Abrahma – Reflections In The Bowels Of A Bird

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It is not a rare event to immerse in a release of expansive and spellbinding imagination, to be taken out of the real world into a creative adventure for an hour or so. It is less often though that you get simply lost within a proposition of such complex and unrelenting ideation that you feel trapped, caught in a claustrophobic tsunami of creative consumption where only the brief gaps between songs offers a hint of escape. Not that you will want to break free from the fascinating and suffocating glory of Reflections In The Bowels Of A Bird, the new album from French rockers Abrahma. It is an irresistible and exhausting emprise of perpetually evolving sound and dramatic atmospheres, an experience as sombre as it is bewitching and as creatively ravenous as it is emotionally disorientating.

There is no real surprise that the album is so intensively and imaginatively imposing, its predecessor Through the Dusty Paths of Our Lives when released in 2012, a similar maelstrom of sound and invention, as described elsewhere as a “heavy odyssey peppered with Hindu mysticism and voodoo convolutions”. The new album has taken that canvas to new and even more expansive and hypnotic realms; every track an individual journey uniting for one colossal and wonderfully unpredictable landscape of senses examining, thought provoking heavy rock.

Released as its predecessor via North American label Small Stone Records, Reflections In The Bowels Of A Bird makes a low-key entrance as Fountains Of Vengeance comes into view on a wave of sonic noise and intrigue, eventually stepping from its presence with thick beats and equally tense riffs and grooves. A grungy air also lines their invitation as the sombrely delivered tones of vocalist Sebastien Bismuth bring a colder subdued presence to the already mesmeric encounter. His and the guitar of Nicolas Heller increasingly entangle and merge to cast a raw and magnetic web of sound, hooks potent and melodies fiery as the song creates a tapestry of Stone Temple Pilots like tempting with invasive post rock ambiences and psyche bred exploration. The song roars and seductively sways across its ever twisting adventure, keys from again Bismuth inventively caressing the darker prowling hues of bass and the predatory beats cast by Benjamin Colin.

Abrahma_album_Artwork     The following An Offspring To The Wolves is immediately a darker imposing character, the bass of Guillaume Colin resonating with menace and toxic enticement as a doomy air colludes with stoner-esque sonic expression. There is an underlying swing to the lumbering infection surrounding the captivating and varied vocal delivery of Bismuth, part of a slow smothering of the senses sparking with flames of sound and emotion across the consuming prowl of the senses. As all tracks upon the album, it is impossible to fully explain all of the textures, emotions, and dark almost meditative radiance oozing from the cauldron of sound and invention at work, but easy to say it is thoroughly absorbing.

Omens Pt. 1 comes next, its sultry climate and sweltering melodic intrigue lying somewhere between psychedelic and occult rock, its exotic lure almost shamanic on ears and thoughts. That of course is only part of the picture, rhythms at times a rapacious confrontation whilst melodies and vocals spill an evocative croon within the explosive causticity embracing ears. It is bewildering and fascinating simultaneously, needing as all tracks plenty of partaking of its proposal to come close to exploring its world. The same of course applies to equally dramatic and engrossing Weary Statues, the track a tapestry of carnivorous intensity, volatile textures, and emotion fuelled drama. It is all, with much more, woven into another transfixing and physically stifling tempest sculpted with creative ingenuity, bold unpredictability, and mouth-watering craft.

Next is the spellbinding Omens Pt. 2, a peaceful reflection of surf rock seeded beauty shimmering with melodic elegance and a haunted breath which becomes more unsettled and agitated with every passing tangy caress and melancholic sigh, Another switching of calm and ruffled intensity eventually leads to a bedlamic finale set ablaze by the slightly psychotic flames of sax from album guest Vincent Dupuy. It is inescapable bait, enslaving attention and emotions before making way for the mystical, tempestuous flight of Kapal Kriya, the track another brooding mix of varied heavy rock sounds in one diversely layered, intimately spatial adventure.

The raging diversity and expectations ruining enterprise continues to thrill through firstly the ferocious rock ‘n’ roll stomp of Square The Circle, its charge on ears as probably assumed by now, never dawdling in one style, torrent of sound, or urgency of delivery for long. Its outstanding incitement is followed by the emotional and increasingly physical turbulence of the excellent Omens Pt. 3 which then moves aside for the equally enthralling A Shepherd’s Grief, which features guitar solos from Monster Magnet guitarist Ed Mundell. It is a squalling seduction, employing vast arrays of challenging spices and emotions in its expansive soundscape, and yes it is creatively sorcerous.

The album closes with the mournful beauty and blistering fire of Conium, a devouring sonic embrace bringing a thrilling release to a dramatic conclusion. The Abrahma /Thomas Bellier produced Reflections in the Bowels of a Bird is a virulent listen which can be as uncomfortable as it is pure seduction, but with constant attention grows from an impressive encounter into something very special.

Reflections In The Bowels Of A Bird is available on CD and digitally via Small Stone Records @ https://smallstone.bandcamp.com/album/reflections-in-the-bowels-of-a-bird

http://abrahmamusic.net/      https://www.facebook.com/ABRAHMAMUSIC

RingMaster 14/05/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Heights – Phantasia On The High Processions Of Sun, Moon And Countless Stars Above

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As in the size of its title, Phantasia On The High Processions Of Sun, Moon And Countless Stars Above is an epic proposition, an atmospherically expansive offering which is simultaneously an encounter of emotional intimacy. In similar fashion whilst being technically intricate and involved there is an organic and almost simple flow to the whole thing. The new creative emprise from UK band Heights, the album is the host of many contrasting things entangling in mesmeric majesty, combining and aligning for an irresistible adventure of aural beauty.

The trio take rich sonic threads from varied styles such as post and progressive rock, jazz and more classically seeded flavours, weaving them into instrumental explorations which invigorate ears and fascinate the imagination with a sublime creative seduction. Formed in 2006, this has been the way of the trio since day one. It is a flavour and imagination ensuring that previous releases like 2008 album Salvation and Trepidation and its 2010 successor From Sea to Sky, have been irresistible lures for the senses and magnets for acclaim. Now guitarist/composer Al Heslop, bassist John Hopkin, and drummer Jay Postones, also of TesseracT, return with their finest most transfixing creative emprise yet, a release which simply immerses the listener in unique and invigorating explorations of sound and sonic suggestiveness.

Phantasia, as we will call the album from hereon in to save space and time in your lives, opens with Universe Forming and swiftly entangles ears and thoughts in a gentle but evocative melodic embrace. A celestial atmosphere and warmth soaks the air of the emerging song, kissing the thickly enticing groove and sonic colouring which is soon filling the song’s spatial canvas. A melodic seducing lights up the now energetic stroll of the encounter but just as potently lays an emotive hue over more calmer, almost solemn moments. Each move within the song, and in those to come, are seamless twists in the landscape whilst rhythms provide a wonderful shading to the prowess of Heslop’s fingers and ideation. That shadow becomes a more vocal, almost predatory tempting further in the track, in turn sparking sultry and Latin spiced enterprise in the melodies. The track is a glorious start to the album instantly matched by its outstanding successor.

4PAN1T  The eagerly prowling incitement of guitar and bass ignites Solar Bringer of Chaos Lunar Bringer of Light into life, their intriguing and beguiling venture springing a new greed in an already fully awoken appetite for what is in offer. Their bait takes ears into another flight through a vast soundscape of universal expanse but also veined by intimate and provocative tendrils of guitar and rhythmic imagination. It is impossible to project everything which goes on in a single moment upon Phantasia, let alone within whole songs themselves, but it is easy to say that the sonic persuasion and ingenious tapestries cast simply take body and emotions into sensational realms away from reality.

Through the climactic smoulder of Aeolus with its jazzy rhythmic enticing and the more agitated lure of Time Dilation, band and album engage and further involve the listener in sonic scenery which is as visually potent on thoughts as it is aurally stimulating. The first is an elegant romance of melodies and those unpredictable rhythms but with more danger lined shadows whilst the second of the two aligns feisty, bordering on volatile mini crescendos with emotively stimulating caresses. It is the darker essences which in many ways spark the emotional side of things for album and listener, ears certainly seduced by the flair and imagination of the guitar but it is the darker drama surfacing around this, especially in bass and drums, which trigger the cinematic stimulus pervading the release.

New Star explodes in a fresh dawn of infectious melodic light next, again the bright air nicely tempered but more so complimented by the throatier tones of bass, before the outstanding Centrifuge turns into an unexpected avenue of discord lined jangles, wiry grooves, and unbridled unpredictability. There is a free flowing essence to the whole of the album, an improv like suggestiveness which at times hints but in this riveting encounter simply engulfs ears and pleasure. Of course it is a planned and again superbly sculpted incitement but worming into the psyche with an organically flowing instinct.

That almost riotous enterprise continues in Perseids, a similarly bewitching encounter with a great grizzle to the bass and expansive textures to its invention whilst Heliograph and the following Astronomer explore more personal and creatively intimate emotions in their individual ways. That is another potent key to the success of Phantasia, though over an hour of in many ways intensive imagination and technical majesty, every song reveals a wholly unique character and presence within the growing and glowing soundscape of the release.

Emotions and thoughts continue to be enthralled as the virulently compelling Ballad Of The Space Time Continuum and the more low key but inescapably enticing On The Wings Of Astral Projection bring their own absorbing aural theatre, whilst ears are especially spellbound by the closing excellence of Everlasting. Rhythmically addictive from its first breath and sonically enchanting throughout, the pure captivation posing as a song brings the album to an intoxicating conclusion.

Whether taking tracks alone or the album as a whole, Heights have created a place to escape to and bask in whilst evading the trials of life and the shadows of the day. There is nothing grand in the intent of the band and their creative thoughts but everything majestic and epic in the results. Phantasia On The High Processions Of Sun, Moon And Countless Stars Above is a must for all progressive/post rock fans, heck melodic rock fans in general.

Phantasia On The High Processions Of Sun, Moon And Countless Stars Above is out now via Basick Records @ http://music.basickrecords.com/album/phantasia-on-the-high-processions-of-sun-moon-and-countless-stars-above and all online stores.

https://www.facebook.com/heightsuk

RingMaster 28/04/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

The Kahless Clone – An Endless Loop

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Atmospherically and emotionally shadowed, An Endless Loop is an immersive and magnetically evocative slice of post rock/dark metal which lures ears and imagination into a soundscape of intimidating possibilities and melancholic beauty. The four-track EP from The Kahless Clone is a mesmeric exploration for thoughts, a sonically cathartic and emotionally imposing journey casting fascinating and lingering shadows on the senses.

The debut release from the Chicago hailing instrumental band, it is a transfixing proposition which simmers tenaciously rather than sparks a blaze in ears and psyche, yet infests and submerges the listener in a constant tide of mood driven ambiences igniting the keenest appetite. The Kahless Clone itself is the brainchild of Novembers Doom guitarist Vito Marchese, who created the band as a portal for his instrumental songs. He enlisted the help of bassist Andy Bunk, keyboardist Ben Johnson, drummer Garry Naples, and Zach Libbe on electronics, programming etc. for the recording of An Endless Loop. Recorded with and mixed/mastered by Chris Wisco at Belle City Sound in Racine, WI, the EP takes the listener to emotion drenched worlds of encroaching shadows and sombre beauty, providing impacting flights through seductively oppressive soundscapes starting with opener Leave This Place With Me.

The first track slowly emerges from the lapping caresses of a dark cloaked tide, the sea a calming yet portentous coaxing aided by similarly imposing breaths of keys and adjoining piano. Soon after, the piece cradles ears in melodic hands, guitars adding to the elegant beauty as electronic rhythms are courted by a ravenously and primordially snarling bassline and texture. Intensity ebbs and flows across the absorbing landscape of the track, taking the emotion and energy of the guitars and rhythms with it and as much as ears and emotions are fed, the imagination is equalled fuelled for its own dark passages of exploration by the sounds and atmospheric smog.

   I Can Feel Them, but I Can’t Remember Them relaxes air and thoughts again next, its morose yet warm entrance a bewitching collusion between a stark post punk bassline and the ever 10471599_846588275397987_8113942985732759572_nemerging and evolving melodic invention of guitar and keys. The bass of Bunk is persistently compelling bait and a reality check within the ethereal embrace elsewhere. It all eventually ignites in an incendiary and fiery eruption of caustic riffs and flaming sonic enterprise, though still sublimely submerged in the overwhelming celestial swamp of sound, before settling back down for an intimate and wistful close to match the song’s entrance.

The final pair of tracks continue the masterful persuasion and adventure expressed by the EP so far, Everything You See is Gone providing a more heavily rhythmic growl and menace to the forlorn atmosphere around them. It is as if guitars and keys have a pent up angst, ripening and festering inside, unable to break the gripping web of beats and bass predation which itself increases in enmity and temptation. There has to be an outlet though, and that dark emotion finally erupts in a tempestuous fire of mournful sonic endeavour and rampant rhythmic agitation. It is a glorious and epic confrontation, the best track on the release involving and enthralling the listener body and soul.

The closing A Somber Reflection, well its label describes it perfectly though not the creative drama and melodic, almost jazz like invention which seduces from within. It is a masterful end to a superb introduction to The Kahless Clone; a band that greed is already hankering for more from. An Endless Loop is also a release which unveils new depths and secrets with every listen, new essences emerging from within its invasive climates bringing fresh adventures with every partaking of its evocative terrains. For fans of progressive/post rock and instrumental dark beauty, this is a must.

An Endless Loop is available now on CD and as a name your price download @ https://thekahlessclone.bandcamp.com/

https://www.facebook.com/TheKahlessClone

RingMaster 18/03/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Pryapisme – Futurologie EP

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Whether you imagine Futurologie as the soundtrack to a deranged fairy tale, the evolving musical carousel to a spatial set ballet, or the accompaniment to the light and dark caresses of life, and it changes with every listen, French avant-garde metallers Pryapisme have ears and imagination eagerly doing somersaults once again. The band itself describes their new EP as a single 23 minute track about space, cats and house rent. Divided into eleven sections which the band suggests is for clarity, the piece is quite simply aural theatre to be bewitched by and run away into one’s own adventures with.

With the added bonus of a complete classical re-orchestration of the track, the Futurologie EP presents more of the insatiably diverse yet never demanding or disjointed aural imagination which made previous album Hyperblast Super Collider one of the essential adventures of 2013. The new release is as fans of the band would suspect a whole new and distinctly individual proposition to the previous encounter, its track Petit traité de futurologie sur l’Homo cretinus trampolinis (et son annexe sur les nageoires caudales), a perpetual evolution and exploration to which a myriad of interpretations and visions, as well as the band’s own drama, can be experienced. As mentioned the piece is split into parts with 1 instantly gripping thoughts as its cascade of beauty yielding keys embraces ears with mesmeric charm. There is a brewing drama behind it though which through an anger fuelled conversation courted by a nintendocore mischief, erupts in a thumping stride of feisty rhythms and ravenous riffs. A mere twist in the tale of course, this in turn slips into a sonic dance of synth bred revelry with sinews stretching from beats, guitars, and energy alike.

It is a compelling start which only gives an appetiser of things to come through the remaining spellbinding flight; cartoonish devilment and oriental infused country melodic twangs just one whiff Artworkwithin the psyche invigorating journey. The whole track moves with riveting fluidity and temptation, imposing itself on the imagination with samurai like nobility occasionally whilst in other moments slipping through noir lit jazz and vaudevillian avenues of enterprise. All the time though it is stirring up ears and thoughts, tempting them into as suggested earlier, constantly shifting exploits and escapades which only breed the fullest passion and bloated enjoyment for the scintillating proposition.

The Clermont-Ferrand quartet of Ban Bardiaux (programming), Nils Cheville (guitar), Antony Miranda (moog, bass), and composer Aymeric Thomas (drums, percussion, keys, Bb and bass clarinet, electronics, programming) constantly cast and recast their web of sonic fascination and aural emprise, at times tantalising the listener with a metallic confrontation of electro and progressive rock experiments, in others flirting with a chiptune spiced classical drama, like a hyperactive Peter and the Wolf revelling in a LSD overload. Equally the piece of music can enchant with a gentle seductive touch or reach into the other extreme and unleash a voracious tempest of electronicore ferocity and blackened post rock predation; though all becomes just individual pieces in an engrossing and mentally inflammatory glitch infused rapacious soundscape.

It is impossible to describe and give a fair impression of the alchemy fuelling and raging within Futurologie, but fair to say that those already blessed by knowing and basking in the wonderful musical oddity that is Pryapisme, will wet themselves in ardour whilst those yet to be infected have been given the most virulent and thrilling doorway into one of the truly unique propositions in music. Oh they and their composition sounds rather sensational orchestrated too just so you know.

The Futurologie EP is available from February 9th via Apathia Records @ http://apathiarecords.bandcamp.com/album/futurologie

http://www.pryapisme.net

RingMaster 09/02/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Arcade Messiah – Self Titled

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The creativity of UK musician John Bassett is a feverish kaleidoscope of colour, invention, and innovative exploration. He has proven it time and time again for over a decade, releasing eight increasingly impressive and attention grabbing albums either as KingBathmat or his own name. The last couple of years or so has seen a richer recognition of his craft and expansive musical imagination, the last two critically acclaimed KingBathmat albums Truth Button and Overcoming The Monster, the latter in 2013, pushing he and the band to the fore of progressive metal/rock whilst his debut acoustic album Unearth earlier this year, reinforced his reputation and ability to explore varied and deeply immersive structures and landscapes. Now the Hastings based multi-instrumentalist, singer songwriter, and producer returns with new solo project Arcade Messiah, a vehicle for his instrumental emprises which as shown by its self-titled debut album, are set to also inflame for ears and imagination.

Merging the boldest essences of styles such as metal, stoner, doom, prog, and math rock within constantly revealing canvases of post rock, Bassett and album provide gripping soundscapes for thoughts to cast their own explorations within and for emotions to colour with their own adventures. The musician talking about the project and album commented that “after writing and producing numerous KingBathmat albums and more recently the acoustic solo album Unearth, I decided I wanted to create my first instrumental album, and I wanted it to be set, audibly and visually in a dark, bleak apocalyptic aura of despair and anger. I wanted to focus on enormous riffs and sorrowful yet powerful musical refrains and place them within a terrain of unusual time signatures interspersed by moments of psychedelic calm.” It is an aim successfully achieved but even more an endeavour sculpting one of the essential moments of the year.

Instrumental albums do not always sink in easily with us, a demand for something maybe indefinable but persistent in igniting body and imagination a persistent requirement which the Arcade Messiah Album Covershowing off of supreme technical skill cannot satisfy. In Arcane Messiah there is nothing but that aural and inventive stimulation, from opening track Sun Exile the album a mouth-watering and rigorously compelling provocation for senses and unravelling gests in the imagination. From the first stirring and virulent call of guitar, album and opener becomes a potent weave of sound and aural suggestion, especially as a hypnotic canter of rhythms and fiery melodies join the emerging sonic picture soon after. Twists in time and invention are as fascinating as the heated creative climate of the track, its increasingly steamy breath and dark expression seductive and intimidating sparking a portentous Icarus like warning in thoughts.

The following Your Best Line Of Defence Is Obscurity slips in on a gentle breeze of sonic air and melodic caressing, though again it is a coaxing lined with dark bass shadows and prowling beats. The imagination is lured into the depths of the heavy smoulder of the piece with ease, thoughts of a lonely existence within the turmoil of predatory but deceptively welcoming emotive scenery emerging. Bassett’s guitar work is riveting, every groove and scorched melody inescapable incitement, but to be fair that applies to drums and bass through to simply the immersing imposing atmospheres conjured. Thoughts are instantly embraced and sparked by the primal and elegant nature of the music, a common factor across the album and in evidence with Traumascope straight after. Its initial post rock ambience is lined with a funk kissed bassline and lively beats from the drums, a union which hangs around before parting its mist for the voracious tide of riffs, which in turn lead to and compliment a stoner-esque flaming to the emerging tempest of emotional reflection and sonic rapacity. The track is a mesmeric blaze which never gets out of hand but leaves its dramatic imprint on senses and imagination with burning contagion.

Aftermath is a sobering haunting after the previous furnaces of sound and inventive intensity, a delicious feast of invasive melodies and bracing elegance which comes with sinister shadowing and anguished reflections. It also has an ethereal touch to its climate but in many ways is just the calm before or within the storm, its peace the bridge to the inventive alchemy of Everybody Eating Everyone Else. The track is scintillating; its initial also haunted passage the gateway into an antagonistic yet infectiously magnetic terrain of abrasing riffs and sonic temptation. There is a feeling of safety within turbulent and aggressive times or landscapes to the song, the guitars providing guidance through fiercely provocative exploits sculpted by rhythms and Bassett’s riff led raw sonic energy. Though musically it is different, there is a feel of early Killing Joke to the structure and tension of this and many tracks, an unrelenting persuasion which is wonderfully nagging at the heart of the ferociously inventive mergers of light and dark.

Steamy stoner spirals of sound open up The Most Popular Form Of Escape next, their acidic tones and spicing bringing rich hues to the climatic broadening of the song’s thick web of flavour and enterprise. Folkish elements are as prevalent in the piece as progressive endeavour and a sterner metallic tenacity, it all creating another unpredictable fascination for ears to bask in, the imagination to sculpt with, and appetite to devour greedily. Its enthralling waltz makes way for the closing Roman Resolution, itself an aural teleidoscope with wide reflective views and internal emotive majesty. An epic cruise through ever evolving sonic experimentation and poetic melodies, it brings a sensational release to a breath-taking close.

After the combined brilliance of Overcoming The Monster and Unearth, there was a small wonder where Bassett went from there. Where he ventured was into a creative maelstrom of sublime ingenuity with a technical and instinctive invention which has no need to indulge in over the top flourishes and pretension as it steals thoughts and passions. Arcade Messiah presents instrumental music which is organic and bracing whilst Bassett might just have put a stranglehold on best of year charts come the end of next month.

Arcade Messiah is available as a name your price digital version and on CD now via Stereohead Records @ https://arcademessiah.bandcamp.com

http://www.arcademessiah.com/

http://www.johnbassettmusic.com

RingMaster 25/11/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Phal:Angst – Black Country

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A raw erosion of senses and psyche, Black Country the new album from Austrian noise sculptors Phal:Angst is a vociferously compelling provocation built upon soundscapes which suggest that the apocalypse is already upon us. Consisting of five intrusive and fierce sonic explorations themed by oppressive manipulation and bigotry, the release is a demanding and uncomfortable proposition to listen to but a welcomingly incendiary confrontation for imagination and emotions to embrace. Forging a caustic industrial, post rock and doom clad fusion of noise, the release is a haunting immersion into ravenous sounds and stark atmospheres from a provocateur bred from the same corrosive intent as a Swans or Nurse With Wound.

Phal:Angst emerged in 2006 as collaboration between the projects Phal and Projekt Angst. The years since then has seen two well-received albums, a soundtrack, and hosts of successful shows unleashed, all adding up to ensure there was certain anticipation for their third album Black Country. Recorded with Alexandr Vatagin and mastered by Patrick Pulsinger, the album is an invasive and riveting consumption which draws on thick essences of EBM and gothic rock alongside those elements of sound mentioned. It makes for an unpredictable and often voraciously abrasive encounter but one which leaves thoughts and emotions aflame and contemplating the incitement unleashed.

Hardwire is the first examination of the senses, a fifteen minute portrait of a world in turmoil and emotionally twisted. From a glorious opening female vocal caress soon wrapped in similarly elegant keys, the track slips into a heavy industrial climate. Beats and electronic designs aligned to war inspired samples emerge within the still warm melodic embrace of the song, the encroaching portentous invasion of the beauty slow and unrelenting as guitars begin their rawer sonic narrative. The track continues to smoulder between melodic grace and caustic hostility whilst melancholic breezes wash the climate of the song and the band’s vocals upon their subsequent appearance. It is a gripping track, a corruption of sound which smothers the beauty within itself in order to provoke and spark ears and thoughts.

The album’s title track is next where again a warm and gentle entrance is made. This time electronic seduction coaxes the senses though around them sonic shadows are swiftly brewing up their intent and menace. They are held at bay though as a funereal rhythmic strides court the radiant and haunted shimmer of synths and guitar. Monotone fuelled vocals add their colour to the emerging song next, though again it is a slow expansion prowled by other continually darkening tones. The repetitious nature within this and all tracks is an inescapable seducing which only adds to the persuasion if not always the accessibility of the song’s temptation. This and its successor The Old Has To Die and the New Must Not Be Born reminds of Young Gods across their maudlin soaked landscapes, the album’s third song especially sparking thoughts of the Swiss band as opening hoarse vocals and intimidating riffs sets the tone and character of the blackened suffocation of the senses to come. Again that repetitive essence and the return of those breath-taking female soaring vocals provide a rich temper to the bestial heart of the track.

It is an enthralling and bewitchingly unpredictable trespass of the emotions providing the album with its pinnacle though that is almost matched by the warped sonic flirtation of Black Milk of Morning. A track which takes its time worming under the skin, despite persistently offering slim and potent melodies across chilled rhythmic scenery soaked in abrasing sonic ambience, it almost sneaks up on the passions especially with the persistence of unpolished reiterative vocals which imprint their presence and pressure within the climactic sonic smog. There is a beauty to the open and merciless aural causticity of the song which will certainly not be for all but as the album, will provide a remarkably rewarding experience for many more.

Black Country closes with the industrial drama and dystopian presence of Theta, a track which feels like an infestation bred from the union of Kraftwerk, Einstürzende Neubauten, and Neurosis. It crawls across the senses, leaving doom bred bait in its wake whilst igniting the imagination with its creative smothering and fiery tenacity. The song is a fine end to a great album, one which at times you wonder what specifically you are enjoying about it but always by the end of its persuasion only want more.

Black Country is available digitally, on double vinyl and CD via Bloodshed 666 Records @ https://itunes.apple.com/us/album/black-country-revisited/id932871714

The album is followed on Nov 28th by digital remix album Black Country Revisited featuring remixes by: Tronstoner/NSA, Swallow Red Rain, Chra, David Pfister, Electric Indigo, Rokko Anal, and Adaevarath/Bastard Sun.

http://www.facebook.com/phalangst

RingMaster 14/11/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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Zapruder – Fall in Line

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It may be titled Fall in Line, but the debut album from French band Zapruder does everything but that with its rigorously unpredictable and exhaustingly diverse sound. The release is made up by a collection of tracks which are as distinctly different from each other as they are united in brewing up intensely compelling and experimentally fiery landscapes. It is devilish and seductive, mischievous and aggressive; a release which confuses and ignites the imagination across its explosive length but ultimately leaves ears hungry and emotions basking in a unique challenge.

Hailing from Poitiers, Zapruder swiftly set about creating new propositions from fusing the likes of mathcore, noise, and post-rock amongst numerous ingredients. First release, the Straight From The Horse’s Mouth EP, was unveiled in 2012 and made a potent mark in drawing attention towards the quintet. Recorded with and mixed by Amaury Sauvé, the mastering done by Sylvain Biguet (Birds In Row, Trepalium), this well-received EP brought forth a creative template which has been pushed and explored to enthralling lengths by Fall in Line. Live the band has similarly risen in stature and acclaim, sharing stages with the likes of Kruger, Celeste, Cowards, As We Draw, June Paik, Offending, and Betraying The Martyrs. Now the also Sauvé recorded and mixed new album, with mastering this time taken on by Rob Gonnella and Nick Zampiello, is ready to draw the hungriest spotlight upon the band, one it is hard to see them missing out on such the creative alchemy within Fall in Line.

Out through both Apathia Records and Hipsterminator Records, the band instantly awakes ears and attention with the raw and corrosive opening to We Are Orphans. The first track is an immediate squall of sonic causticity and rhythmic predation, the guitars of Etienne Arrivé and Quentin Cacault roaring and chugging for a magnetic lure before the scathing vocal tones of Isaac Ruder erupt with searing antagonism. It is a harsh and gripping mix, especially with the throaty bass bait of François Arrivé aligning to the rhythmic antagonism of drummer Romain Fiakaifonou. The track at this point is hardcore and noise fuelled but already igniting intrigue with its emerging startling twists and warped grooving. Well into its assault, the song’s body is a delicious tangle of spices and ideation, every aspect unafraid to venture into unexpected explorations though the blunt force and raw energy of the song never waivers. Teasing melodies and blistering scythes of guitar only increase the potency of the turbulent maze as the song moves through a slightly more placid and reflective passage before closing out in a scorching finale.

The following Cyclops is bred from the same raucous template initially, guitars and vocals a scarring tempest punctured by just as hostile and disorientating rhythms. The track like its predecessor has a definite essence of Coilguns and Fall in LineKunz to their ferocious touch, but also as warped infestations of noise and melodic toxicity worm under the skin of the song and the listeners psyche, hints of bands such as Destrage and Kabul Golf Club play with thoughts. Persistently dark and imposing, the song begins reeking of delicious evocative sax and clarinet wails through guest Clément Beuvon, whilst coarse melodies add to the emerging colour and expansive depths of the thrilling track. It is a glorious examination of the senses and thoughts, one soon surpassed by the brilliant Modern Idiot. Another kind of beast entirely, the song buzzes around ears straight away with a jazzy sonic blistering and rhythmic juggling before exposing its venomous intent and malevolent contagiousness. Grooves swell and spin within the intensive tempest, breaking free to sculpt an almost deranged revelry of charm and mischief within the still lingering oppressiveness of the song. Post rock, groove metal, jazz funk, and psychotic mathcore are all in the staggering brilliance of the encounter, each seamlessly flirting and twisting around each other for a major pinnacle to the release.

Moloch explores another fiercely intensive landscape, its scenery brutal and emotionally stark but moving towards and evolving into a just as forcibly compelling and potently evocative beauty. The thick texture and atmosphere of the song never relinquishes it’s also smothering agility, thoughts and emotions inescapably wrapped by the almost dystopian touch of the track’s climate. As all the songs on the album no matter their brutality or charm, there is an infectiousness which is captivating and commanding, as shown by the riveting and sultry instrumental Delusion Junction and the cryptic ingenuity of Doppelgänger. The first is a jazz kissed smouldering of elegance and searing beauty whilst its successor is a hellacious stomp of inhospitable and addiction sparking genius. Grooves swing with salacious appetites whilst pungent rhythms stomp with irreverent urgency, The vocals are also unbridled in their ravenous intent, but it is the manic flames of sax which holds the key to making an outstanding song into a classic one. With the discord lilted ingenuity which marked out Essential Logic sounds in the eighties, the sax of Beuvon flirts and swaggers with a ridiculously captivating groove all of its own, in turn seemingly to spark an increased playful and dramatic vaunt in all elements of the track.

From that stirring peak the album turns to another right away, the heroic stroll of Monkey On My Back explosively igniting ears before erupting into a bedlamic storm of rebellious rhythms and psychotic guitar revelry, all grazed by the scarring intensity of the vocals. The song is a furnace of contagion and disorientating enterprise, but again one not content to risk the listener getting an understanding and expectation of things in motion as it falls into a black pit of sonic anguish and rhythmic stalking. As the album, the track needs plenty of time and attention to reveal all its depths but rewards with another major twist to the release.

The radiance of the melodic croon that is Loquèle is just as wrong-footing as the bedlam within the songs before it, its unexpected and untainted beauty a relatively smooth emotive flight within a shadow coated ambience. With equally clean and unclouded vocals from this time Cacault, the track feeds an already thoroughly greedy appetite for the album, as does the closing Je Ferai De Ma Peau Une Terre Où Creuser. A blazing final hoarse roar, musically and vocally, the track is a post hardcore/post metal journey through raw and climactic emotions and sonic terrains. It as the previous track cannot match the heights and might of the songs before them, but each show a passion and majesty to their impacting enticement that only means the album ends as impressively as it started.

Zapruder tests and make demands right across Fall In Line which means they will not be for everyone, but for all with a taste for experimental and intrusively inventive explorations, they are a proposition which should be hastily sought out.

Fall In Line is available now via Apathia Records / Hipsterminator Records @ http://www.apathiarecords.com/en/albums/fall-in-line-by-zapruder/ or http://zaprudertheband.bandcamp.com/album/fall-in-line

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RingMaster 22/10/2014

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