Inwolves – Involves

inwolves-front_RingMasterReview

In music the imagination needs feeding as much as ears and that is certainly what Involves masterfully achieves. The new album from the dark cinematic invention of Inwolves, the release takes the listener on a host of individual journeys and sonically eventful adventures which, whilst carrying their own suggestive dramas, sparks the mind to create its own imagined exploits in tandem. It is one of the most fascinating and provocative collections of aural experiences and sonic explorations for thoughts and emotions to immerse in, and in turn one of the most beguiling listens in a long time.

The project consists of Karen Willems, previously a drummer for a.o. Yuko who has also worked with Dirk Serries on Cycle and the Zita Swoon Group among several side projects, alongside Jürgen De Blonde and Ward Dupan. Their sound draws on the inspiration of seventies “kosmische musik” as it ventures into explorations of electronic and spatial soundscapes drawn from the predominant palette of drums, guitars, and synths textures. To be honest listening to Involves shows that any attempted hint to their music is persistently redundant as each track comes, infests, and seduces the imagination with its own uniqueness. To put it simply, the band creates expansive tapestries of sound and styles which certainly our interpretations can only attempt to provide a clue to.

Involves opens with I Va Va Vimedoom, an initially shadow wrapped persuasion swiftly engaging ears and thoughts with its melancholic synth cast entrance. There is a childlike innocence to the single melody courting the darker hues, though it soon, as the senses, enveloped by the portentous electronic smog that rolls in like stormy invasive clouds. Peace becomes tempestuous, emerging finally again to stand as that lonely initial charm within an absence of everything which shaped its birth.

It is a magnetic thought provoking start, though further contemplation is put on hold as Minimal steps forward next to bewitch and seduce. From its post punk scented electronic opening, exotic melodies and rhythms jostle for attention; eventually sharing ears as a south west Asia flavoured tempting wraps the senses and imagination. Closing eyes and allowing thoughts to wander brings a personal flight across Abyssinian and Mesopotamian landscapes but one surrounded by lurking dangers and encroaching dark times which in turn leads to thoughts to the destruction of ancient sites by modern terrorism.

The track is irresistible, as too is the following sinisterly toned Vladimir. The track is again an imagination nurturing episode on the album’s creative narrative. It easily incites mental and emotional involvement as its popping beats become entangled in a dark web of sonic and suggestive intrigue which blossoms around them. There is a kinetic virulence to the rhythmic shuffle also gripping attention before the track suddenly turns on its head and swims with synths into a dark bluesy and increasingly intensive devouring of the senses. There is a sixties hue to its controlled yet intimidating new tempestuousness, Procol Harum coming to mind initially as streams of orchestral and gothic flames rise up to evoke further persuasion upon the listener.

Strange Waltz provides exactly what its name implies; its opening muggy sonic climate eventually descending into clarity and a slow and flirtatious but again sinister three step shuffle as darkly romantic as it is emotionally apocalyptic, and ridiculously compelling. Maybe not the intention but the instrumental plays like a death dance within the imagination, suggesting and enthralling before the cosmopolitan business of Intown takes the listener down a whole different highway. Krautrock and slimline but pungent industrial essences converge on ears, the analogue embraced romancing of the recording, as across the album, memory provoking as too the bordering on obsessively rhythmic prowess which invites thoughts of bands like Kraftwerk and Neu! to the hypnotic endeavour.

Involves is completed by firstly, the invasively dark and increasingly distressed and psychotic Dirty Monks, a track unleashing a maelstrom of tortured voices and souls within its cathedral spawned ravenously shadowed depths. Its suffocating majesty subsequently makes way for the closing suggestive alchemy of Be Kind. The track is a cosmically spiced venture with Devo-esque tones to its electronics and Landscape like mystique to its discord and melody woven spatial drama. It is also another enslaving attention as it leads ears into a revolving flight of intimate and broad aural stimulation, every turn fresh from the previous with vocals an extra stirring spicing to the array of captivating textures.

It is hard to accurately describe Involves or its individual temptations but fair to say each will feel a unique experience for every singular exploration into a band which specialises in creating, to borrow the last words of their press release, “a world of endless possibilities.”

Involves is out now via Consouling Sounds and @ http://inwolves.bandcamp.com

https://www.facebook.com/Inwolves-266399616750821

Pete RingMaster 30/03/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Steaming Satellites – Slipstream

Steaming Satellites

Following their highly acclaimed debut album The Mustache Mozart Affaire a year ago, Austrian band Steaming Satellites unveil its successor Slipstream, a release which one suspects with easily  match the strength of response certainly amongst their fans. Eleven indie/alternative rock/electronic tracks which at times seem deceptively simple but are crafted with precise thought and imagination, the album easily shows why the Salzburg quartet is earning such eager reactions even if it does miss out on provoking a continual potent wash of ardour for its offerings.

Reliably informed that the band began around 2005, they began seducing their local and homeland crowds soon after before venturing farther afield with a US tour with Hello Electric in 2009 followed by another with Portuguese band The Man the next year. 2012 saw not only the release of their first full-length but more tours across Scandinavia and Spain with Two Gallants whilst strong festival appearances including the Eurosonic Festival in Groningen brought this year to life. The foursome of vocalist/guitarist Max Borchardt, bassist Manfred Mader, keyboardist/bassist Emanuel Krimplstätter, and drummer/programmer/keyboardist Matthäus Weber have built on their previous release with Slipstream, bringing an arguably grittier and more caustic breath to its presence though melodies and electronic elegance are still given full rein.

Released via The Instrument Village, the album opens with its title track, a cosmic heralding instrumental with sinister suggestiveness and295486_10151678988644741_1044438872_n dawning melodic grandeur. Seemingly seeded in 2001: A Space Odyssey, it is a decent enough beckon which leads into Another Love, the song instantly grabbing attention with its Sicilian keys temptation. Soon joined by the distinctive tones of Borchardt the lure only gets stronger especially when the brewing drum and bass persuasion grips tightly to ignite a wash of passion. There is a soulful fire to the vocals which again is focus pulling whilst once into its stride the song saunters along with evocative colour and melodic enterprise.

The next up Notice raises things another level, keys again opening up the path for the fine vocals and melodic sun of the song to stroll along. A rich bluesy lilt to the guitars has thoughts alert whilst the now bold swagger of the track and its harmony led festive energy has ears dancing to their soulful tune. A foot and emotion puppeteer of a track, there is a certain Black Keys feel to the song which seems at odds with the suggested comparisons to Led Zeppelin, Pink Floyd, and Bob Dylan which accompanied the release, though you can at times understand that idea. The following Another Try also brings a different thought, this time of the Alex Turner led band as it evokes a reflective and provocative narrative within the imagination. The synths sculpt an inciting ambience whilst the drums vein it with an honesty which alongside the excellent gnarly snarling bass lines ensnares a real hunger for their presence.

The intriguing ballad So I Fell Down brings again that Arctic Monkeys feel especially vocally, with Procol Harum like keys reaping the seeds of the seventies to mesmerise mind and emotions. Like the album as a whole, the song takes time to make its persuasion, taking numerous plays before it fully declares its riches it is the epitome of a slow burner forging a long term recruit for its glory.

Both Timezone and No Sleep for the Damned engage easily with the ear without quite matching what came before, though the blues drenched croon of the second of the two skirted by a great rhythmic taunt holds more than enough to pull one back into its depths time and again. The next up Rudder ebbs and flows within the passions, its evocative electro weaves and vocal harmonies making a magnetic breeze across feisty rhythmic waves of temptation which traps the listener in its creative snare. It like many does not light any raging fires inside but smoulders in thoughts and memory potently enough to make another strong impression, something you can lay at the door of Slipstream as a whole.

Shadows Collide is another more than decent ballad where again Weber steals most attention, which is then left firmly in the shade by the best song on the album, Anyone. There is a mischievous look on its tempting face from the start; keys, guitars, and rhythms courting the emotions like a pack of festival hounds before stretching their arms to welcome a delicious flaming shower of brass. The song takes no time in securing total ardour but then raises the game again with a step midway into mellower sway of invention and energy speared by hot coals of sonic invention and melodic fire.

Concluded by Gone and its melancholic poise, Slipstream is a very enjoyable and appetising album which as mentioned makes it clear as to why the band has come under such positive declarations, though it does not exactly spark a rapturous passion inside.  Steaming Satellites does bring plenty of appetising and easy to indulge in sounds and imagination though and undoubtedly will leave their fans new and old blissfully content.

http://www.steamingsatellites.com/

8/10

RingMaster 02/09/2013

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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