Uncaging the emotional beast: an interview with Owleye

Owleye_RingMasterReview

Formed in the late half of 2013, Owleye is a snarling post hardcore roar from Denver. After a potent couple of years across their local scene, last year saw a line-up change and short hiatus with the departure of their previous vocalist. The release of their new EP this past April announced and confirmed the welcome return of the quintet and we seized on the opportunity to talk with the band and find out what makes them tick…

Hello and thanks for taking time out to talk with us.

Thanks for having us.

Can you first introduce the band and give us some background to how it all started?

We are Owleye, a post hardcore band from Denver, Colorado. The band started in 2013 with a group of friends DJ (guitar) Brad (bass) and Frank (drums) getting together and wanting to make something new and unique while keeping true to their roots. Myself (Tim vocals) and Dave (guitar) came into the band mid-2015.

Is Owleye your first musical venture and if not have previous experiences had any impact on what you are doing now, in maybe inspiring a change of style or direction?

We’ve all be involved with other bands with different experiences. Having different paths always is super cool cause we can throw so many different elements and styles and blend it into what Owleye really is.

Tell us about the band name.

The band was originally I Will Lie but Owleye was always in the back of our heads so it quickly changed to that.

owleye2_RingMasterReviewWas there any specific idea behind the forming of the band and also in what you wanted it and your sound to offer?

I mean really we just wanted to play music that is relevant and also very unique at the same time. I mean listening to our new EP No Wounds, the listener will notice every different tone and feel to each song ‘cause they are all similar but different at the same time, it’s really cool.

Do the same things still drive the band when it was fresh-faced or have they evolved over time?

I mean my vocal style was a lot different than the previous vocalist, so I mean we are pretty fresh still but the overall outlook of the band has evolved tenfold over the past year and with this EP.

Equally since your early days, how would you say your sound has evolved?

I know it is very cliché but we’ve all just matured as musicians and it really shows in our new sound and new music. Even writing now our songs we are working on are growing bigger and more mature.

That change has been more of an organic movement or you guys deliberately setting out to try new things?

Well again with me coming in, I wanted a different sound and wanted to write music that is very comfortable for my vocal style so it was basically starting all from scratch again and trying new things until we were all on the same page.

Presumably across the band there is a wide range of inspirations; are there any in particular which have impacted not only on the band’s music but your personal approach and ideas to creating and playing music?

We are all inspired by different genres and things but we kinda just write how we are feeling at that moment in time. This last EP was me getting a lot of things off my chest that I’ve been holding in for years. So who knows what is to come in the future ha ha.

Is there a regular process to the songwriting?

We kinda just pre pro little ideas and grow off said idea. Being able to hear an idea over and over again in earphones is so beneficial and every band should do it to help them get the best product.

owleye3_RingMasterReviewWhere do lyrical inspirations more often than not come from?

I wrote a lot of past experiences that have been held over my head for a long time and just trying to find the positive. Sometimes life sucks and I’m just trying to make light of things in my lyrics and find the true beauty that comes with hardships.

You mentioned it earlier, so can you give some background to your latest release?

Our latest release No Wounds is really all about finding ourselves with this new line-up and touches a lot on my past insecurities at least lyrically. It’s struggling with different things in life and trying to find the light of stupid fucking situations.

Every song is pretty different themed with tones and the overall feeling it gives. I mean there are parts where you wanna punch your best friend in the face to the next song that really tugs at your heart strings and makes you want to cry. Cycles especially is really emotional and talks on losing a loved one and trying to grasp that one thing that will stay with you long after they are gone. It’s a very interesting EP for a debut release with so many different sounds, which is real cool.

Are you a band which goes into the studio with songs pretty much ain their final state or prefer to develop them as you record?

I mean we like to do pre-production a lot but really change the song at least 10-15 times before even going into a studio to work with a producer to get the best product we can get from it. I think having the ability to hear things back is the most beneficial thing a musician can ask for.

Tell us about the live side to the band, presumably the favourite aspect of the band?owleye Photo credit_Channel Nightmore

I think what sets us apart from some other bands is our live performance because we go hard in the paint every single time. You can feel the energy during our set where even if you don’t like our music you are going to want to move around just cause we put so much of our souls into every performance.

It is not easy for any new band to make an impact regionally let alone nationally and further afield. How have you found it your neck of the woods?

We are still currently starting to branch out from our local scene to a more national scale and really the only thing we can do or any band for that matter is just work your ass off to get what you want from your art.

How has the internet and social media impacted on the band to date? Do you see it as something destined to become a negative from a positive as the band grows and hopefully gets increasing success or is it more that bands struggling with it are lacking the knowledge and desire to keep it working to their advantage?

I don’t think it really brings anything negative for us personally but that’s the fun thing with social media people really only care about the negative. We are so quick to jump on anyone’s mistake ‘cause you know everyone is perfect but I think if society could easily cut through the bullshit then social media sites could be a positive outlook on everything.

Once again a big thanks for sharing time with us; anything you would like to add or reveal for the readers?

Thank you so much for having us guys, and to the readers we love you so much and thank you for making our lives liveable by allowing us to play music.

Check us out if you haven’t yet and expect to see us coming to your city in the near future!!

https://www.facebook.com/owleyebandco    http://www.owleyeofficial.com/   https://twitter.com/owleyeofficial/

Pete RingMaster

The Ringmaster Review 08/07/2016

Syren City – Paradise In The Dirt

Syren City Promo Shot_RingMasterReview

Almost two years ago, UK rockers Syren City laid a hefty punch on attention with the Escape EP, five tracks of multi-flavoured rock ‘n’ roll which was as compelling as it was thrilling. Now the Bristol quintet returns with its successor Paradise In The Dirt and three more encounters which leave ears ringing with pleasure and an appetite for more simply greedier.

Formed in 2011, Syren City swiftly bred a sound from essences drawn across the likes of post hardcore, punk, metal and alternative rock. The 2014 Escape EP quickly showed it was a formidable and striking mix, echoing the band’s live reputation earned through festival appearances and shows with the likes of Turbowolf, The Alarm, Mallory Knox, Max Raptor, The Hell, Roam, Black Foxxes, Futures, Young Legionnaire, Attack Attack, and Blitz Kids. The release of their new proposition shows that the band’s sound has continued to expand and indulge in greater adventurous traits, increasing in magnetism with equal measure. The first in a series of EPs which have a conceptual thread and link, Paradise In The Dirt captures ears and imagination with swift deftness of enterprise and a rousing boisterousness, never relenting upon or releasing the listener until its final note has shared its mighty bait.

Syren City Cover Artwork_RingMasterReviewIt opens up with It’s Morphine Time, a song which descends on the senses like a tempestuous challenge from its first breath, but a threat just as quickly seducing ears and appetite as riffs and rhythms launch their hungry persuasion. In no times wiry grooves are entangling song and listener while anthemic vocal roars across the band find a great Beastie Boys feel to them. As it proceeds, the scent of bands such as Rage Against The Machine and Refused also colour the encounter, with frontman Simon Roach taking vocal charge as the barbarous rhythms of bassist Sam Leworthy and drummer Mat Capper badger and incite. It is a virulent infectious affair with the enterprise and fiery grooves of guitarists Ian Chadderton and Josh Mortazavi arousing, aiding and shaping the songs twists and turns as its metal/heavy rock antagonism and inescapable catchiness fuels pleasure, the song alone surely ensuring the EP’s certain success.

It is quickly backed up by its companions though, Danielle coming next and opening on a melodic caress which inspires the following vocals and flirtatious gait of the song. Little time passes before again a volcanic quality and energy erupts, its theatre creating a My Chemical Romance like attraction before things slip back into the captivating calm and the repeat of the galvanic cycle. As within its predecessor, there is a kind of tempestuousness to ideas and intensity which only adds to the riveting drama provided before 10,000 Knives steps forward to grab its share of the plaudits. Initial riffs and lures have a slight Therapy? feel before the punk heart of band and song grips and adds a Reuben meets Taking Back Sunday hue to the outstanding encounter.

All three tracks are uniquely distinct to each other but fuelled by a sound with a character all Syren City’s. The band impressed with their last release and have only made a bigger impact with Paradise In The Dirt, a release sure to be the favourite EP of 2016 for a great many.

The Paradise In The Dirt EP is out now through all stores-

https://www.facebook.com/SyrenCity  https://twitter.com/SyrenCity  http://instagram.com/syrencitymusic

Pete RingMaster 30/06/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Cardinal Bay – Answers EP

CARDINAL BAY_RingMasterReview

Making a potent introduction with their debut EP last year, UK post hardcore band Cardinal Bay have upped their game with its successor Answers. It is a five track proposal which growls as it dances on the ear, all of its tracks being as seriously catchy as they are emotively and aggressively forceful.

The strength of the band’s 2015 debut EP Way Back Home, released in their second year together, suggested that the Bridgwater quintet had the potential to make some big musical statements ahead and Answers certainly lives up to that promise in many ways. It comes after a year, since that first release, where the band undertook many UK tours, playing around the country alongside Amaryllis, Lost Atlanta, Chasing Cadence, and Breathe in the Silence and supported Funeral for a Friend before playing main stage at the UK’s biggest youth music festival, Butserfest. The early months of 2016 have been no different in business and success, the five-piece having made a recently acclaimed appearance on the main stage at Teddy Rocks. Now it is time for the Jonny Renshaw (Devil Sold His Soul) recorded Answers to lay down a marker for what many are calling the most exciting band to recently emerge in the post hardcore scene.

art_RingMasterReviewFrom its first moments, the Answers EP certainly does little to dismiss that type of claim, its title track slipping into ears with a melodic jangle as feisty sounds flirt with its background. Pretty soon rhythms and riffs are jostling for attention too as the strong harmonic cries of Josh Rogers colour the song’s air. It is not an over striking start but the song easily has attention held, especially once Roger’s strong vocals stroll with a throaty bassline from Jonny Dibble for company as beats jab and skirt their tempting. As the guitars of George Hill and Dave Small cast a web of melodic suggestiveness, the song simmers nicely with the occasion eruption of raw vocal growls matched by an increase in energy led by the lively beats of Matt Ward.

A strong start to the EP, the song is a sign of things to come with bigger and bolder things waiting to really spark the imagination starting with Out Of Sight. The second track has a far more imposing air to it straight away, swinging beats hitting with a heavier hand as again raw vocal squalls court the impressing melodic tones of Rogers. The band does have a flare with creating infectious pop seeded enterprise too and that also blossoms within the tenacious encounter, almost so well that its make the rawest hues of the track seem unnecessary.

Its feisty presence is matched and eclipsed by the outstanding roar of the following #Shotgun. Instantly it has a virulence and fiery edge which seduces and ignites the imagination and appetite to their strongest reactions yet. There is something familiar to the song, an indefinable essence which only adds to its drama and magnetism built on shadowy rhythms, melodic adventure, and a rampant catchiness more than conducted by Roger’s powerful delivery.

Masquerade makes a more tempered impact next though from its initial grouchy attack amidst a spiral of sonic enterprise, the track easily engages and increasingly pleases ears. It lacks the spark of its predecessors musically, the ear grabbing bite which chains attention but certainly makes up for it with the now expected great vocal quality of the band.

The EP comes to a close with There Are No Flames In Hell, a track which slowly burned itself into the passions. By its end though, and helped by round after round of its infection loaded chorus, it emerged as another strong and lingering favourite. The track contains every impressive element of the band and its sound, giving plenty more reasons why so many are waxing lyrical about Cardinal Bay. With the Answers EP to the fore, 2016 is looking like being a big year for the Somerset band.

The Answers EP is out now @ https://cardinalbay.bandcamp.com/

https://www.facebook.com/CardinalBay   http://cardinalbayuk.tumblr.com/   https://twitter.com/CardinalBayUK

Pete RingMaster 17/05/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Cute Cute Death – Vessels

Cute Cute Death Promo Shot_RingMasterReview

With a name which certainly sparks intrigue, Cute Cute Death back it up with a sound just as attention grabbing and now an album which climbs over the senses, trespasses their boundaries, and leaves fierce satisfaction in its wake. Vessels though is a slightly curious affair for personal tastes, an album which for its first third certainly pleases yet without sparking much more whilst its remainder is a different type of protagonist sparking real excitement about itself and the band’s future.

The seeds of Cute Cute Death began in 2008 when drummer Wayne Kopman and guitarist Johnny Correia relocated from their home city of Johannesburg, South Africa to the UK. Settling in London, the pair met and subsequently linked up with vocalist Niko Forster. After a few line-up changes, guitarist Ricky Gurung and bassist Robert Pipe were enlisted, at which point the band properly emerged, initially under the name Set The Air On Fire. They were soon lighting up stages with their American Metal/hardcore influenced post hardcore endeavours, taking to their growing sound inspirations from the likes of Lower Definition, Alexisonfire, Gallows, Finch, Refused, Deftones, and Glass Jaw, who especially come to mind at times listening to Vessels. The subsequent time since starting has seen the band play across the UK with bands such as Broadway, Atlantis, Flood of Red, They Say Fall, Confessions of a Traitor, and Rival State, all the time adding to their potent reputation which is now pushed again by their debut album.

Produced by Joseph Grouse with Justin Hill (Sikth) mixing, mastering, and co-producing, Vessels opens up with its title track; a song needing little time to get a firm hand on ears and attention. The guitar prowess of Correia and Gurung quickly casts a web of enterprise that lures the imagination, their sonic touch soon wrapping the impressive clean tones of Forster. Straightaway he impresses, increasingly so as his delivery springs rawer, dirtier, and grouchier roars to equally fine success. As the rhythms rumble and prowl the resourceful landscape of the song, there is no escaping the lure and vibrancy of the encounter yet, and we emphasize for personal ears and tastes, it never quite taps into something which really stirs up the passions.

Cute Cute Death Cover Artwork_RingMasterReviewAll the same it is a powerful and dramatic start to Vessels continued by the Sikth meets Incubus personality of Alarm. Once again, the guitars dance with invention and craft as rhythms crowd the senses with their hungry shadows, all colluding to burn fiercely around the equally inflamed and rousing tones of Forster. The track enjoyably blisters on the ear before seamlessly evolving into the rawer antipathy of Pockets. Sonic tendrils and band shouts bring fresh drama to the album whilst the bass of Pipe borders on predatory as it robustly swings through the web of unpredictable and intoxication grooves and scything hooks. There is something extra about the track, if indefinable, which its predecessors lacked, an essence which and hints at the adventure waiting to escape the album further on.

Red Lights makes a calmer entrance next, though walls of bruising rhythms led by the tenacious swings of Kopman amidst intimidating riffs are soon descending on the senses before the song grows into another skilled and magnetic blend of contrasting textures and intensity, as ever echoed in the vocal enterprise of Forster. From its success the brief instrumental of Interlude looms upon ears with electronic suggestiveness on board, it drawing the listener into the awaiting revelry of DMT. It is from here that Vessels suddenly triggers a lustier reaction, though again it is hard to say exactly why, the major differences between the qualities and invention of songs before and after the melodic break not an open reason. With persistently twisting grooves and unpredictable rhythms aligned to writhing tendrils of sonic imagination adding to its temptation, there is no denying that the song simply enthrals and sparks a new breed of pleasure.

There is certainly greater diversity across the songs from hereon in on the album, starting with the warm caress of Statues. The song is an emotive melodic hug and vocal croon with the guitars spellbinding and Forster bordering on majestic with his again wonderfully varied tones. Taking best song honours, the track almost alone tells you all you need to know about the potential and already established invention of Cute Cute Death and that is without sharing any invasive trespass, which they have already proven to be equally adept at.

Leave This City follows and quickly holds courts as its web of spidery grooves and melodic acidity lies magnetically upon the rapier like thrusts of Kopman and another darkly juicy bassline from Pipe. There is a theatre to the hooks and the lively invention which grips the imagination as forcibly as the song’s underlying rhythmic rumble and fiery catchiness takes the body. It is an almost imposingly persuasive proposal matched by that of the enjoyably volatile and often irritable Glass Eyes and eclipsed by the closing might of Dinosaur. The final track is a tempest of anthemic hardcore, rebellious punk rock, and psyche infesting noise rock persistently involved with progressive and melodic ingenuity. The song is rebel rousing, a spirit igniting finale to the album offering a creative call to arms for the impressive invention and presence of Cut Cute Death.

Vessels is an excellent first full-length from the band; one which, even with that odd impact initially, left us thrilled and eager to recommend all fans check out what is a fresh breath in the post and hardcore scene.

Vessels is out now through all outlets on Friday 13th May.

http://www.cutecutedeath.com   https://www.facebook.com/cutecutedeath/     https://twitter.com/cutecutedeath

Pete RingMaster 13/05/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com

Ghosts Again – The Closest Thing To Closure

Ghosts Again_RingMasterReview

Based out of North Carolina, Ghosts Again is a post hardcore trio releasing a new EP, The Closest Thing To Closure this month. Having missed their earlier efforts, the new five track encounter is the first time we have had to check out a band many are suggesting is loaded with promise. From a strong but initially underwhelming start, it is fair to say that The Closest Thing To Closure suggests that Ghosts Again is indeed a potential equipped band well worth paying attention to.

Rising from the ashes of its member’s previous projects, Close Up on the Quiet Ones and Messenger Down, Ghosts Again picked up highly positive attention in 2015 with the release of the single, Business as Usual. It and their sound lured understandable comparisons to bands like Underoath and The Amity Affliction, suggestions easy to see happening again with The Closest Thing To Closure EP, though what ultimately emerges is an imagination and boldness in song which suggests Ghosts Again are shaping something heading towards being distinctly theirs.

GA4(Art_RingMasterReviewThe EP opens with Skeleton Boy which quickly shows the vocal and melodic prowess of vocalist/guitarist Alex Cortright. As the darker hues of Brandon Washington’s bass unites with the swinging beats of drummer Arun Bose, a great blend of brooding and lighter sonic hooks ensnare ears as Cortright’s roars continue to flame and impress. There are elements which really grab attention but equally from sound and the raw side of the vocals things are a touch too formula; failing to ignite personal tastes beyond being contented and firmly intrigued.

Pant’s Division (The End is Silence) makes a similarly expected and appealing start with heftily swung beats within sonic smog of suggestiveness around the band’s vocal variety. As the first, the song is skilfully woven with each moment involved yet a fluid web of sound and emotion; not openly striking but potently persuasive. It is the emerging element of discord and in turn melodic elegance which lifts the song to another alluring level though. It brings greater drama to the temptation and a richer element of unpredictability which really grabs the spotlight in the following and outstanding Les Enfants Terribles. From the start, grooves wind their charms around ears, the imagination just as easily bitten by the web of melodic enterprise and vocal dexterity which blossoms as the song broadens its adventure. There is a touch of My Chemical Romance to the track at times which enjoyably lines the more volatile and metal bred dexterity as well as the thickly emotive calms within the persistently evolving song.

That new level of invention continues in Relive Revive; its emotional and sonic blaze colouring an equally fascinating tapestry of guitar craft and rhythmic theatre. As with all songs on the EP, there are plenty of textures and moments of creativity to recognise or certainly compare to other bands within the post hardcore scene but tinted with a freshness of thought and skill which stops it becoming too indistinct or dull.

Ending with the increasingly compelling Eleven, a song fusing symphonic hues in its boisterous and bracing tempest of heart and sound, The Closest Thing To Closure leaves a healthy, and growing with every listen, appetite to indulge in the highly enjoyable Ghosts Again challenge and reward proposal. It is a band showing that earlier mentioned potential at every turn of an EP which is not ground-breaking but offering plenty to please ears with vigour and style.

The Closest Thing To Closure EP is out now on iTunes.

https://www.facebook.com/ghostsagainband   https://twitter.com/GhostsAgainBand

Pete RingMaster 25/04/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com

Dead Winter – My Only Home

Dead Winter_RingMasterReview

The early weeks of 2014, saw UK post hardcore band Dead Winter make a rather potent introduction to themselves with debut EP Erasing Glaciers. It was a magnetic six track fury of melodic metal and hardcore ferocity soaked with open potential which had already aroused attention with its first outing a few months earlier. Its re-release four years ago though, sparked a more national awareness which the band fed with their impressive live presence. The past couple of years or so have seen the band seemingly quiet. Things were happening though with ideas and directions breeding line-up changes as the band headed into their next steps now marked by new single My Only Home.

Formed in 2011, the Blackpool hailing band soon lured loyal support and ears with their sound and in turn the successful Romesh Dodangoda (Funeral for A Friend, Twin Atlantic) produced Erasing Glaciers. Weaving inspirations from bands such as Bury Tomorrow, Bring Me The Horizon, and A Day To Remember into their sound, Dead Winter and EP were soon drawing acclaim from the likes of Rock Sound, Powerplay, and Big Cheese Magazine. That regrouping and defining of direction and intent followed but now, and ahead of their first album also called My Only Home, set for release this summer, Dead Winter ‘return’ with a bang in the shape of its title track and an equally gripping video.

With Dodangoda at the helm of album and single again, My Only Home swiftly descends on ears with rapier like rhythms and badgering riffs which soon reveal their own predacious intent and snarl. There is a great metalcore edge to the trespass but a hue soon matched by the melodic enterprise and warmth increasingly aflame in the song. In the first minute alone, the band shows themselves to have tapped into a new contagious and virulent quality in their music without defusing the emotive intensity and fire that marked out their earlier exploits.

As pop punk in many ways as it is melodic metal and post hardcore crafted, the song continues to stir up appetite and pleasure, It provides a compelling and at times almost hostile anthemic proposal further shaped by the guitar craft of Jamie Townsend and Adam Roberts whilst driven by Danny Dawkins’s addictive beats and led by Ant Jones’ outstanding clean and melodic tones. There is a real maturity to the song which hopefully is a big teaser to the heart of the album to come, and a bold adventure which simply whips up attention.

My Only Home, single, video, and album looks like the moment when Dead Winter reassert themselves as one of Britain’s most exciting and seriously promising propositions.

The single, My Only Home is out April 15th. Check out the video on our Video Selector page.

https://www.facebook.com/DeadWinterUK

Pete RingMaster 15/04/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com/

Victorian Whore Dogs – Afternoonified

VWD_RingMasterReview

From the voracious trespass of Afternoonified there is no hiding place for the body and emotions, no safe haven within a sludge/doom metal bred consumption of the senses from a band ready to devour far broader attention than already incited by previous releases. Afternoonified is the eagerly awaited debut album from UK quartet Victorian Whore Dogs and the next punishingly irritable and rousing exposure to the band’s self-named “Sexy Hobo Trampcore.”

The Guildford hailing and 2010 formed Victorian Whore Dogs have already whipped up potent attention and keenly offered praise through their first pair of EPs, starting with the three track rabid assault of Fetch in 2013. Fair to say, Hobo Chic two years later stirred up even greater awareness and support for the band whilst pushing their stripped back and hungrily abrasive sludge metal cored sound on again which Afternoonified now continues. The album’s eleven corrosive roars are as unashamedly raw and boldly cantankerous as ever but equally show a new creative imagination and greater resourceful design to their ravenous and invasive ferocity. It is a wake-up call to those still blind to their sonic antagonism and gripping humour lined devilry, and sure to enhance a formidable reputation already earned by the band’s live presence which has already seen them crush venues alongside the likes of Conan, Ortega, We are Knuckle Dragger, Lord Misery, and Burden of the Noose as well as the New Blood Stage at Bloodstock in 2015.

Afternoonified opens with Mutton Shunter where an initial sonic lancing quickly invites inescapably anthemic beats and caustic stabs of guitar. Their union becomes more abrasive and compelling as psyche infesting grooves from Adam Crawley seduce as they wander through ears. The-hardcore/noise seeded side of the band’s animosity soon emerges too as vocalist Danny Page uncages his throated shredding roars matched in forceful kind by the vocal squalls of bassist Andy Nuttall. The track is superb, quickly in control of attention and an eager appetite whilst being purposefully guided by the rhythms of drummer Stephen More.

Front_Cover_RingMasterReviewIts creative animus is followed and matched by that cast by Captain Kirk Was My Favourite Stormtrooper. Straight away a web of spicy grooves and rapacious riffs unite beneath a mercurial atmosphere ablaze with the jaundiced vocal ire of Page. Like a psychotic mix of Neurosis and William English, band and track create a thick and swinging incursion of the senses finally making way for the even more antipathy toned challenge of I Have Become. The next track immediately shows an even darker and heavier gait which only becomes more intense and atmospherically tar thick as it insistently lumbers through ears on the way to spreading its cancerous hues to Murder Boner which breeds a whole new inhospitable sonic malignancy from them. Again the merciless aspects are offset by infectiously demanding rhythms and fearsome yet engagingly waspish grooves and piercing hooks; a combination resulting in a highly alluring landscape around more vocal enmity.

Both tracks commandingly stir up again the hungry focus and emotional involvement already in motion though the pair soon finds themselves eclipsed by the calmer invasive flirtation of Barrington Monroe. It’s droning elegance and fiery ambience smothers the senses whilst simultaneously invigorating them with a dark almost nagging touch and charm crawled over by the fiercely rasping vocal delivery of Page. The track beguiles as it scars, a quality found again in the far more predacious and equally enthralling (I Can’t Believe It’s) Nutbutter which stalks ears from its start before breaking into a repetitive and addictive groove veined grind/sludge metal woven grudge.

An infectious persistence of grooves and predatory rhythms shape the similarly captivating Agœcia next, the track another which seems to instinctively incite the primal wants of any slab of galvanic aural barbarism. It is admittedly, a quality gracing the whole of Afternoonified which will keenly entice those with an emotionally and sonically dissonant tooth, and repeats its success in the likes of the melodically and emotively rancorous Snatch Files and in turn the rhythmically enslaving Nååñshååg. The first of the two expels a coarsely bracing blaze whilst its successor creates a tapestry of rhythmic incitement before soaking its frame in doom fuelled sonic and vocal venom. It is another which infests the psyche and passions with little resistance whilst showing a strain of diversity which maybe not all songs as openly show but for the main hold.

The album comes to a close through the virulent feud of Southern Fried Homicide and the crawling aural malice of Sebastian Tenderhoof, another duo pushing the blend of textures and flavours to greater variety within their individual conflicts of sound and intent. Together they make for a heavily pleasing end to a thoroughly gripping and enjoyable invasion of body and spirit.

Though Afternoonified will impress those with an appetite for sludge, doom, and debilitating metal swiftly it is over numerous plays that it truly comes into its own and reveals its depth of invention and character. Victorian Whore Dogs is a band on the prowl with its finest vindictive growl about to be let off the leash.

Afternoonified is released April 1st via Hibernacula Records @ http://victorianwhoredogs.bandcamp.com/ and http://www.hibernacularecords.com/product/afternoonified-by-victorian-whore-dogs

https://www.facebook.com/VWDBAND

Dates for the Victorian Whore Dogs UK Tour:

01/04 – Reading, Facebar*

02/04 – Southampton, Firehouse *

03/04 – Portsmouth, Edge of the Wedge

07/04 – Worcester, The Pig & Drum *

08/04 – Leicester, The Firebug *

09/04 – Leeds, Bad Apples*

10/04 – Nottingham, The Running Horse *

14/04 – Bristol, Stag & Hounds +

15/04 – Cardiff, Fuel +

16/04 – London, The Black Heart +

17/04 – Brighton, The Prince Albert *

22/04 – Worthing, Bar 42

*With Morass of Molasses

+With Greenhorn and Tides of Sulfer

tour_RingMasterReview

Pete Ringmaster 31/03/201

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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