Feral Kizzy – Slick Little Girl

Phote by Luke Fisher

Phote by Luke Fisher

The debut album from Californian dark poppers Feral Kizzy is simply an aural playground, a landscape of musical roundabouts spinning through modern tenacity and invention and creative swings whooshing across eighties new wave and jangle pop. Slick Little Girl is soaked in originality and nostalgia, a mix providing a riveting and thrilling treat ultimately cast as something unique to the Long Beach quintet; and something very easy to get addicted to.

Formed in 2010, Feral Kizzy consists of five musicians uniting a rich variety of inspirations in the band’s sound. References have been made to Patti Smith, Concrete Blonde, the Yeah Yeah Yeahs, and The Cure, though the one band which comes to the fore more than most, whether an influence or not, is eighties US band Pylon, especially their first album Gyrate. As suggested all spices and essences are evolved into something new but there is certainly a potent and enjoyable similarity in textures, sound, and unpredictable invention. With some guest contributions from bassist Hannah Smith Keller and Hannah Blumenfeld (Jail Weddings, White Murder) on violin and cello, the five piece of vocalist Kizzy Kirk, keyboardist/vocalist Brenda Carsey, guitarist Johnny Lim, drummer Mike Meza, and bassist Kevin Gonzalez perpetually explore their and the listener’s imaginations within Slick Little Girl, and fair to say they leave major pleasure in their wake.

Opener Lapdog Apparition needs little time to lure ears and appetite with its potent charms, a thumping initial beat casting the first hook swiftly assisted by a jangle of guitar and the saucy shimmer of keys. Quickly into a magnetic stride the song swings along with sharp twists, subsequently slipping into a more fluid and mellower enticement then just as easily coming out of it and starting the cycle again. A tinge of the Au Pairs flirts with thoughts as it continues to dangle bait and enterprise through ears, though it is the delicious B-52s like detour which seals a lustful deal with emotions through its Rock Lobster like tease.

Feral-Kizzy-Slick-Little-Girl-Cover__RingMasterReview   The track is creatively irresistible, a major flirtation matched by the band’s new video/single Community Service. A throbbing Cure like bassline sets things in motions, whispers of guitar lining the entrance of vocals with Kirk alone an enthralling invitation and in union with Carsey, inescapable tempting. The song proceeds to spin a web of tantalising vocals and hooks as its rhythms offer a shadowed prowl against the more celestial flight of the keys. It is captivating stuff, an inventive weave of textures and melodic infection, with the description of Xmal Deutschland meets Throwing Muses and indeed Pylon a canny hint.

The Way We Are has a fine line in guitar jangle and spicy melodic imagination backed by another addictive dark rhythmic baiting from Meza and Gonzalez, whilst vocally a Debbie Harry like whisper clings to the expressive roar of Kirk. Matching the invention and lures, Carsey breeds a pungent waltz of persuasion with fingers on keys too, it all colluding in a busy and thick dance of jangle pop before making way for the melodic caress of Sally and the Emcee. A gentle saunter equipped with rawer, incisive edges, the song is a provocative croon which thickens with every passing chord and beat until filling air and ear like dense melodic smoke. It persistently smothers the senses and seeps into the psyche, seducing with increasing effect over every play.

With a similarly sculpted canvas Lament comes next quickly breeding its own distinct character with a bluesy tang and citric adventure of spatial keys. The track is mesmeric but with a fire in its belly leading to a feisty rock tenacity driven by masterful riffs and hooks from Lim. Again sounds from earlier decades entwine with a modern invention and freshness, culturing something as much psyche pop as it is punk rock. From one album pinnacle to another with the scuzzier Life Associates which straight away is a more forceful and rugged proposition through the snarl of bass and guitar alone. Again there is a punkish element to the song’s roar and a sultry kiss to the melodic endeavour on offer, something like Siouxsie and the Banshees merged with Martha and The Muffins a strong reference, though as across the release, songs come with Feral Kizzy originality which argues against any comparisons as much as it sparks them.

More blues bred twangs grip the guitar enterprise in Not My Mind, the spicy coaxing quickly engulfed in the melodic poetry of keys and attention grabbing vocals. Though it does not quite light the same rich fire in ears and thoughts as its predecessors, the track reveals yet another side and depth to the songwriting and invention of the band, its body a volcanic fusion of sounds and textures which never erupts but is a constantly imposing and gripping incitement unafraid to unleash the heat of its heart.

The Dinosaur flirts and sways with sixties garage pop captivation and indie rock mischief next, flirting with body and thoughts from start to finish and never relinquishing its tight vivacious hold until passing the listener over to the just as ingeniously compelling tempting of The Skin Is Thick. A darker but no less boldly imaginative encounter, the song winds around ears like a lithe temptress, constantly stirring up shadows and deep rooted instincts through heavy seductive tones of bass and enchanted keys spilled drama. With vocals also on a resourceful intent to enthral and enslave, the song makes an impressive and exciting warm-up act for the closing show stopper What Are You Doing? All the lures and creative theatre of its predecessor is taken to a new level, every second of the song a controlled but rich blaze of skilled and impassioned endeavour. It is an epic bellow from the imagination and creative depths of the band only enhanced further by the sensational presence of Kirk and the intense incitement of the orchestral coloured strings, their spicy lure bringing echoes of Sex Gang Children back in the day.

Feral Kizzy is superb at uniting slim and often repetitive textures with thick tapestries of ingeniously woven enterprise, the last song epitomising that craft and success which flows across the whole of Slick Little Girl. The album is a thrilling adventure; one bred across the years in many ways but solely of the now, and Feral Kizzy a band surely looking at big things ahead.

Slick Little Girl is available from June 26th on LP/CD/Tape/Digital via eliterecords @ http://www.eliterecords.de/#!webshop/cst1

http://www.facebook.com/feralkizzy   http://www.feralkizzy.com

RingMaster 25/06/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

 

Goldsmack – Wild Season

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To be honest it is proving hard to describe the Goldsmack sound; certainly it is a blaze of sultry pop equipped with a potent glaze of psychedelia. But equally it delves into dark rock ‘n’ roll and blues bred exploits whilst casting a theatre of intimate drama amidst an evolving landscape of aural roars and smouldering emotions. Maybe the closest hint is to say that the Italian trio create something akin to Nick Cave and the Velvet Underground uniting in the seduction of My Baby and MGMT, but then again maybe not. There is also a familiarity to their music which makes accessibility very easy but as revealed by the diverse collection of adventures within their new debut EP Wild Season, it is once caught by that invitation that the real adventure and thrill actually begins.

Goldsmack consists of vocalist Georgia Minelli, guitarist Davide Tebaldi, and bassist/keyboardist Luca Bagatti, three childhood friends brought up “in the single most beautiful and boring place on earth”. It was a small village in the gentle hills of northern Italy where the trio nurtured their musical prowess and imagination, amongst many things to while away the hours. Their sound plays like the home of dreams and isolation bred from a similar source of inspiration in their remote upbringing whilst the band name, again to quote from the press release, “…refers not as much to real gold, but rather to an alchemical sort of gold, a chimera, a potent drug…a prismatic, paradoxical thought that becomes circular and obsessive.

Good Morning Star tantalises first, a monotone sonic lure the thread to a web of electronic beats and guitar cast spirals of melodic enticing. A thick bass tempting swiftly adds to the potent bait, the mix carrying a post punk air reinforced by the also singularly expressive tones of Minelli, an essence of the Au Pairs coming to mind at this early point. At the heart of the persuasion a brewing infectiousness grows, wrapping the increasing celestial pop and vivacious radiance of the encounter. Contrasting it though are prowling shadows courtesy of the bass aligned to a sonic predation, extremes colluding to offer their part in the exploration within the EP of “the impossible triangle between Love, Money and Spiritual Enlightenment”.

The captivating start is swiftly surpassed by A Wild Wild Season, a fascinating dark rock stroll seeing Bagatti bring his full vocal participation to the narrative alongside Minelli. A spicy melody winds itself around another darkly lit bass coaxing, beats resonating in the background as Bagatti’s equally shadowed Cave-esque tones cast the beginning of the evocative narrative. The song continues to saunter, merging lighter scenery into the sinisterly aired landscape, whilst both Bagatti and Minelli duet and entwine their compelling deliveries to enthralling success. The seduction gains even greater momentum as a croon of orchestral like coaxing reveals their provocative textures in another riveting and mouth-watering triumph to the release.

A feisty ambience of blues and psyche rock smothers ears next as Rites Of Spring takes over, that My Baby reference a perfect clue to the sultry and fiery shuffle of the encounter. Minelli is as much ablaze as the guitars, their individual tempestuous energies and impassioned creativity uniting in a fire of persuasion though one kept in check a touch by the great wandering tenacity of the sobering bass. Once more ears are glued and imagination ignited; their appetites hungry for more and straight away fed by the similarly caustic delta blues pop/funk of Kids with Guns. Feet and emotions are quickly recruited to the swagger of the song, ears seduced by the impressive and sizzling enterprise of Tebaldi’s guitar resulting in one more increasingly enjoyable and incendiary escapade.

The closing Of Human Bondage is an enthralling oddity, a turbulent experience of dark drama and emotional torment coloured by insightful references and samples. These alone reinforce the imposing theatre and power of the track but are matched just as potently by the menacing shadow coursing its sound. Within it all a dark beauty is at work too, a calm and hope which only accentuates the track’s absorbing provocative heart.

It is a gripping end to a thrilling introduction to Goldsmack. Wild Season is an infestation of the psyche which continues to work away even after its sound has left the body; a golden slice of psychedelic darkness and shadowed pop whose recommendation comes as a roar.

Wild Season is available now @ https://itunes.apple.com/us/album/wild-season-ep/id988821494

http://goldsmackmusic.com/   https://www.facebook.com/pages/Goldsmack/804817556212518

RingMaster 20/05/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

 

Flyying Colours – ROYGBIV EP

Flyying Colours_Reputation Radio/RingMaster Review

Like a favourite candy, the ROYGBIV EP from Australian shoegaze popsters Flyying Colours, is richly flavoursome, addictively captivating, and impossible not to treat oneself to another portion of. It is a delicious slice of aural contagion wrapped in inescapable melodic seduction, and one addiction it will always be ok to indulge in.

Hailing from Melbourne and formed in 2011, Flyying Colours cite My Bloody Valentine and Fleetwood Mac as influences to their own sonic explorations and with the former an immediate spicing and the latter becoming more apparent over listens, they make a healthy spicing to something individual to the band. Similarly the compelling beauty of a Lush and the psych pop seducing of House Of love also nudge comparisons yet there is a bolder, almost bruising texture to the Flyying Colours sound which adds stronger uniqueness to the creative theatre of songs and EP. 2013 saw the release of their self-titled debut EP, a full introduction to their attention grabbing, raw beauty clad sound which came after the first teaser of the single wavygravy. Its qualities and lures are now explored with new intensity and adventure through ROYGBIV, a success with the potential of awakening a really broad spotlight upon their presence.

Flyying Colours EP_Reputation Radio/RingMaster Review     Single songs and the EP as a whole, are as rich in aural colour as its title suggests, but an evolving kaleidoscope of sound rather than a structure of individually layered hues just lying against each other. It all has a changeable and transfixing quality which starts with I Don’t Want To Let You Down. A sonic jangle works on the senses initially with its bait quickly joined by the thick beats of drummer Andy Lloyd Russell. The persuasion of guitar expands the moment the two meet and collude in awakening imagination and appetite, a sonic smoulder with a lively underbelly casting its spell on ears as the equally magnetic vocals of guitarist Brodie J Brümmer caress. The song continues to stroll with warm intent, getting feisty at times especially in a vivacious chorus which sees second guitarist Gemma O’Connor add her siren-esque tones to the mix. The bass of Melanie Barbaro is arguably the most laid back thing on the increasingly fiery encounter, yet her strings only add thick seduction through their thickly magnetic shadows within the blaze of the song.

It is a potent and infection clad track quickly backed and surpassed by the voracious shimmer of Running Late. Guitars jangle and dance in ears, offering a feel of British eighties indie pop a la Orange Juice and Josef K, whilst both vocalists twin up their mellow tempting to stroke ears. There is an unmissable sparking between textures in the song, igniting the thick sonic haze of the encounter further and indeed a sway of bodies and movement of feet and emotions before it.

The increasingly impressive adventure and ascent of the release continues with Not Today, and straight away the song has ears and thoughts spellbound as an opening melodic mist is pierced by one invigorating and tantalising bassline. Its groove is matched by those of the guitars and also in the more low key post punk vocal delivery of Brümmer. That post punk essence is throughout the EP but especially here makes the most delicious lure, suggesting that if Joy Division had gone funky with their sound it would have been something akin to this hex of contagion. Spicy hooks and a rhythmic swagger relentlessly feed a quickly hungry appetite and impassioned lust for the incitement and it is no surprise the song is the lead invitation to the EP, and indeed a favourite across the band’s recent UK tour with Pinkshinyultrablast.

In The End emerges from the closing strains of the triumph, swiftly laying down its own virulent persuasion though reining in the dramatic urgency of its predecessor just a touch as it wraps ears in a thicker smooch. Like the last track though, it barely takes a minute before full involvement of the listener is enticed, the still tenacious energy of the song inescapable incitement to the body as feet tap rigorously and hips swerve to the flow of the proposal.

Final track Leaks almost bludgeons its way into view in comparison to other tracks, the muscular snarl of bass and matching jabbing beats a heavily boisterous lure courting a caustic yet bewitching sonic mesh of sound from the guitars, it all coloured again by the immersive vocals. It is a fiery end to the release, and another irresistible song showing, as each proposition within ROYGBIV, another twist to the sound and invention of the band.

Flyying Colours is cast as shoegaze but their outstanding EP proves that there is much more to their voraciously bubbling shimmer of sound, plenty to appeal to fans of melodic and psychedelic rock as well as those of psych and lo-fi pop.

The ROYGBIV EP is available via Club ac30 in the UK @ http://store.clubac30.com/products/548073-flyying-colours-roygbiv-ep and in the US on Shelflife @ http://www.shelflife.com/catalogue/LIFE126.html now!

https://www.facebook.com/flyyingcolours   http://www.flyyingcolours.com/

RingMaster 18/05/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

 

 

Oh! Gunquit – Eat Yuppies and Dance

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Time to meet your new favourite band and album, and the beginning of frequent visits to hospital A&E because of the twisted rhythmic effect on the body and the deranged dance-floor tempting offered. The culprits are UK provocateurs Oh! Gunquit and debut album Eat Yuppies and Dance. With more agitated rhythms than found in a Cardiothoracic unit entangled in a web of virulent contagion built on salacious grooves and naughtily flirtatious temptation, the band’s sound is pure irrepressible addiction. Hints of their devilish practices have been unveiled for quite a while by singles, videos, and an acclaimed live presence, but with Eat Yuppies and Dance, the London based quintet has just infected the world with their finest moment yet.

With a sound presumably self-tagged as rumble-bop trash freak-a-billy, and you have to say it fits perfectly, Oh! Gunquit has its seeds in a meeting between neighbours Tina Swasey and Simon Wild at a North London vinyl-only sweaty cellar club DJ night. Apparently from an energetic pogo competition the pair decided to form a band based on their mutual love of wild garage punk, exotica, raw rhythm ’n’ blues, and surf-trash. This was 2011 and since then the band they subsequently formed has become an eagerly devoured proposition across shows and festivals which have seen them playing with the likes of Black Lips producer King Khan with his Shrines, Fat White Family, Public Service Broadcasting, Andrew Weatherall, and Keb Darge amongst many. One gig even saw Adam Ant make a “crazed” impromptu stage invasion whilst radio has been just as hungry for their songs. This has all been backed by a pair of limited edition and self-released seven inch vinyl singles and tantalising videos to match. Now with Dirty Water Records, the band has uncaged their greatest bait of sound and devilment yet to seduce and enslave towns, nations, and the world.

Front Cover 2 flat (1)     With a line-up completed by Kieran, VV, and Alex, Oh! Gunquit equip Eat Yuppies and Dance with a torrential revelry which can fall into anything from psyche rock and pop to garage and punk rock, and on again to rockabilly and surf rock and that is still only part of the full musical stomp which starts with opener Sinkhole. The resonating slightly tinny beats which accost and incite ears from the first breath of the song are the sign of things to come, their anthemic lure having one single aim with their actions, to ignite body and emotions. Vocals jump in swiftly with the same impact before the song slips into a sultry groove woven caress of surf temptation over a vivacious garage rock canvas. The voice of Denver bred Tina brings an enticing tang to the exploit as does the acidic kiss of guitar enterprise which flames across the encounter, everything combining for a potent and lively start to the album.

It is an opening quickly over shadowed by the brilliant Head Bites Tail, an exhausting tapestry of dark pop and fiery rock ‘n’ roll best described as The B-52s meets The Cramps whilst being filtered through the warped funk voracity of Rip Rig & Panic. Brass seduces with unbridled toxicity across the song whilst rhythmically it is as busy and inescapable as the first seconds after doors open on a Black Friday high street sale. The vocals are equally as volatile and excitable in quite simply one quite exhilarating proposition.

Sixties beat lined and blues hued Caves strolls in next, its suggestive swagger as tempting as anything cast by your favourite temptress. Once more there is a great tinge of B-52s to the exceptional enslavement but to that there are additional essences of garage punk bands like The Orson Family, the bluesy seducing of a My Baby, and the garage pop escapade of The 5.6.7.8’s in the mix. The song is pure aural sex but as becomes a habit with Eat Yuppies and Dance as soon as you think the band has hit a pinnacle they come up with an even more deviously addicted treat, in this case Bad, Bad, Milk. Vocally and musically insatiable, the track is sheer addiction from the first flying syllable and rhythmic swipe to its final infection loaded spark. Everything from the chin down is in rapid union with the merciless stomp, every beat, groove, and flame of brass simply Class ‘A’ addictiveness to which vocals and melodically mischievous hooks are the ringleaders.

     The fuzzy sax hazed, seventies psyche pop dance of Hope In Hell provides another new colour to the diversity of the album, before Pony Boy brings a rockabilly/fifties rock ‘n’ roll tenacity to its garage punk shuffle to ignite ears all over again. Think Imelda May meets The Horse Party and you get a whisper of its epidemic of sound and persuasion, again Eat Yuppies and Dance stretching its creative landscape.

Into The Woods visits a bluesy backwater scenery in the imagination next, rock ‘n’ roll keys a la Fats Domino, luring excitedly from within the sweltering but inviting climate of the song. A great merger of fifties and modern rock pop, the song flirts and dances with ears and emotions until making way for bubbly rock ‘n’ roll of I Need Help Now. As its predecessor, the song casts a spell on body and vocal chords whilst creating a new twist of dark pop adventure within ears and album, at times skipping along like a predatory version of The Shangri-Las in a fiery entanglement with Cradle.

All the big irresistible rhythms and anarchic incitements are out for Voodoo Meatshake, their rabid seducing matched by brass and vocals which in turn are bound by searing grooves and a suggestive stroking by keys. It is an explosion of lustful sounds and rousing energies, one of those feel good assaults on the senses which have you exhausted and bloated with pleasure. The same applies to closing song Lights Out; a rhythm ‘n’ blues romp leaping around fondling the passions like a mix of The Revillos and King Salami and the Cumberland 3. It is a glorious slice of sonic diablerie, a mouth-watering hex on feet and passions bringing the similarly sorcerous Eat Yuppies and Dance to a dramatic and thrilling end.

There is no remedy to the potency and create toxins of Oh! Gunquit’s sound, just more lust emerging with every listen of their brilliant first album.

Eat Yuppies and Dance is available now via Dirty Water Records @ http://www.dirtywaterrecords.co.uk/shop/#!/Oh-Gunquit-Eat-Yuppies-and-Dance-CD/p/47051183/category=2749844 and https://ohgunquit.bandcamp.com/album/eat-yuppies-and-dance

https://www.facebook.com/ohgunquit/

RingMaster 02/05/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

The Loons – Miss Clara Regrets

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Ahead of their new album on the legendary Bomp Records, San Diego quintet The Loons have released a two track single on Dirty Water Records. The songs, Miss Clara Regrets and Alexander, the latter a cover of the Pretty Things classic, were recorded exclusively for the label and alone reveal that over the twenty years or so that the band has been treating ears they seem to get more potent and essential.

Consisting of vocalist Mike Stax who is equally known for Ugly Things magazine which he runs, bassist Anja Stax, guitarists Marc Schroeder and Chris Marsteller, and drummer/producer Mike Kamoo, The Loons again bring the sixties psyche beat/pop invention which seems to run through their veins with their own modern pop tone to the single. And once more the band captivates with a slice of raw pop majesty.

Miss Clara Regrets instantly has ears engrossed and the appetite licking its lips as a deliciously throaty bass hook aligns with pungently anthemic beats, they both in turn wrapped by a flowing wine of sonic enterprise. Feet and indeed body are soon pumped up and bouncing to the swing of the song, its contagion inescapable as is the melodic acidity soaking every magnetic second of the incitement. It is one of those songs which simply tap into the wants of any pop rock fan, of any era, whilst merging nostalgia and modern instincts into a slice of addictive rock ‘n’ roll.

The Loons do not fiddle too much with Alexander, staying close to the original character of the version from the band which Mike makes no secret of adoring and constantly champions their cause. They do give it that Loons snarl though, vocally and musically which brings another hue to the set in stone classic. It is a great company to Miss Clara Regrets, though it is the lead song which ultimately steals the plaudits and lures these ears back time and time again.

If Miss Clara Regrets is a hint to what the band’s new album has in store for us all, expect nothing less than unbridled fun and enjoyment from that too.

Miss Clara Regrets is available now via Dirty water Records on 7” vinyl and download @ http://www.dirtywaterrecords.co.uk/shop/#!/The-Loons-Miss-Clara-Regrets-b-w-Alexander-download/p/47051206/category=2749844

https://www.facebook.com/TheLoons.SD

RingMaster 02/05/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

Asylums – Wet Dream Fanzine EP

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What do you get if you take a pinch of Supergrass, add it to an ounce of We Are The Physics, and then spice the mixture with a further splattering of Manic Street Preachers, Devo, and We Are Scientists? Well there is a good chance it will be something like the irresistible sound of and debut release from UK psyche poppers Asylums. There have been some startling entrances and introductions over the past months alone, but it is hard to remember many getting ears and emotions as excitable as the Wet Dream Fanzine EP manages in its three short, sharp slices of angular pop rock. The release is pure contagion but with a deranged invention and devilish imagination which reminds of a few and stands thoroughly unique in its character and temptation.

Asylums hails from Southend and have already picked at rapidly growing attention through their home made videos for the tracks making up the new EP; though having the songs bound together in one addictive package seems to make them grow in greater in persuasion and flirtation again. Live too the quartet of Luke Branch, Jazz Miell, Henry Tyler, and Michael Webster have been stirring up a buzz, a tour with The Vaselines and their own headlining enterprises luring in more and more appetites from fans and media alike. Now the Wet Dream Fanzine EP steps forward, with its title track released on the same day for the band’s new single, and there is a certainty that it is poised to shake up the UK indie rock scene for the better.

That new single opens up the release, Wet Dream Fanzine instantly laying down sonic smog of guitar enterprise which with pungent rhythms, has feet and thoughts immediately engaged and enthralled. The swing of the vocal delivery matches the warm stride and swagger of the song, everything a bouncy dance of mischievous persuasion with melodies and vocal harmonies soaked in creative devilment. There is no escaping the infectiousness of the encounter or its insatiable torrent of quirky and highly flavoursome hooks, it all unrelenting for the whole of the two and a half 10868149_320437288151046_8986672175115969600_nminutes the track takes to leap all over and inflame the passions.

There is no let-up in the devilry and quality either as the punk infused tenacity and urgency of The Death of Television takes over. An initial sonic spearing is the trigger to rebellious percussion and beats aligning to vocals just as sharply edged in their delivery. The song is soon a masterful stomp of creative agitation courted by a rhythmic and riff clad proposal which leaps around like bare feet on hot coals; the type of brilliance which made Baddies so essential when around. There is also an old school punk DIY feel to the EP and songs individually, which simply energises the second song and listener during its brief but addictive stomp.

The release closes with I’ve Seen Your Face In A Music Magazine. The third song combines the spicy grooving which lit up the first song with the more caustic attitude of the last track, merging it into a melodic and discord spiced wine of sound and invention. As the other songs, attitude exudes from every pore and note of the outstanding incitement, guitars toying with the imagination as rhythms jab with their own refined tempo on the senses and pop punk sparked vocals croon and roar with perpetual captivation.

It may be only one release but it is easy to suggest Asylums is the next big thing not only in but for British rock ‘n’ roll. The last time we were this excited was when…well privacy prevents details.

The Wet Dream Fanzine EP and single are available from February 23rd via the band’s own Cool Thing Records.

http://www.asylumsband.com/ / https://www.facebook.com/asylumsuk

RingMaster 23/02/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from http://www.thereputationlabel.today