Voyager – Ghost Mile

There is no denying the eager grin which broke upon faces here when the new Voyager album was sent through, having been seriously tempted by the band since their second album uniVers in 2007 and lustfully hooked through their fourth and fifth in the acclaimed shapes of The Meaning of I and V. The later in 2014 set a plateau it was easy to wonder if the Australian band could eclipse thereon in. Hopes and a quiet confidence have just been realised with the release of Ghost Mile, an album which brings a truly fresh breath to progressive metal as instinctively catchy and virulent as it is technically and inventively imaginative.

The success of the Perth quintet’s last album saw the band invited to perform at major festivals such as ProgPower USA, Euroblast Festival in Germany, and the ProgPower Europe Festival in The Netherlands as well as sharing stages with the likes of Deftones, Opeth, Leprous, Protest The Hero, Nightwish, Epica, Oceans of Slumber, and Coheed and Cambria. Voyager ended last year touring Australia with Deftones and Karnivool and being further invitations to play Euroblast and Progpower EU this year, the latter as headliners. Now with Ghost Mile driving things, it is hard to imagine 2017 being anything other than a really busy adventure, one no doubt littered with praise lured by their stunning new album alone.

Mixed by Matthew Templeman and mastered by Simon Strutters, Ghost Mile opens up with Ascension. A golden melody kisses ears first with the warmth and intrigue of a dawn sun, its suggestive air tempting the imagination before bolder rhythms add their bait. Djent teased enterprise is soon joining the blossoming affair, their steely tenacity paving the way for another caress of elegance around the radiant tones of Danny Estrin. As magnetic as ever, his presence is swiftly joined by sturdier textures whilst being the ringleader to an irresistible infectiousness soon fuelling the chorus and body of the evolving encounter. With the suggestive heat of his keytar matched in craft and magnetism by the guitars of Scott Kay and Simone Dow, the song is pure captivation, only increasing its potency as breaks of predacious intent and aggression escape.

The quite stunning start is quickly continued by the equally outstanding Misery Is Only Company. From the off, it has a harder core to its presence, a latent but open intensity which lines jagged riffs and the brooding air of Alex Canion’s bass. There is no containing the instinctive catchiness within songwriting and imagination though, the swinging beats of Ashley Doodkorte inciting similar boisterousness in the resourceful and technical enterprise across the band. Deftones’ Chino Moreno recently likened Estrin’s voice to Duran Duran’s Simon LeBon, something at times easy to agree with and indeed at times the song has something of the British outfit to its pop sensibilities, infectiousness aligning with more predatory essences to masterful effect.

Next up Lifeline initially lays another sunny shimmer on the senses, its progressive aptitude soon courting metallic rapacity though as melodies radiate and vocals warmly croon. Relaxing into a gentle stroll, there is still a constant snarl to the guitars and bass which breeds alluring unpredictability and waiting volatility, the latter never truly having its moment but keeping the calm honest whilst giving the progressive/ pop rock adventuring a threat. As with its predecessors, physically involving the listener is a quick given and with increasingly lust.

The provocative nature of Fragile Serene seduces next, its climate a mix of melancholy and joy with one addictive hook at the heart of a fusion of rich temptations which almost swarm over the senses into the imagination before To The Riverside carries the same fantasy off in its evocative piano led flight towards the waiting more capricious embrace of the album’s title track. From the first second, Ghost Mile has an agitated eagerness which infects body and spirit, the carnivorously laced bass growling beautifully within the fiery but composed roar of the track. Like sonic and melodic alchemy, the song turns four minutes or so into a cauldron of heavy and light, dark and luminous adventure; contrasts uniting rather than battling for the album’s pinnacle.

What A Wonderful Day pretty much sums up the feeling during its three minutes plus, its pop nurtured rock ‘n’ roll as contagious, additive, and arresting as anything heard this year so far. Its warm dance though does have predacious overtones lurking in its shadows, their semi-vocal presence more realised in the tenebrous texture of the following Disconnected, though it is never devoid of the light and vibrancy instinctive to the Voyager imagination. With industrial breath seeping into the track’s progressively nurtured and invasive metal challenge, there is nothing to deter a quick and full submission to its rousing and often caustic incitement.

The enchanting fascinating of This Gentle Earth simply beguiles next, the union of piano and vocals alone sheer seduction and only escalated as rhythms probe and drama floods every rising texture and tendril of contagion sharing sound; an infectiousness belying the emotional reflection of disconnection.

The album finishes with the fiercely charismatic As The City Takes The Night, a track growing from an absorbing tango into a blaze of heart and intensity which smoulders, simmers, and boils across its eventful reflection without ever seemingly taking the same route twice. As the album, the song is a fascination giving more and more with every listen, rewards including pure pleasure.

Expectations of Voyager are always high because of previous triumphs but again left short by an album which will take some shifting from being one major contender for this year’s greatest moment.

Ghost Mile is out now via Nova Distribution across most stores.

http://voyager-australia.com/   https://www.facebook.com/voyageraustralia   https://twitter.com/voyagerau

Pete RingMaster 17/05/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

One Morning Left – Metalcore Superstars

OML promo_RingMaster Review

Metalcore Superstars is the new album from Finnish melodic metalcore band One Morning Left, and our introduction to a sound which quickly you get the marmite factor feeling about in, it breeding love or eager dislike with little in between. As the eleven rousing tracks of the encounter run riot through ears with their bedlamic burst of styles and flavours, we quickly fell into the former opinion and keenly embraced its ferocious mayhem.

It has been three years since the quintet released their seemingly well-received second album Our Sceneration; it’s uncaging in 2013 quickly followed by the band increasing their live presence and hitting stages alongside the likes of like Adept, F*ckface Unstoppable (Bam Margera), Protest The Hero, and We Butter The Bread With Butter and more across Europe. 2014 saw the band begin working on Metalcore Superstars, its creation an extensive affair as the band honed their new ideas into its slightly psychotic character until arriving at the seriously eventful confrontation grabbing ears today.

Maybe the best way to generalise the One Morning Left sound is ravenous metalcore with the punk contagion of Billy Talent, the techno adventure of Silent Descent, and the mischievous prowess of Hollywood Undead; it coming with a hardcore/avant-garde surge of attitude. The result is a full-on and enjoyably unpredictable protagonist, even if one that flirts with a loss of control at times.

art_RingMaster ReviewOpener OML_KVLT sees the band announcing themselves in anthemic style, the vocals of Mika Lahti a busy and tenacious mix backed by those of guitarist Leevi Luoto. Checking out tracks from previous releases, there seems a lighter tone to the creative devilment of One Morning Left this time around with Metalcore Superstars but equally a more rabid snarl to their sonic and lyrical warfare amidst bolder drama to their imagination. The first track continues to stir ears and appetite with its fiery nature and pungent tapestry of flavours, subsequently creating a virulently infectious incitement that chews on the senses.

The following Heavy Metal Finland flirts with nintendocore like bait initially, it’s tempting aligned to vicious growling and broody dynamics which erupt further within the emergence of the tempestuous proposition. Without the constant spark of its predecessor, the track pleases as it toys vocally with heavy and death metal spices as well as similarly varied textures musically; enjoyably backing up the strong start without quite making the same impact.

The guitars of Luoto and Ari Levola aggressively dance with sonic attitude within ¡Derailed! next, but also they are unafraid to unleash some funk seeded flirtation whilst keys engage in a kaleidoscope of electro flavours and atmospheric suggestiveness. All the time moving towards a bruising confrontation, the track provides a galvanic finale within a formidable rhythmic web cast by drummer Niko Hyttinen before the outstanding You’re Dead! Let’s Disco! has body and energies fully involved in thumping aural devilry. Like Hadouken! meets The Browning, the track is a chest beating slab of sonic and vocal defiance again lit by the off-kilter imagination of keys and programming from Veli-Matti Kananen and bracingly driven by his bass lines and the swinging scythes of Hyttinen. Careering on the precipice of psychotic chaos, the track leaves body and emotions bursting with lust, a success matched by The Recipe, it a more controlled but no less forcibly resourceful and deranged web of concussive textures and fascinating theatre.

Kings and Queens throbs and pulsates straight after, its opening a haunted cascade of electronic splatters leading to a warmer toned but more punk bred aggressor as melodically engaging as it is infectiously cantankerous. That Billy Talent air is at its strongest here in a song with an inventive weave maybe less exploratory than others on the album but is still sculpted from a heftily flavoursome torrent of ideas. Its lean take on that thick diversity elsewhere works a treat, providing one more major highlight.

A muggy collage of metal and punk ‘n’ roll colours Fast and Furious 6.66 next, its electronic calms only bringing more intrigue loaded variety to ultimately an enraged bluster of the song whilst Devil’s Nest rumbles and grumbles from a sinister melodic entrance into an exotically hued adventure with duelling contrasts against aligning radiances and hostilities. A dogged but invitingly invigorating swamp of noise and flavour, the track grips attention and eager involvement with its theatre of enterprise leaving the album’s title track to bully and harry senses next, though it too is unafraid to seduce with the beckoning fingers of melodies and harmonies.

A great carnival-esque air comes with the riveting Eternity; the penultimate treat playing with a My Chemical Romance meets AFI hand within its just as potent murderous traits to ingeniously nag and thrill ears before making way for the closing turbulence of Sticks and Stones. Like being rabidly assaulted by a seductive temptress bound with irritable intent and wrapped in orchestral grandeur, the track is one enthralling end to an inescapably magnetic release.

For some, the creative turmoil and bordering on insatiable imagination of Metalcore Superstars may not hit the spot for ears or desires, but it only left us exhaustively wanting more. So be brave and take on the adventure One Morning Left offers with their latest proposal we suggest; it just might ignite your day.

Metalcore Superstars is out now in Finland via Inverse Records with full release from February 22nd in central Europe through Bleeding Nose Records, and across America and Oceania on Imminence Records.

http://www.onemorningleft.com/   https://www.facebook.com/Onemorningleft   https://twitter.com/onemorningleft

Pete RingMaster 25/01/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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All To Ruin – Among Us

All To Ruin Promo Picture

Back in 2013, Welsh melodic metallers All To Ruin made their introduction with the Parables EP, a striking collection of songs whose only real issue was a sound which lay comfortably within that of the crowd. The suggestion and potential though was that the band would evolve into something much more distinct in time. Now the Port Talbot band return with its successor Among Us with the first question in anticipation of its release being had All To Ruin found that unique identity. Certainly in adventure, craft, and maturity, the band’s sound has openly leapt on, but in originality it is a bit of yes and no. A familiarity to bands such as Funeral For A Friend, Protest The Hero, and at times August Burns persists but it is now coloured with a freshness and creative tenacity which makes the band’s sound linger and take on a more individual character. All To Ruin is still searching for that real originality it is fair to say but as you get caught up in their powerful anthemic choruses and the fiery passion of vocals and sound, that moment in time belongs solely to them.

Formed in 2011 and with a demo under their belts by the end of that first year, All To Ruin swiftly lured attention from fans and media alike. It was Parables which lit an even stronger awareness and following, backed as potently by live performances which has taken the band to play over the past four years with the likes of The Gallows, Young Guns, Deaf Havana, This Is Hell, Lower Than Atlantis, The Blackout, Funeral For A Friend, Heart Of A Coward, Heights, Exit Ten, Textures, Continents, Sylosis, The Chariot, Revoker, The Casino Brawl…well the list goes on and on. Entering the studio, as with their last EP, with Martyn ‘Ginge’ Ford and Matt Bond (Slipknot, Trivium and Bullet For My Valentine), All To Ruin reveal a bigger, bolder, and more flavoursome sound in Among Us with, as earned by the earlier release, similar if not greater responses expected in return.

All To Ruin Cover Art     The EP opens with Take The Reins and instantly encases ears in spicy grooves, hungry riffs, and punchy rhythms. Vocalist Aaron Roberts just as quickly brings his impressive voice to the affair whilst the guitar of Rhodri Williams provides a spiral of sonic enterprise and temptation. That new strength in songwriting and sound needs little prompting to show itself, as too a bolder imagination as the song slips into a gentle melodic embrace of voice and guitar. The thick swipes and rolls of drummer Tom Richardson keep an aggression bubbling though, eventually becoming the spark for a return of the opening impassioned roar of the encounter.

It is heavily enticing start to Among Us taken up another level by its title track straight after. Jabbing beats and a dark throaty bassline from Dan George provide the initial bait, their intimidation swiftly wrapped in the sonic tendrils of guitar. It all evens out as a warmer but no less imposing weave of increasingly gripping melodic adventure unites with the tempestuous and intensive rhythmic side of the proposition. There is also a drama to the song, emotionally and physically, which reveals more of the inventive and mature edge to the band’s creativity. An orchestral seducing in the background of the song helps that theatre arise as it flirts throughout, and once given its clarity, simply captivates in the finale of the excellent song.

Certainly there are plenty of recognisable elements on the two songs so far, but in reality that kind of applies to most releases these days, and as mentioned when songs like Among Us and the following Disconnect bellow with passion and imagination, it is predominantly a flavouring which only adds to the enjoyment. The third song brings a similar canvas to the previous track, an emotive orchestral colouring immersing the imagination as rhythms plunder the senses and vocals unleash the heart of the proposal. Aggressive and reflective simultaneously, the track spins another intriguing web of sparkling endeavour soaked in familiarity though it reveals itself to be even stronger in enterprise and emotion.

Aggression fuels History next, the best song on the EP driven by a creative snarl and provocative energy spawned by carnivorous riffs and uncompromising rhythms. Rather than being tempered this is complimented by the blistering sonic exploits cast by the guitars and the inventive twists further stirring up an already explosive song. On the last EP there was one song which stood out and pushed the envelope on the release and on Among Us it is History.

The EP comes to an end through Beneath The Steel Sky, a blaze of melodic rock which like a friend wraps enjoyably around ears and feeds the appetite. As shown here, technically the band has grown impressively as they have in songwriting and sound, but it is the imagination which lines every song which most stands out even if uniqueness is taking longer to come through. As with Parables though, Among Us suggests it is looming and closer still, but again the reality is that as songs consume ears and imagination only thorough enjoyment is the outcome.

The Among Us EP is available from April 27th via http://www.alltoruin.bigcartel.com/ and through all stores.

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RingMaster 27/04/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

ASCENDING MELODIC METAL CREW ALL TO RUIN RETURN WITH NEW EP!

All To Ruin Online Promo Picture

With a melting pot of influences stemming from August Burns Red and Protest The Hero, All To Ruin continue their climb with their own brand of melodic metal that blends blistering riffage against catchy hooks. The rising crew nationally release their spanking new EP ‘Among Us’ on Monday 27th April.

Hailing from the blue collar steel works town of Port Talbot, South Wales, All To Ruin were born in 2011 and quickly became a force to be reckoned with. By the end of the year, the band began work on their first demo, which happily secured national attention from Kerrang! Magazine. A series of successful shows followed before the band headed into the studio with Martyn ‘Ginge’ Ford and Matt Bond, whose previous credits include Slipknot, Trivium and Bullet For My Valentine. The tuneful metallers came out of the studio with a cracking debut EP in hand. The five-some dropped the record in 2013 and it firmly stamped All To Ruin on the map. The EP picked up glowing reviews and support from Rock Sound Magazine, Metal Hammer, Big Cheese, Powerplay, XFM Rock show and Team Rock Radio.

In addition to picking up critical acclaim for their recorded work, the band also have an impressive live CV to date, having played shows with The Gallows, Young Guns, Deaf Havana, This Is Hell, Lower Than Atlantis, The Blackout, Fei Comodo, Funeral For A Friend, Heart Of A Coward, Heights, Exit Ten, Textures, Viatrophy, Continents, Sylosis, The Chariot, Revoker, The Casino Brawl, Twin Zero, Bury Tomorrow and Yashin.

2015 looks ripe for the band to transcend the underground, and they are loaded with their explosive new EP ‘Among Us’. Opener ‘Take The Reins’ gets the ball rolling in supreme style with its crunching techy riff assault pitched by Aaron Roberts’ hugely infectious vocal lines that will bed down deep into your pores. The EP’s namesake ‘Among Us’ is another impressive nugget of melodic metal with its thunderous riffery and layered texturing. ‘Disconnect’ and ‘History’ offer up additional evidence that the South Wales metallers really have an arsenal of banging tunes at their disposal. Lastly, ‘Beneath The Steel Sky’ completes the record with its stunning muscular delivery and killer refrain. Stay tuned to the band’s Facebook page for tour announcements and show updates; big things are going to happen ……
All To ruin PromoImage
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-ALL TO RUIN RELEASE ‘AMONG US’ ON MONDAY 27th APRIL THROUGH ALL STORES-

Beyond the Dust – Khepri

Beyond The Dust - Promo Pic 2013 HD 1

Beyond the Dust is a French progressive metal band which has a very potent future on the evidence of debut album Khepri. It is not a release which puts the band up alongside the weightier and more robustly adventurous protagonists of their genre, but one which suggests with the ripe potential coursing through their songs, that the Paris quartet could find that success some when within their evolution.

The band made a potent introduction to themselves with their six-track New Dawn EP in 2011, a release which led the band to shows with the likes of Periphery, Sybreed, Protest The Hero, Monuments, and Becoming The Archetype. The song Reality Deformed opened up a new gaze of attention with its unveiling at the beginning of 2012; the song which featured ex-Aliases singer Jay Berast already showing hints of the new maturity in songwriting and sound which is ripe within Khepri. The band signed with Dooweet Records last year for the release of their first full-length, it a 57 min concept album which has been compared to “references like Dream Theater’s Metropolis Part 2: Scenes From a Memory mixed with Meshuggah’s Catch 33 and Periphery’s albums.” That might be a grand suggestion for Khepri but certainly Beyond the Dust has grown in creative strength and imagination between releases and this certainly lights up the album.

A mature male voice sets the scene as first track Rise waits in the shadows to reveal its presence. It is a dramatic scene being cast under a stormy sky, one soon joined by the melodic charm of guitars and a darker foreboding bass tone. Similarly the ambience of the track becomes thicker in dramatic hue, providing an intriguing premise that Meshuggah bred enterprise agitates and ignites. The instrumental is a captivating opening to the album, alone sparking the imagination and anticipation of what is to follow.

Clarity is the next offering, its own elegant start a potent coaxing before being immersed in a vibrant but cloudier weave of riffs and rhythmic incitement. It is not a particularly stormy encounter though and is soon mixing in peaceful melodies and certain emotional calms, but still prone to eruptions of raw vocals squalls alongside the predominant clean delivery, as well as fierce intensive roars of sonic voracity. The track continues to seduce and blaze away in ears, the band persistently impressing in craft and ideation but, and something which applies to most of the album, not finding that final spark to push the band beyond familiar territories.

After the Light is a valiant attempt though, a voracious predator from the start but guided by the excellent clean tones of the vocalist and almost as swiftly twisting into unexpected and khepricompelling detours. The song is quite gripping, luring in close attention as you wait to see where it goes next, and it does not disappoint with its imagination whilst still managing to stay within the original framework of the song’s tempest. There are moments where it veers towards the precipice of too much but always turns away and explores new just as sonically theatrical and engrossing ventures. A proposal to take your time exploring, much as Khepri itself to be fair, it emerges as a peak of the release which grows even more impressive over time.

A smoother embrace comes with Relief, melodies and harmonies as resourceful as the guitar escapades and vocal variety. There is a small sense of flamboyancy through the solo which will appeal to some and maybe less to others but it is the lack of the bold almost warped ingenuity of its predecessor which prevents the song lighting emotions as potently. As a rapacious melodic rock track though there is little to ignore and refuse, much as with Last Breath, though the song is much more volatile emotionally and aggressive creatively. The further into its short but eventful body it travels, the greater the creative temptation discovered where again a more twisted invention is allowed to flirt with the listener even if in short doses.

Both Zero and Silence and Sorrow have the imagination heavily invested and ears fully attentive, the first a tenaciously expressive and inflammatory instrumental coaxing thoughts and emotions into the savage jaws of its successor. The most carnivorous track on the album, riffs and rhythms a barbarous incitement, the song proceeds to explore a sonic tapestry of bedlamic enterprise and melodic ingenuity. Funk, jazz, and math rock all seem to have a part of its breeding whilst the ever impressing vocals in their harmonic styling only add to the magnetism of the tempestuous encounter. As After The Light, the track stands as a pinnacle of Khepri, the moments where something new is truly breached.

The three parts of The Edge of Earth and Sea complete the album, each a part of an epic twenty plus minute narrative also standing well individually if taken that way. Part 1: The Tears Of Departures is a mellow and evocative embrace, though as expected it has a fiercer energy to its air and a darker nature to its shadows. They subsequently boil over into a brawling hardcore-esque vocal expulsion over jagged riffs and tingling melodies, the evolving vocals and warm guitar expression ensuring though that there is plenty of adventure in the growing maelstrom, a stormy scene which slips into again the more restrained and charmed opening to Part 2: The Fear Of The Journey This in turn rumbles with storm like emotion and intent across its colourful and technically extravagant soundscape. The mid way collapse into hellish domains, where the safety of the narrative’s protagonist is lost, suddenly ignites the track to new heights matched by the voracious stalking of the senses from riffs and rhythms. There is a new inescapable drama to the scene which you wish was there sooner and longer as Part 3: The Bliss Of The Gathering comes in. With its rugged terrain and hungry hostility aligned to harmonic reassurance, the bliss of its title seems to come at a price thematically, but with a new pleasing adventure offered to the listener.

It is potent end to a fine first album from Beyond The Dust, not one to rave endlessly about but easily a release to recommend progressive metal fans take a good look at. Khepri is a seriously solid and enjoyable proposition, not pushing the band above the crowd but with songs like Silence and Sorrow and After The Light showing flair and promise which definitely excites, it hints that their time in a singular light will surely come.

Khepri is available via Dooweet Records now @ http://dooweet.bandcamp.com/album/khepri

https://www.facebook.com/beyondthedust   http://www.beyond-the-dust.com/

RingMaster 28/02/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://reputationradio.yooco.org/

 

Wolfetone – Silence Is Acquiescence

Wolfetone Online Promo Shot

A slow burner which takes time to getting going in some ways but emerges as a quite tasty slab of adventurous rock ‘n’ roll, Silence Is Acquiescence suggests the UK has another highly promising proposition in its rock scene under the rather cool name of Wolfetone. The release loudly hints that this is a band we should definitely be watching out for ahead, and with its rampant potential and increasingly persuasive songs, the band’s highly enjoyable debut album suggests why wait, a sentiment we can only concur with. It is a attention holding start to Wolfetone’s persuasion on a national spotlight, one with a few things needing ironing out ahead, but a collection of dynamic and exciting songs which do what all encounters should, leaves ears eager and satisfaction full.

Hailing from Northampton and Milton Keynes, Wolfetone has taken little time luring in eager support and attention through a live presence which has seen the band pick up highly favourable reviews and increasing acclaim whilst sharing stages with the likes of Heart of a Coward and Scholars. Their dynamic mix of alternative and melodic rock is bred with inspirations from bands like Billy Talent, Sikth, Protest The Hero, Foo Fighters, Reuben, and Hundred Reasons but as Silence Is Acquiescence shows, but it is a sound with its own emerging and distinct personality as shown by the album.

It opens up with Blame Culture, a track which personally did not grab as quickly or fully as following songs subsequently do with greater ease. In saying that once the big healthy bassline showed its lure and a potent wiry hook bound a flame of riffs, the track certainly had interest and appetite engaged. In hindsight it is a relatively low key song in comparison to many of its successors, but doing enough to tempt and certainly showing the strength of the band’s songwriting as well as their individual and united skills. The firm and punchy rhythms of Baz Woodsford and the increasingly alluring dark throated tones cast by Ollie Young’s bass make the strongest impression in a song which ultimately lacks the spark to ignite personal tastes. That success though is swiftly solved by the following Tanks, a vibrant and immediately striking slice of melodic rock veined by another spicy bassline and a potent blaze of enterprise from the guitars of Andy 11095_674690912650087_5503712840674927464_nSimmons and Dan Moloney. There is also a pop punk contagion to the stride and chorus of the encounter, offering a dynamism lacking in the last song which in turn feeds a new energy in the craft of the band. The vocals of Moloney also have a new lease of life, ably backed by the rest of the band in a three pronged harmonic adventure.

Born Human steps up next and is similarly loaded with an eager attitude and adventurous nature; the album in full swing now and providing all the proof as to why Wolfetone is beginning to stir up a buzz. The prime hook of the song is a tangy temptation too which steals the show from equally robust and tenacious elements within the seriously catchy proposition, whilst the changing gait of the song adds to the easily accessible but unpredictable nature of the track.

The feverish Enemies with its emotional intimacy and thumping heartbeat has ears and imagination greedily involved, a tempting reinforced by the excellent slip into melodic and harmonic calm with just an edge of angst. It is a passing breath though as the song is soon flexing creative and rhythmic muscle as hooks bite and melodies flame over the captivating frame of the song. Another highlight of the album, it is matched in success by the impassioned drama of Lost Boys, where guitars and voice create a colourful scenery of lively melodies and reflective emotion respectively, and the punkier exploits of Milton. An immediate favourite on the album, the track stands toe to toe with the listener through abrasing riffs and bracing rhythms whilst vocals croon and hooks spread infectious enterprise. Once more the bass Young feeds instinctive likes as if it already knows what the listener wants, his growling instrument the darker intimidation of a song which is prepared to brawl but would rather rigorously party with the listener.

Another highlight of Silence Is Acquiescence seduces straight away, The Constant a song which is happy either stirring up a tempest of sound and endeavour or laying warm melodic hands on the senses, and does both with invention. There is certainly a depth to the sound and songwriting of Wolfetone which is untapped but hinted at throughout the album, this song the strongest evidence of that further promise and potential which we will hopefully be exploring over future releases.

The album is finished by an acoustic version of Blame Culture, a wholly captivating offering with bewitching strings, but one which does emphasize the only issue with Silence Is Acquiescence, and that is the production on the vocals. Less prominent on the first couple of tracks but increasingly obvious as songs pass by, the excellent voice of Moloney and the supporting tones of the band come in a hollow embrace. It is a slightly cavernous effect surrounding them which is almost as if the vocals were recorded in a large cold bathroom rather than where the rest of the songs were laid down. The fact it cannot stop the songs making such strong impressions is testament to the band and the writing but it does just temper and stop an impressive debut from being a truly striking introduction.

Nevertheless Wolfetone has set down a potent marker and base for their next steps, and bred a definite appetite for their highly enjoyable sounds with their impressive release.

Silence Is Acquiescence is available from February 23rd @ https://itunes.apple.com/gb/album/silence-is-acquiescence/id955979528 and through all stores.

https://www.facebook.com/wolfetoneuk

RingMaster 23/02/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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The Body Politic – Egressor

TBP-July-2014-Promos-3344

As sonically savage as it is melodically radiant, Egressor provides one sizeable tempest of aggression, passion, and technical invention which thrusts Canadian progressive metallers The Body Politic into a whole new spotlight. The EP is a furious yet seductive storm which is as accomplished and gripping in its senses ravaging enterprise as it is in its rich croon of melodic and harmonic endeavour. The six track encounter provides a blistering fascination and unpredictable adventure which took a short while to reveal all its glories but emerged as another of the rigorously compelling events of the year.

Coming out of Vancouver Island and taking their name from the Clive Barker short story, The Body Politic made an attention grabbing mark with their well-received debut album All Too Human in 2011. Their sound entangles the nuances and freedom of jazz, which most members of the band studied at Vancouver Island University, with the colourful exploration of progressive metal and the predatory voracity of metalcore. It is a striking blend, skilfully twisted into an imagination binding storm as evidenced by Egressor. Following a period which has seen the band undertake several Canadian tours and share stages with the likes of Tesseract, Protest The Hero, and Scale The Summit, the new EP suggests it holds the spark to wider recognition as it sets the band out from the crowd.

The release impresses in many aspects, the technical craft, explosive adventure to the songwriting, and the striking vocals of Sam Britton the most striking of these. Produced by Spencer Bowman, the release opens with Vitam Agere. It EP Cover - Body Politic - Egressor - 2014is a haunting instrumental piece, emotion spilling keys stroking ears as a sonic wind grazes the senses. The restrained entrance soon brews up a forcible and portentous coaxing as guitars and rhythms sculpt a climactic air which is still soaked in that initial haunted, almost apocalyptic texture. The track flows straight into Armature, the track an immediate onslaught of eventful and demanding rhythms aligned to scorching grooves and ragged riffs. Driven by the coarse scowls of bassist Jesse Janzen, his tones as aggressive as the metalcore spine of the track, the song swiftly reveals potent scenery of raw persuasion from the riffs of Matt Aasen and Dan Montgomery alongside the thumping beats of Spencer Bowman. This onslaught is tempered by the technical flair and imagination the guitarists also unleash and the exceptional clean vocals of Britton, his entrance the final piece in the jigsaw bringing the track alive. As soon realised every moment is just an instance in the journey of a song, the starter proceeding to steer ears and emotions through avenues of raucous passion and ingenious technical enterprise, all soaked in the emotive keys of Rob Wilkinson.

It is an imposing and impressing start but merely a taster of greater things to come, instantly shown by the following All Hands. Electro radiance sets the track off before a torrent of contagious jagged riffs and the brawling tones of Janzen erupt, their confrontation swiftly tempered and complimented by the smooth flow of Britton’s delivery. The song then twists into an enthralling schizophrenic dance of psychotic rhythms and similarly bred sonic imagination, both aspects flirting with and chewing on thoughts and senses respectively. It is a glorious turn in the song before it slips back into its melodic fire bound in hostile intent. The track is sensational, a constant flood of creative intrigue and bold invention unafraid to wrong-foot and confront the listener.

Swing For The Fences has the task of following the EP’s first highlight and does so with antagonistic gusto. Grooves and riffs climb over the psyche from the off before relaxing into a melodic embrace led by Britton’s refreshing tones. Keys and melodies wrap emotive arms around ears before the track combines its dark and light side for another absorbing flight of riveting imagination and honest passion. Both sides of the vocals impress but it is the guitars which push passions from ardour into a lust for the song, their almost cryptic invention as bewildering as it is bewitching and never allow senses and thoughts to settle and get a firm hold of the swirl of sonic acidity and bedlamic enterprise at the heart of the track.

In song and EP though, every part of the band combines to create spellbinding torrents of adventure and intent, keys and bass as vocal in their own way as the rhythmic and sonic character of tracks. Colqhoun instantly proves the point, the throaty lure of Janzen’s bass and the seducing presence of Wilkinson’s keys potent and expressive textures in the song’s exploration. Though not as dramatically gripping as its two predecessors, it casts a seriously rewarding and imagination provoking canvas coloured by raw metal and jazz rock hues, before making way for the closing Irradiate. The final track takes its initial crystalline melodies into a turbulent yet infectiously captivating furnace of adversarial angst and provocation, shadows and light hurling themselves around each other through the stunning skill and imagination of the band.

The track is a thrilling end to an outstanding release, one with the flesh and soul to push The Body Politic to the forefront of progressive metal.

The Egressor EP is available now digitally as a name your price download and on CD @ http://thebodypolitic.bandcamp.com/

http://www.thebodypolitic.ca/

RingMaster 17/09/2014

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