Arcade Messiah – II

John Bassett _RingMaster Review

Though time wise it has been around a year between releases, it feels like a mere breath in sound and relationship between the self-titled debut Arcade Messiah album and its successor II. Continuing in adventure where its acclaimed progressive rock predecessor left off, the new encounter is an emprise of instrumental majesty and incitement reconfirming John Bassett as one of Europe’s finest songwriters, composers, and musicians.

An artist no stranger to garnering thick attention and praise through his band KingBathmat and acoustic offerings under own his name, Bassett’s solo instrumental project Arcade Messiah is another unique proposition from him. Weaving strands of highly varied styles from metal to math rock, stoner to post rock with further diverse and progressive flavours soaked in stirring ambience, the first Arcade Messiah album was a riveting exploration of sound and emotion through individual incitements. Each song worked on the listener’s senses and imagination and as mentioned, II carries on in the same vein but further experiments with textures whilst stretching the fusion of styles and essences to richer and deeper extent. Basset himself neatly sums up II, saying “after the surprise success of last year’s original Arcade Messiah album and after receiving feedback from fans of that album I decided to make a sequel, a continuation of that album, that is hopefully bigger, better, more refined and more dramatic, but which didn’t lose the vibe and atmosphere that was created on the original album“.

Arcade-Messiah-II-Cover_RingMaster Review   II opens with Moon Signal and straight away thoughts drift on the breeze of melodic and atmospheric coaxing. Keys whisper suggestively with their calm caress whilst a guitar emotively entices before sparking a broadening into a thicker and more volatile landscape. The celestial air which painted the start continues to ebb and flow within the spatial yet tightly woven invitation of the track, its journey hinting at vastness and intimacy simultaneously whilst twisting through varied realms as the song explores new avenues of calm, tempestuousness, and imagination.

As expected, Bassett bewitches and provokes ears and emotions with his writing and craft, each piece of music a tapestry of clues and persuasion for the imagination to run with greedily, Red Widow another swift example and success. The second track has a more sinister air to its tone and presence which starting from a sonic mist is soon opening up layers of equally intimidating and seductive expression. The arousal of ear and thought also evolves through many guises within the full umbrella of sonic temptation, a creative travelogue shaping all tracks with the compelling Black Dice Maze a prime example as it glides through sonic intrigue and emotive calm as well as tenacious rock ‘n’ roll and ravenous volatility within its gripping theatre of sound and invention.

The next up Gallows Way seduces from its first touch. Initially it is a surf rock infused ambient hug on the senses, soon spreading out with evocative melodies and reflective sonic shimmers as guitars and keys align with shadowy but restrained rhythms. The skills and invention of Bassett across the instrumentation is a perpetual doorway into the heart of the music, guitars especially descriptive and suggestive across the album but just as potent are the rhythmic contrasts and darker hues that can either ripple or erupt in more forceful intent to temper or enhance the adventure around them. In the fourth song beauty dominates though whereas Fourth Quarter involves rugged scenery of riffs and dynamics within a sonic radiance which immerses the listener with a climate of invitational sultriness and tempting danger. The track is a gripping fascination and rich aural temptation matched in might by the sultry mystique of Via Occulta. The short piece is a maze of shadows, a lure into secrets and hidden depths, and a spellbinding flight even with its brevity.

Across both Read The Sky and Start Missing Everybody, artist and album continue to be a kaleidoscope of aural ingenuity and temptation; each of them evocations which transfix and incite the senses and imagination into unique interpretation of the sonic palette on offer. The closing pair of the two is a melancholic kiss but just as potently fuelled by hope and energy to create something emotionally anthemic.

The CD version also includes the bonus track The Four Horsemen, a striking cover of the Aphrodite’s Child song which was also Arcade Messiah’s contribution to the recently vinyl released compilation album by Fruit De Mer Records called Side Effects. Alone it is worth the purchase of a CD, Bassett giving the track fresh life and suggestiveness, though the cream of II is undoubtedly his original and thrilling tracks.

John Bassett as mentioned is for us one of the UK’s most potent and stirring songwriters, let alone musicians, and II another thick slice of pleasure.

Arcade Messiah II is out now digitally as a name your price download @ via Stereohead Records and on CD from November 27th.

Pete RingMaster 23/11/2015

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Bauda – Sporelights

bauda_band_pic_RingMaster Review

Sporelights, the new album from progressive/post rock band Bauda, is certainly not a difficulty proposition to get closely familiar with but it does need time to reveal the myriad of layers and creative colours within its compelling body. Consisting of seven immersive encounters, the release is a flight of temptation which has major moments of creative seduction but equally from start to finish only keeps ears and imagination eagerly and increasingly greedily involved.

The fascinating Sporelights is the third album from Bauda, a band which emerged in 2006 as the solo project of guitarist/vocalist/chief-lyricist-songwriter César Márquez. Inspired musically and lyrically by the great landscapes of their homeland Chile, the project released the Del Mar Al Aire EP in its first year with debut album Oniirica appearing in 2009. As things evolved and grew, Márquez recruited drummer Nikolas Recabarren and bassist Juan Díaz into the band in 2012, the trio’s creative collusion giving birth to second album Euphoria…Of Flesh, Men and the Great Escape that same year. In 2013 the line-up was added to by keyboardist Edgardo González with Bauda soon working on its next release, Sporelights. Produced by René Rutten of Dutch alternative rock band The Gathering, the album takes its themes from “the perpetual struggles of men against the enslaving nature of modern societies”, and swiftly lays an immersive ambience on the senses as a sign of things to come.

bauda-cover_RingMaster Review   That coaxing is through opener Aurora, an instrumental of sonic suggestion and rhythmic incitement which is as portentous as it is gripping revelry for ears and thoughts to contemplate. The keys of González weave a radiant, kaleidoscopic tapestry of sound and suggestiveness as a more tempestuous atmosphere brews, rhythms in turn aligning to the more caustic creativity of Márquez’s guitar. Subsequently as cold and sinister as it is warmly inviting, the piece flows and evolves right into Vigil, the post punk air and textures of the former continuing but soon wrapped in enticing vocals and the melodic seducing of keys and harmonies. Magnetism drips from the track, its eighties spiced air offering essences seemingly inspired by a Porcupine Tree or The Pineapple Thief whilst the orchestral wind of the song rises and lifts the senses over an underbelly of rugged and compelling rhythms, a blend which alone fully involves attention and appetite.

The album’s title track steps forward next, Sporelights entwining guitar bred melodies with a thickly alluring and inventive prowess; eighties band Modern English coming to mind before a relative calm gains great volatility urged on by the predatory tone of the bass as steely hooks litter the absorbing web spun by Márquez’s guitar. Once more an evocative atmosphere lays an inescapably captivating tempting in collusion with the increasingly impressive individual and united craft of Bauda, the result a glorious, almost smothering hug of lively adventure.

A slightly calmer but more shadow honed proposal comes through War next, its melancholic breath and darkly soaked air simultaneously mesmeric and imposing. Military inspired beats skirt the smouldering beauty of melodies and vocals as thicker haunted hues courting the almost fiery atmosphere and radiance embracing ears and thoughts. As its predecessor, the track is sheer captivation and matched by Tectonic Cells in its own individual drama. Rhythmically an adventure alone, beats and bass swiping and grumbling in a multi textured waltz, the song blossoms into a sunspot of sonic suggestion through keys and guitar. The instrumental bewitches as it incites, seduces with an emotive and physical trespass leaving a greed for more, a hunger then sated by the rock pop festivity of Asleep In Layers, another song coloured with a more eighties post punk/new wave seeding amidst a theatre of progressive and melody soaked imagination.

Completed by Dawn Of Ages, arguably the least impacting but no less enticing song on the album with its crystalline melodic kisses, electronic drama, and tempestuous ambiences around ever impressing vocals, Sporelights is a masterful pleasure. Being our introduction to Bauda, how it compares to previous releases in sound and growth we have yet to learn but if they are half as enthralling and enjoyable as Sporelights, they are a future must check out too.

Sporelights is released October 19th digitally and on CD via Temple of Torturous @

Pete RingMaster 19/10/2015

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Zephyr – An Odyssey For The Living

Zephyr Promo Shot_RingMaster Review

There has been a wave of metalcore seeded releases to cover recently and joining that relatively strong list is the debut EP from UK quartet Zephyr. The band’s sound is a little different to the rest though with its fierce roar aligning with progressive metal imagination and post rock ambience. Fair to say it is a blend which swiftly engages ears and makes the An Odyssey For The Living EP one fascinating potential loaded enticement.

London bred Zephyr only emerged earlier this year with the foursome of vocalist Cameron Alexander Thomson, guitarist Jacob Gudge, bassist Attila Tashi, and drummer Gideon Waxman quickly unveiling video single The High Road. Its viral online success sparked a live presence which in little time was also soon gaining strong support and praise. Now a full introduction comes the way of An Odyssey For The Living, five compelling and tempestuous tracks recorded with Kelly Pinchin and Ollie Dow from In Archives and produced by Julian Rodriguez from Elitist.

Zephyr Cover Artwork_RingMaster Review     The release is opened up by Familiar Spirit, a track instantly wrapping ears in an atmospheric guitar melody before thick bass groans and firm beats collude with raw vocals squalls. All the time the fingers of Gudge are weaving sonic and evocative tendrils around which keys lay their tantalising hues, the song as ethereal as it is viciously uncompromising. It is an enjoyably busy track with new corners and layers being unveiled through subsequent listens, a quality applying to the whole EP, and a personal want of diversity in vocals within a genre generally seeming to lack adventure in that department, nicely satisfied by Thompson.

The strong start is potently backed by Little Lamplight where again a warm melody honed coaxing brings the track into view before cruel riffs and rhythms bruise whilst being entwined in a provocative and perpetually shifting web of progressive leaning guitar enterprise united with suggestive keys. Further variety to the vocal incitement from Thompson and the band equally adds to the alluring but dangerous nature of the song to leave ears and thoughts firmly involved.

Cloud Spires opens in similar style to its predecessors whilst creating its own persuasive design of open technical craft and jagged riffery soaked in melancholic and emotionally reflective ambience. Those evocative textures are matched in potency by the mix of scarring and clean harmony wrapped vocals and though there does seem to be a kind of common template to Zephyr songs each creative canvas is coloured and twisted into individual characters that, as here, hold ears and imagination firmly in their intrigue lit tempests.

Next up is Gemini where, with Rodriguez guesting, a mariachi like vocal lure leads the listener into a maelstrom of jazzy guitar tempting, vocal ire, and a sonic painting of evocative endeavour and textures. Enthralling with its unpredictable imagination and great diversity, the song emerges as the strongest highlight of the release before Black Luster brings it all to an invasive and tantalising close. It is an outpouring of physical and atmospheric emotion, an undulating wave of intensity and creative tempting which like the sea has fierce under currents below a shimmering surface beauty.

An Odyssey For The Living is an impressive and thickly enjoyable debut from Zephyr, the band’s potential as rich as the flavours in their sound. There is for personal tastes that final spark missing to really inflame thickly satisfied reactions and emotions to the release but easy to sense that will come as the band grows, matures, and evolves in all aspects. Certainly they are ones to watch ahead and enjoy now.

An Odyssey For The Living is available from October 9th through all digital platforms.

Pete RingMaster 07/10/2015

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Eyemouth – Noera Genesis

eyemouth_RingMaster Review

It is impossible for anyone to discover every band unleashing their imagination and musical prowess on the world alone so it is always with great gratitude when something simply falls into the lap whether as a by-product of doing something else, through recommendations, or simply by an artist introducing themselves personally. That gratitude is especially intense when it leads to something which truly excites and stirs up the imagination. So it is with thanks to Marcus Lilja that we can now enthuse about his band’s latest release and fascinating sound.

A member of Swedish band Eyemouth, Marcus alongside David Lilja, Tove Ekman, and Joakim Åberg, have already sparked great attention and eager appetite with previous EPs, Black and Blue Latitudes and Non Compos Mentis, both out earlier this year. In an intent to bring ears a quartet of EPs in 2015, they now unveil the third in the enthralling shape of Noera Genesis, a theatre of sound and imagination which is as bewitching as it is wonderfully challenging. Formed in 2011, the Eyemouth sound defies pinning down, their original synth led endeavours having evolved over the ears to what captivates within their latest proposal. Merging industrial and post rock ambiences with shamanic rhythms, electro rock intrigue, and darker as well as heavier rock incitement, the Göteborg band had bred a tantalising and unpredictable tapestry which is cinematic, at times sinister, and thoroughly compelling.

noera-genesis-_RingMaster Review     It opens with Come This Far, and a haunting ambience littered with portentously dulled bell tolls in a cavernous landscape. An equally ‘flat’ but alluring bass adds further peculiar bait to the brewing enticement before stepping away again as synths and vocals begin their individual and colluding narratives. Soon, the track slips into an electronic canter awash with the expressive melodies and atmospheric hues of the keys and littered with rawer guitar and bass tempting. Ears and imagination are gripped early on, a hungry appetite soon following suit as the song with its Ghost In The Static crossed with Celldweller like stroll explores more of its imagination whilst simultaneously opening up provocative depths amidst roars of contagious enterprise.

That cinematic essence we mentioned is quickly bringing a suggestiveness across the EP; a gothic/industrial drama with 1984 meets Lovecraftian occultism growing in thoughts during the first song separate from its actually premise whilst the dark bowels of a sea bed leviathan explored and corrupted by the Victorian trespass of someone like Captain Nemo echoes the dystopian siren call seeping out of The Rise Of You. This is just the power of the music triggering such dark adventures, the band lyrically opening up doors to more ideas through its broad yet equally intimate theatre of word and premises. It is gripping stuff which reveals more with every listen and pleasingly confuses the imagination with each turn too as thoughts and ears try to work out the heart of the impressive song and release.

In My Mouth has a lighter soundscape but that leads to a more bedlamic and psychotic playroom for the listener’s thoughts. It is aural madness sublimely sculpted and organically uncaged as deranged keys, haunting harmonies, and demonic textures slim down to inventive smog, this toying with the listener for just under two absorbing minutes. The fact it ends too soon is a brief frustration, a short lived moan though as soon all focus is on the initially just as disquieting Sometimes. We say initially, in fact the song never stops being a disturbing magnetism as it evolves with every passing breath, more shamanic drums and lures aligning with whispered vocals which alone almost taunt the psyche with their tone. Subsequently synths build walls of tempestuous oppressiveness coated in discord laced melodic captivation, that in turn twisting into an instrumental finale of melodic rock infested with rasping and erosive textures.

It is impossible to provide a truly clear idea of what Eyemouth brings to bear on body and mind with Noera Genesis, so much going on as they additionally spark personal thoughts to run wild in grand ideas as you have just read, but every listen is full mouth-watering joy. We have yet to investigate the previous pair of EPs from the band, but you can only assume they too offer an experience rare to the ear and most others going by the invasive beauty of Noera Genesis.

Noera Genesis is available from September 30th via most online stores.

Pete RingMaster 30/09/2015

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Sloth – Slow As Shit

sloth-desert_RingMaster Review

Lounge music for the aftermath of the apocalypse; the sound crawling, seeping through Slow As Shit certainly lives up to its title, and indeed the name of its creator Sloth. The predominantly instrumental album is half predation, half raw hypnotic temptation; a mix breed of doom and sludgy invention at times entwined with electronic and stoner mischief, and a very solid and alluring introduction to the solo project of Blake Caverly.

With inspirations probably safe to assume coming from the likes of Pallbearer, Bongripper, and Boris, Sloth and Slow As Shit swiftly entice and intrigue with opener Meditate. Instantly dark and cavernous with a portentous air to its emergence, the brief piece is the sonic yawn of a beast about to arise and slowly lumber across the senses. Its successor Green Sunrise similarly begins on a provocative sonic touch, its radioactive texture soon breeding thick, slowly stretching tendrils of guitar and creeping rhythms. As the atmosphere becomes more caustically blustery, the grooves find a ‘warmer’ voice to their enterprise whilst beats explore even more intrusive intent in contrast, all elements uniting in a predatory crawl as suitable to the ascent of a beast like Mothra as it would be to the demise of life as we know it. The imposingly alluring encounter continues to brew malcontent in its nature and extensive presence though like a couple of the other tracks, it stays a minute or two too long for personal tastes but with strong hooks and smart repetition aligning with the craft and imagination of the song, it ensures a captivating start to the album.

sloth-cover-art_RingMaster Review     Waking Up follows and shares a heavier, more malevolently hued landscape and surrounding air with ears. As in its predecessors, and indeed those to come, electronic essences and temptations bubble and simmer within the dark doomscape of the song, their shards of unpredictability and spatial light increasing the intoxicating melodic endeavour veining the creative mass of shadows and suggestiveness. A post rock breeze similarly brings to light new aspects and depths to the music, each glimpse adding more colour to the sound and the temptation working away on the imagination.

The following Call Of The Sloth is another intensive crawl over the listener; its smog of invasive energy bred in the sonic craft of Caverly, itself a keen persuasion to body and thoughts. Every moment in its nine plus minutes, brings fresh tones and rich slithers of imagination but also, certainly on the surface, a few close similarities to the tracks around it, that element emphasized in the repetitious air which coats the song’s extensive length. Nevertheless, it is little less than compelling as it sets ears and thoughts up for the ravenous experience of Nothing But Leaves. Featuring vocals from Mikey Gascoyne of Valravn, the track is a tantalising mix of melodic melancholy, doom bred suffocation, and scarred blackened textures which twist and evolve whilst luring in other flavours around the raw tones of Gascoyne. It perpetually crackles and burns on the senses, leaving scarred flesh in its corrosive wake whilst equally inciting an eager appetite for more with its melodic enterprise.

Awaken That Which Lies Amongst The Trees cakes the senses in a thick atmospheric trespass and sonic acidity next, the guitar craft of Caverly especially persuasive in tempering more savage vocal squalls whilst Smoke ‘N’ Sleep brings the album to a fine close with its unexpected, electronic stoner-esque waltz. Keys simply entice and dance in ears and imagination, the music’s air drifting as fluidly as the song title suggests as EBM seeded hooks add to the creative revelry. In many ways the track does not fit with what came before it but there is no escaping that it still provides a thoroughly enjoyable and relevant end to the release.

   Slow As Shit is a great first glimpse at the craft and invention of Blake Caverly. It might not be the release to get you over excited but as we have found, it is likely to ignite potent intrigue in the exploits of Sloth ahead.

Slow As Shit is available from September 28th via the Sloth Bandcamp

Pete RingMaster 28/09/2105

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The Virgance – Paradigm 3

The_Virgance_Paradigm_3_promo_pic_1.jpg_RingMaster Review

Looking for an escape from the turbulence of the modern world, from the grind and imposition life so often brings the day? UK artist The Virgance is one who provides such opportunity through his new album Paradigm 3, a celestial post-rock fuelled instrumental flight on the wings of shoegaze expanding through immersive ambiences which just suck you right in. Close your eyes and drift in thought and the album simply transports ears and mind to another fascinating and warm landscape, though it too has shadows to intrigue the imagination and stir the emotions. The release is a fascinating exploration, one which occasionally ebbs and flows in potency from time to time with personal tastes but one which from its first mesmeric note through to its final wash of atmospheric beauty, leaves a rousing glow in its wake.

The Virgance is the solo project of Colchester hailing Nathan Smith, former guitarist of UK indie band Ripley and the co-producer of electronica outfit Loveless. Early 2014 saw Smith emerge with his debut album Lost Continent, a release luring critical acclaim and eager awareness the way of The Virgance. Its successor in the January of this year only lured greater plaudits and attention, Hiko Shrine reinforcing the reputation and expansive nature of Smith’s composing and sound which Paradigm 3 now explores to richer success.

cover_RingMaster Review   From opener 25 Years ears are entranced and the imagination ignited by the almost ravenous kaleidoscope of sound and textures slowly and magnetically swamping the senses. The guitar craft and enterprise of Smith is as lively and enthralling as the ambiences and beauty oozing from the keys, and equally the darker hues and character of drums and a bass which at times are virtually stalking the psyche from within the sonic drenching of track and air. For us the best instrumentals, even within an open theme or inescapable atmospheric suggestiveness making major hints on the imagination, are those allowing thoughts to conjure new and different exploits with each and every listen and certainly that is the case with Paradigm 3 and each individual emprise of sound and invention.

Through both the rockier Epiphony and the haunting Sequester Smith ‘traps’ the listener in a cloud of sonic seduction and less prominent but equally alluring rhythmic contrasts. The first of the two pieces blossoms with its great subtle repetition within an absorbingly crafted sonic journey whilst the second is like an evolving spatial mist, an enthralling brewing of slightly sinister tinged intensity in sound emerging within noir toned drama.

From one big highlight to another and the more minimalistic and earthbound Moonolog. A simple union of bass and guitar alone has ears gripped and thoughts involved whilst around them a tension slowly but clearly grows in the lining and atmosphere of the track. Calm and warm sonic caresses ultimately keep any volatility at bay but the hints are there to ensure the track continues to dispel expectations and predictability.

There is a great raw edge, and at times thicker expulsions, within Paradigm 3; another underlying constant which chooses its moments to temper the universal flight and fiery elegance within the likes of the senses smothering Saturnine which embraces controlled causticity to fine effect. In contrast, Down The River leaves rougher traits under wraps as its siren-esque swelter and ethereal vocal bewitchment, courtesy of Shauna McLarnon of dream pop duo Ummagma, swallow ears and emotions. The first single from the album, it sparks thoughts of new worlds and old civilizations but again terrains with fresh scenery every listen.

The album is completed by firstly Dissipate, a brief and fiercely potent stretch of sound and imagination which is as strangely harrowing as it is mystically compelling and finally No Return, itself a darker and seemingly harsher environment initially, but emerging like a celestial butterfly shredding warm resonance with every melodic flutter, though again darker elements bring an extra resourceful slither of intrigue.

   Paradigm 3 is spellbinding, an exploration you will only be glad you have not missed. It is best heard in one full odyssey of sound and stimulation though admittedly that does run the risk, if not paying attention, of tracks merging into one and another and losing some of their defining features. However you embrace the album though, it is a proposition that shoegaze and post rock fans especially will find great rewards in.

Paradigm 3 is out now on CD through El Vals del Conejo and as name your price download via The Virgance Bandcamp.

Pete RingMaster 22/09/2015

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Exxasens – Back To Earth

cover_RingMaster Review

Sheer captivation for ears and imagination, Back To Earth is as much a rich flight of suggestion as it is a sonic portrait. It offers a persistently evolving journey within its walls which leads every single involvement in that spatial adventure breeding new and different explorations within the imagination. The new album is the new offering from Spanish rock band Exxasens who weave a revolving kaleidoscope of post and space rock which equally draws on other potent flavours immersed in ambient majesty. There is an almost exhausting richness and density to the textures and creative hues crafted within the release and it is fair to say everything together leaves ears and imagination basking.

Exxasens was originally the solo project of Barcelona guitarist/programmer Jordi Ruiz (Playmotive, Kyba) who took the inspiration of space and “particularly those that have voyaged heroically into its heart of darkness” as the spark to his compositions and explorations. That theme has continued to be the incitement across each song crafted and proposition released, starting from debut album Polaris, released by ConSouling Sounds in 2008. Its successor Beyond The Universe the following year, again via the same label, awoke greater attention as Ruiz’s predominantly instrumental soundscapes continue to grow and expand as the realm they explored. Eleven Miles came next, released in 2011 on Aloud Music Ltd who also provided the vehicle for the critically acclaimed Satellites to be devoured through two years later. Since then Exxasens has grown to a quartet with bassist Cesc Cespedes, keyboardist Sergio Ledesma, and drummer Oriol Planells linking up with Ruiz, and now unveiling the eight track absorption that is Back To Earth.

From the sultrily alluring charm of Supernova, the album bewitches and involves the listener. The opener casts a smooth yet invigorated adventure through gentle and seductive spatial caresses edged by more volatile rhythmic agitation. Endearing melodies slip from the guitars like ripe fruit from a tree whilst the keys are more mist like with an equal potency on ears and thoughts. Their lures are aligned to dramatic rhythms which just intensify as the song’s atmosphere becomes increasingly fiery. It is a thrilling and enthralling take off for the album which My Hands Are Planets hones into its own energetically ethereal insight. As across most tracks there is a loneliness echoed by the sounds but one which simultaneously welcomes attention with a warm tempting; these reassuring colours and atmospherics portrayed through rousing melodies and evocative synth cast seducing.

Comparisons to the like of Mogwai and 65daysofdstatic have been lent the band previously and indeed towards Back To Earth, easy to understand why with the masterful entwining of sounds and elements within tracks like Hugeness and Oniria’s Interlude, though all tracks certainly spin their own identity with the first of this pair courting a more rugged and rocky scenery of textures and energy where extremes embroil in each other’s beauty, often with whirlpool like tenacity and appetite. Additionally enriched by a melodic choir like array of voices at one point, the track is superb, rousing the energies before its successor calms them back down with its radiant melodies and provocative stringed beauty. Its irresistible charm leads ears and emotions into the exhilarating multi-toned depths of Your Dreams Are My Dreams and another ever changing and compelling emprise of sound and suggestiveness.

Bright Side Of The Moon has a more exotic air as Porcupine Tree like flames incite within an increasingly mercurial atmosphere. It is a tempting which becomes more aggressively arousing and in turn intoxicating with every twisting groove and fiercely expressive sonic enticement before Saturn comes forward with new provocative exploits. With vocals for the only time on the album a prominent and highly agreeable proposal and texture, the track is as fascinating as it is electrifying, its Tool meets Voyager meets God Is An Astronaut an easy immersion.

Completed by its rhythmically galvanic, melodically spellbinding, and sonically searing title track, Back To Earth just takes you to other realms and new climates with fresh awareness of sound and in one’s own thoughts. Quite simply the album is glorious and Exxasens an incitement to real musical adventure all should partake in.

Back To Earth is available now via Aloud Music Ltd in Europe, the Ricco Label in Asia (Japan, Taiwan, Indonesia), and Rock-House in Russia.

Pete RingMaster 08/09/2015

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