Faces Of Eve – The Story So Far

Faces Of Eve Promo Shot_RingMaster Review

It may intensely fascinate more than it explosively thrills but The Story So Far, the debut EP from UK metallers Faces Of Eve, is a thoroughly enjoyable introduction to a potential drenched band. Across six compelling tracks, they create a tapestry of diverse sounds which at any given moment can be as progressive metal as they are alternative rock, as tech metal as they are experimental. It makes for a seriously enticing proposal keeping ears and imagination rigorously keen and though many songs just lack the final essence to ignite the biggest reactions, an ingrained appetite for more is a swiftly done deal.

The Hertfordshire quartet emerged towards the end of 2013, Faces Of Eve emerging from the ashes of Brave The Moment, Shields, Trophies Of Dahmer, and Olympus Must Fall. A potent following to their impressive live presence quickly grew and now fresh off a UK tour with Oaths, the band is turning up the heat on a national recognition with The Story So Far.

It all starts with For My Fallen Heroes and an enticing coaxing from guitars and a harmonic ambience. The strings of Dan Sloane gently dance with ears as the melodic tones of vocalist Benjamin Fordham Black add their caresses to the magnetic persuasion. The air of the song has an increasingly imposing texture, not intimidating but carrying open shadows enhanced by the heavily wiry tones of bass. It does all unite in a richer and thicker tempting, though that is for mere moments as the song suddenly stops. It is a strong opening but the abruptness of the track without being instantly replaced by its successor, or bleeding straight into it, feels slightly odd. It is a minor thing though and soon forgotten as Feed emerges from the distance with a tangy groove around punchy rhythms. Full in the face, the track is soon a thrilling web of spidery grooves and sonic tendrils wrapped in more strong vocals and contagious hooks. An increasing unpredictability almost as quickly erupts too, a weapon the band use to great effect over the release and here emerges in jagged riffs and barbarous snarls from the bass of Alistair Hines which strikingly flirt with the superbly crafted mesh of flavours and technical imagination. It is like a festival of sound, a collusion of textures hinting at bands like Circles, Muse, Alexisonfire, and Shattered Skies, and at its heart just an irresistible rocker.

Faces Of Eve Cover Art_RingMaster Review   The following Crime Of Passion opens with a sombre atmosphere, vocally and musically, as scythes of guitar court the imagination with the vocals in a melancholic yet charming invitation. The steely funk bait of Hine’s bass stirs the song’s air soon after as the blend of falsetto and emotive vocals entangle, the track eventually shrugging off its reserve as the potent beats of Oliver Jones incite a voracious and snarling tango of metal bred sound. As its predecessor, the song is soon evolving and weaving in various styles with every passing grouping of seconds and similarly gripping ears and thoughts through its bold adventure.

Temporal Rotunda also has a morose toned start, voices and sounds cloaked in a cloudy ambience which eventually sparks into a composed but fiery stroll littered with jabbing beats and gnarly riffs bound in spicy grooves and melodic incitement. The track prowls at certain points, imposing its weight and alluring intensity whilst veining its trespass with attention pulling slithers and twists of melodic and off kilter imagination. By its end the dark side of the track is a riveting enticement, leaving a lingering pleasure which One Man Show runs with through its own vivacious and agitated qualities. The technical growl and nagging of song and sound is a persistent beckoning but the band inventively send it spinning with swift flashes of avant-garde and progressive ingenuity, matched by resourceful vocals. It is an outstanding track which epitomises everything good about The Story So Far and how it just misses the mark. It is inventive and fiercely imaginative but never pushes its promise to the limits hoped, never quite finding the spark which tips a great song into a show stopper.

It is nevertheless inescapable evidence of the songwriting and technical qualities of Faces Of Eve and their infectious sound which is confirmed on final time by Dwellers. The closing song is another which is a born rocker at heart, its aggressive alternative rock core encased in a spiral of tenacious grooves, their union twisting into an increasingly dramatic and ferocious blaze. Things continue to move into new textures and scenery as the track increasingly lure ears and enjoyment, always returning to its creative spine but always providing new highly satisfying endeavours off of it.

Faces Of Eve is a name to make a note of and The Story So Far a release to seriously think about checking out. Both are destined to promote thoughts that here is a band with a very successful future before them if they want it.

The Story So Far EP is available from Monday 29th June through all digital platforms and as a name your price download @ http://facesofeveuk.bandcamp.com/album/the-story-so-far

https://www.facebook.com/facesofeveuk     https://twitter.com/F_O_E_UK

RingMaster 29/06/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

 

The Ghost Next Door – Self Titled

TheGhostNext Doorband_RingMaster Review

Sometimes a band name can alone ignite potent intrigue, spark an instinctive interest. Fair to say The Ghost Next Door easily did that but where so often others fail, the Californian quartet backed it up with a just as intriguing and fascinating album, a self-titled debut ripe in invention, unpredictability, and dramatic textures. The release is a tantalising weave of diverse styles and bold imagination honed into something as contagiously addictive as it is rousingly anthemic. Description of The Ghost Next Door sound is destined to vary from listener to listener and all will be no doubt right in varying degrees but one thing expectations can assume is most will be waxing lyrical about the outstanding proposition.

The Ghost Next Door name is inspired by the supposed haunted house that founder and vocalist/guitarist Gary Wendt (ex-Skinlab, Sacrilege B.C.) found himself living next to and its sound forged from a desire to “marry the dark melancholy of 80’s and 90’s alternative with the aggression and drive of Bay Area metal.” Linking up with bassist Seanan Gridley and drummer Sean Haeberman, the band after forming played around California for a few years but unable to really find their niche disbanded. Continuing to work on recordings already underway though, Wendt with the help of people like Steve Green (Skrew/Skinlab) recorded and mixed The Ghost Next Door debut album, following it with a reforming of the band. Gridley reunited with Wendt whilst the line-up was completed by Sacramento guitarist Aaron Asghari and drummer Paula Sisson from Remagen in Germany. Since its return the band has hit the live scene with hunger again, playing with the likes of DRI, SpiralArms, Dr. Know, and Comes with the Fall amongst many. Released via Mausoleum Records, their first album is now let loose and if you needed proof that rock and metal could be boldly adventurous, intelligently inventive, and make an instinctive partner in lust, this is it.

It all begins with Forever My Demon, an electronic mist slowly emerging with suggestive tones and subsequently spawning bulging rhythmic bait and evocative melodic tempting. Already there is an anthemic core luring attention, bait enhanced by atmospheric keys and eventually a potent wash of caustic guitar. As Wendt releases his vocal persuasion too, there is a mix of metal and rock enveloping ears and imagination with thoughts of Stone Temple Pilots and nineties heavy rockers Skyscraper swiftly coming to mind. It soon evolves again though, a grunge and fiery groove driven colouring joining the already established textures, they in turn slipping into a progressive/ heavy metal twist. It would take a page long review to cover the full thrilling adventure of this song alone to be honest, it’s busy but fluid and bold enterprise further emulated in every unique track upon the album, but fair to say all perpetually leave ears enamoured and appetite greedily hungry.

TheGhostNextDoorRingMaster Review     Proof comes in Crickets straight after, its heavy and eagerly prowling riffs instantly encasing ears as rhythms keenly jab throughout. As swiftly guitars spill wiry hooks at will, their barbs gripping ears as vocals and melodic hues begin thickening the enticement. As in the opener, every moment of the song comes with creative drama and unexpected turns of ideation, ensuring that though it does not quite rival the success of its predecessor, it is a riveting enjoyment, though soon outshone by the invigorating All Fall Down. There is a familiar air to the song, though for no obvious reasons, but this only adds to the swift seducing of ears through tangy melodies, spicy grooves, and more antagonistic beats and vocals. A heavier growl is soon pushing the track but again it is all relative to the moment in the song, progressive and hard rock essences as much an open input as melodic and groove metal in its absorbing weave.

Ten Steps Back backs up this new plateau breached by the album straight away, it and the following triumph of Dead Things. The first of this pair entangles ears in tendrils of guitar and accusation fuelled vocals, their restraint but strong tempting enhanced further with outbursts of harsher, more hardcore like punk expulsions of emotion and sound. With stabbing scythes of sonic ingenuity bridging this cycle and a subsequent harmonic flirtation teasing with a pause midway, the song is a kaleidoscope of imagination with its second half as distinct and seamlessly crafted as the first. Even listening to it constantly, every partaking of this song and indeed album brings fresh rewards, its successor another prime example. More ruggedly direct than the last song in many ways, its roars and strolls rigorously with hearty beats against just as sinewy riffs, their intensity urged by the great mix of vocals and bound in a rich sonic web of sparkling endeavour.

Bully lives up to its title, springing from a deliciously tangy dance of guitar hooks into a predatory stalking with the bass especially vocal in intimidating intent. Eventually it rises into a full bruising and mouth-watering incitement with those initial lures still working spicily away to ensnare, the following mellow melodies within resonating rhythms bringing the seduction. The track completes a quartet forming the pinnacle of the release though it is not the end of the inescapable persuasion and creative alchemy of the release.

The beginning of next up Eleven O’Clock Blues is almost theatrical, vocals and rhythms entering with a swinging gait against the more aggressive surge of riffs. Everything is soon entwined in a revolving fury and melodic embrace, the former aspect the thickest texture breeding an array of metal based ingenuity and flavours. To try and simplify the glorious body of the song, try to imagine a mix of Machine Head, Killswitch Engage, Alice In Chains, System Of A Down, Tool…actually don’t it probably will still be wide of the mark as already we say do yourself a favour and simply go explore the album and bask.

In hindsight this song is another of the album’s greatest successes, and another increasingly thrilling proposition with every listen just like the far gentler but no less magnetic Fragile. The song is a feisty croon which is as seductive in its mellower moments as it is in its impassioned blazes, and without managing to reach that lofty perch set, leaves only fresh greed and pleasure in its wake before album closer Famous Last Words similarly cradles and bellows over the senses with irresistible charm and inflamed passion. With a rich strain of thrash and classic rock in its ferocious belly, if not the stronger unpredictability of other proposals, the track is a powerful end to a stunning album.

If like us the band name sparked a flicker of attention do follow it up, and if it does not still launch yourself at The Ghost Next Door, a band and release which truly has something for everyone but in an exhilarating tapestry like no other.

The Ghost Next Door is out now on CD and digitally via Mausoleum Records @ http://www.music-avenue.net/mausoleum/detail.php?id=251158

http://www.theghostnextdoor.net/    https://www.facebook.com/theghostnextdoor

RingMaster 16/062015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

Max Pie – Odd Memories

MaxPieBand_Reputation Radio/RingMaster Review

Fair to say their name is still as dislikeable as it was when we covered their excellent album Eight Pieces, One World album two years ago but musically the Belgian metallers still rock the juices out of us as proven by new encounter Odd Memories. Max Pie fills their third album with all the essences which made its predecessor a surprising and compelling proposition but it is with bigger and bolder imagination and creative energy. We are no major heavy/power metal fans here to be honest but once again Max Pie has given us one thumping and rousing time.

The band was formed in 2005 by vocalist Tony Carlino taking inspirations from bands such as Symphony X, Van Halen, Toto, Queensrÿche, and Dream Theater into their emerging ideas. A slightly unstable time in personnel graced their early years before Max Pie released debut album Initial Process in 2012. Fan and critically acclaimed it was surpassed by Eight Pieces – One World a year later in presence, sound, and praise. Its release was followed by the band playing numerous festivals and undertaking tours with the likes of Symphony X, Evergrey, Fates Warning, Avantasia, and Queensrÿche. Now they return with, as the last album, the Simone Mularoni mixed and mastered Odd Memories and simply their finest, most inventive proposal yet.

The album opens with its title track; an instrumental ripe with a foreboding atmosphere and epic textures all cinematically imposing on the imagination. This type of beginning is becoming a common practice across varied metal offerings but when done right, as here, it makes a potent invitation into any release. As the track slips into the following Age of Slavery, a sizzling electronic coaxing colludes with rampant riffs and a melodic embrace of keys. The thick commanding rhythms of drummer Sylvain Godenne shape and invigorate the track further, framing the growling vocals of Carlino perfectly. The frontman’s diverse delivery is as magnetic as ever, some elements more powerful and potent than others but like the music, a constant lure that likes to stretch and push both song and musician. As the guitar and keyboard craft of Damien Di Fresco builds and expands its enterprise, the track blossoms into a sturdy and fiery encounter to really kick things off.

It is also, in many ways, a relatively straight forward and maybe expected proposal from the band, the new exploration showing itself more from Odd Future on. Keys breed the first mesmeric caress on the third track before guitars and the wonderfully dark throated bass of Lucas Boudina bring their hues to the emerging and stirring landscape of the encounter. Once vocals join, the song settles into a melodic roar and sonic flame of melodic and heavy rock ‘n’ roll, their union a heated and tenacious arousing of ears and thoughts veined by sparkling, and at times understated temptation from the keys. It is when things go off kilter with a glorious stretch of discord kissed invention and melodic bedlam that the song really comes alive and if there is any moan it does not play in this great moment long enough.

MaxPieOddMemories_Reputation Radio/RingMaster Review     Promised Land opens on a vivacious escapade of keys quickly encased in storming riffs and rhythms, it all quickly blooming into a virulently contagious slice of rock pop with classic metal and progressive rock hues. It has single running through its potent craft and lusty veins, every second of the track a bold and rousing incitement for body, voice, and emotions. Such its power and lure, it gives next up Love Hurts a hard time trying to follow it, and as mesmeric in melodic beauty within tempestuously emotional and physical terrain that it is, it never quite finds the same full-blooded personal reactions as its predecessor. It is undeniably superbly crafted and woven though and does leave only fully satisfied thoughts before the darker, ravenous excellence of Don’t Call My Name takes over. The guitars alone are predatory with their creative rummaging of the senses whilst the keys float with celestial temptation above them and the uncompromising rhythms spearing it all. Reaping the ripest elements of technical and progressive metal, band and track pulsate as they gnaw on ears, adding melodic and harmonic balm to the increasingly irresistible voracity on offer. With Carlino also on fine form, the track is the pinnacle of the album, reason alone to eagerly approach Odd Memories.

The acoustically brewed Hold On slips in next to transfix and from a slow start to its persuasion grows into a big favourite. Whether by chance or intention, it has a Bowie-esque essence to it, a floating whisper in quieter moments which does it no harm. It is a scent soon out flamed by vocals and the sonic blaze giving the song rich crescendos and a breath-taking finale before Unchain Me takes the listener on another tumultuous ride of rugged metal and tantalising electronic adventure.

No prizes in guessing some of the scenery within Cyber Junkie, its electronic and industrial endeavour a potent spicing to another song offering a compelling fusion of bestial metal and melodic flirtation, the former steering the ship with invigorating success. As Don’t Call My Name before it, the track is a masterful web of varied and diverse styles in one predacious provocateur, thoughts of bands from Anthrax to Armored Saint, Dream Theater to Skyharbor coming to mind across its exciting and again show stealing soundscape.

The album is finished by The Fountain Of Youth, a song which either a raging storm of a canter or a gentle caress enthrals and sparks only the keenest attention and support from ears and emotions. Like a couple of other songs it takes longer to get all of its hooks inescapably entrenched but with its additional symphonic elegance and emotively hued strings, the song has seduced long before realisation notices.

Wrapped in the excellent artwork of Didier Scohier, Odd Memories and indeed Max Pie have caught us again with a tempest of sound and invention driven by craft and passion. This time it is bigger, more adventurous, and confirming the band as one of progressive power metal’s finest.

Odd Memories is available from June 19th via Mausoleum Records @ http://www.maxpie.be/shop.php

http://www.maxpie.be/   https://www.facebook.com/maxpiemusic

RingMaster 19/06/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

Prog Metal beasts ‘Faces Of Eve’ lay down a marker with their spanking new EP

Faces Of Eve will be uncaging their EP ‘The Story So Far’, on Monday 29th June through all digital platforms.

Faces Of Eve Promo ShotEncouraged by an array of areas from Circles and Hacktivist to Alexisonfire and Slaves, Faces Of Eve can loosely be placed in the progressive / tech metal bracket. However, their deft ability to merge genres where ensuring widespread appeal and originality, is certainly impressive.

Hailing from the Hertfordshire area and born from the ashes of Brave The Moment, Shields, Trophies Of Dahmer and Olympus Must Fall, Faces Of Eve despatch technical riffery and ferocious power merged with unbridled energy and considered song structures. The quartet have also acquired a substantial following in such a short space of time, largely due to the strength of their set and work ethic. The band have just completed another successful jaunt around the UK with fellow rising hardcorers ‘Oaths’.

Faces of Eve now press on with their debut EP ‘The Story So Far’. The record is brimming with six slabs of sizzling progressive infused technical metal. From the dynamic and alluring beatings of opener ‘For My Fallen Heroes’ through to ‘Dwellers’, the band deliver each note and riff with heartfelt emotion and formidable force. With further touring and shows in the pipeline for the remainder of the year, just watch them take off…..

FACES OF EVE RELEASE ‘THE STORY SO FAR’ ON MONDAY 29th JUNE THROUGH ALL STORES

Faces Of Eve

EP Tracklisting:

 1. For My Fallen Heroes; 2. Feed; 3. Crime Of Passion; 4. Temporal Rotunda; 5. One Man Show; 6. Dwellers.

https://www.facebook.com/facesofeveuk   https://twitter.com/F_O_E_UK

No Consequence – Vimana

No Consequence press shot

It is probably not too far from the mark to suggest that Vimana, the new album from UK progressive/tech metallers No Consequence has been one highly anticipated offering, and right on the money to say it is one strapping beast of sound and creative attitude. The release takes an already highly flavoursome and attention grabbing sound to new pastures of imagination and voracious intensity, aligning the established technical and aggression of the band to a more concentrated brew of melodic and expressive adventure. It is their most rounded and gripping proposition yet with just the hint that they and we are still nowhere near the finished article of their potential and sound.

Renowned as one of the most impressive live acts on the European metal scene, listing the sharing of tours and stages with the likes of TesseracT, Chimp Spanner, Carcer City and just recently Monuments and Murdock on their CV, No Consequence follow up their previous acclaimed albums In the Shadow of Gods and IO, of 2009 and 2013 respectively, with an incitement which seduces as it tears strips of the senses and relentlessly fascinates as it casts a roar of uncompromising aggressiveness.

NC-Vimana-packshot   Vimana begins with the short persuasion of Acala and an immediate hint of dramatic climates and textures within a harmonic embrace. An intro come scene setter, the appealing opening is soon departing for the more rugged and emotionally intensive Our Time Has Come. Restrained yet rich grooves wind around ravenous riffs and a sonic turbulence as the rawer aspect of vocalist Kaan Tasan comes to the fore. He too though is soon showing an adept range as a cleaner presence entwines with his dustier snarls. As the guitars of Dan Reid and Harry Edwards flirt and abrase ears with craft and enterprise, the song’s tempest provides a persistent challenge and enticement of progressive and technical tenacity. It is equally a weave of varied metal and melodic toxicity, it all colluding in one magnetic lure holding attention and appetite firmly in its hands alongside enjoyment.

The following Is This A Way To Live has a calmer if no less energetic presence, though vocal squalls and cantankerous riffs as well as a grooved taunting offer disagreement. Subsequently the song slips into a mellow reflective passage within a still tempestuous atmosphere, the bass of Tom Parkinson a prowling shadow in the growing web of wiry grooves and hooks whilst the rhythmic animosity of drummer Colin Bentham is barbarous in the norm and bestial, like the bass, in the track’s most agitated state. With a Middle Eastern suggestiveness emerging in its thick ambience and unpredictability driving every twist and turn, the track has ears and thoughts thoroughly captivated before making way for the more rigorous examination of Resistance and in turn the cyclonic energy of The Turning Point. There is a carnal essence to the savage riffs and technical predation of the first of the two, but countered by and aligned to a constantly evolving landscape of immersive melodies, heart driven vocals, and a blustery fury. Virulently contagious and intrusively dynamic, the track is the first major pinnacle within an already seriously impressing album and quickly matched by the inventive theatre and hostile temptation of its successor. It is another song which merges contrasts and contradictions in sound and energy in a riveting emotional and breath-taking physical turmoil. Though arguably not as technically busy as previous releases but certainly as skilfully dynamic and inventive it, as all the songs within Vimana, reveals new corners and depths with every listen, ensuring every flight of the album’s raging adventure is increasingly rewarding.

The elegant caress of brief instrumental Half Light comes next, its evocative beauty courted by a vocal sample before Citizen with a similarly warm charm and presence takes over. Of course things get more heated and agitated soon after, guitars spinning a trap of sonic predation matched by heavy rhythms though almost as quickly, a melodic tempting returns to seduce once again. The vocal variety of Tasan leads an eventual merger of both aspects as the song becomes a bewitching trespass on ears and passions.

There is something familiar about the following Speechless especially when vocals and song are in full roar but ultimately it casts a uniquely inflamed presence rife with emotional ire and sonic adventure. The lead track from the album and another highly satisfying encounter, it still does not quite take ears and emotions on the same thrilling ride as other tracks upon the album or indeed Disconnect which straight after unveils a worldly melodic emprise within a creative bellow and an imposing persistently evolving incitement.

Vimana is drawn to a close by firstly the cauldron of diversity and extremes that is Signs and finally its title track and its mellow croon on ears. Also equipped with a rhythmic stalking, the last song increasingly spawns brighter and bolder voracious flames throughout but without ever catching ablaze; a restraint which you have to say superbly works.

Both tracks bring Vimana a fine and absorbing finale, the album ending as potently as it began. There are moments where personally there was a wish for the band to go further with its melodic explorations or inhospitable endeavour but no moment when No Consequence just do not seriously impress. Bottom-line is that Vimana is an unbridled recommendation for not only technical/progressive metal fans but for the broad attention of metal itself.

Vimana is available now via Basick Records digitally and on CD @ http://music.basickrecords.com/album/vimana and http://basick.supplies/collections/no-consequence

https://www.facebook.com/noconsequenceband   http://www.basickrecords.com/bands/no-consequence

RingMaster 09/06/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

 

Kastasyde – Gnosis

Kastasyde Promo Photo 2015 BW_Reputation Radio/RingMaster Review

If there has been another album this year as startlingly diverse and adventurous within its confines, providing a truly coherent passage from start to finish than Gnosis, it has so far been hiding away. The new creative incitement from Chicago metallers Kastasyde, the release is a fascination on first listen, a captivation after more eager plays, and an eventual obsession over time. Some offerings hit you straight between the eyes and others make a smouldering proposal leading to the same success. Gnosis is both persuasions at the same time and a release destined for best of year nominations.

Formed in 2001, Kastasyde has released a couple of demos, a pair of well-received albums, and a similarly successful EP. Their ever evolving sound has also lured in comparisons to the diverse likes of Mastodon, Acid Bath, Napalm Death, and Machine Head, suggestions sure to expand as Gnosis continually unveils its inventive persuasion and colossal depths. Inviting a guest guitar solo from Black Dahlia Murder guitarist Ryan Knight as well as lap steel guitar contributions by Justin Spring within the album, the quintet of vocalist Jarrett Roberts, guitarists Eric Kornfeind and Jerome Marshall, bassist Dustin Roberts, and drummer Garry Naples (Novembers Doom) take little time to rile up and bewitch the imagination with their highly anticipated album, quickly giving progressive extreme metal and metal in general, a new protagonist to get excited over.

Gnosis opens with Natural State and instantly has attention enthused as a thumping of beats match the roaming exploits of guitar and bass. It is a tenacious and fiercely inviting start luring the listener into a subsequent inferno of vocal hostility, ferocious rhythms, and hungry intensity. Death metal, hardcore, and groove metal unite in the maelstrom of ideation already badgering ears and lighting thoughts, the gripping onslaught providing an increasingly more expansive landscape of sound with each passing twist and moment. As the track spins through essences of noise and progressive rock as well as a blackened malevolence, things continue to enthral and excite. It is an impressive and seriously busy opening to the album but one which never piles on the invention and thickness of its creative tapestry so that things are smothered or missed, or indeed under appreciative. In saying that though, as song and album prove over time, each listen only reveals new and fresh nuances which only increase the pull of its presence.

Kastasyde Gnosis Album Cover_Reputation Radio/RingMaster Review   The following Buried in the Sky continues in the same vein but with a distinctly individual character. Jarrett Roberts’ vocals once more squall with expression and magnetic persuasion as the guitars of Kornfeind and Marshall simultaneously scorch and dance over the senses. Their union alone ensures a hungry appetite but with the throbbing bass adventure offered by Dustin Roberts a prowling enticing alongside the rapier swings of Naples, greed becomes involves, especially once the song slips into a flowing passage of melodic rock deeded imagination. It is calm in the storm and more, a Stone Sour-esque crooning laying out an evocative tempting to get fully involved with before the drums raise their energies and enterprise to lead song and ears into a ruggedly tempestuous roar.

The album’s epic title track is next, ten minutes which alone provides an intensive exploration of sound and emotion as extremes and contrasts again collaborate in a mouth-watering landscape of craft and ingenuity. A gamut of provocative atmospheres and flavours are woven into the turbulent flight, the suggestion that there is something for everyone in a song never a truer claim.

The melodic beauty of In the Spiral with its sultry ambience and crooning vocal incitement comes next, the song a seductive ballad as powerful in its creative voice and feeling as the blazing fury of Blackheart which follows. As its predecessor, the song is outstanding, a hellacious rage of rock ‘n’ roll sculpted with the richest armoury of fierce metal textures. It too, and as now expected is equally a web of uniquely different and seamlessly aligned flavours and ideation; ears and imagination once more being constantly challenged and rewarded.

Never At Peace is the next gloriously inventive brawl on Gnosis, a fusion of hardcore and metal which twists and rampages like a dervish but equally creates a melodic and contagious roar which is as predatory as it is warmly bracing. With its brilliance and adversarial invention just outshining the peaks already making up the album, the track takes best of honours before being almost matched by the mesmeric radiance of Empyrean. Opening guitar enterprise and its subsequent endeavour has a Steely Dan feel to it whilst the sultry and mystique lined melodies and imagination which veins another powerful song, seduce like a mix of Motherjane, In Flames, and KingBathmat.

Both tracks are breath-taking in their unique ways leaving the closing Tiamat a formidable task to ensure the album ends on a similar high. Bedlam is not quite the right word for the might and tempest of the thrilling finale, but best describes the whirlpool of adventure, ingenuity, and sounds colliding and colluding fluidly in the inimical emprise. In many ways the song sums up everything about the album and indeed the creative intent of Kastasyde, and yes it leaves Gnosis in as impressive a state and stature as it started and indeed further climbed to.

Kastasyde was a new introduction to us with Gnosis but leave with the words best of year challenger and major breakthrough release on the lips.

The self-released Gnosis is available now @ http://kastasyde.bandcamp.com/album/gnosis

http://www.facebook.com/kastasyde

RingMaster 05/06/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net