshuga of a tango, intermittently interrupting its blaze with further inventive twists.

Both the psychotic Fisole, where instruments are abused and random items employed for a warped bedlamic cacophony, and the noise rock taunting of Quicksand keep the passions breathless, the second of the two finding an element of Melvins and even Pere Ubu to its spellbinding guitar sculpted temptation. As impressively thrilling as they are the pair are only the appetiser for the pinnacle of the album, Gurdy. The track takes a breath before cantering eagerly through the ears, spicy short guitar strokes and rumbling riffing spurred on by the darkly sinister vocals and unrelenting rhythms. The track is pure 100% unbudging contagion, every flavour, trait, and inventive bait pure addictiveness. Imagine Mike Patton, Pryapsime, and Queens Of The Stone Age engaged in an illicit enterprise and you have the quite magnificent Gurdy.

Genderman Can provides a raw punk fuelled rampage next, vocals and bass antagonistic whilst the guitar boils the air with a blues tasting sonic toxin which again is only good for health and passions, especially its closing warped and sizzling smothering of the senses. From here the album relaxes its energetic stance to unveil a pair of slowly burning treats. Bomb comes first, its opening air awash with the fiery country blues flames which were hinted at on its predecessor. With pulsating beats and a psychedelic ambience drifting over song and listener whilst the vocals like the music flickers within a seductive fire formed around the narrative, the track is a mesmeric enchantment littered and primed with broad intrigue and unruly invention, but within a relatively sobering confine.

The closing A To Beans is just aural sex, a slow hip swerving seductress with smooth rhythms, a throbbing intent, and a sinister vocal invitation which should be avoided but impossible not to embrace as deeply as the noir blessed sounds. It is a ridiculously captivating end to a quite sensational release. As these last words are written contemplation of how BulBul avoided our attention is loud and incriminations rife, but it is hard to imagine previous releases being better than Hirn Fein Hacken so maybe this was the right time to find the band. We are heading back into their history as you read and suggest you do the same once you have been infected by this mad beauty.

http://www.bulbul.at/

http://bulbul.bandcamp.com/album/hirn-fein-hacken

10/10

RingMaster 08/04/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Sweet dances and psychotic episodes: an interview with Fede of Destrage

fede2

Difficult to describe but very easy to enthuse vociferously over,  Are You Kidding Me? No. the new album from Italian metallers Destrage is easily one of the most thrilling and innovative albums to come along not only this year so far but over a long time. It is a fever of invention and imagination which confronts and seduces the senses through a maze flavours, styles, and experimentation. It is sonic and noise anarchy at its best, a psyche teasing triumph which declares its creators as the exhilarating maelstrom of adventure metal and music is always crying out for. To find out more about band and release we had the pleasure to explore the depths of Destrage with drummer Federico Paulovich, venturing into the creation of the album, Ron “Bumblefoot” Thal, tomato juice, audience sex and plenty more…

Hi Fede and thank you for talking with us.

Before we look at your new album would you tell us about the beginning of Destrage?

The current line-up has been consistent since 2007 and after their first demo, Self Id Generator, Destrage signed a deal with Howling Bull Records, Japan, and released their first full length, Urban Being, which also saw a worldwide release by Coroner Records in 2009.The second full length The King Is Fat’n’Old was released in 2010 by Coroner Records and Howling Bull, supported by European and Japanese tours and international festivals such as Heineken Jammin’ Festival, Euroblast and Mair1 Festival, The Bad Side Festival, MetalItalia Festival, MAV Festival and more. The eclectic festival run afforded Destrage the opportunity to share the stage with Red Hot Chili Peppers, Parkway Drive, Hatebreed, Unearth, Municipal Waste, Sick Of It All, Freak Kitchen, Monuments, Jeff Loomis, Penny Wise, After the Burial, Puddle of Mudd, August Burns Red, Enter Shikari, Caliban, Every Time I Die, Lordi, Moonspell and many more. In 2012, we wrote and recorded our third album. The result, the band’s most focused and dynamic effort yet, Are You Kidding Me? No. led to a worldwide deal with Metal Blade Records.

What was the spark and intent of the band at the beginning and does that still drive the band just as potently today?

We simply LOVE to spend time together, playing together, laughing and making jokes or just hanging. If “millions $$$” are not involved in a musical project (like in our case) every member needs to enjoy every single moment of the “band life”, form the sound check to the time spent on the van. It’s about alchemy in my opinion.

Of course conflicts, like in every relationship, are part of the game. But that was intent at the beginning and nothing is changed at the moment 🙂

How would you say the band has evolved over the years musically and emotionally?

We believe that our evolution as musicians and composers fully reflects our personal growth in real life. You gotta experience something before you can say something; that’s the main reason why we are always evolving, and we’ll always be. So, expect something really different from the albums to come… About how we changed through the three albums, there are a couple reasons that can explain the process. At the time we were composing and recording Urban Being, there was a big change of line up, and all the songs were composed mostly by Matteo; only with The King Is Fat’n’Old we started working all together on the songs, so the main difference from Urban Being is the result that came out from a combined work. We had the same approach in composing Are You Kidding Me? No., but a few years passed, so we were more close-knit as a team, and above all, our music influences had really changed in the meanwhile, as well as we grew up as persons.

Italy seems to have a rather rich and expansive metal scene, how have you found it on the inside and has it becomes easier for a

 Photo by Michael Gardenia Photography


Photo by Michael Gardenia Photography

band from your country to break into a wider audience over recent years?

In Italy, being in a metal band is definitely not easy. Italian scene, especially on rock and metal music, can’t be compared to the German, UK, Scandinavian or American ones. Our scene is based on pop-folk authors. We have to face a pop and hip hop mainstream market which dominates our local music market, and you have to fight a lot to find, not only a good label deal or an honest booking agent, but also a decent place to play. I have to say that Destrage always met great guys on the road, who contributed to support local bands and this was a great luck for us. Nowadays for the first time we can see a metal scene growing in our country and that’s incredible.

You have just released your third album as you mentioned, the quite brilliant, and I am not just saying that because we are talking, Are You Kidding Me? No. Because of the album we described the band as ‘a ten-legged groove machine with just as many schizophrenic characters posing as songs within its latest temptation.’ The album must be your proudest moment to date recording wise, even over the achievement of making your very first release?

I think this album is what makes us really proud at the moment. The first Urban Being wasn’t even a team work, the whole band wasn’t even there. As much as it can be uplifting to see your first record see the light, we believe it’s much more precious to wait a few years and deliver something that really reflects what you are.

If Urban Being was modern metal with a touch of Destrage, The King was Destrage with some modern metal dressing, Kidding is finally the essence of Destrage.

Your sound as clearly shown on the release employs a maelstrom of styles and flavours crossing fields of genres. How would you describe it in context to Are You Kidding Me? No. for newcomers to the band?

We destroy, create, transform, sublimate. We worship enthusiasm and venerate the shake that it gives.

I think Destrage sound’s is spontaneously various and weird. It’s like we learned how to speak the “metal” language as kids, and then growing up we opened our ears to the world and learned so much more, and the process is still going.

Everything that inspires us, from movies to fine art to haute cuisine to love and sex, can be easily translated into hard music as it is our native language.

This said if you take a look to our Spotify profiles you’ll be surprised. Or disgusted ahahah…

I’d love to tell these newcomers: we’d love you to take what the album is actually giving, with a clear and naive point of view, not expecting this record to be something that is going in the direction you already have in your mind. We are not saying the album is a unique piece of music that doesn’t resemble anything else you’ve heard before, no, but it definitely has its degree of originality.

It comes to my mind a story: the first time i tried tomato juice I almost puked, since it is a fruit juice and I was expecting a fruit juice-like taste. My brain was ready to enjoy a semi-definite, predictable experience and was already projecting it in my mind as the glass got to my lips. By the time the liquid touched my tongue I was disappointed, disgusted. The contrast with what I imagined was just bad.

Now tomato juice is my favorite.

Let’s not expect cats to bark.

Simply listen, enjoy or not.

1978605_10153840599710104_1863836033_nThe songs on the album are almost exhausting in their imagination and ever evolving inventive anarchy, they border schizophrenic at times haha. They sound like a puzzle to excitingly decipher and it is easy to assume they are constructed in a similar way so how do you approach the writing and creation of your songs?

Ahahah you’re right. It’s a giant puzzle made by post-it! We love to use them to keep always in mind the structure of every song, and be able to get an overview on the whole album structure as well.

A Destrage song can start from a riff, a melody, or a drum pattern coming out from any member. Then we work on it all together…in the name of post-it !

!We just try to make music that makes us happy and that is fun for others. If this means diverse people will come to our shows then be it! Can’t ask for more. We believe a band is like a person. No human being is always angry, happy or introspective all the time and a project of five different people should naturally deliver many feelings and states of mind at once.

!Also it is easier to swallow a bitter pill if before and after you eat a spoonful of sugar, that’s why complex parts are inscribed in a creamy song with melody and apparently simple rhythm. It is then choice of the listener to enjoy the surface or dig to the nerdy core, it is our business to make both levels as enjoyable as possible.

We don’t want people to come to our gigs and take notes, we want them to come and jump.

Do songs organically grow from those initial seeds or is there a stronger element of deliberate sculpting in their creation from you?

It really depends on the song, but usually what we try to do is to start from an idea or concept that has its own soul and then decorate it with our craftsmanship, instead of putting together many different elements, that most of the times wouldn’t match very well. It is way easier to write very complex stuff for the sake of being technical, so we try to make it enjoyable by anybody. Once I’ve been told by a wise person that we should put sex in every single thing we do, so we put a lot of effort in doing so because we believe that having sex with your audience is way better than masturbating on your own. So even if our technique may result impressive sometimes, we think that music must come before sport in any case.

Did you approach the recording of the album in any different way to your previous releases?

I think every time is different because we change, we evolve as persons and musicians. It’s really a big mixture of feelings, emotions and thoughts. For AYKM?N. after a long period of composition and pre-production, everybody was really focused and motivated to give his best. Somebody was excited, but still worried about some parts here and there, because we didn’t have that much time to rehearse every song properly, so the trickiest parts were kind of scary. Obviously everybody wanted to have fun as well, so jokes and funny moments happened all the time; that’s the way we like doing things together. Every time we enter the studio we realize how much we love making records, and how stressful it is at the same time. Everyone wants the record to be “perfect”, so sometimes somebody loses his mind or goes crazy. Fortunately we have five very different personalities, and we know each other very well, so everything usually sorts out very quickly.

Tell us about the recording of Are You Kidding Me? No. Did the songs evolve further in that environment and did you learn anything this time to take into your next adventure?

The recordings were a bit messy, definitely a non-linear path. Even in the final phase of the production we were having new ideas and insights. Probably hiking in nature, getting lost in an unknown city, visit art galleries, alternate your perception are good ways to get inspired in the beginning of the process and recording is the best way to get inspired in the end of it. Even in its half dark, closed, silent spaces the studio itself is a huge source of inspiration. You are there, but you are not what matters. The album is all and you disappear.

Many of the songs made it to the record the way they were written, other didn’t and we kept changing them until the very end.

We made a documentary of the whole recording process, it will be published soon.

As the album teased, seduced, and thrilled us we laid numerous comparisons at its feet; moments in the eclectic alchemy which Destrage 1reminded us of bands such as Jane’s Addiction, Red Hot Chili Peppers, American Head Charge, Mr. Bungle, Dillinger Escape Plan, Faith No More Kontrust and French bands Mucho Tapioca and Toumai, even at one brief point Ugly Kid Joe. It shows the diversity and expanse of your sound. Are there any specific inspirations which have really influenced you if not for the band as a musician?

All those that you mentioned played a crucial role in our inspirational feast, but not more than Michel Gondry, Quay Brothers or Paolo Barnard did. And they don’t release albums.! !

Are You Kidding Me? No. sees a guest appearance by Ron “Bumblefoot” Thal of Guns’N’Roses on its title track, How did that union come about?

We all are Ron’s big fans. When we finished the track Are You Kidding Me? No. we felt something was missing in the end. In fact, a Bumblefoot solo was missing. Since we had no connection with him, Mat emailed Mattias “Ia” Eklundh, who played on Jade’s Place (in our previous record The King Is Fat’N’Old) and became our friend (he’s such a cool guy!). He asked him for an address, a number, some contact to get in touch with Ron. Mattias as usual answered very politely, but didn’t give Mat what he wanted (he’s a very respectful person). So Mat was left with no choice other than going on Bumblefoot’s website and write to the general mail address. And surprize, Ron answered immediately telling us the song was super good and he’d do the collaboration. He told Mat he was touring with GnR in that period, so we should wait for a month or so. We thought it was his way to refuse. Instead he actually wrote back when the tour was over, asking what we wanted exactly, and we answered “we want you to do whatever you want for 32 bars”.

Few funny private messages followed and we got our perfect solo in 3 days. Smooth. The song seemed to be made for him, as he also said later in an interview. So, good experiment, and when we got to meet the guy in person we liked him even more. Ron is rad.

That track is also the most, can we say creatively and thrillingly psychotic on the album, probably our favourite song though it is hard to choose just one. Can you give us some insight into its creation?

Are You Kidding Me? No. is one of our favourite tracks too, for two main reasons: its origin and its content. The song was born randomly, as Mat sang what became the trumpet melody while going around on his red Vespa.

So, in the beginning we only expanded what comes after the trumpet, all that gipsy-sounding part. We wanted to make it a bonus track and leave it as it was. Then with no reason or precise plan, we wrote all the rest around it, putting no limits and setting no borders, following the lyric concept “Everybody does all kind of shit, I’m sorry that I’m sorry, I had to do this”.

The content came along in exceptional short time, and surprisingly our mindless creation gave birth to some of the most cerebral and psychotic parts of the whole album. !

As you said earlier the album is also your first with Metal Blade Records. How has the link up impacted on the album so far?

Being signed with such a great label is a dream come true for us! Definitely it’s giving us way bigger exposure, and much more people are listening to the new album because of this. But on the artistic point of view it didn’t have any impact, simply because we could sign the deal with MB because we already had the new album finished and ready to go.

Destrage is a band never slow in hitting the road and stages, the same again for 2014 I can assume? Any details you can reveal?

Absolutely yes! Everything is “work in progress”, our goal is to play these songs live, touring as much as we can, bringing our music everywhere…we’ll see what happens! 🙂

We can’t wait to be on the road again!

Once more thank you for sharing time to chat with us. Anything you would like to add?

Thanks for your attention! Our new album Are you Kidding Me? No. will be release on March 3 in Europe through Metal Blade Records. More music and videos will be released soon, so stay tuned though our official pages http://www.facebook.com/destrage, http://www.youtube.com/destrage andwww.twitter.com/destrage!

Thank you so much for this interview guys! 🙂

Read the review of Are you Kidding Me? No. @ https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2014/03/06/destrage-are-you-kidding-me-no/

Pete RingMaster

The RingMaster Review 19/03/2014