Tommy And The Commies – Here Come

Entangling the addictive hooks of Buzzcocks, the pop contagion of The Undertones, and the punk irreverence of The Cortinas with the early mod punk instincts of The Jam sounds like one rather tasty aural recipe; a mix which the imagination does not have to merely ponder as it is at the heart of the irresistible sound of Canadian outfit Tommy And The Commies. Their debut release, Here Come, soon proves there is much more of an individual character and flavouring to the band’s sonic holler though, a sound which you just feel would have been as potent back in the late seventies as it will undoubtedly be now.

From Sudbury, Ontario, Tommy And The Commies is the united exploits of Jeff Houle (Strange Attractor), his brother Mitch, and frontman Tommy Commy. Together they create “hooliganistic mod-punk” as nostalgic as it is rigorously fresh and in raucous evidence within the Slovenly Records released Here Come. The album immediately erupts with opener Devices, vocals and guitar colluding in instant temptations as rhythms boisterously roll. Very quickly we found ourselves agreeing with the Howard Devoto spicing to Tommy’s vocals as suggested by the album’s press release, but as within the music individuality soon wins through. The track continues to romp and stomp with punk/power pop infectiousness inciting body and vocal chords from start to finish, success only matched and escalated across the remaining slices of viral boisterousness and tenacity.

The following Straight Jacket shares its own virulent catchiness; from its first breath getting under the skin with excited riffs and melodic enterprise. Slightly more restrained in urgency than its predecessor, the track is still an unbridled bundle of energy and creative uproar bounding along without inhibition before Permanent Fixture springs its Dickies scented revelry. Again riffs and hooks collude in its excitable endeavour as rhythms robustly stir and bite within a full fusion of the familiar and new.

Something akin to 999 meets The Vapors,  Hurtin’ Boys provides another major highlight in nothing but across the album; its jagged stroll swift and a constant incitement on body and spirit before new single Suckin’ In Your 20’s entangles raw seventies power pop with modern day indie dissonance to similarly manipulate hips and throat.

A definite hint of The Ramones teases within the wiry antics of Throwaway Love, the guitar laying a mesh of hooks and melodic niggling which just brought lust to the appetite as rhythms simultaneously worked away on a body just as much badgered and inspired by the infectious clamour of So Happy where a Pixies like hue adds to inescapable temptation.

The release closes up with Reggie Rocks, another irrepressible slice of mod infused pop punk which is all mischief and noisy attitude wrapped in instinctive enterprise and contagion; a track which throughout epitomises the fun and energy of the band let alone their creative animation.

For us the best releases leave you feeling alive and inspired; Here Come does that and more.

Here Come is out now via Slovenly Records; available @ https://slovenly.bandcamp.com/releases

 https://www.facebook.com/TOMMYSCOMMIES/

Pete RingMaster 06/10/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Fuzzy Vox – Ba-Da-Boom

With one of our favourite escapades last year being the No Landing Plan album from French rockers Fuzzy Vox you can be sure that news of its successor got us rather excited, a lusty reaction which only got more exuberant upon hearing its quartet of boisterous escapades. Ba-Da-Boom is a romp of the band’s feverish rock ‘n’ roll taken to a new pasture of imagination and fun, the year between releases seeing an evolution in sound and flavours, confirming the band as one exciting and creatively excitable proposition.

With new drummer Jeremy Norris alongside vocalist/guitarist Hugo Fabbri and drummer Nico Maïa, Joinville le Pont hailing Fuzzy Vox are continuing to stir up attention with their rousing, mischievous sound through Ba-Da-Boom. It is a success first poked with debut EP Technicolor in 2012 and accelerated by the band’s first album, On Heat two years later and subsequently reaching a peak through its successor No Landing Plan. Now their fusion of garage rock, power pop and instinctive rock ‘n’ roll is ready to spark another burst of acclaim and revelry through Ba-Da-Boom and as it stomps around in ears it is hard to see anything getting in its way.

It opens with I Fell In Love With The World, a track which saunters in on a spicy groove and rapacious rhythms which as they leap are just waiting to unleash their full energy which they do a touch in the subsequent flirtatious stroll of the track. Loaded with tasty hooks, eager vocals, and swinging harmonies, the song blossoms into a seductive roar of sixties teased garage rock and pop rock devilment with a chorus which is inescapable creative bait. Providing hips and the spirit one anthemic vehicle to lose composure with, the track is irresistible.

A potency swiftly matched and pushed further by the pop ‘n’ roll fuelled Eyes On You. Again beats thump as they tempt with chords and riffs alongside, all colluding in almost salacious incitement as vocals command the tenacity of it all. With a great punk boisterousness to its stomp and psych rock tendencies in its melodic explorations, the song is superb, reason alone to check out the EP.

Cold Justice follows and quickly shares more of the new broader flavoured sound of the band. Sixties pop and seventies power pop fused with pub rock shenanigans, the song swaggers along with mischief in its antics and charm in its melodic glaze. It is a truly magnetic affair becoming more physically involving by the minute and thickly compelling by the listen.

The EP ends with I Want Drums, a ‘showcase’, if any further proof was needed to his prowess, of Norris’ rhythmic dexterity. His skittish beats come with poise and a rousing agility which is equally matched in the revelry of his companions in voice and sound. With sixties garage rock again fuelling the fire, the track is like an illegitimate offspring from a union between The Monks and Jon Spencer Blues Explosion but bred on its own imaginative mischief.

It is an outstanding end to another delicious endeavour with Fuzzy Vox, a release which may not eclipse that brilliant last album but stands right by its side whilst revealing a fresh new venture in the hunger of the band’s insatiable sound.

Ba-Da-Boom is out now and available @ https://fuzzyvox.bandcamp.com/album/ba-da-boom-2

http://fuzzyvox.com/     https://www.facebook.com/fuzzyvox    https://twitter.com/fuzzyvox

Pete RingMaster 05/12/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Royal Podencos – Broken Bones

Released earlier this year, Broken Bones is an album well worth taking a close listen too especially if you have an appetite for boisterous garage rock. The second album from Spanish quartet Royal Podencos, it offers much more than that garage rock tag, the Santander outfit creating their sound with a  just as rich flavouring of punk, blues rock, and power pop for a proposition as fresh as it is enjoyably nostalgic.

The successor to 2014 debut What´s your plan, the eleven song strong Broken Bones needs little time to get the body bouncing and an appetite for the band’s rock ‘n’ roll brewing with opener Sexuality. The foursome of Jonny, Jota, Toni, and Hans instantly tease with a rockabilly riff, its lure aligned to a rousing hook and melodic devilry as rhythms dance invitingly in the ears. With great distinctive vocals riding its mischievous almost salacious antics, the song swiftly springs its inescapable trap to inspire the body and imagination to be as lively as its own escapade.

It is a rousing start to proceedings which is never outshone within Broken Bones but certainly rivalled like by its successor Break us down. Its own swinging flirtation and gait brings a more sixties flavoured adventure but one quickly revealing its seventies punk instincts as vocals and hooks unveil their infectious intent. As the first song it is a highly catchy and addictive proposal, a slice of pop infused punk ‘n’ roll to get the hips and spirit dancing; their energies given no respite by the following more bluesy rock ‘n’ roll of The dog you found. With a Tom Petty-esque scent and drawl to its stroll it too casts a contagious sixties power pop jangle with a truly virulent hook to grab ears and attention alike.

Though not quite finding the heights of its predecessors, Anything you want is no lightweight in persuasive rock ‘n’ roll either, its tenacious swing and sharp hooks leading the listener into eager involvement while Noone´s giving up in here, whilst keeping enjoyment full, allows a breath to be taken with its Americana kissed blues croon and suggestive guitar woven melodic web. Both tracks spread the rich flavours in the Royal Podencos sound further, each song so far revealing a different angle in the garage rock ‘n’ roll heart of the band.

A little creep has the inner bounce leaping again as it shares its pop rock contagion next, eager rhythms injecting its already enticing bait with moments of anthemic tenacity as riffs scythe across their swings before What´s wrong with you has thoughts going back to bands like Eddie and The Hot Rods, The Motors, and Tonight with its hepped up and highly enjoyable antics.

The discord lined canter of On and on hits the spot within seconds next, its punk nature and off-kilter harmony inescapable temptation against which Let me shake puts up its own blues laced raw pop ‘n’ roll to matching persuasive success. As with most tracks within the album, each has an instinctive knack in setting traps and hooks which are impossible to evade or ignore resulting in another very agreeable rock ‘n’ roll workout.

The closing pair of You got a home and Tell me why are no different even without quite hooking up with the passions as naturally as others within Broken Bones. Nevertheless, their respective individual moments of garage pop punk and classic blues rock leave pleasure high and the album impressing right up to its last breath.

While sensing something even more unique is lurking, just waiting to break out in the Royal Podencos sound, Broken Bones consistently hits the spot with moments of lustful pleasure on top. If you are looking for some new varied rock ‘n’ roll to get dancing too then Broken Bones is well worth tangling with.

Broken Bones is available now @ https://royalpodencos.bandcamp.com/

https://www.facebook.com/royalpodencos/

Pete RingMaster 21/11/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

The Tangents – Tonight

Hailing from Nottingham, The Tangents is a trio which seemingly has been making a strong impression on their local music scene. With new single, Tonight, as a form of evidence, it is not too hard to understand why. The track is a lively slice of indie pop rock with a catchiness and vibrancy which belies its emotive theme of lost love and leaves a strong intrigue to hear a bit more of the British outfit.

Consisting of vocalist/guitarist Tom, bassist Jack, and drummer Angus, The Tangents is a band letting their music do all the talking so there is not a lot of background we can share. Tonight is a very vocal declaration of their potential rich sound and already strong songwriting. It is also a flavoursome slice of infectious rock ‘n’ roll and indie pop with a tasty strain of late seventies/early eighties power pop in its contagious stroll.

With its theme of a relationship break up seeded in a split experienced by Tom, the song opens with tenacious drums springing from a sonic mist, the plaintive tones of Tom and the emotive strokes of his guitar quickly adding their presence. Soon into its catchy canter, the already potent beats of Angus punch and jab, enjoyably resonating on ears as Jack’s bass adds more melancholic hues to the swinging gait of the track.

There is a slight mod like essence to the encounter too, especially across its boisterous chorus, which adds to its enterprising and increasingly rousing character. Together, it all makes for a proposition which may be just one song but if matched and built upon ahead is the first sign of a band with the ability to provoke much broader spread attention.

Tonight is released May 27th.

Upcoming live dates:

01/06/2017 – The Venue, Derby (tour)

03/06/2017 – The Leadmill, Sheffield (tour)

08/06/2017 – The Church, Leeds (tour)

17/06/2017 – The Parish, Huddersfield (tour)

22/06/2017 – The Engine Shed, Lincoln (tour)

29/06/2017 – The Shed, Leicester (tour)

30/06/2017 – The Maze, Nottingham (tour)

https://www.thetangents.co.uk/     https://www.facebook.com/thetangentsuk    https://twitter.com/thetangentsuk

Pete RingMaster 25/05/2017
Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Hello Bear – I Don’t Know… It’s Fun Though, Isn’t It?

hello-bear-promo-shot_RingMasterReview

A trap waiting to grab your imagination and energy, I Don’t Know… It’s Fun Though, Isn’t It? more than lives up to its title with its bouncy persona and rousing spirit. The new EP from British quartet Hello Bear, the four-track stomp is a sparkling burst of power/punk pop which may not carry major surprises but is as fresh and vibrant as anything escaping the year so far.

Formed in 2010, the Norwich bred band take inspiration found in the likes of Weezer, Pavement, Los Campesinos!, Refused, The Bronx, Presidents of the USA, McFly, Johnny Foreigner, and Dananananaykroyd into their own highly flavoursome exploits. Invigorating as a live presence which has seen Hello Bear play with bands such as Los Campesinos, Coasts, Darwin Deez, The Futureheads, and The King Blues, their sound is an ear grabber which now refuses to be ignored within the band’s new offering. The press release accompanying the EP suggests it carries “their most exciting material to date.” Being our introduction to Hello Bear it is hard to confirm or argue, but exciting the Lee Batiuk (Deaf Havana, Trash Boat, Hopeless Records) produced release is and relentlessly enjoyable.

I Don’t Know… It’s Fun Though, Isn’t It? opens up with new single We Held Hands Once, But Then She Got Embarrassed, the collective energy and enterprise of Luke Bear (vocals, guitar, keyboards), Mary Bear (guitar), Tom Bear (bass), and Daryl Bear (drums) hitting the floor running. A lone strum entices first being quickly joined by the potent tones of Luke before the song jumps on ears with eager riffs and canny rhythms. In no time it is into an infectious stroll with hooks and melodies uniting to charm attention before brewing and finally expelling a virulent contagion through its irresistible chorus. There is no escaping joining those offering Blink 182 meets Weezer as a reference for the tenaciously lively sound of song and band; add a touch of Super Happy Fun Club and The All-American Rejects though and the mix is even closer to the rousing incitement.

hello-bear-cover-artwork_RingMasterReviewThe following Mmm Cheque Please! makes a just as striking entrance, another single strain of guitar bait making the first lure, rampant beats and Luke’s inviting vocals the next  before it all blooms into another infectious canter. Daryl’s beats resonate as they land and Tom’s basslines grumble as much as they seduce while Mary and Luke share a tapestry of hooks and melodic endeavour which only leads to a greater appetite for song and release. Admittedly the track lacks the final spark which ignites its predecessor but leaves pleasure bubbling eagerly as does Dirty Weekend with its more restrained but wholly magnetic presence. Repeating a prowess which confirms Hello Bear masterful at creating big choruses and ripe hooks which simply infest the psyche, the song lays lustfully upon the senses.

The EP ends as its starts with a track which just whips up the passions. Attack Hug Influences is addiction for the ears, a slice of rock pop which seizes hold of body and spirit in a breathless romp complete with spicy hooks, tenacious rhythms, and a vocal coaxing which virtually forces listener involvement.

It is a boisterous end to a release which demands a party is woven around its presence each and every time. No moments of major uniqueness, all irresistible fun fuelled ingenuity; that is I Don’t Know… It’s Fun Though, Isn’t It?, one of the most enjoyable adventures this year.

I Don’t Know… It’s Fun Though, Isn’t It? is released November 11th

http://www.hellobear.co.uk/   https://www.facebook.com/hellobear/    https://twitter.com/hellobearband

Pete RingMaster 08/11/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Fuzzy Vox – No Landing Plan

Fuzzy Vox in Space

Fuzzy Vox in Space

Wondering how to spend the weekend to its fullest enjoyment? How about filling your home with suitable alcohol, inviting a horde of friends over, and turning the speakers high as the new album from Fuzzy Vox provides a party to remember. I should warn that weak hips will be put under serious stress in this pursuit of fun because No Landing Plan is one of the most energetically feverish and tenaciously insatiable incitements to hit ears and bodies in quite a while. A collection of songs bred on garage rock and power pop, the French band’s second album is pure rock ‘n’ roll virulence with a character as varied and demanding as the medical bills received after it has seduced bodies to exhaustion.

Hailing from Joinville le Pont, Fuzzy Vox is the devilment of vocalist/guitarist Hugo Fabbri, bassist Greg Dessons, and drummer Nico Maïa. Emerging in 2011, the band quickly awoke national ears with the release of first EP, Technicolor in the October of 2012, breaching broader attention with debut album On Heat early 2014. The past couple of years have been especially lively and successful for the trio; tours all over Europe building on the success of their album with a recent adventure alongside Jim Jones Revue & Thee Vicars one particular highlight. Fuelled by the punk DIY ethic which again sees their latest encounter a self-released proposition, Fuzzy Vox is now ready to dive into major spotlights wherever they can be found, and with No Landing Plan as their key, betting against the band hitting new peaks of attention to match the plateau set by the album is pointless.

Recorded in Los Angeles last summer with Andy Brohard and Ryan Castle (Primal Scream, Black Angels), who also mixed the album, No Landing Plan gets straight to devilish work with opener Explosion Of Love. From the first slither of feedback a sense of mischief is a foot, and quickly playing with ears as jabbing beats join a web of temptation cast by guitar with the bass in swift seductive union. Hugo’s vocals alone show the energy and passion running eagerly through the song and sound, hooks and choppy riffs building on it with their own addictive dexterity.

art_RingMaster ReviewIt is a rousing start eclipsed by the following Distracted. The garage rock of its predecessor takes a more sixties scent in the second song, The Stones an easy clue which unites with a more Hives like tenacity as the track blossoms its anthemic adventure. Again feet and hips are as much a blur of involvement as ears and appetite are hungry recipients of the increasingly dynamic mesh of contagious sound and sonic bait.

With Told You Before taking little time to stir limbs into action with its punk rock/power pop shenanigans, the album has body and soul lock ‘n’ loaded in its high octane revelry. Wiry grooves and melodic flames only add to the imagination’s subservience and remember that mention of exhaustion? Already the signs are there barely three songs in.

That variety in sound is also pushing through by now too, the scintillating Grow Evil exploring a lively rock pop prowl with a touch of The Jam meets The Dirtbombs to its almost carnal temptation whilst I Got A Girl bounces around in a power pop stomp drawn from both the sixties and seventies take on the infectious flavour. Both tracks are superb but outshone by the jagged rock ‘n’ roll of Bo Diddley, a song living up to the sound its title suggests whilst creating a catchy incitement of viral proportions.

The Jam comes to mind again as Don’t Leave Me Behind steps up next with its melodic rock ‘n’ roll, equally though, so does an open Elvis Costello inspiration. It is a blend when woven into the band’s own invention simply sparks up further keen endeavour with and within the track, and indeed Charlie once it takes over with its R&B laced pop romp. As easy as it is to get entangled and absorbed by the carnival of sound, lyrically the songs within No Landing Plan are just as potent and impacting, Charlie especially striking. That diversity of sound is also in full swing within the song alone, a float through crystalline ambience following a thrilling surge of Oliver’s Army spiced devilment, leading to another anthemic whipping up of feet and emotions.

Easy Street frolics in ears next with a swinging festivity of sound and voice whilst teasing like something akin to a pop punk version of Supergrass whilst A Reason To Love leaves the listener in the throes of ardour for its surf rock coated, rockabilly bloomed slice of punk ‘n’ roll carrying flames of Living End/Tiger Army in its imagination. As an example applying across the whole album, for the references offered they are mere clues to the Fuzzy Vox uniqueness which fuels all tracks to gripping success.

So get those dancing shoes on and corks popped because Fussy Vox has one memorable weekend, indeed any moment in time you wish, ready and waiting courtesy of No Landing Plan.

No Landing Plan is available from February 26th  from most online stores.

http://fuzzyvox.com/    https://www.facebook.com/fuzzyvox   http://www.twitter.com/fuzzyvox

Pete RingMaster 26/02/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com/

Harlots – Chinese Carpet Factory

harlots_RingMaster Review

Creating infectious alternative rock ‘n’ roll with a healthy power pop tenacity and rigour to it, UK quartet Harlots release their debut album to end the year with a potent nudge on national recognition. Eleven tracks of virulent pop rock, Chinese Carpet Factory is a boisterous romp littered with flowing melodies, persuasive harmonies, and hooks with an instinctive vice like grip. Add bold rhythms alongside rousing choruses and Harlots have provided one rather enjoyable proposition.

The London based foursome recorded Chinese Carpet Factory with producer Rory Attwell (Palma Violets/Vaccines) on a boat on the bands of the Thames, and straight away it laps ears with feisty persuasion through opener Wicked Tongue. Building from a scene setting sample, the song is soon sauntering along with lively rhythms and just as eager vocals as guitars crash and scythe with spicy enterprise. The bass too is a pulsating slice of bait, it all uniting with accomplished and catchy effect. The song pretty much sets the tone of the album; the individual characters of songs all bred from this kind of rousing combination or certainly carrying a rich vein of it through their varied bodies.

Gotta Get By is quick evidence, the second track swinging in with its own hue of infectious zeal and inventive vibrancy. Part shoegaze, part power pop, and all flavoursome temptation, it bounces along whipping up eager involvement in feet and hips, and even though the song is a slither at less than two minutes in length, it shows that Harlots can be as effective on the dance-floor as in more intimate unions with listeners.

If The Ramones were The Beach Boys, House of Love became Birdland; they just might sound like Harlots on the seductive Seen A Girl whilst the outstanding Every Little Thing merges that with a further touch of indie/Brit pop imagination. The track is an addiction in the making, from vocals to melodies, rhythms to riveting hooks, revelry of pop ‘n’ roll to get greedy over.

Through Work Work Work and Up Away, the album reveals even more variety, the first a web of virulence seeded in sixties Beatles whilst its successor is an alluring croon of acoustic guitar and reflective voice with a chorus as enslaving as any within the bolder, bigger boned offerings within Chinese Carpet Factory. Both songs leave ears smiling and pleasure high before Rush jumps in, off the back of the album’s twenty two second title track, to cast a My Bloody Valentine/Verve like incitement which just seems to get more persuasive with every listen.

There are some tracks within Chinese Carpet Factory which really leap out, Every Little Thing and Gotta Get By a couple and next up You Got Me soon there by their side. Laying a jangle of guitar as its first touch, rolling out anthemic rhythms almost as swiftly, the track bounds around and bounces off ears with voracious revelry, its sixties/eighties pop breath entwined with modern indie ingenuity quite irresistible.

The album finishes with firstly the rawer aired and just as gripping drama of The Colour & The Noise, shoegaze, pop, and noise rock blurring their boundaries in another big highlight, and finally Days Are Done. The Beatle-esque balladry of the final song ensures the album comes to an engaging end, its embrace not as pungent as elsewhere within Chinese Carpet Factory but still a potent end to a fine release.

Chinese Carpet Factory is a great introduction to Harlots, a release easy to spend plenty of time with for perpetual enjoyment. This is a band still growing and evolving their sound you sense too, so real potential of big times ahead we suggest.

Chinese Carpet Factory is out on NOV 28th.

http://www.theharlotsmusic.com   https://www.facebook.com/theharlotsmusic

Pete RingMaster 27/11/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com/