False-Heads – Wear and Tear

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Proving that their impressive introduction in outstanding debut EP Tunnel Vision last year was no fluke, UK alternative/psyche rockers False-Heads now unveil its successor the Wear and Tear EP. In fact such its magnetic manner and devilish invention, the new release makes its predecessor feel like just an opening teaser to its glory, a rather tasty one for sure, but the prelude to the outstanding and masterful adventure now igniting the passions. Consisting of four attitude cored incitements of noise and psyche rock unafraid to weave in just as warped essences of pop, alternative rock and more, Wear and Tear is a confirmation and wake-up call to the creative might and potential of another seriously exciting band within the British music scene.

Hailing from the East London area, False-Heads is a band which needs little time to grab attention with their imagination gripping sound, swift evidence provided by EP opener Wrap Up. Its first breath comes with a spicy and fuzzy wind of persuasion and energy, a raw guitar courting of the ears soon backed as potently by a heavy and predatory bassline and crisply delivered beats. The trio of Luke Griffiths, Jake Elliott, and Daniel Delgaty have within the first seconds of the track, coaxed eager attention which only strengthens as the song relaxes into a cleaner climate of sound still driven by that initial throaty bass temptation and just as magnetic vocals. Now firmly into its stride, the song unveils a confident swagger but also an appetite to explore heavy rock riffery, stoner-esque grooving, and noise rock imagination, all teased with post punk like infectiousness. It is a fluid and unpredictable adventure keeping ears and thoughts on their toes and emotions high.

False-Heads-Wear-Tear-artwork-450x444  The thick flavours and enterprise fuelling the song continue into the grungier Twentynothing, a proposition opening with a Nirvana like enticing but soon evolving into an intimate design of melodic expression and melancholy wrapped rhythms. Any moment is just that in the passage of the song, and it swiftly moves into an embrace of a more Melvins meets Asylums like tenacity and imagination, though still circling that early magnetic grunge bred hook. As all the tracks there is a glint in its creative eye, a devilment which relishes teasing familiar spices and twisting them into fresh and infectious uniqueness.

The following Snatch is the same, a proposition drawing from recognisable flavourings but disfiguring them with ingenious revelry for something new and distinct to False-Heads. Persistently the band seems to be compared to The Pixies, not as obvious a reference for us until you hear this one song. It strolls along with a virulent swing and addictiveness which could easily be Frank Black composed, serenading with minimalistic charm and just the right amount of causticity to the guitars and dour monotony to the rhythms. Around it though, sounds and textures seduce and flare up, creating a web of intrigue and volatile enterprise which swiftly and inescapably inflames ears and the passions.

It is another sensational offering upon Wear and Tear leaving closing track Nothing In There some work to do to end the release on a similar height. It is fair to say it fails, but only just as it mesmerises the senses with its dark drone of sonic incitement. Like a post punk/shoe gaze proposal held in a post rock atmospheric embrace, the song is simultaneously cold and sultry with noise seduction and psyche rock provocation as open and riveting as the other textures mentioned. It is a fascinating and compelling end to an irresistible provocation of body and mind.

False-Heads left a lingering and convincing impression with their first EP a year ago but have more than overshadowed it with Wear and Tear. There are a few bands which trigger the deepest, intensive excitement in the grand landscape of emerging bands right now and of those that do, False-Heads stand to the fore.

The Wear and Tear EP is released March 23rd on Hi4Head Records and available at http://false-heads.bandcamp.com/album/wear-and-tear

https://www.facebook.com/FalseHeads

RingMaster 23/03/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://reputationradio.yooco.org/

 

Zoner – Euharmonic Elevation

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Here we have an album which if in the mind to, you could pick at and suggest a few deficiencies but there is no escaping it is also one compelling and enjoyable proposition. The release in question is Euharmonic Elevation, the second album from rock/metal band Zoner. That is a simple description for a proposition with a sound which draws on a myriad of styles and flavours in its almost deranged invention. Release and band are a one of a kind, though each also draws on open inspirations which we will come to shortly. It all results in a collection of songs which hold few major surprises yet are one big and riveting surprise.

Zoner is the solo project of Antonis Demetriou, a musician and songwriter hailing from Nicosia, Cyprus. His music as mentioned is bred from a vast array of spices across numerous decades, and his band as described by Demetriou himself, “a rock/metal band with influences ranging from ‘ABBA to Zappa’ via all the VERY best in pop, rock, prog, punk, funk, disco, hard, heavy and thrash!” 2012 saw the release of debut album Spectraphonic Deviation, and now the artist returns with its successor, again a self-released, recorded, and produced offering, deserving of intrigued attention.

As opening track In the Name of Creativity establishes itself in ears, the first thing with captivates about the sound is its strange similarity to Bill Nelson, well his Red Noise guise certainly. Zoner is a more voracious and heavier proposition but from vocals to the sonic invention, there is a definite if coincidental feel of the ex-Be Bop Deluxe man to proceedings. The first track strides with muscular rhythms and stirring riffs from its initial sonic invitation, swiftly settling into a heavy rock and classic metal fusion. Vocally Demetriou is engaging and though he is arguably not a natural vocalist, any weaker moments are more than compensated by his inventive expression. The song itself continues on to explore new progressive and melodic textures, its technical intricacies as potent as the simplicity in which everything successfully fits together.

The enjoyable start is swiftly continued by the stronger lures of Hail Rock ‘n’ Roll, a rock ‘n’ pop romp living up to its title with hook laden riffs and an equally addictive bassline. Thumping beats only add to the contagious drama whilst the swing of the song forms the lead into a catchy chorus as flirtatious as the intrigue wrapped guitar work. Its finale of persistent title chants is irresistible and sets ears and imagination up nicely for the melodic elegance and croon of Patience of a Saint. A smouldering landscape of sonic enterprise, the song is an easily endearing encounter. The vocals are similarly mellow and it all makes for a partly mesmeric offering until it unlocks its heart of classic rock tenacity. It loses some of its grip from this point but still holds attention with unpredictable twists and keys sculpted tempting.

Politics of Modern Love steps in next and soon steals top honours on the album. The song makes a low key start, coaxing the listener gently before revealing a predatory prowl of riffs and dark toned vocals. It is a transfixing and thrilling turn, a post punk/ experimental adventure with a minimalistic air leading to a full blaze of striking imagination and creative exploration.

Both A Wasted Life and Are You the One keep ears and appetite satisfied, the first again bringing an eighties new wave/ post punk tempting to its theatrical hard rock canvas. As its predecessor, the track is riveting scenery of pungent sonic interplay and tenacious enterprise, an enthralling dance with recognisable flavours and expectations defeating invention. Its successor is equally unpredictable but does not have the same success with personal tastes. At times it is a stirring and invigorating exploit but in other moments, especially its start, leaves emotions flat. When it does hit the mark though, primarily when it unleashes its aggression, the song is a feisty enjoyment ending on a much loftier peak then where it started.

Early thoughts and expectations of The Sabbath Waltz arising from its name alone are soon confirmed by its muscular riffs and heavily landed rhythms. It is heavy metal with a sinister tang and melodic flaming, but again reaping spices from previous decade in its colourful web of sound and creative thought. Imposingly magnetic, the track crawls over senses and psyche, leaving another lingering lure easy to want to hear more of.

The closing Turning Point of No Return is an acoustic crafted ballad with Latin bred drama and character, another which misses our appetite but easy to see being a rich pleasure for others. It is a decent end to a release which keeps luring attention back its way. It has shortcomings; the production in certain areas shallow and not helping vocals at times but Demetriou himself has admitted that he is not really an engineer/producer but handles these tasks out of necessity. It cannot defuse the core quality, passion, and invention of the music and songs though. There are also other elements which at times you might wish for something different or for them to be tweaked but it is all relative to taste and again only increases the weight of the potential of the artist and sound, suggesting that given the chance to record with the right people and circumstances, Zoner might just have something very special lurking inside.

Euharmonic Elevation is available now on CD and across most digital stores.

http://www.zonermusic.com/   https://www.facebook.com/zonermusic

RingMaster 17/03/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://reputationradio.yooco.org/

Treedeon – Lowest Level Reincarnation

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Surely bred in the depths of hell, Lowest Level Reincarnation is the ultimate seduction. Like a Hieronymus Bosch painting, the new album from German noise abusers Treedeon is a visceral kaleidoscope of vibrant addictive aural colours and inescapable temptations within a landscape of sonic and emotional torment. It is bestial, it is carnally intimidating, and it is an all-consuming swamp of savage confrontation but most of all it is one exhilarating trespass of the senses.

Treedeon emerged in 2012 when vocalist/guitarist Arne Heesch and vocalist/bassist Yvonne Ducksworth linked up after the almost simultaneous demise of their respective bands Ulme and Jingo de Lunch. Initially Treedeon was an acoustic proposition and made its live debut at 2012’s South Of Mainstream festival filling in for the by now disbanded Ulme. At this point Christian “Boomer” Böhm linked up with the duo, pledging himself as “the missing link” as he offered to play drums in the band. As songs were written and created, leading to an early demo, there was no escaping the heavier voracious element fuelling their sound, fury audiences soon heard at events like the infamous Roadburn Festival, where the band played as part of Exile On Mainstream’s 15 year anniversary showcase. The digital unveiling of the demo swiftly brewed up attention and buzz around the Berlin trio though it was a mere taster of more corrosively impressive things to come. Recorded at Studio Wong in Berlin last November, Lowest Level Reincarnation sets a striking marker for not only Treedeon but doom/sludge spawned noise punk in general.

The eight track sonic tsunami begins with Love Turns Liquid and immediately has ears and attention on board as the punch of Böhm’s premeditated slow swings rock the senses. It is not hostile bait he lays down but it is imposing and highly anthemic as each incessant jab awakens a keen appetite which is swiftly fed further by the grouchy voice of Ducksworth’s bass and the abrasing causticity of the guitar. Hooks are already flirting from within the building tempest of noise, leaping out on the subsequent sonic smog as Heesch’s grizzled vocals croon expressively and angrily. The rhythmic persistence of the eight minute plus track creates an inescapable trap for instinctive and primal needs whilst the doom soaked crawl of the song simply ignites ears and imagination; the encounter the perfect blend of erosive persuasion and addictive invention.

The following Blankapitation similarly attacks on two fronts, its rhythmic and grooved taunting a commanding contagion whilst the thick sludginess of the guitar’s enterprise is a suffocating and alluring raw embrace. It is the vocals of Ducksworth, who takes the lead this time, which strikingly ignites the track though, her delivery pure punk with an attitude to match. It is a thrilling contrast to the highly pleasing caustic attack of Heesch in the previous song and in his backing here, a creative aural stabbing of ears at times from the lady and a constant roar of belligerence.

Satan’s Need takes over next and within seconds consumes the senses in a tempest of fiercely heavy riffs and matching intensive rhythms, all bound with inflamed heavy grooves. The two singers share the track, duelling rather than dueting across its ravenous and exhausting turbulence. It has a harsh and acerbic canvas but also reveals an underlying swing to beats and grooves which does not temper the tempestuous nature of the encounter but certainly makes its punishment bewitchingly palatable.

Through the superb Extinction with its a rhythmic tempting, which is almost like a call to arms for body and emotions, and a sinisterly hued grooving, and the snarling Wendigo, band and album only heap on further corruptive influence and pleasure. The first of the two is the kind of flirtation you know will only lead to destruction but with the deepest carnivorous bass growl and tart grooves, not forgetting exceptional vocal endeavour, the track is the master of lustful submission. Its successor again embraces a stronger punk rancor in its erosive sonic squall. Ducksworth vocally is a fiery temptress and with basslines predatory confrontation as Heesch creates a warlike maelstrom of antipathy with voice and riffs, the song is an animus which flows in all ways into the equally venomous and scarring Venus With Teeth. There is no shelter from its sonic and intimate enmity or from the transfixing rhythmic craft and enticing of Böhm. It writhes like a plague ridden scavenger, spilling and spewing sonic spite and magnetic invention with every intensive and exciting twist.

The album’s title track worms into the psyche next, its insidious crawl of sound and malevolent emotion encroaching ears like a tar thick virus, consuming every pore whilst immersing the senses and thoughts into the darkest pit of depressive and oppressive toxicity. The song is spellbinding, an infestation of sound and intent you only want to devour more of, even if it provides the longest and darkest twelve minutes of your life.

Lowest Level Reincarnation is completed by the outstanding Terracide, another imaginative torrent of crippling and gripping rhythms aligned to incendiary grooves and impressive vocals from both Ducksworth and Heesch. That imagery of a Bosch composition again seems to fit the track, its presence and premise a sonic opening of hell’s pits.

Treedeon is that nightmare you can never be rid of but truthfully you look forward to, its challenge and adventure a dark and dangerous endeavour but cathartic and seriously rewarding. The same applies to the magnificent Lowest Level Reincarnation, an album sure to expose one intensively exciting prospect to the fiercest spotlights.

Lowest Level Reincarnation is available now via Exile On Mainstream digitally and on CD/vinyl @ http://www.mainstreamrecords.de/shop with its US release in April.

https://www.facebook.com/Treedeon

RingMaster 12/03/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://reputationradio.yooco.org/

Inca Babies – The Stereo Plan

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From the days when the devil thrust his evil designs into music, dark rock ‘n’ roll has been a persistent and endearing temptation. From the leather clad hip and vocal lures of Sweet Gene Vincent to the modern psychotic seductions of Dedwardians, it is a delicious trespass of ears and imagination that continues to evolve rich adventurous psyche twisting pastures. The likes of The Doors, The Cramps, The Birthday Party, Bone Orchard, The 69 Eyes, Eighties Matchbox B-Line Disaster, The Dropper’s Neck to name a few, have continued to expose the senses to new ravenous depths of sinister sonic exploration over the decades. One band which from their emergence in 1982 has also sculpted a perpetual warped seduction is Inca Babies. Their almost serpentine invention and dark musical incitements have continued to inspire and invigorate, even during the near on twenty years they were absent from the music scene, but since returning in 2007 you can only suggest that the UK trio must have shaken hands on a new deal with Lucifer as they have risen to truly become one of the leading lights and template setting protagonists of British rock ‘n’ roll.

The evidence is already boldly apparent in their two albums since reforming, the acclaimed Death Message Blues and Deep Dark Blue of 2010 and 2012 respectively. Both releases ignited an already ravenous gothic rock scene and duly deserved all ardour given but each in many ways was just an immense but leading appetiser for the glory of The Stereo Plan. Released towards the end of 2014, the band’s seventh studio album is a masterpiece of the dark aural arts. The third instalment of their death blues trilogy, its fourteen-track proposal twists and turns through the primal essences of post punk, surf, garage punk, trash blues, and every other dark flavour available, but bred in the imagination of Inca Babies transforms into a recipe of ingenious alchemy. It is a transfixing and slightly menacing proposition which has everything from feet to the passions ablaze.

Listening to The Stereo Plan is almost like immersing in a greatest hits collection of songs, every encounter of such irresistible and impressive invention and contagion that there is no time to take a breath and reflect until the final note of the release drifts away. It all starts with the album’s title track and its opening tangy lure of surf bred toxicity. It is an instant inescapable invitation for ears and imagination, the percussive shuffle which soon adds its bait only increasing an enticement which deepens again with the thick bass prowls of Vince Hunt. Continuing to bind ears in his guitar’s delicious spicery too, Harry Stafford pounces with his vocal and lyrical dance, as everything in the song colludes to create satanic rock ‘n’ roll majesty, especially as rhythms grow in intensity and devilment with the vocals to arouse an even lustier persuasion.

How to follow such a magnificent start would have many bands in a cold sweat but not Inca Babies as they match its majesty with a just as compelling incitement going by the name of Scatter. Stereo Plan Front 1The swinging beats of drummer Rob Haynes recruits eager attention right away, swiftly adding appetite as riffs and bass grooves unite with his anthemic beats and the incoming catchy vocal delivery. Into its stride the song expels a punk causticity around its driving rhythmic spine, the fingers of Stafford continuing to dance over the strings of his guitar to create a web of sonic addiction. The aforementioned Dewardians comes to mind as the song bounces with venomous mischief and also Eighteen Nightmares At the Lux with its scuzzy textures.

The salty smoulder of Damnation comes next, an Orson Family like countrified shimmer fuelling the temptation of guitar and rolling beats. As the opening pair of songs, psychobilly bred rapacity coats the song but also here a more garage punk tenacity emerges and grows to an even more potent persuasion in the following River To the Centre of the World. A haunting slice of upbeat balladry with a chorus which simply infests the senses, the track is dark poetic manna for ears and imagination. It also continues the mouth-watering diverse landscape of the album, each song a blossoming of individual and unique gothic theatre bred in sinistrous ideation.

The Cajun cast spell of Stand Down Lucifer keeps listener and album in lustful realms next, its sinuous shimmer and invention a creeping and inescapable seduction whilst Feast With Panthers strolls in with stalking rhythms and demonic hooks within again a fine and alluring vocal proposal. Like Th’ Legendary Shack Shakers meets The Screaming Blue Messiahs, the latter a band easy to offer varying degrees of comparison to across the album, the track swings it frame and flirtation with mischief in its eyes and a wicked lick on its melodic lips. The Stereo Plan began on a lofty pinnacle and this pair again sublimely ensures that there is no slip from such heady heights.

   Last Flight Out of Saigon with its pulsating bassline and acidic sonic veining croons suggestively in ears next, its minimalistic yet cavernous presence a mesmeric hex before the garage pop feistiness of Absolute Leader of the World leaps at the senses. Holding a great raw seventies/eighties punk essence to its contagion, the song is a sweetly caustic roar of blues rock which re-ignites body and energies after the resourceful ‘rest’ found in its predecessor.

Returning to the insidious charms which festered wonderfully in the early songs, Devilfish Anarchy stalks and romps with that gothic blues meets psychobilly predation and devilry. Beats and basslines are the instigator to lust fuelled whiplash as vocals and melodic toxins work away on thoughts and emotion. It is an exhausting pleasure whose rigorous nature is swiftly tempered and contrasted by the funereal stance and classical elegance of Still Mountain, a bewitching ballad wrapped in imposing and provocative shadows.

A dirtier yet restrained heavy rock pushes the walls of Damn Our Hides next, its persuasion not as instant as elsewhere, though swiftly a captivating companion for ears, but slowly burning away behind the scenes and repeatedly nudging thoughts after the event, as so many other songs on the album. Its enduring temptation is another striking aspect of The Stereo Plan, each twist of its design able to return at leisure and with potency, just as the heated jazziness of Ghost Ship. The track is ablaze with sultry trumpet flames, filthy basslines, and delirious sonic enterprise combining for a fiery musical sunset on an apocalyptic landscape.

The album is finished off by the excellent psyche/ surf rock stomp of Blacktop Speedway and finally the garage rock serenade of Late Night Frankie Brittle, a croon which simply grows in weight, intensity, and sonic rabidity with volcanic imagination. The pair makes a thrilling end to one irresistible encounter.

Admittedly having a soft spot for the type of sounds Inca Babies revel in went in their favour, but also it brings more demands but once again the Manchester trio stand tall over them as they again help lead British rock ‘n’ roll into new and exciting explorations.

The Stereo Plan is available now via Black Lagoon Records

http://www.incababies.co.uk/   https://www.facebook.com/incababies/

RingMaster 11/03/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://reputationradio.yooco.org/

Fawn Spots – From Safer Place

Pic Ben Bentley

Pic Ben Bentley

Though it will not be the fiercest most hostile offering you will come up against this year, there is definitely a visceral rawness to the debut album from UK trio Fawn Spots which has the senses curling up like paint on a wall under extreme heat. From Safer Place is a furious yet creatively magnetic seduction which rages with a belligerent hardcore and punk voracity whilst smouldering with a noise rock and post punk invention. It is also a massive grower, from a strong and captivating first impression becoming one inescapable proposition drawing ears back again and again with growing eagerness.

Hailing from York, Fawn Spots emerged in 2011, originally as a duo with the intent to “push how much noise two people could make.” One or two line-up changes has led to vocalists/guitarist Jonathan Meager and Oliver Grabowski alongside newest member, drummer Paddy Carley, now standing before the world with From Safer Place in their creative hands. Written and recorded in sheds located in an abandoned Georgian garden and lyrically inspired by T. S. Eliot and Jean Paul Sartre amongst others, the album is a stirring foraging of the senses and sparking of the imagination. It retains the intensity which has already fuelled the band’s sounds and sonic assaults but explores even greater twists of invention and twisted enterprise, its songs barbarous but also ingeniously unpredictable.

New Sense stirs the blood first, its opening sonic yawn the prelude to a maelstrom of aggravated rhythms and caustic riffs raged over by bracing and instantly appealing vocals. Hooks are just as swift a lure too, almost taunting from within the smoggy air of the track. It has to be said that initially the closed in, claustrophobic air to songs took a while to acclimatise to. It did not defuse the success and weight of the persuasions but certainly distracted for the first couple of tracks before slipping into place and becoming part of the inventive furniture of From Safer Place.

The strong start is matched by I’m Not a Man; I Never Will Be, its more controlled entrance just a deceit as it too is soon a tempestuous storm of riff and rhythmic confrontation. Barely safer_place_layout_ideapassing a minute in length, the track throws in the irresistible hook or two also, successful bait courted by a great heavy bassline as the temperature and temptation of the album continues to rise through it and find new heights via the spicy causticity of A Certain Pleasure. The band has understandably been compared to the likes of Rites of Spring, Husker Du, and Mission of Burma, but the third track, and not alone in this, sparks thoughts of older bands like The Fire Engines and Wire, if lost in the blistering causticity of At the Drive In. The track sparks new greed in an already contented appetite for the album, its potency emulated and surpassed again by the outstanding Black Water. Sinister in its melodies and vocal harmonies, toxic in its sonic enterprise, the track is post punk at its most addictively inventive and predatory.

Natural Vision returns to the smoky and oppressive texture of the beginning for its persuasion but turns in on itself with minimalist hooks and melodies which vein the intensive rhythmic and abrasing examination of the senses. Though the track leaves a satisfied smile in its wake it lacks the striking spark of the songs around it, as emphasized by the album’s title track. There is a feel of Josef K in some ways to the next song, as well as a brawling punk ferocity which vocally and rhythmically pulls no punches. It is an exciting peach of a bruising on ears and psyche, and almost poppy in its infectiousness.

The heavy rhythmic entrance of Remains sets the scene for an agitated dance of psychotic beats and brawling vocals bound in a tapestry of toxic melodies and piercing hooks next. It is a glorious violation and imagination sparking incitement which has to bow a little to the superb In Front of the Chesnut Tree which follows. Its start is ripe with choppy dark bass pokes whilst the soon joining melodic winery is pure XTC, though it all evolves swiftly into an even more apparent Joy Division blossomed tempting. The instrumental is bewitching, seriously addictive, and given the clarity which the vocals are not across the album, becomes a lusty seduction on ears and the passions.

The album is completed by firstly the hellacious tempest of Recurring Face, a hardcore spawned furnace of vocal and sonic spite infused with cold post punk ingenuity. At its conclusion it is impossible not to draw a deep breath in recovery before the closing Basque Knife consumes ears with its psychotic and predacious, but controlled swamp of sound and enterprise. It is a fine end to a great release if not living up to the previous peaks on the album though to be fair the strength of all songs seems to grow with every single dive into their corrosive beauty, this no exception.

     From Safer Place is a treat of primal and instinctive noise delivered with a similar inbred passion and animosity. It tests, stretches, and excites in equal measure and makes for a very easy recommendation.

From Safer Place is available now via Critical Heights @  https://itunes.apple.com/gb/album/from-safer-place/id943965796

http://fawnspots.tumblr.com/     https://www.facebook.com/Fawn.Spots

RingMaster 10/03/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://reputationradio.yooco.org/

Horse Party – Out Of Sight/Receiver

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The exciting thing about UK band Horse Party is as much as they have openly grown in songwriting and sound, they have lost none of the instinctively raw and organic essences which made them strikingly leap out with debut single Back To Mono almost two years ago. Their new single is bound in majestic raunchy charms as both Out Of Sight and Receiver show new striking steps in craft, sound, and sheer creative adventure, but each still seduces with that primal spice which brought the trio to life.

Hailing from Bury St Edmunds, the threesome of vocalist/guitarists Ellie Langley and Seymour Quigley, alongside drummer Shannon Hope, have persistently garnered acclaim and an increasingly growing and devoted fan base with their gripping and at times sinisterly devilish sounds. From the Scarlet & Blue EP to last year’s debut album Cover Your Eyes, released through Integrity Records, Horse Party has gripped attention and increasingly greedier appetites, including those of 6music’s Lauren Laverne and Steve Lamacq, Shell Zenner at Absolute Radio and XFM’s John Kennedy. Live too the band is no stranger to eager responses, last year seeing the band successfully playing Latitude Festival’s Lake Stage at the invitation of Radio One’s Huw Stephens and BBC Suffolk Introducing. Now Out Of Sight/Receiver is poised to push the band on again, and as it is without doubt their finest hour to date, it is hard to see it failing to tempt the broadest spotlights upon the band.

Out Of Sight starts things off and is instantly prowling ears with thoughtful yet predatory riffs from the guitars matched by crisp beats. The darkly seducing tones of Langley queens over the 10847766_768484469911623_4136520996259037093_nentrance, her delivery sure and intense yet wholly seductive from the first breath. Widening its expression without leaving its shadowed scenery, the track proceeds to tease with small burst of melodic light and anthemic vocal unity whilst steely hooks only add to the addictive bait of the song. Fizzing up further into its presence with psychedelic lit sultriness and smouldering emotion, the adventure continues to be unpredictable and inescapably addictive with a chorus which similarly becomes more virulent and entrancing over the length of the outstanding song.

It is a glorious temptation but even with its might cannot help being surpassed by the delicious alchemy of Receiver. More energetic from the first second, the track is also an even darker and more sinister provocation, riding in on an irresistible post punk rhythmic baiting of ears and imagination. It is wonderfully repetitive from hereon in, riffs and hooks recycled with compelling effect as the dual tones of Langley and Quigley croon with sobering yet magnetic persuasion. That post punk essence is a constant treat within the song too, essences of bands like Au Pairs and Joy Division merging with the darker side of a Morningwood or Yeah Yeah Yeahs, but coming out as something ingeniously unique to Horse Party.

The song as the single is outstanding, both songs easily the best things to emerge from the imagination of the trio and they have some treats already under their creative belts. Horse Party is a band ready to join the frontline of the UK garage rock/rock scene and with releases like this drive it to new heights.

Out Of Sight/Receiver is available from February 23rd on limited edition 7” black vinyl as a co-release by R*E*P*E*A*T Records and the band’s own Pure Deadly imprint @ https://horsepartyparty.bandcamp.com/album/out-of-sight-receiver-7-single

Horse Party are also on tour right now with upcoming dates at…

Friday 27th February – Ipswich Steamboat Tavern

Friday 27th March – London The Garage

Saturday 2nd May – Bury St Edmunds Fringe Festival

Friday 15th May – Cambridge Junction

Saturday 13th June – Norwich Open

https://www.facebook.com/horsepartyparty

RingMaster 22/02/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from http://www.thereputationlabel.today

 

 

SeaWitches – Stars

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On the surface Stars, the new single from UK band SeaWitches, is a simmering lake of melodic radiance but look deeper into its depths and the song is a discovery of compelling shadows and rawer, almost predacious textures. Making a strong first impression but becoming more fascinating and captivating with every embrace, the song also suggests Liverpool has yet another tantalising proposition blossoming in its musical heritage.

The seeds to SeaWitches began with the meeting of Jo Herring (vocals/guitar/bass) and Laura Caldwell (bass/guitar/keys through friends in 2007. Their creative talent and musical passion SEAWITCHES ARTWORK PRINT finalsoon united and from being initially called The Woods, brought SeaWitches to the Liverpool music scene. Drummer Tilo Pirnbaum joined the band in 2012, a year also seeing the release of their well-received debut, the Spacegun EP. Since then venturing successfully further afield into places like Manchester and London, the band last year unveiled new guitarist Jamie Jenkin and second EP Tear back the sky, again to potent responses and praise. Now the quartet casts Stars on the country through Edge Hill University’s The Label Recordings, run by Carl Hunter of The Farm and assisted by media students, the song a blaze of radiance sure to catch a host of new appetites and lure further eager attention.

The song’s first breath brings a rich melodic enticing complete with a spicy hook which would not be out of place in an Echo and the Bunnymen offering. Alongside it though a dark throated bassline brings a more post punk flavouring whilst vocally and infectiously the song has a whisper of The Passions to its discord kissed pop. Similarly though a shoegaze ambience and dark folk temptation manages to loudly whisper within the feisty and pungent energy of the song, more flavours emerging with each passing moment in the potent underbelly of the increasingly bewitching and riveting encounter.

In many ways Stars is a puzzle to explore, a seemingly warm enticement leading to more unpredictable and slightly turbulent sinister explorations but thick exciting rewards. SeaWitches spin a spellbinding hex through their new single and we suggest they and we can expect big things ahead.

Stars is available via The Label Recordings from 16th February

https://www.facebook.com/SeaWitches/

RingMaster 1602/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pU37ylCYa-A

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