Promethium – Faces Of War

There is nothing better than hearing, release by release, the growth of a band in craft and sound especially when their potential is realised step by step whilst offering plenty more promise to be anticipated. Such has been the case with British metallers Promethium, a band who has openly blossomed record by record and now breaches a whole new plateau with Faces Of War.

Creating a sound merging old school with modern rapacious flavours, Lancaster hailing Promethium formed in 2007. Inspirations to the quintet included the likes of Black Sabbath, Metallica, Megadeth, and Pantera, essences still colouring a sound today which is as individual to its creators as you would wish. Quickly releasing their first EP, The Revenge, it was in 2009 and with debut album, Welcome to the Institution, that the band grabbed our, as so many others, attention. It was a raw yet accomplished introduction rich with that earlier mentioned potential brought to some fruition in its successor Origins four years later. As it built upon its predecessor’s strengths, so Faces Of War builds upon the second album but with a far more dramatic impact in songwriting to imagination to craft.

A concept album with each song offering a different perspective to war, the album launches at the senses with opener Enemies of Fate. A portentous sonic tone lures a march of riffs and rhythms into view with grooved armoury in its midst as vocalist Steve Graham swiftly joins the attack. It is a composed assault though, the band almost sizing up the listener rather than going at them full charge, providing a healthy mix of intrigue and predacious intimation. In no time guitarists Dan Lovett-Horn and Rossi are weaving a transfixing tapestry which is more than matched by the great vocal backing unity between Rossi and bassist Henry Greenwood; just two aspects in the inescapable maturity and growth in the band’s sound already being unveiled.

The outstanding start is followed by the similarly impressive Declaration. From its initial grooved trespass and Graham’s earnest calls, the track just wormed its way under the skin. The swinging strikes of drummer Kev Yates potently stir the senses, their rapacious incitement aligned to the groaning contagion of Greenwood’s bass as again a great maze of sonic enterprise is cast by the guitars with Curran Murphy guesting with a flavoursome solo. Drops in intensity brings spoken words from Nev Jones as Graham croons, a fluid twist which subsequently sparks a roaring finale before the outstanding P.O.W steps forward with its own dark clouds and intent. Grooves and rhythms instantly collude around vocals as an irritability fuels the nature of the track, essences of those aforementioned influences to the band spicing the volatile air of the track.

A shadowed calm is brought in by next up Shell Shock, its atmosphere as claustrophobic as it is seductive. That reflection rich restraint intermittently erupts in a cauldron of turbulence and emotive turmoil yet all the time guitars continue to weave a suggestive web of melody and predation. It is another gem and though only four songs in fair to say Faces Of War had us firmly hooked; a grip only tightened by 20,21,15 and its wirily grooved stroll. With Barry Mills sharing vocals with Graham across the song it boils with sonic dexterity while rumbling with rhythmic manipulation.

Such the massive heights of the first half of the album maybe it is inevitable that the task of living up to what came before slips up meaning personal tastes are not always stoked up as rigorously yet everything about Turncoat, from its vocal mix and rousing rhythms to sonic invention, is an ear grabbing proposition. It just misses some of the major sparks of its really striking predecessors.

As soon as the grooved webbing of Stolen Valour wraps ears straight after appetite was back to greedy, guitars and rhythms almost dancing on the senses with their snarling and badgering enterprise as again a vocal blend simultaneously entices and harries. With every passing minute the track simply blossoms as it evolves, harmony loaded vocals and creative unpredictability fuelling its compelling arsenal of invention. Another candidate for best track it is swiftly followed in matching captivation by Final Solution, itself an almost deceptive proposal being as intimidating and predatory as it is invasively infectious.

Featuring one of our favourite guitarists in Jay Parmar, Kill on Demand is one of those rousing anthems which have thoughts and spirit as eagerly active as the body. Led by the crunching beats of Yates and the brooding tones of Greenwood’s bass, the track is a magnetic fusion of old school and current ferocious metal shaped by the ever imaginative work of Lovett-Horn and Rossi and capped by the stylish raft of Parmar.

The album closes with its title track, another rigorously catchy and aggressive creative raid warlike in its tone and galvanic in its character. Epitomising the fresh strength and guile not forgetting that real maturity in the band’s sound, the track is a masterful conclusion to one mighty fine release.

Promethium and their sound just go from strength to strength, in turn so too pleasure. Yet there is still the feeling that they are yet to hit their full potential which considering the sheer unrelenting  quality of Faces Of War is something to keenly anticipate.

Faces Of War is available now @ https://www.promethiumband.com/product-page/faces-of-war

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Pete RingMaster 12/02/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Dark Hound – Dawning

Without a plaintive twang in sight, Dark Hound presents a new side to the assumed Nashville music scene though new album Dawning. Hear the Tennessee capital’s name and you automatically think country music in its glory but the ear grabbing quartet prove that its metal scene is in pretty good shape too.

Dawning is the band’s second album and sees them more than build on their well-received Oceans EP of 2015. That followed a self-titled debut full-length from a year earlier which itself sparked strong support across the local rock and metal scene. Formed in 2009, Dark Hound has persistently built and earned a potent reputation for themselves highlighted by Oceans and now set to be escalated by the Kaelin Tauxe/Dark Hound produced Dawning.

The band’s sound is a magnetic mix of flavours; heavy, alternative, and groove metal as prevalent as more progressive and voracious flavours. It is a blend which swiftly grabs attention within opener album Ashes of Your Worth. Instantly riffs ride the senses, the just as persuasive tones of vocalist/bassist ET Brown melodically surfing their tenacious waves. With grooves swiftly winding around ears as a grunge wash descends the track only tightens its grip, guitarists Evan Hensley and Preston Walls weaving a mesh of enterprise as crafty as it is imposing. The track is superb, taking little time to incite and inflame an appetite for stylish yet instinctively rapacious rock ‘n’ roll.

The ticking bomb of Josh Brown’s beats leads in the following Guilt Tripper, his bait accompanied by citric soaked grooves. The punk coated attack of ET’s voice soon joins the thrash spiced temptation, his bass invitingly throbbing as melodic hues infest voice and sound; the cycle repeating with greater endeavour as the track embraces fresh flavours each round. The song bears some of the inspirations to Dark Hound, essences of bands such as Megadeth, Iron Maiden, and more so Testament rising in its heavy metal exploits before making way for the equally infectious trespass of Carnival of Youth. ET’s seemingly calm tones again have an underlying snarl in their arsenal, it igniting with raw dexterity to match the fire of the sounds around him led by the rapier swings of Josh. Captivating from beginning to end, the track reminds of UK band Promethium a touch, the Dark Hound sound infusing their individual invention with more familiar ingredients to fine effect.

The opening whirl of guitar in The Answer had ears totally enthralled, its craft irresistible and continues to tempt across a song which to be honest otherwise did not make the same impact as its predecessors yet was the centre of attention in its increasingly enjoyable company before Crisis of Hope takes centre stage. It too makes a transfixing entrance, its hook fuelled lure Skids like and subsequently coring an emerging Jane’s Addiction-esque stroll. As the previous song, it was bit of a slow burner on ears though making a more than decent first impression, but grew minute by minute, listen by listen into another highly enjoyable encounter within Dawning if still missing the heights of the first trio.

Predacious in tone and sound Thrown to the Wolves quickly hits the spot next, the track almost crawling over the senses even with its eventual lively gait and nagging persistence while Stripped Away aligns acoustic flirtation and creative drama for its own gripping theatre. Considered and seductive, boisterous veering on rabid, the song is a carousel of adventure making a big statement for best song, both tracks in the running and matched all the way by the raucous yet harmonically teasing Balancing Act. Again recognisable flavours collude with strong surprises for a proposal which infested ears and appetite like an aural addiction.

Through the shadowed lined charge of The Jagged Edge pleasure was constant though certain moments did not connect with personal tastes as firmly as others, nothing though to dismiss the increasingly persuasive encounter over, while Thrashgasm delivered exactly what you would expect with its title with aggression and creative passion energy, the snarl of the bass and the ever energetic vocal incitement especially enjoyable.

The album concludes with Here Lies Truth and immediately trespasses ears with carnal riffs and teasingly salacious grooves. Again vocals simply draw involvement as guitars badger and conjure, rhythms imposing and driving song and spirit in fine style alongside as Dawning closes on another high

After the first couple of involvements we would have said Dark Hound had something worth checking out, numerous listens later it is a proposition which needs to be explored. This is a fine band in the making with an album we have found ourselves only getting greedier over.

Dawning is released digitally and on CD January 19th, available @ https://darkhound.bandcamp.com/album/dawning

https://www.dark-hound.com/    https://www.facebook.com/darkhoundband    https://twitter.com/darkhoundband

Pete RingMaster 19/01/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Target: Renegades – [Press Start]

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Heavy, imposing, and rigorously compelling, [Press Start] the debut album from UK rockers Target: Renegades, may not be a ground-breaking offering but it is a release demanding attention and inspiring perpetual returns to its muscular arms. Everything about it snarls and confronts, but with rugged charm and passionate intensity which turns familiarity into a raw asset, the album is a potent and riveting declaration of the accomplished craft and rich potential within its creators.

Hailing from the North-West of England, Target: Renegades has been earning strong attention and acclaim with their ferocious hard rock bred sound, 2012 seeing them voted by music fans as the Unsigned Revolutions Award winners. Alongside the release of their debut release, the Corruption For Beginners EP and the band’s stature as an impressive live proposition, which has seen them play with the likes of The Vibrators and I Am Giant, it has been a powerful emergence which [Press Start] only reinforces and pushes to another level. Produced by Daniel Lovett-Horn of another of the UK’s best formidable underground talents, Promethium, [Press Start] hits hard and with ferocious relish from the start , showing the quartet of vocalist Adam Hulse, guitarist Daniel Fide, and bassist Jack Hamnett, alongside drummer Steven Erskine who has since left to be replaced by Matt, as a thoroughly masterful and thrilling incitement.

The album opens with Once Was Strength and an initial web of sonic enticement from the guitars. It is an imagination awakening start which intrigues without setting a fire, though the addition of a dark throated bassline and crisp percussion certainly enlivens the lure. A great roughly touching groove soon ignites infectiousness in the song, egged on by the great abrasing and potent tones of Hulse, whilst a heavy swagger is soon in charge as the encounter increases its impressive persuasion. Rhythms badger ears with the same composed relish as elsewhere throughout and though it lacks a final spark to explode into an outright storm, the track is an exciting and captivating opening to the album.

The following I’m Not Emotional is more of the same but with an openly distinct character. Contagious and clad in intimidating sinews, the track strides with imposing antagonism and creative tenacity to push the release up another step 1011910_473542209405259_773939138_nright away. Vocally Hulse again impresses whilst rhythms dangle addictive bait before ears, it all glazed with a sonic mist and causticity woven skilfully by Fide. The bass of Hamnett almost stalks everything around it, again its heavy grizzle of a tone magnetic within the sonic smog. The track is riveting and makes a raw tempest to which the following melodic beauty of emotive Wounded offers a superb contrast and companion. Showing more of the vocal depth of Hulse and creative potency of the band, the song plays, as its predecessor in many ways, like a mix of nineties band Skyscraper and Pearl Jam. It is a tantalising and bewitching mix of power balladry and raging passion, which with the last song sets the pinnacle of the album.

Oro provides a swift and muscular kick spawned from scarring riffs and menace drenched rhythms whilst vocally Hulse whips up an anthemic dirt ball of confrontation and antagonism. It is a great addictive track continuing the lofty plateau of the album, and a riot you can only imagine whipping up live audiences in an eager frenzy. Its hostile stomp makes way for the similarly intensive but more restrained Vulture, another song employing recognisable essences but turning them into a flavoursome spice within the band’s own honest and accomplished recipe. Once more a grungy infusion makes its potency known to add further flavour, though ultimately the enjoyable encounter does not manage to rival certainly the trio of excellent triumphs before it, nor the insatiable rampage of These Eyes Judge which follows. Storming ears with fiery riffs and rapier like beats the track roars and charges with merciless intent across its length, merging this rabidity with more restrained moments which lack the spirit and fire of the rest of the nevertheless gripping encounter but certainly does its potency no harm at all.

Its imaginative and stirring finale leaves an enthralling enticement which is immediately taken up by Say Goodnight and its opening dark roaming bass shadows and spicy sonic weave of guitar. The final track of the album stalks ears and thoughts with its persistent heavy footed and evocatively intensive presence, providing an atmospheric landscape unafraid to visit elegant and melodic embraces which in turn explore rawer and more impassioned blazes of adventure and sonic bluster. It is a glorious end to the alum, its most adventurous and sublimely provocative offering leaving the listener basking in the potential it alone offers for the band.

[Press Start] is a striking and exciting debut from a band you can only see growing stronger and more boldly inventive as they evolve and explore. Target: Renegades is the name to watch out for, one as it is easy to assume we will be hearing plenty more of ahead.

[Press Start] is available now digitally and on CD @ https://itunes.apple.com/gb/album/press-start/id890500862 and http://www.targetrenegades.bigcartel.com/product/press-start-album-cd respectively

http://www.targetrenegades.co.uk

RingMaster 17/10/2104

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Promethium – Origins

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Two years ago UK rockers Promethium impressed with their debut album Welcome to The Institution declaring themselves as a band rife with promise and enterprise. Their mix of heavy and classic metal, despite its strong and gripping entrance, also seemed to be saying ‘you have seen nothing yet’ as it left a certain hunger in its creative wake. Now awaiting its moment to burst into the world on September 30th, Origins with ease backs up that apparent statement with a collection of tracks which scream from the rooftops just how much Promethium and their sound has matured and evolved between albums.

Formed from the remains of Skin Crawl, Bodies, Desolate and Natual Thing around six years or so ago the Lancaster band first opened up a wave of attention with their first EP Tribute to the Fallen of 2009. Followed by the successful and well received Welcome To The Institution the feeling that the band was about to erupt upon the higher levels of UK metal was maybe a little premature at that time. Met with acclaim and support things still seem to have moved on slowly for the band in regard to recognition though certainly tours with the likes of Furyon and Beholder as well as their own shows, did their stature no harm at all. Listening to the rich textured sounds and riotous energy and appetite of Origins only supports the notion that we all jumped the gun on their ascent but now could be the time it all kicks off for vocalist Gary McGahon, guitarists Daniel Lovett-Horn and Rossi, bassist Barry Mills, and drummer Dominic Clayton.

Whereas the previous album was a multi-flavoured mix of metal, for Origins the quintet has gone back to the roots of the band and promethiumcentred the core of their sound in prime heavy melodic metal, though it is as full of aural colour and sonic spice as ever. This definition of their direction we would suggest goes much towards the bigger deeper sound making the songs immersive and captivating, that and the obvious evolution in maturity and musical skills. From the opening track Won’t Break Me the leap in sound and composition openly hits, the track immediately wrapping the ear in sonic flames from the guitar and a bass and rhythmic inducement which stands bold and tall in craft and presence. The vocals of McGahon have also found a richer voice and delivery to match the sounds, and as the contagious opener rampages it all makes for an intensive lure for thoughts and hunger. There is a familiarity to the song which teases but as from day one with Promethium, band and music refuses to be compared to anyone else such the unique flavour of their music.

From the impressive beginning the album unleashes two more fierce encounters in the form of the confrontational Gunslinger and the antagonistic beast The Art of Hurting. The first of the pair, and the track which has been publicly teasing people up to release date, brings a great mix of vocal styles and intensive riffing veined by a cage of rhythmic prowess but it is the searing charm and flames of the guitars which steal the show before passing on to its equally rapacious successor. Holding its rabidity in check certainly compared to the previous songs, the track prowls the senses sucking air from the lungs with its oppressive and menacing nature. It is a brute of a treat which continues the vigorously strong start of the album provoking more thoughts that the band’s time has come.

Bringing a less intensive but no less striking offering, Counterfeit with sonic spires of melodic potency and riveting craft leads the listener into further fresh avenues whilst Rain with its power ballad like passion pushes the envelope of the songwriting and its realisation on the album yet again. The song is a real slow burner with its first engagement drawing strong acclaim and over subsequent listens drawing real ardour.

The riff sculpted almost Sabbath like The Hunted reeks old school metal in the best of ways though the vocals lack the bite and potency on earlier songs, especially the less successful mix of harsh and cleaner hues. It is still a richly satisfying ride which is matched by the slow melodic drawl of Plagued by Evil, another song which reminds of something else but will not give up the source, probably because there is none. The songs make for a less impacting but undoubted magnetic middle to the album which is given another adrenaline boost with Revolver, a song which conjures up a predacious animosity and within its storm an anthemic persuasion to capture the imagination.

Completed by the excellent Believer, a track which has more twists and turns to its inventive sound and melodic furnace than a dog chasing its tail and an invention which leaves each listen a little more rewarding and revealing, and the closing mesmeric instrumental title track, The Sky Rocket Records released Origins is a mighty release and step in the dawning of Promethium as one of UK’s most thrilling metal bands. Strangely it still suggests there is more to come from and hone within the band which is as dramatically exciting as the album itself.

Origins is released on October 7th

http://www.promethiumband.com

9/10

RingMaster 28/08/2013

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Subject Seven – Fall Of The Four

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UK metallers Subject Seven never fails to offer up an experience and release which plays with and ignites the senses, eventually working into the passions with generally incendiary results. New album Fall Of The Four is no exception, a release which comes at the listener with a varied expressive presence to captivate the imagination whilst feeding primal needs. It brings ten melodically flaming tracks with equally compelling sinews and muscular intensity veining to its multi-flavoured body and from start to finish leaves a more than healthy satisfaction.

Formed in 2010, the Preston quartet did not stand still waiting for acclaim and interest, taking a mere trio of weeks to record debut EP New Dawn and soon standing as one of the more enterprising and welcomed international touring act, the band playing over 250 shows in their first 2 years leading to their critically acclaimed debut album Seven Rising of 2012. Led by acclaimed Underground Horror Director (Creepsville, Slasher House)and vocalist MJ Dixon, and made up of members of Dennis Delight, Hockey Mask Heroes and Ocean Bend in the shape of guitarist Sam Saint, bassist Jim jam, and drummer Paul Swindells, Subject Seven has continued to earn respect and a devoted fan base through singles like Come Out Tonight, No Fate, and Search The Dark and their additional videos, and their fiery live performances which has seen them alongside bands such as AC/DC, Iced Earth, and TerrorVision. Passionately independent forming their own unique record label and production house Mycho Records which has seen them work with first class acts like Sinnergod, Better Left Alone, Promethium and Blaze Bayley (Iron Maiden/Wolfsbane), the band laid down the strongest temptation for their new release with the recent release of the single and video Heart Of Osiris.

It is a persuasion soon cemented by the album which opens with said single. The atmospheric opening drama of the song is pure Subject 7 covercinematic menace, its tantalising and sinister breath evolving into an electro metal taunting of the ear ripened further by the crisp and potent rhythms and knee staggering riff strikes. Alongside the formidable aggressive provocative the keys continue to wash the ear with evocative and warm caresses whilst the vocals similarly seduce rather than antagonise for a strong and expressive welcome. After listening to the album and in hindsight, the song is maybe not the track we would have chosen to lay an invitation down for the album but there is no denying its imaginative venture with symphonic whispers coating its rising flumes of melodic elegance.

The following You Heard It Here First snaps at the ear with a feistier beckoning whilst again coaxing with melodic invention for a mix of classic and groove metal with a distinct stamp of the band on its vibrant hide. The track is another rise to the album and as third song 14∑E (04U) lights up the ear the sense of it getting better and better as it progresses is strong and proven across its subsequent offerings. This track like its predecessors merges a pleasing electro teasing to its muscular craft and passion bringing essences of Killswitch Engage and Silent Descent into a more hard rock lilted melodically crafted endeavour.

Both Diablo and Celestion enthral with their distinct breaths, the first laying a folky breeze intriguingly upon its contagious and potent grooves and essence  developed further by the keys amongst the hungrier riffs and intensity whilst its successor is an enchanting soaking of emotive ambience and sonically kissed melodic beauty. It is a simmering piece of instrumental fire which showcases the impressive craft of the men behind the sound and their songwriting, which at times can be submerged within the infectious call of songs.

From the insatiable virulence of Never Let You Go the album lifts an even greater head of potency and temptress like persuasion, Iblis Trigger taking the lead with its rampant energy and senses caging riffs and rhythmic provocation. The song raises a more attitude driven passion but still allows the melodic strengths and addiction of band and song to have their declaration within its enslaving stature, the guitar laying a narrative of sonic heat within the heart of the track to secure greater attention.

Both To Deth We Ride and Thirteenth Hour stomp with another elevation in fervency, each ridiculously catchy and easy recruiters of listener assistance with invention veined with metallic spirals recalling the likes of Maiden and Dio, whilst closing song The Fall makes for a pleasing and visually inspiring conclusion though the fun hidden track Chinese Vampire has the last enterprising and mischievous say.

The only wish you could have for the release is maybe a more rabid snarl to its confrontation and elements, a growl which actually takes a bite across the length of Fall Of The Four rather than making just suggestions. Nevertheless the album is a richly satisfying and pleasing release which shows exactly why Subject Seven is constantly on the playlist of a great many melodic metal fans.

http://subjectseven.co.uk/

8/10

RingMaster 13/06/2013

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Interview with Dan Lovett-Horn of Promethium

Promethium is a band that through an excellent and acclaimed EP and album plus a reputation for excellent and impressive live shows that has more than earned their right to be spoken as one of the best emerging metal/rock bands in the UK. With the band preparing and working on their next album we thought it was about time to catch up with guitarist Dan Lovett-Horn to find out more and reveal more about a band that will soon be making a very distinct mark on UK rock.

Welcome guys and thank you for sharing your time with us.

Could you first introduce the band members?

Many thanks dude. On vocals we have Gaz McGahon, Guitars, Dan Lovett-Horn and Rossi, Bass Barry Mills, Drums Allan Gardener.

How long has the band been going and how did you all meet?

The band started around five years ago. I was planning a studio project after my last band was disbanding.  I met up with some musicians friends and all of a sudden we had a new band. Many members later and we are still here.

Promethium is not your first experience in a band then?

It’s quite weird actually. I had always wanted to play in a band with Rossi and after much pestering I finally had the opportunity when he left his last band Desolate. Gary had been an old band mate from our school years and he had just returned from London after his last band had come to an end. Barry is the frontman in the fantastic rock band Massive Wagons and his main reason for joining was he was missing playing the bass.  Allan is the newest member from a now defunct experimental band.

Has metal been the sound you have created as musicians or is there a touch of Ministry in your journey to date if you know what I mean haha?

My previous band was influenced by 80’s rock and the music I was starting to write was going in a far heavier direction. So there was a change of direction because my own style of playing dictated that the music was becoming heavier. I must admit that Rossi is the one who brings the Ministry side to us. I guess it’s his old man influence.

Your debut release was Tribute to the Fallen in 2009, tell us about that initial acclaimed EP.

It was really great as we knew we were onto something cool, and as soon as it was released the reviews were very positive. The radio airplay then started, and we knew we had to crack on getting the album recorded.

It seems things between that and your first album two years later did not accelerate as one anticipated for the band is that fair to say?

That is fair.  What is funny is the album was recorded very quickly, however the delay came from the manufacturing end and also the release date got altered a couple of times. Originally everything was ready for April 2010. There were delays and complications we couldn’t control.

That album was the excellent Welcome to The Institution which came out last year. How has that been received?

Overall it’s been good. We have had a lot of positive feedback and some great reviews. This in turn has also been helped by our debut music video “Visions” which has been banned on most music channels. We did two versions, one to get banned and create publicity and the safe one as a fallback for, and both got banned. It would seem what we consider acceptable the outside world does not.

As with any release there are always going to be people who dislike a recording, however we have found that even with negative reviews, people check us out, and so it works in our favour.  The artwork could have been better but in all honesty you don’t judge a book by its cover so why would you with an album.

The album is a powerful and varied release, what was the inspiration behind it?

The concept behind the album was to make a recording of a new kind of metal, one that fuses a varied style of influences and isn’t bothered about current bandwagons.

As mentioned Welcome To The Institution is diverse in sound suggesting varied influences within the band, is that so and what are your most inspiring ones?

Big influences overall are Metallica, Megadeth, Annihilator, Testament and 2pac 

Months on from its release what are the things about Welcome to The Institution you feel could have been better and alternately give you the deepest pride?

Overall we love the album. My biggest pride is the fact that it’s an album created with friends.

What have you learned from making it that will stand you in good stead for future recordings?

We’ve definitely learnt the meaning of Pre Production, and that’s something we are doing heavily for the next album. Also learnt what I need to do in regards to recording tips for more varied sounds.

How does songwriting work within the band?

We have now got it down to a fine art. I right the bulk of the music. Rossi then re-writes it, and then together as a band we arrange it. The final piece of the puzzle comes when Gaz sits down to process his thoughts and write the lyrics.

Is Promethium a democratic or is there a final voice on certain aspects of the band?

That’s a bit of a weird one. Yes we are a full band however we allow certain people to have a final voice depending on the matter.

You are currently working on your new album, what surprises and treats are we going to discover within in?

It’s going to be awesome. I have friend who turned up at the studio the other day and literally said the songs were jumping out of the speakers at him. We have really gone back to basics on this album, looked at every riff, every solo, every drum beat and fill, and every vocal melody.  It is going be an album that people will take note of and I am certain it will open the gates for us.  We have really gone back to our musical roots and this is where that album comes from.

Are there any definite songs you can reveal for it and an album title for the project?

We have decided not to release the title yet, but current song titles are Believer, Gunslinger, Wont Break me, and Plagued by Evil.

Apart from the album what plans do you have for 2012, plenty of gigs?

2012 is a busy year with the first half packed with gigs all over the country including the fantastic Future Perfect festival in May in Manchester. The second half of the year will be studio based so that we can look a spring 2013 release for album two.

How hard is it to keep outside life from distracting and coming before the life of Promethium for you guys?

Music for all of us all is a passion. We love it whether it is gigging or in the studio or in rehearsal. We all work full time and if we didn’t love doing this it would be difficult to manage both things. We just don’t see it as a difficulty its part of our life and we love doing it.

Many thanks again for chatting with us.

Can we end with a couple of in depth questions…firstly which band member would you be most reluctant to share a broken down elevator with?

Rossi – he would geek you death before the oxygen ran out – although that might be a good thing suffocating in a lift sounds like a horrible way to die.

And lastly which of the band has the darkest embarrassment to hide and what is it?

If you buy a copy of our album when it comes out the sleeve notes will tell all!!

Read the review of   Welcome to The Institutionhttps://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2011/08/30/promethium-%E2%80%93-welcome-to-the-institution/

RingMaster Review 04/04/2012

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Promethium – Welcome to The Institution

It is always with great satisfaction when a band that may not be new in existence but new to the ear surprises and delights as in the case of UK rockers Promethium. Though the Lancaster band has been going for at least three years it is fair to say even with the acclaim for their debut EP ‘Tribute to the Fallen’ in 2009 they have not found the deserved notice outside of their more localised area, with their debut album Welcome to The Institution that is a situation that should be soon rectified as it finds its way into more ears and awareness.

Promethium emerged from the remains of Skin Crawl, Bodies, Desolate and Natual Thing, all bands well known and respected in the Lancaster / Morecambe music scene. This pedigree of Promethium brings a distinct and extremely skilled ability and song writing process to the band that is very evident upon the ten tracks that rumble within Welcome to The Institution.  As represented by the band’s name the music they produce is a kind of by-product of varied rock ingredients such as hard rock, metal, classic rock, and thrash, all melded and worked into a resulting energised sound that with equal power, eagerness, and open accessibility entertains with honest enthusiasm and unrelenting intent. The one thing that stood out apart from the strength of the songs was that despite these varied influences apart from one time, they did not particularly remind me of any other band which is rare and that is never a bad thing.

Firstly to get the negatives out of the way, well just the one and that is the artwork, as well as being poor and generic in many ways it gives a wrong impression of the band, suggesting another formula rock band trotting out Sabbath/Maiden like tunes, and to those who run to the hills at the thought it is too easy to move on quickly without checking out what is a very fine release out.  

The album opens on the excellent instrumental ‘Distant Illusion’, which after the packaging’s initial interpretation immediately intrigues but also deceives a little, holding off from revealing the sounds to come, once ‘Visions’ bursts in with its hard rock vigour soon the truth is revealed. The song which is also the first video from the album is a perfect introduction to the band, its relentless riffs and addictive chorus openly inviting and impossible to not be joining in with by half way. It also shows the fine vocals of Gary Mogahon, filling the song with a delivery equal in power to the surrounding sounds.

As the tracks play the creativity of guitarists Daniel Lovett-Horn and Rossi is obvious, driving hard and flowing in all the right places backed by the intense drumming of Fraser and the calming and eventful bass of Wayne Ward. At times Ward’s riffs firmly hold a song in check and in others he adds distinct and throbbing inclusions of his own.  The consistency from all across the whole album is very solid but three tracks really show the promise and a definite upward climb in popularity for the band.

Tribute To The Fallen’ flies with devastating wall crumbling riffs and harmonious vocals backed by growls that add a great extra dimension to the song. The heavier attack certainly suits the band as they skilfully blend it into melodic play that dances on the ear. This was the one time thoughts of another band came to mind, a Disturbed flavour seeping through though this track. Equally impressive are the closing duo of tracks ‘The Curse’ with a gloriously compelling bass sound and the mighty ‘Murder Inc’ showing murder based rock is more fun than one can imagine as drums pulse in the skull whilst intrigue and revelations in lyric and sound excites.

Welcome to The Institution is a great album and though the band still have a little way to go to find a sound immediately distinctive they have shown they are one of the more promising bands and should be watched closely in the future.

Welcome To The Institution is available now on Casket Music for details go to http://www.myspace.com/promethium666/

RingMaster30/08/2011

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