Bottle Next – Bad Horses

Bottle Next is a hard folk band from the French music scene. It is a tag which is maybe unique to the band not having come across it before but only partially touches on their sound. Weaving seriously engaging songs from the imaginative threads of everything from indie and pop, through progressive blues and hard rock to folk and indeed any mischievous form of rock ‘n’ roll you wish to suggest, Bottle Next make for a tantalising proposition which within debut album, Bad Horses, persistently encroaches upon rich fascination and aural seduction.

There is a real sense of fun within and with the duo of guitarist/vocalist/saxophonist Pierre Rettien and drummer/vocalist Martin Ecuer; a feistiness and devilment which openly fuels their music. From the release of their first single in 2011, the pair has drawn increasing attention and support with a pair of EPs surrounded by other individual tracks and videos as well as an energetic live presence which has seen them play across France and further into Europe; sharing stages with the likes of Triggerfingers, Lofofora, Zebda, Mass Hysteria, Didier Wampas, and No One Is Innocent as well as appearing at festivals such as Rock’n’Poche Festival, The Festival du Chien à Plûmes, Musikmesse in Germany), Belgium’s Mannrock (Belgium) and the Swiss Zikamart Festival.

Released a few weeks back, Bad Horses is an announcement for a wider range of ears and spotlights of the presence of Bottle Next; the Daniel Bergstrand (Meshuggah, Soilwork, In Flames) mixed release swiftly making the most of the opportunity with its opener Break Down the Door. The initial twang twisted strums of Rettien have an instinctive striking swing to their nature, a zeal matched in the senses rapping beats of Ecuer. That energy is equally as frantic in the delivery and character of the former’s vocals; together the duo creating a body inciting, spirit dancing slice of tenacious melodic rock as garage raw as it is hungrily infectious.

It is a thickly enticing start matched in memorable heights by next up Choices, the song a swagger loaded stroll of blues tinged rock ‘n’ roll sharing a Queens Of The Stone Age meets In The Whale like adventure. There is a rapacious essence to the grooves winding around ears and an atmospheric suggestiveness to the keys which interrupts the urgency of the canter whilst emerging folkish revelry has a funk seeded grin encapsulated by the earthily sultry lures of sax.

From one mouth-watering escapade to another as next up, Running Herd, takes ears in its grips with stabby riffs and agitated beats, both entangled in a volatile web of melody and vocal dexterity. As with its predecessors, involvement in its tenacious shuffle is instinctive; voice and hips giving quick submission to its imaginative multi-flavoured dance before Revolution shows the grittier hard rock side of the band’s sound. It too though weaves in a lure of melody and pop scented indie enterprise topped by a chorus wearing sixties/seventies pop rock catchiness.

A slightly calmer air drifts over Age of beauty; the song tempting and vivaciously crooning like a mix of XTC and Be Bop Deluxe though like all songs it never settles for one idea or style for much longer than it takes the imagination to adopt one of the moments of creative chicanery.  At times it is an almost punchy encounter, the next a floating caress and consistently a captivating proposal before the outstanding Overthere grabs an already keen appetite for the release’s romp with its heavier touch and spikier climate. Again a grunge seeded essence runs alongside the song’s heavier rock instincts, colluding in a slimline, impulsively addictive temptation smoking in its shadows with a wealth of additional flavoursome scents.

The album’s title track is a more kinetic and wiry caper, guitars and drums magnetically nagging and popping as the track’s rock heart and vocals roar; pure rock ‘n’ roll its creative mantra while Machines courts a matching breeding in its mellower, blues rock tinged pop ‘n’ roll. Both offerings make swift deals with ears and imagination, More Humane matching their success with its folk/indie rock enticement brewing up from within initial suggestive smog of melodically nurtured atmospherics; funk and progressive keys born revelry growing across its enthralling body sparking canter.

The melody woven infection of The Lift off straight after is no less an inducement of physical participation, its warm and boisterous invitation a fest of inventive festivity for limbs and energy. The same equally comes with closing song The Woody Man where its folkish colour and melodic charm takes the track’s kinetic nature in hand, giving it a great layer of restraint without defusing its multi-style embracing devilry and impact on body and spirit. It is a great end to a rather fine album which it is fair to say had us leaping and grinning from start to finish, no track anything less than an imaginative galvanic romp. Bad Horses offers something really fresh in its familiar flavours and boundless enterprise in its bold and playful quest to simply rock ‘n’ roll. The best album you will hear this year, maybe or maybe not; destined to be one of the most enjoyable, without question.

Bad Horses is out now @ https://bottlenext.bandcamp.com/album/bad-horses

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Pete RingMaster 30/05/2017

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Ritual King – Elixir

Ritual King, Portraits II, Brunswick Mill, Manchester, 25/7/16Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

This past week saw the re-release of the Elixir EP from UK heavy blues trio Ritual King, an encounter well worth checking out if it did not hit the radar first time around. Offering five highly infectious and richly flavoursome tracks which feel familiar without revealing why as they provide a fresh and imaginative adventure, the EP is a good time just waiting to be had.

The seeds of Ritual King began when in 2013 drummer Rodge Hodges met guitarist Jordan Leppitt at Bolton University. Inviting bassist Dan Goodwin to join them, the threesome emerged as Renegade & Retrospect, subsequently recording and releasing a debut EP. With a live presence equally making a potent impression to that bred by the record, they set about writing and recording their second release. Such its obvious step forward from the last, the band decided to change their name; step forward Ritual King.

Elixir opens up with Devil’s Chokehold and immediately confronts ears with bone shuddering beats and wiry grooves. There is no stopping a swift appetite for what is on offer especially as an increasing crowd of guitar exploits leads to an infectious stroll of senses rapping beats, a tenaciously throbbing and catchy bassline, and the equally inviting vocals of Leppitt. There are few surprises within the song yet every minute is a host of blues seeded hooks and swinging rhythms bound in fiery grooves as virulent as the contagion they are part of.

The excellent start continues with ISD. Its initial touch is a melodic kiss, a moment of seduction lined by the darker hues of bass and already biting beats. In no time, the track is boldly sauntering along, its gait an infectious swagger as the potent tones of Leppitt, backed by the rest of the band, add their own anthemic strains to those already fuelling the robust encounter.

ritual-king-cover-artworkCopyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyrightHodge’s rhythmic prowess sets the following Detachment in motion, the track almost enjoyably searching for its purpose over the opening seconds before settling into a stroll which as its predecessor has a strong classic rock air to its lively presence and ear enticing flavouring. Grooves and riffs again unite for an aggressively tenacious but controlled assault, the fiery enterprise of Leppitt’s guitar as rousing as his riffs and Hodge’s muscular swings.

Too Fast is next, guitars sizzling on the senses from its first breath, melodic and blues rock entangling from thereon in as the song reveals an infection loaded personality led by the rhythmic dance and vocal incitement of Hodges and Leppitt respectively. With an unpredictable nature to its somewhat familiar presence, band and song create a magnetic shuffle which leaves ears greedy and enjoyment full while never being too sure of where the track will take them.

The EP closes with the new Ritual King single, Unorthodox Satisfaction. A lone melody romances ears first, its gentle slightly melancholic coaxing strong but deceptive as its breath slips away only to open up the way for one delicious bassline from Goodwin. Throughout the release his grooves bind attention but incite the lustiest reactions here as its bait grips ears and carries them into the waiting, Celtic spiced exploits of band and track. There is a touch of a Horslips to the hooks escaping the infectious swing of the song, a spicing throughout a relentless captivation of ears and imagination. Latin hued guitars and a climactic air only add to the drama of a song which grows in strength and quality with each passing minute.

It is a fine end to a thoroughly enjoyable release which whilst having moments less original than others persistently impresses and shows the potential of a sound brewing into something unique and even bolder.

The Elixir EP is out now across all stores.

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Pete RingMaster 06/12/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

The Visit – Through Darkness Into Light

The Visit_RingMasterReview

Many before us have cast potent words of acclaim and ardour upon the highly anticipated debut album from Canadian duo The Visit; enamoured comments and descriptions as complicated and simplistic as the arising emotions warranted. To those justified statements of praise come another; Through Darkness Into Light is simply one of the most sublimely crafted and mesmeric moments of pure aural beauty you are likely to hear in a long time.

The Visit is the creative union of cellist Raphael Weinroth-Browne and vocalist Heather Sita Black, a project which emerged around a year ago within the Ottawa music scene. Soon their live performances were earning mass praise as too their debut release, the bordering on fifteen minute adventure of single track Between Worlds. Securing coveted slots at Nouvelle Prague Festival in Prague, Czech Republic, Ottawa’s RBC Bluesfest, and the Royal Conservatory’s esteemed 21C Festival in Toronto since, the pair unveiled their debut album towards the rear of 2015, a proposition which has continued to lure and incite eager attention and lustful plaudits.

Whether taking Through Darkness Into Light as one epic journey or as individual emotive tales, the album is a powerful captivation of sound and creative expression. For simply voice and cello, it is also an awe inspiring giant tapestry reeking atmospheric and emotional suggestiveness. The five tracks making up the release provide poetic soundscapes to physically and emotionally immerse in, yet equally an intimacy in tone and voice which serenades and seduces the imagination as potently as the raw ambiences and enveloping atmospheres hug the senses.

THE VISIT ALBUM COVER_RingMasterReviewSound wise, what seems simple to pin down after a fleeting listen is anything once diving into the album. To try and simplify it, classical chamber music craft and imagination is ingeniously embraced by and entwined with a wealth of transfixing hues from varied sources; Middle Eastern and Persian music among them. From opener Without This Flesh and its cold but engaging initial charm, The Visit cast a fascination of sound and Homeric majesty. The magnetic elegance and poignancy of Black’s voice paints rhapsodic yet intimate reflections of vast and at times starkly imposing landscapes and their emotive beauty whilst the Weinroth-Browne conjures a physical portrayal with his bow which is as majestic whether he gently caresses strings with it or scythes across them with impassioned intensity and drama.

Each track is as much its own mini travelogue of exploration as part of a bigger journey; all persistently evolving and twisting quests of spellbinding imagination and unpredictability. The likes of Offering with its sultry air and shadow bound scenery and the progressively brewed intrigue and beguiling seduction of Cast Off The Veil take the listener into seemingly familiar but undiscovered and arresting avenues of worldly theatre and emotional observation. Again the cinematic quality of tracks simply adds to the adventurous reactions of ears and imagination which as the music evolves with every listen of each individual creative emprise such as the album’s final pair, the spellbinding Through Darkness and celestially hued Into Light.

As traditions and bold discoveries merge, reflected in lyrical voice and sound, the release sparks fresh interpretations with every listen, ones that also persistently shift and will be unique to every set of ears and imagination immersing into Through Darkness Into Light. Truly it is impossible to give a full picture in words of the creative alchemy at work from Weinroth-Browne and Black, and we have barely touched on the technical might of both, but it is very easy to recommend an album and experience of pure inspirational beauty which is unlike anything you will come across anywhere else.

Through Darkness Into Light is available now @ http://thevisit1.bandcamp.com/

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Pete RingMaster 09/03/2016

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Rangda – The Heretics Bargain

art_RingMaster Review

The Heretic’s Bargain is the new album from instrumentalists Rangda, a trio who take ears and imagination on tantalising and feverishly unpredictable adventures of sound and intent, as evidenced by the five temptations making up their latest release. The album is a kaleidoscope of flavours and exotic hues, an incitement as psychedelically sinister as it is melodically sultry and perpetually hypnotic.

Rangda is the imagination fuelled union between drummer Chris Corsano alongside guitarists Richard Bishop (ex- Sun City Girls) and Ben Chasny (Six Organs of Admittance/ Comets on Fire). 2010 saw their debut album False Flag released with two years later its successor Formerly Extinct unveiled, both on Drag City who also release their new carnival of sound and invention. With also the live 10” offering Rangda Live in Krefeld and a split album with The Dead C under their creative belts, and the experience of featuring on over 400 albums between the three of them, it is fair to say that something new from the band is highly anticipated by a great many, something The Heretics Bargain rewards in magnetic style.

Starting with To Melt the Moon, Rangda provide a maelstrom of suggestiveness for the imagination which will undoubtedly create unique tales for each immersing in the song and album’s escapades. The opener instantly ruffles ears and appetite with its direct shuffle of niggling riffs and feisty rhythms. It is eager bait which in no time then slips into something mystique wrapped; melodies toying with thoughts as the perpetually nagging lure of guitar and drums entices. Within its other-worldly landscape, surf rock colludes with psyche rock; psychobilly and blues rock scented hues further adding to the cinematic yet intimate nudging of hips and thoughts.

Rangda_RingMaster ReviewThe track is glorious and quickly matched by the compelling and devilish canter of The Sin Eaters. Once again grooves and melodies entangle spicy hooks as the crisp jabs of Corsano create an alluring frame. They are all sinisterly seductive ingredients courted by hidden dangers in the song’s shadows as the track becomes a tenacious soundscape of drama and tangy temptation, much as its successor Spiro Agnew. Bishop and Chasny explore in the same scenic emprise as the previous pair, where Middle Eastern flirtation romances the senses whilst sparking in thoughts a tapestry of interpretations of the sound soliciting ears with every listen; that a success found by each track in their individual ways.

Sonic smog with deranged rhythms descends on the senses as Hard Times Befall the Door-to-Door Glass Shard Salesman smothers ears next. Straight away Bishop and Chasny create a cauldron of discordance and sonic trespasses as the beats of Corsano court their own deranged challenge. From this electric dust storm calm eventfully emerges, a mellower passage which still unbalances thoughts and emotions with its jazzy, seemingly improvised but expertly conjured exploration of depths soaked in melancholy led emotions.

From its haunted body, Mondays are Free at the Hermetic Museum slips out, the nineteen minute exploration a gallery of musical and emotive avenues clad in humid sonic invention and sweltering melodies soaked in an air of romance and dangerous intent. Perpetually evolving from start to finish, with moments of lively festivity merging into dark strains of emotional espionage and vice versa, every turn a whole new outlook of scenery and suggestiveness, the track alone makes the album a worthy sharing of time with.

Coming new to Rangda, we cannot suggest how it compares to its predecessors, but certainly we can say for coherently exhilarating, experimental, and creative drama, The Heretics Bargain is a temptress very hard to say no to.

The Heretics Bargain is out now via Drag City @ http://www.dragcity.com/products/the-heretics-bargain

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http://www.dragcity.com/artists/rangda

Pete RingMaster 22/02/2016

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Jet Noir – A Cold Day In Hell

Jet noir_RingMaster Review

Continuing her solo progressive gothic seduction on ears, Jet Noir releases new single A Cold Day In Hell, a transfixing lure on the imagination and enticing incitement for the body. The successor to previous releases, The Scarlet Woman and Like A Circle, which came out earlier this year, the new track simultaneously acts like an atmospheric predator and melodic enthralment with a potent suggestion of dark shadows and emotive escapades to captivate from start to finish.

cover_RingMaster Review Taking time away from Naked Lunch, the London based Jet Noir has increasingly grown her mix of dark trance and progressively honed gothic suggestiveness, a union at times also offering a slim but imaginative symphonic flirtation hue to get wrapped up in. Her previous EP and single mentioned above, has brought an even blend of those ingredients though often leaning more towards electronic revelry within highly suggestive shadows bred by the songs involved. With A Cold Day In Hell though, there is a heavier and more primal rock spine involved, around which the progressive enterprise of Noir’s heart and craft unveils a provocative and dramatic narrative.

Opening with an instantly enticing nag of bass alongside the alluring voice of Noir, the song is soon sending scythes of scuzzy guitar across its emerging body. That bait is quickly wrapped in the melodic prowess and ambient charm of Noir’s keys, their flowing theatre expanding the strength of word and sound on ears and imagination. Thoughts are sparked into adventures of past times, distant battles, and darkly romantic crusades yet equally the portentous elegance and imposing atmosphere of the track could soundtrack any modern physical and intimately emotional apocalypse.

The track is a bewitching play of sound and expression, easily the most imaginative and thrilling offering from Jet Noir yet. Complete with a trio of re-mixes of the song from Ruinizer, Attrition, and Dean Baker of synth pop band Cloak, A Cold Day In Hell is a tonic for the dance-floor and imagination, and only the start of bigger things from its creator we suggest.

A Cold Day In Hell is available from October 4th via https://jetnoir.bandcamp.com/album/a-cold-day-in-hell

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Pete RingMaster 04/10/2015

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Eyemouth – Noera Genesis

eyemouth_RingMaster Review

It is impossible for anyone to discover every band unleashing their imagination and musical prowess on the world alone so it is always with great gratitude when something simply falls into the lap whether as a by-product of doing something else, through recommendations, or simply by an artist introducing themselves personally. That gratitude is especially intense when it leads to something which truly excites and stirs up the imagination. So it is with thanks to Marcus Lilja that we can now enthuse about his band’s latest release and fascinating sound.

A member of Swedish band Eyemouth, Marcus alongside David Lilja, Tove Ekman, and Joakim Åberg, have already sparked great attention and eager appetite with previous EPs, Black and Blue Latitudes and Non Compos Mentis, both out earlier this year. In an intent to bring ears a quartet of EPs in 2015, they now unveil the third in the enthralling shape of Noera Genesis, a theatre of sound and imagination which is as bewitching as it is wonderfully challenging. Formed in 2011, the Eyemouth sound defies pinning down, their original synth led endeavours having evolved over the ears to what captivates within their latest proposal. Merging industrial and post rock ambiences with shamanic rhythms, electro rock intrigue, and darker as well as heavier rock incitement, the Göteborg band had bred a tantalising and unpredictable tapestry which is cinematic, at times sinister, and thoroughly compelling.

noera-genesis-_RingMaster Review     It opens with Come This Far, and a haunting ambience littered with portentously dulled bell tolls in a cavernous landscape. An equally ‘flat’ but alluring bass adds further peculiar bait to the brewing enticement before stepping away again as synths and vocals begin their individual and colluding narratives. Soon, the track slips into an electronic canter awash with the expressive melodies and atmospheric hues of the keys and littered with rawer guitar and bass tempting. Ears and imagination are gripped early on, a hungry appetite soon following suit as the song with its Ghost In The Static crossed with Celldweller like stroll explores more of its imagination whilst simultaneously opening up provocative depths amidst roars of contagious enterprise.

That cinematic essence we mentioned is quickly bringing a suggestiveness across the EP; a gothic/industrial drama with 1984 meets Lovecraftian occultism growing in thoughts during the first song separate from its actually premise whilst the dark bowels of a sea bed leviathan explored and corrupted by the Victorian trespass of someone like Captain Nemo echoes the dystopian siren call seeping out of The Rise Of You. This is just the power of the music triggering such dark adventures, the band lyrically opening up doors to more ideas through its broad yet equally intimate theatre of word and premises. It is gripping stuff which reveals more with every listen and pleasingly confuses the imagination with each turn too as thoughts and ears try to work out the heart of the impressive song and release.

In My Mouth has a lighter soundscape but that leads to a more bedlamic and psychotic playroom for the listener’s thoughts. It is aural madness sublimely sculpted and organically uncaged as deranged keys, haunting harmonies, and demonic textures slim down to inventive smog, this toying with the listener for just under two absorbing minutes. The fact it ends too soon is a brief frustration, a short lived moan though as soon all focus is on the initially just as disquieting Sometimes. We say initially, in fact the song never stops being a disturbing magnetism as it evolves with every passing breath, more shamanic drums and lures aligning with whispered vocals which alone almost taunt the psyche with their tone. Subsequently synths build walls of tempestuous oppressiveness coated in discord laced melodic captivation, that in turn twisting into an instrumental finale of melodic rock infested with rasping and erosive textures.

It is impossible to provide a truly clear idea of what Eyemouth brings to bear on body and mind with Noera Genesis, so much going on as they additionally spark personal thoughts to run wild in grand ideas as you have just read, but every listen is full mouth-watering joy. We have yet to investigate the previous pair of EPs from the band, but you can only assume they too offer an experience rare to the ear and most others going by the invasive beauty of Noera Genesis.

Noera Genesis is available from September 30th via most online stores.

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Pete RingMaster 30/09/2015

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Hardcore Anal Hydrogen – The Talas of Satan

Hardcore Anal Hydrogen

Sometimes a release just stops you in your tracks, presses an irresistibly inviting hand into yours, and pulls the psyche into an undiscovered experience which ignites every pore, thought, and emotion. Such is the case with the unpredictable, thoroughly compelling, and insatiably gripping new Hardcore Anal Hydrogen album, The Talas of Satan. Though their third album it is the first to cross the always eccentricity inspired greedy appetite of the site, which is quite irritating realising we had missed out on the previous sure to be thought provoking creativity of the French quartet. Their new album is quite glorious, an exploration where predictability and assumptions do not even get a sniff of realism in its exhausting inventive tapestry of sound and imagination. It is an unforgettable adventure everyone should experience at least one in their lives if only to show that originality and bold invention is not a dying trait of modern music.

Hardcore Anal Hydrogen was formed in 2009 with the meeting of Martyn Clement (guitar/backing vocals) and Sacha Valony (vocals/keys/flute). A duo in the studio expanding to a quartet with the addition of bassist Jonathan Marole and drummer Damien Salis on stage, the band has released two albums before the new revelation, Fork You and Division Zero in 2009 and 2011 respectively. The band’s sound is a fusion of metal and ethnic music, brewed into rabidly diverse and fascinating ventures in turn soaked in experimentation and imagination. Released via Apathia Records, The Talas of Satan is an eclectic dance of modern and traditional spices thrust through a maelstrom of structural instability and physical might aligned to disorganised invention sculpted with the purest skill and instinct.

Every track on the album is a unique character in presence and sound, making a general description or comparison for the album impossible. logoThat is a wonderful essence which constantly exploits and ignites the imagination from the opening track Dhamar. Hand drums, possible tablas open up the track, the eastern lure instantly captivating as the thick blaze of metal spawned riffs and pungent rhythmic caging join in soon after. Still merging both ethnic and aggressive counterparts, the track steers ears into a groove and psyche metal escapade which constantly relaxes to flirt with that initial Indian folk tempting. The vocals scratch and scowl as an additional texture to the opening piece, provoking thoughts of Korn whilst musically elements suggest Motherjane and Pryapisme, the last a constant and most accurate relation to Hardcore Anal Hydrogen.

The mouthwatering start is swiftly reinforced by the outstanding Ramahd, a ravenous squall of sonic and hardcore hostility with plenty of sonic and electronic toxicity which again sends the passions into a hectic scramble for more. There is a definite Mad capsule Markets feel to the rawest psychotic aspects of the track whilst the guest scratching skills of DJ Mattéo produces a spice you can find anywhere from Limp Bizkit to The Kennedy Soundtrack for another potent flavour to the virulent contagion. It is a bordering on pestilential treat with rhythms which resonate in their uniquely specific tone, a breath-taking enticement taken further by Release The Crackhead. The track prowls and prances with a posing gait which dances mischievously around the ears, coaxing closer attention for the subsequent unleashing of blackened vocal spite and dramatic intensity. With more shadows and colours to its imposing endeavour than on a dysfunctional TV, the track courts every emotion from passion to fear, seduction to madness .

The following Pentamère is a celestially borne instrumental with twinkling sonics and bubbling expression within its expansive flight. It is a piece of music which at first was not a certain success for ears but once it stretched its warm arms into an oriental sunset with tribal chants and charmed vocals, submission was rapidly given and retained by the following Kalakaka. The storm unleashes a punk metal ferocity, its persistently twisting sonic grooves entwining the senses as the vocals rage with tempestuous expression, again the previously mention Japanese band coming to mind. The track scores and rages against ears and emotions, taking stabs with rhythmic spite and antagonistic riffery whilst vocals torment thoughts and its victim within the climax. It is another song which unveils a new facet and side to the album, as does quite brilliantly Rupack. It isa track which stomps and dances with the imagination through fevered keys and menacing rhythms. Side steps into jazzy avant-garde revelry makes a delicious fuse to the already smiling appetite helping it develop a greater predatory hunger. Imagine a mix of Pryapisme, Cardiacs, Kontrust, and Mucho Tapioca and you get a whiff of the mania superbly offered.

Next up COI rages with chucky riffs and brutal rhythms for another addictive metallic onslaught; guitars scything air and senses with vicious intent whilst bedlamic vocals find a new vitriol to their grazing tones. Once more though there is a wealth of additives which ensure song and experience is one of a kind, just like the very short sonic disorientation which KRR offers, the track psyche/hardcore at its noisy inventive best.

The seemingly distressed passion of 한오백년 probesthoughts next, driven by the equally intense guest vocals of Doowah before Coq au vin strolls in with a big naughty grin on its face and an electro/Nintendo devilry which masterfully teases around the coarse punk vocals and ravenous riffs. It is no surprise at this point to hear the song unlock a bedlam of ideas and psychotic imagination converted to equally deranged sounds, continuing the strengths of the album so far. The song is a beautiful meshuga sparking a rapturous and maybe equally cracked ardour for it.

The album ends just as powerfully compelling as it started, Chautal a rigorous mix of ethnic and metallic genius which flows as if family whilst offering extremes in beauty and character. It is impossible not to immerse in and be seduced by the track and all of its imagination, drama and epic intent making for a sensational finale. The Talas of Satan is quite brilliant and Hardcore Anal Hydrogen a rare proposition which creates something that is truly new and inspirational, not forgetting unbridled fun.

https://apathiarecords.bandcamp.com/album/the-talas-of-satan

https://www.facebook.com/hardcoreanalhydrogen

http://hardcoreanalhydrogen.com/

10/10

Ringmaster 01/04/2014

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