Native Construct – Quiet World

Photo 3_Cinematic

If Quiet World is the kind of thing the members of Native Construct come up with whilst heavily involved with their college studies, then their future not only looks rosy but the music scene is destined to some real greatness ahead. The band’s debut album is a fascinating end enthralling adventure entwined in more styles and flavours than London Fashion Week and an imagination which simply bewitches that of the listener. It is not without a few flaws yet for an introduction to the band and their creativity, a ‘wow’ is in order.

Native Construct consists of vocalist Robert Edens, bassist Max Harchik, and guitarist Myles Yang, three music students who came together creatively in 2011 whilst at the Berklee College of Music in Boston. Using the composition and arranging skills learnt in their studies, as well as the technical craft and inbred inventive talent of the band members, the trio began drawing on a torrent of genres from progressive and classical rock to heavier technical incitements, as well as musical theatre, jazz and plenty more. Between 2011 and 2013, Native Construct set to work writing and recording what was to become Quiet World, predominantly self-producing the concept release, whilst continuing their studies. It came to the attention of Brian Slagel at Metal Blade Records at some subsequent point, and as their press releases says “What began as jam sessions simply for fun eventually turned into a full-fledged musical endeavor.” The band was signed to the label and the album, with its vocals being recorded with Jamie King at The Basement Studios in North Carolina, is now out there to surely stir up a worldwide appetite for this potential drenched band.

Cover   Quiet World brings a tale, to simplify it, of a mute and slightly unstable man who has an unreciprocated love for a girl which leads to obsession and eventual resentment. He also creates for himself a new, fantastic world where there are no oddballs or outcasts, which is where the album comes in. It is an eventful lyrical exploration more than matched by the musical adventure around it, and started with Mute. From an isolated climate with random sonic textures flying round the senses, the song bursts into theatrical and orchestral life. Strings and melodies spin an immediately potent and cinematic landscape of sound and emotion whilst the ravenous drum work is an uncompromising tempering of the fiery beauty. It is an invigorating start coated in elegance and menace, keys and guitars duelling with rhythms for voice whilst equally sharing the spotlight, whilst the vocals of Edens roar and serenade across the magnetic proposal. Relaxing into an avant-garde/jazz lit calm coloured by a seducing of piano and infectious harmonies, thoughts of bands like 6:33 and Pryapisme come to mind, and even more so as volatile and tenacious elements add their erratic and compelling presence to the mix. There are moments which for personal tastes do not quite hit the same sweet spots as others, but constantly evolving and unpredictable with that cinematic orchestral temptation returning in full persuasion, the song is intoxicating drama.

Following song, The Spark of the Archon, opens with an eighties bred synth pop shuffle, keys and percussion a smiling lure before riffs and grooves bring a rawer edge to the entrance. Once in full pop rock flow though, the song has a strong coincidental whiff of UK band 12 Stone Toddler to it with a Mike Patton/Mr Bungle touch too. Music and vocals again bring fluid scenery of unexpected detours and wrong-footing escapades whilst crafting an immersive and easy to greedily devour proposition. Lyrically at this point the protagonist’s new world sees the rise of Archon who leads an uprising in this new land against opposing character Sinister Silence.

The proceeding tracks bring for the main, different episodes in their enduring struggle, Passage next stealing attention and imagination with its stroking embrace of shadowed kissed strings around equally evocative guitars. Sultry and exotic, intimidating and melancholic, the track as those before has a perpetual shifting in its tone and sound, though it is more stable in its progressive flight and controlled in the additional additives of textures and styles seducing the imagination. In saying that the pent up creative bedlam which marked the previous tracks has to go somewhere, and like an itch which has to be scratched it bursts out through gypsy folk breezes and technical metal roars, to name just two of the delicious strains of the almost psychotic enterprise released.

Your Familiar Face also has a calmer interior within its walls, emerging as the most restrained of all songs upon Quiet World but unafraid to throw an unexpected twist and wink of creative mischief into its theatre of sound. It is a captivating caress on the senses but it has to be said by its end ears were hankering for that warped ingenuity, which is swiftly fed again by Come Hell or High Water. Sombre strings play with and incite body and mind right away, though behind their sombre face there is a twinkle which is taken up by rhythms and the swiftly joining vocals. Like a stage show song, it grows in stature and emotional drama, becoming a hearty bellow and in turn a snarling vociferous provocation, especially vocally. Of course by now expectations are redundant, the song ebbing and flowing in all aspects and extremes whilst conjuring new unpredictable and riveting antics.

The album is completed by firstly Chromatic Lights, a short instrumental detour within a raw ambience, which leads into the closing Chromatic Aberration, an epic twelve minute plus psychotic tapestry of emotion and unbridled creative mayhem. It is a chaos which is as perfectly shaped as it is emotionally deranged; every groove, melody, and rhythmic trespass a coherent and engrossing incitement in a cinematic flight across tempestuous and constantly changing emotional climates. The track is a dynamic and scintillating adventure all on its own, a mouth-watering musical emprise which combined with the rest of Quiet World simply leaves ears and emotions smiling.

We mentioned the album is not without issues but to be honest the more you listen and delve into Quiet World they are hardly of relevance, except to ensure that the band’s next offering when they have no other distractions, is an already highly anticipated proposition.

Quiet World is available now on Metal Blade Records via http://www.metalblade.com/nativeconstruct/

https://www.facebook.com/NativeConstruct

RingMaster 23/04/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

End Begin – Empire Fools

evil-clowns-horror-clown-horror-pictures-scary-clown-1

As much as a riot of sound and a brawl of instant provocation go down a treat with these ears so do sonic and imagination sparking musical journeys and that is exactly what you get with the impressive debut release from UK band End Begin. A collection of evolving and thought provoking creative episodes in the gripping tale of one man’s journey to save his race, Empire Fools is a captivating and imaginative adventure challenging “listeners to look at humanity’s current ways and to truly question their roles in society.” From start to finish the release grips ears and thoughts, at times more dramatically than in other moments, but constantly provides a richly enticing and unrelentingly enjoyable proposition.

Hailing from Leeds, the progressive rock/post metal quartet emerged in 2010 and since then has bred a strong and loyal local following which with the release of Empire Fools threatens to spread much further afield and we suggest swiftly. Live the band has become an acclaimed part of the northern underground circuit and taken in shows with the likes of Thine and Pteroglyph along the way. Produced by guitarist David J. Freeman with the rest of the band, Empire Fools has be a proposition the band has taken its time over, a creative incitement that has been intensely sculpted and honed until finding the striking depth and persuasion of sound which embraces ears and immerses the imagination from opener Tey’sha onwards.

The first track emerges from a sonic fuelled atmosphere of almost intimidating suggestiveness, the portentous air blossoming into a tempest of hearty riffs and antagonistic rhythms. The guitar of Freeman is as imposing as it is fiery whilst the bass of Rory Smith adds a dark menace which complements the pungent strikes of drummer Dominic Turton and contrasts the emerging expressive melodic enterprise of the track perfectly. Soon seemingly established, the direction of sound suddenly swerves on ears and slips into a post rock apocalyptic calm, bass and guitar again a contrasting but united design of imagination and craft. This shadowed peace welcomes the excellent voice of Dave Rangel, his warm and expressive tones unveiling the narrative whilst backed well by the voice of Freeman. We mentioned Pteroglyph earlier and there is a definite similarity in structure and evocative nature to the song, and indeed album, to the project of Jimmy MacGregor, though in sound they stand apart. The track continues to twist and shift in creativity and character throughout, offering a persistently absorbing and exciting start to the album.

An opening bubbling of riffs and guitar endeavour ensures the start of Missionary has an instant grip on ears and imagination next, a hold tightening as again impressive vocals and a darker rhythmic side joins the provocative canvas of emotion and sound. Bursts of impassioned and technical intensity and moments of creative and vocal intimacy are fused and entangled across the song, their unity helping make the encounter an immediately alluring proposal though, as its predecessor and the rest of the album, holding more in its depths which only subsequent flights through the release begin to reveal.

     Empire Fools is definitely an album which flourishes and strengthens over a wealth of listens. There is no denying that it makes a strong first persuasion but as shown again in Lice, it only grows to a greater and more impressive stature given increasing time and attention. The third track has a heavier more volatile metallic substance to its flurries and perpetual prowl, epitomised by the earthy and sinister tone of the bass. Freeman’s guitar finds a great inflamed and acidic quality to its most compelling endeavour yet, whilst vocally Rangel more than solid in his main delivery brings great drama and adventure with additional twists and turns. The track is exceptional, an early big favourite and pinnacle in the release though straight away backed resourcefully by, after the beauty soaked ambience of the brief instrumental After Martyrdom, the progressive and melodic seducing of Numbers. Ten minutes long, the journey begins in a mellow kiss of voice and sonic charm subsequently brewing up more stormy scenery through bass and drums for the revelation of the lyrical adventure. In theme song and album is as rich and immersive as the sounds and enjoyable also needs many plays to fully piece together and explore.

At times there is an essence of UK band An Entire Legion to the End Begin sound across the album and indeed KingBathmat certainly to this track, nothing thick but a regular and potent coincidental scent which only adds to the riveting temptation. Trium Virum is another offering a similar suggestiveness though its beginning is more akin to the Arcade Messiah side of the creativity of KingBathmat’s John Bassett. The song is a smouldering and sultry yet reserved wash over the senses, ripe in sonic and melodic flames courtesy of Freeman with an almost predatory yearning care of Smith’s tantalising basslines. Fair to say it is another big highlight of the ever impressing encounter.

Rangel’s voice at times has a task to stand equal to the striking and dramatic enterprise elsewhere, but even without any real snarl or aggression to take them on he constantly stands by their side in potency and clarity, the production offering a strong base which he exploits perfectly as evidenced once more in the epic closing track. Another imagination inciting instrumental comes first; Remnants a tapestry of sonic clues for thought to run with before another extensive outing in Becoming brings the album to a stirring end. A dark start is driven by a vocal menacing before slipping into an even more tempestuous and agitated, almost capricious landscape with the stunning enterprise of Turton especially shining. It is a creative emprise though with just as potent warm colours and intimidating hues to its presence, crafting an engrossing and exhilarating offering for ears and psyche to take on. Again it is a song needing numerous visits to fully explore and appreciate its growth into the album’s most impressive track, but certainly it has body and emotions lit from its first flight too.

     Empire Fools just grows and lures the passions into greedier satisfaction with every listen, increasing the evidence that it and End Begin is a must investigation for all progressive rock and metal fans. It is hard to imagine there being many debuts making a bigger impact within those genres this year and deserves keen attention.

Empire Fools is out now via https://endbegin.bandcamp.com/

It is also available as an 8GB wafer USB containing extensive material such as guitar tabs, a digital booklet, a full digital painting, and a special featurette from the studio. For more info…

http://www.endbeginband.net/ https://www.facebook.com/endbeginband

Upcoming live dates …

Wed 29th May The Washington, Sheffield, UK

Fri 8th May The Snooty Fox, Wakefield, UK

Fri 22nd May Parish, Huddersfield, UK

Sat 23rd May Chameleon Arts Café, Nottingham, UK

Sat 22nd Aug Lincoln Imp, Scunthorpe, UK

RingMaster 19/04/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

Red Sky – Solo Musica A Riempirmi Gli Occhi EP

 

Pic 3

What can we tell you about Red Sky? Well he is a masked guitarist/rapper from Milan, creating a web of creative adventure and imaginative sound. From the founding of his solo project in 2011, he has released one album, one single, and three EPs, each earning increasing acclaim and attention. In the third of those latter propositions, the latest release, he has also revealed a simply fascinating and magnetic new direction in sound and intent. The Solo Musica A Riempirmi Gli Occhi EP is a transfixing and compelling exploration which embraces the artist’s broadest landscape of imagination and flavour yet.

Red Sky initially began as an instrumental rock proposal and swiftly drew close attention with the Tra l’ombra e l’anima EP in 2011, awareness increasing with the release of debut album Origami the following year. The Origami RMX EP in 2013 kept the growing buzz around Red Sky going but revealed little of the new adventure and shift of intent to emerge in forthcoming songs and music. Solo Musica A Riempirmi Gli Occhi is the witness to and evidence of the exciting evolution and change in the Red Sky’s invention. Its six adventurous incitements merge the instrumental rock essences which lit its predecessors with new stirring strands of electronic imagination and rap bred enterprise. It is a captivating union which offers an open familiarity in some ways but fresh invention throughout.

It all starts with Il Prezzo, a short and riveting piece of atmospheric sound and persuasion. The piece magnetically shimmers from its first endearing touch, stroking ears with increasing potency as electronic and guitar crafted radiance embrace the imagination with a sultry ambience. Spoken vocals add to the brewing drama, though being delivered in Italian leaves their narrative and emotion unknown for us less enabled linguists. It is an engrossing entrance though which is continued by the following tempting of Cadono Giù (Freestyle N.1). A symphonic whisper coats its start but swiftly the song is a lively romp of electronic revelry and feisty rock flames. Equipped with irresistible spicy hooks and flowing synth bred flights of warm enterprise, the track immediately has ears and feet involved, gripping the imagination just as potently with its subsequent agitated adventure. There is a feel of The Kennedy Soundtrack to parts of the song whilst its sonic weaves embrace rich melodic and gothic metal theatre and vivacity, and with the sparkling guitar imagination having a whisper of Squidhead to it, the track easily enthrals.

Front     Il Flauto floats in next, its opening flirty radiance skirted by darker shadows. It is a union which continues to court each other as the song develops, each aspect increasing in texture and depth as more instrumentation and creative intrigue gets involved. Vocals are also a prominent proposal within the track, their presence punchy and expressive within the thick melodic blaze around them. Rap and metal are no strangers in music and in the song they bring a recognisable offering yet within the maze of its fusion of imaginative symphonic and folk metal with classic and electro rock; everything takes on a whole new and invigorating adventure.

Next up is Neve which features the soaring tones of Ideogram vocalist Martina Ambruosi. It begins its rise with a sinister and cinematic melodic drama, keys providing a catchy and portentous coaxing that simply basks in emotion as a growing tapestry of sound and ideation blossoms around them. Red Sky and Ambruosi do not exactly duet in the song but entwine their vocal deliveries around that of the other, a highly flavoursome union matching the expressive and provocative music boiling up around them. Though not quite as gripping as its predecessor, the song is aural theatre impossible to tear away from.

A mellower croon of sound provides the mesmeric breath of Stelle, music and voice a warm hug on the senses as delicious strings and sparkling electronic endeavour provides visual colouring for the. The track entrances thoughts and appetite with sublime mastery before making way for the closing Finchè Morte Non Ci Separi, itself a fascination of diversely textured sound and exotic invention. Showing a worldly landscape which is constantly evolving through mysterious calms and raging symphonic blazes, the piece is as expansive as it is deeply intimate and an absorbing end to a thoroughly bewitching release.

Also featuring the scratching skills of Dj Zero Tx on certain songs, Solo Musica A Riempirmi Gli Occhi is one of those encounters which take you by surprise and easily breed a keen hunger for more. The new twists in sound and experimentation from Red Sky have created an impressive exploit loaded with the potential of even greater creative emprises ahead.

The Solo Musica A Riempirmi Gli Occhi EP is available now via Ronin Agency.

http://www.redsky.it/   http://www.facebook.com/redskyofficialpage

RingMaster 25/03/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://reputationradio.yooco.org/

Siriun – In Chaos We Trust

Siriun 2

It might have the title In Chaos We Trust but there is nothing random and bedlamic about the debut album from Brazilian progressive metallers Siriun. Certainly the release is a furious and blistering merging of varied creative winds within extreme metal but comes entwined in a superbly imaginative and inventive technical prowess across songwriting and sound. Recognisable essences and established flavours consort with fresh and invigorating ideation, the result one thrilling and thoroughly gripping proposition.

Siriun is the brainchild of Rio De Janeiro guitarist/vocalist Alexandre Castellan, a project formed in 2014 to give an avenue to his musical ideas and creative tenacity. It was a proposal he intended would also be enriched with the strongest creative heart and invention possible, an intent which led to the band line-up of long-time friend and bassist Hugo Machado, and the rhythmic tour-de-force that is drummer Kevin Talley (Six Feet Under, Daath, Feared, Suffocation, Devil Driver, BattleCross) alongside its creator. The subsequent outcome of the union is the hellacious and fascinating In Chaos We Trust, an album bringing the metal world another intensively striking and ferocious proposal from Brazil.

The album first embraces and ignites ears with Mass Control, a track swiftly luring strong attention through its opening wash of melodic endeavour and sonic enterprise alone. The guitar of Castellan virtually flirts with ears, coaxing and enticing before a consuming wall of rhythms pounce. The powerful beats of Talley bring intimidation and temptation whilst the snarling tones of Machado’s bass, though less intrusive, only adds to the emerging predatory nature of the track. It is an impressive start soon casting a just as magnetic storm of scarring riffs and rhythmic voracity. Castellan’s vocals bring their own caustic but also an alluring texture and enticing to the increasingly gripping encounter, their raw and pleasingly varied expression and colour immense within the expanding web of melodic and progressive exploration. At its and indeed the album’s heart, the encounter is a beast though, prowling and growling with almost malevolent aggression and emotion, but consistently baiting its animus with transfixing imagination alongside seriously skilful and anthemic enterprise.

Siriun Artwork 1    The following Infected is just as riveting and mighty, and again straight away holding ears and thoughts tight through the breath-taking craft of Talley courted by a potent acoustic caress of guitar. Of course skirting it all are shadows and a more hostile intent, one which is soon driving the great carnivorous tones of bass and the just as swiftly riled riffs. It is the contagious swings of Talley’s beats though forcibly leading the tempting, their devilry like a sinister and hostile carnival bringing Latin seeded percussive revelry into a courtship with hellish animosity. The track continues to twist and incite through every dramatic aspect, the fingers of Castellan manipulating strings for a fluid and enthralling tapestry of sonic and acoustic melodic captivation.

There is no dipping of adventure and craft, or in an already greedy appetite for the release, as both Spread of Hate and Cosmogenesis seize ears and the imagination. The first of the pair is a blistering fury of sound and attitude, but again reined a touch by the technical invention and skills of the trio, something you can attribute to all songs upon In Chaos We Trust. Ravenous and enthralling in equal measure, the song roars like a mix of Sepultura, Mudvayne, and Devildriver yet entwines its roar in a melodic exploration opening up a unique and mouth-watering adventure. Its successor is a brief instrumental, an acoustic flame within a cold and haunting ambience within which a seduction of electric guitar provides evocative light. It leads into the just as shadowed and initially emotionally imposing and portentous title track. Though that suggestive threat and darkness never leaves, the song soon explores a landscape of provocative melodies and imagination within that tempest in waiting. There is an increasing pressure though bred from bass and drums though, a weight which eventually breaks down resistance and explodes in an onslaught of thrash drawn riffery and death metal vitriol. Again though, it is a passing passage in a journey of a song, part of an evolution which never waits around too long in one train of thought and sound keeping ears and imagination enslaved.

Transmutation steps up next and another web is spun around senses and thoughts, another offering relishing the skills and invention of every band member. Talley has brought his most viciously creative endeavour to the release, perfectly supported by the rabid craft of Machado whilst Castellan vocally and especially in his guitar explorations, leads the listener through a roller coaster of enterprise and emotion with ideas which rarely leave ears less than engrossed even if in rare moments the fluidity of twists are not as polished as elsewhere. It is almost a clutching at straws though to try and temper the weight of the enthusiasm for the release, a ‘lust’ continuing through the emotive and physical turbulence of Transmutation. As uncompromising and venomous as it is engagingly colourful in exotic melodies, the song bellows with creative toxicity sparking once more a hunger for more.

It is a want immediately fed by the closing pair of Intent and Becoming Aware. Each explore yet new spices and exploratory endeavours in their ferocious bodies, the first brewing a waspish nagging in its riffery and a sultry climate around its winery of melodies and sonic intrusion. It all comes ruffled up by the muscular avalanche of Talley’s swings and the grouchiness of Machado’s bass whilst the closing track brings the album to a climactic end. Though it is arguably the least inventively inflammatory and breath-taking of all the tracks, it has ears ringing and thoughts contemplating ardour whilst hoping this union of three exceptional musicians is the first of many.

In Chaos We Trust is an exhilarating encounter, one managing to offer sounds and flavours which provide at times a very familiar canvas to leap upon but just as powerfully create a proposition that reeks of fresh invention and new adventure. Simply it is a mighty mix from a project with the potential to craft truly inspiring templates for progressive and extreme metal ahead.

In Chaos We Trust is available now via http://www.siriunband.com

https://www.facebook.com/siriunband

RingMaster 24/03/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://reputationradio.yooco.org/

Train Arrival – Dramatic Existence

cover

An engrossing proposition for ears and imagination, it is fair to say that Russian band Train Arrival has given one impressive introduction to itself through debut album Dramatic Existence. Oozing creative theatre as striking and potent as the technical craft bringing it to life, the eight track encounter is a riveting adventure of instrumental progressive metal. To that cinematic canvas though, there are also inventive weaves of djent voracity, symphonic ambiences, and oriental and Eastern beauty captivating the senses. It makes for one mouth-watering offering, one not lacking either familiarity or fresh invention, but ultimately providing a thoroughly enjoyable and imaginative emprise of sound and intent.

Train Arrival is the solo project of Krasnodar composer and guitarist Max Ben and that is about all we can reveal about the talented artist. Then again Dramatic Existence does all the talking starting straight away with opener History. A lone melancholic guitar melody wraps around ears first, its sweet tone soon joined by darker caresses and a classical air. It is a gentle and captivating start, immersing senses and thoughts with great potency as keys and a symphonic breeze brings new warmth and expression to a by now rhythmically bold proposal. As becomes a constant success across the release, the imagination is already conjuring a landscape of peace and beauty echoing the dramas and turbulence of past times. The track as all subsequent songs is an aural paint box for thoughts, inviting interpretations addition to the piece’s own suggestiveness, and finding new twists with every listen.

The following Returning takes the listener into a far more aggressive and agitated climate, but equally as tempting and inviting. Rhythms cast a web of intimidation whilst jagged stabs of guitar only accentuate the danger and imposing presence of the new soundscape. A djent bred examination shows its first grouchy signs whilst keys again cast an immersive embrace over the volatile heart of the track. It is a gripping and skilful theatre of sound and invention from Ben, every second of its six minutes providing persistent magnetism, the same which is easily said about all tracks and immediately evidenced by Theatre Of War. The outstanding third track does not enter with the hostility its title might suggest, in fact is less forceful than its predecessor in many ways, but offers drama and epic grandeur aligned to intimate aggression for one transfixing exploit. Again ragged djent persuasion colludes with elegant and immersive symphonic arrangements courted by emotionally colourful keys, whilst mystique and melodic hues of the Oriental with far reaching Eastern spices bring their intrigue to track and ears as the listener is taken again on their travels musically and mentally.

There is an underlying fatality to the track though and its aftermath is echoed in Devastation next, its colder air a telling introduction though soon succumbing to another tempestuous climate, sculpted imaginatively and powerfully by the guitar skills and keys crafted adventure of Ben. To that technical prowess there is a creative resourcefulness too which makes this and all pieces a fluid and tenacious theatre of sound and expression. The track has thoughts and emotions instantly and firmly involved, their premises uniting with the artist for another peak of the already highly impressing album.

Majesty just about sums up the air and presence of the next song, keys dancing provocatively over ears with an endearing renaissance charm before rhythms and riffs bring a creative turmoil to the expanding adventure. Predatory shadows and sounds stalk the melodic flaming of guitar and the bewitching radiance of keys, each of their twists bringing striking textures, creative hues, and sheer mesmeric enterprise best described as, yes majestic.

The ten minutes epic temptation of Badlands is next, provocative balladry and stormy climates colliding and entwining for another spellbinding offering which is simultaneously seductive and fiercely erosive on the senses. Possibly a touch overlong, though there is never a point where attention and appetite waivers, the track is a journey and adventure all on its own, and that is another impacting thing about Dramatic Existence, tracks work just as powerfully alone or as one act in the album’s whole sonic libretto. The song flows straight into the reflective embrace of Ashes Of Time, a serenade skirted by a carnivorous bass tone and raw edged riffs. It is the melodic lure of the song and guitar though which prevails in the increasingly volcanic atmosphere and intensity of the track, both assisted by the warm and emotive tides of the key’s invention.

   History Repeats brings it all to a fine, epilogue like end. The piece is maybe not the most impacting and gripping, relative to what came before, but provides a final richly satisfying and suggestive voice to the breath-taking exploit. It also provides one last slice of evidence to not only the impressive technical craft of Ben but his pleasing understanding and restraint in not over powering impressive songwriting with indulgent excesses of technique.

Dramatic Existence is a tremendous entrance by Ben and Train Arrival, progressive metal which simply ignites ears and imagination. The album might not be imposingly pushing progressive metal boundaries but it is giving them a damn good shaking as it thrills.

Dramatic Existence is available now @ https://trainarrival.bandcamp.com

https://www.facebook.com/TrainArrival

RingMaster 18/03/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://reputationradio.yooco.org/

Beyond the Dust – Khepri

Beyond The Dust - Promo Pic 2013 HD 1

Beyond the Dust is a French progressive metal band which has a very potent future on the evidence of debut album Khepri. It is not a release which puts the band up alongside the weightier and more robustly adventurous protagonists of their genre, but one which suggests with the ripe potential coursing through their songs, that the Paris quartet could find that success some when within their evolution.

The band made a potent introduction to themselves with their six-track New Dawn EP in 2011, a release which led the band to shows with the likes of Periphery, Sybreed, Protest The Hero, Monuments, and Becoming The Archetype. The song Reality Deformed opened up a new gaze of attention with its unveiling at the beginning of 2012; the song which featured ex-Aliases singer Jay Berast already showing hints of the new maturity in songwriting and sound which is ripe within Khepri. The band signed with Dooweet Records last year for the release of their first full-length, it a 57 min concept album which has been compared to “references like Dream Theater’s Metropolis Part 2: Scenes From a Memory mixed with Meshuggah’s Catch 33 and Periphery’s albums.” That might be a grand suggestion for Khepri but certainly Beyond the Dust has grown in creative strength and imagination between releases and this certainly lights up the album.

A mature male voice sets the scene as first track Rise waits in the shadows to reveal its presence. It is a dramatic scene being cast under a stormy sky, one soon joined by the melodic charm of guitars and a darker foreboding bass tone. Similarly the ambience of the track becomes thicker in dramatic hue, providing an intriguing premise that Meshuggah bred enterprise agitates and ignites. The instrumental is a captivating opening to the album, alone sparking the imagination and anticipation of what is to follow.

Clarity is the next offering, its own elegant start a potent coaxing before being immersed in a vibrant but cloudier weave of riffs and rhythmic incitement. It is not a particularly stormy encounter though and is soon mixing in peaceful melodies and certain emotional calms, but still prone to eruptions of raw vocals squalls alongside the predominant clean delivery, as well as fierce intensive roars of sonic voracity. The track continues to seduce and blaze away in ears, the band persistently impressing in craft and ideation but, and something which applies to most of the album, not finding that final spark to push the band beyond familiar territories.

After the Light is a valiant attempt though, a voracious predator from the start but guided by the excellent clean tones of the vocalist and almost as swiftly twisting into unexpected and khepricompelling detours. The song is quite gripping, luring in close attention as you wait to see where it goes next, and it does not disappoint with its imagination whilst still managing to stay within the original framework of the song’s tempest. There are moments where it veers towards the precipice of too much but always turns away and explores new just as sonically theatrical and engrossing ventures. A proposal to take your time exploring, much as Khepri itself to be fair, it emerges as a peak of the release which grows even more impressive over time.

A smoother embrace comes with Relief, melodies and harmonies as resourceful as the guitar escapades and vocal variety. There is a small sense of flamboyancy through the solo which will appeal to some and maybe less to others but it is the lack of the bold almost warped ingenuity of its predecessor which prevents the song lighting emotions as potently. As a rapacious melodic rock track though there is little to ignore and refuse, much as with Last Breath, though the song is much more volatile emotionally and aggressive creatively. The further into its short but eventful body it travels, the greater the creative temptation discovered where again a more twisted invention is allowed to flirt with the listener even if in short doses.

Both Zero and Silence and Sorrow have the imagination heavily invested and ears fully attentive, the first a tenaciously expressive and inflammatory instrumental coaxing thoughts and emotions into the savage jaws of its successor. The most carnivorous track on the album, riffs and rhythms a barbarous incitement, the song proceeds to explore a sonic tapestry of bedlamic enterprise and melodic ingenuity. Funk, jazz, and math rock all seem to have a part of its breeding whilst the ever impressing vocals in their harmonic styling only add to the magnetism of the tempestuous encounter. As After The Light, the track stands as a pinnacle of Khepri, the moments where something new is truly breached.

The three parts of The Edge of Earth and Sea complete the album, each a part of an epic twenty plus minute narrative also standing well individually if taken that way. Part 1: The Tears Of Departures is a mellow and evocative embrace, though as expected it has a fiercer energy to its air and a darker nature to its shadows. They subsequently boil over into a brawling hardcore-esque vocal expulsion over jagged riffs and tingling melodies, the evolving vocals and warm guitar expression ensuring though that there is plenty of adventure in the growing maelstrom, a stormy scene which slips into again the more restrained and charmed opening to Part 2: The Fear Of The Journey This in turn rumbles with storm like emotion and intent across its colourful and technically extravagant soundscape. The mid way collapse into hellish domains, where the safety of the narrative’s protagonist is lost, suddenly ignites the track to new heights matched by the voracious stalking of the senses from riffs and rhythms. There is a new inescapable drama to the scene which you wish was there sooner and longer as Part 3: The Bliss Of The Gathering comes in. With its rugged terrain and hungry hostility aligned to harmonic reassurance, the bliss of its title seems to come at a price thematically, but with a new pleasing adventure offered to the listener.

It is potent end to a fine first album from Beyond The Dust, not one to rave endlessly about but easily a release to recommend progressive metal fans take a good look at. Khepri is a seriously solid and enjoyable proposition, not pushing the band above the crowd but with songs like Silence and Sorrow and After The Light showing flair and promise which definitely excites, it hints that their time in a singular light will surely come.

Khepri is available via Dooweet Records now @ http://dooweet.bandcamp.com/album/khepri

https://www.facebook.com/beyondthedust   http://www.beyond-the-dust.com/

RingMaster 28/02/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://reputationradio.yooco.org/

 

Seven Year Storm – Aion I EP

Sean Lang press photo

With most instrumental releases, especially in metal, there is so often a bias to the instrumentation of its creator or the composer of the pieces. This can work or not depending on personal appetites for the leading element, so it was with extra intrigue that the Aion I EP from progressive metal band Seven Year Storm was allowed to take ears in its creative hands. The band is the solo project of Canadian Sean Lang, a Vancouver-based freelance drummer / instructor who until now has been contented to keep his music compositions restrained just to song writing. Thanks to pressure/support from friends, Lang was finally persuaded and encouraged to record and release his music and a fascinating treat it is turning out to be.

The first thing to thrill and please is that there is no leaning to a particular instrument with Lang’s compositions; yes songs are potently rhythm driven but in tandem with just as dramatically skilled and voraciously creative elements across guitar and bass. This could have been a top heavy and certainly an unbalanced proposition in the hands of some but upon Aion I, every imagination coloured and skilfully sculpted landscape is a thoughtful and inventive equilibrium. Solely written and produced by Lang, the EP sees him link up with guitarist Dean Lamb(Archspire), whose fingers are surely possessed by the devil at times, and bassist Brent MacKenzie, the provider of the dark emotions and shadows which also superbly balance and temper the fiery side of the release.

Morphogenesis opens up the EP, keys an immediate warm lure tenderly coaxing attention whilst also brewing up a sonically misty atmosphere. It is not long before a turbulent climate hits the scene though, snapping rhythms aligning to snarling riffs snarl and subsequently a melodic blaze cast by Lamb. There is a swift visual suggestiveness to the music too, a cinematic incitement which only grows as keys and guitar entwined inventively around the precise yet unpredictable patterns of Lang. Essences of classic rock, jazz, and technical vivacity spice up the progressive emprise, the track as the beats growing into a wonderfully fascinating and perpetually evolving creative theatre.Seven Year Storm - Cover small

The dramatic and invigorating opener is followed by the classically seeded Dyatlov, the track bringing a more intimate narrative to its canvas whilst still expanding into another broad movie of sound and evocative enterprise. Tenacious flames collude with calm passages of melodic elegance and stirring almost sinister ascents of drama, as the music again explores new avenues of imagination and inventive twists. As its predecessor and those to follow, the track does not really end sounding as it began, but like a child is still the same heart just with growth evolving its character.

A celestial charm embraces Virtue next, the song a mesmeric soar across a summery climate within which Lang prowls and directs the adventure like a conductor with his exhausting and exhilarating swings whilst MacKenzie adds a throaty growl to the djent like jaggedness of riffs. Into its rich and slightly tempestuous stride, a haunting calm and melodic beauty suddenly descends, a gothic breath spiced by the noir lit vaudeville of keys a gripping twist backed by Lamb’s increasing transfixing invention. The unpredictable treat is a union of light and dark, much as its successor Nazca Lines. The following piece is an emotionally agitated but as now expected fluid exploration through heavier and darker investigations entangled with bewitching flames of light.

     Blue Car Syndrome brings the EP to an impressive close, again all three musicians spinning an explosive and fiercely imaginative web of sound and ideation. As all tracks, it is as separate an individual as it is a part of one massive sonic travelogue of melodic and dramatic realms, emotionally and physically. It is fair to say that our words do not do justice to the skills of the band, the ravenous theatre of the songwriting, and the sheer strength and diversity of the sounds within Aion I. The first of two EPs planned this year, the final thought is to thank those supporting Lang and hope they continue to inspire him to release further triumphs like this.

The Aion I EP is available now digitally and on CD @ http://sevenyearstorm.bandcamp.com/

https://www.facebook.com/sevenyearstorm   http://www.seanlang.com/

RingMaster 26/02/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://reputationradio.yooco.org/