No Kings No Slaves – New Lease of Life

Providing a striking full introduction to themselves with debut album New Lease of Life, Switzerland hailing No Kings No Slaves have swiftly proved themselves a compelling proposition. The release is a cauldron of melodic hardcore but an encounter which dares to seek out bold and fresh pastures if maybe not always quite fulfilling the potential that imagination brings. Even so it is an album that scorched ears and ignited the senses as well as raised a hungry appetite for the band’s emotion loaded, tenaciously sculpted roar.

Lucerne hailing, the quintet of Pädi Reichmuth, Julian Thalmann, Philip Heini, Mario Rosso, and Dave Aletz embrace the inspiration of bands such as Architects, While She Sleeps, Bring me the Horizon, Gallows, The Ghost Inside, and Pure Love to their melodic hardcore bred sound though one as suggested relishing the additional flavouring of a varied mix of metal and rock. It has already shaped a well-received EP though New Lease of Life will be the first contact for a great many with No Kings No Slaves and one which will surely draw rich attention their way.

Dealing with issues ranging from transience and social ills to toxic relationships, New Lease of Life is fuelled by a furnace of passion and emotion, worldly and intimate; a fire matched in the intensity and enterprise of its sounds. Album opener, Judgment, swiftly shares that multi-faceted blaze, the song rising from portentous rhythmic intimation with a wave of heavy metal riffs quickly followed by Thalmann’s raw throated, senses abrasing tones. Just as urgently imaginative melodic threads wrap ears, the brief track an intro of sorts but providing a full incitement before the album’s title track erupts. Nagging almost bullying rhythms are surrounded by blazing guitars as again vocals coarsely assault the air but an attack from all quarters which equally captivates, especially the more post hardcore textures and harmonic vocal backing that brings greater potency to the track.

Though a form of familiarity is bred from its hardcore instincts a persistent unpredictability also shapes the alluring character of the album and the likes of the following Ticket To Far Away and Modern Life Slaves. Both tracks sear the senses as much as they melodically stir the imagination, each a tapestry of passion and intensity relishing the recipe of flavours making up their adventurous natures. The second of the two especially hit the spot with its groove metal tinted dexterity, being rivalled by the just as dynamic and multi-flavoured inferno of Humanity’s Curse.

Across the likes of Hell with its intense heart and sonic firestorm, the heavy metal hued A Quiet Place, and Medication with its more classic metal instincts, No Kings No Slaves reveal more of their creative adventure and boundary breaking imagination, the latter pair of the three the best moments within New Lease Of Life for us while after the haunting radiance of a short Interlude, the explosive Our Name Is Greed provides another fiercely memorable moment and pleasure. It is a rousing proposal that singes the senses as it cauterizes ill-will and emotion, rhythms and melodic flames relishing the individual and united prowess of the band.

The final pair of songs, Electric Sky and Losses, similarly flourish through the quintet’s eager embrace of flavours, the first emerging our favourite track as it casts a web of styles and agile dynamics upon the band’s melodic hardcore pyre with its successor similarly explosive and bold in its nature and creative character.

New Lease Of Life is a release which just gets better song by song, its second half majorly arousing the passions and personal plaudits but from start to finish the album only impressed and declared No Kings No Slaves a band attention was made for.

New Lease Of Life is out now.

https://www.facebook.com/NKNSband/   https://www.instagram.com/nokingsnoslaves/   https://nokingsnoslaves.bandcamp.com/

Pete RingMaster 14/03/2020

Copyright RingMasterReview: MyFreeCopyright

SPInnERS – Operation: Breakout

It is four years since we were introduced to Greek outfit SPInnERS through their third album, Ghost. It was a striking and rousing invitation to the Athens hailing trio’s clamorous fusion of post hardcore, punk, noise and indie rock, and reason enough to suggest the band were poised to stir the same attention and recognition that they already had at home further afield. It is probably fair to say that those expectations have not been realised yet but that relative anonymity is sure to be tested again with the release of new full-length, Operation: Breakout.

Between those albums, the 5 Songs EP of 2018 hinted at a new breath of flavoursome adventure to the band’s sound, a richer touch of imagination now flourishing within eleven-track loaded Operation: Breakout and fair to say that the album swiftly had ears hooked with opener We Are Entering A New World Of Artificial Optimism And Massive Screens. The track is a slice of dark instrumental suggestion upon a robust surge of rhythmic enticement setting down the first potent trait to be found within the album, a melodic and imaginative drama which needed no words alongside to provide plenty to conjure with.

Of course the band’s lyrical side does nothing to defuse that potency as the following Revenge Of The Tribesmen proves, the song leading ears in with a tease of guitar before the thumping rhythmic prowess of drummer Chris joins the resonating drawl of Johnny’s bass. As the track twists and turns with hooks and riffs, guitarist Panos weaving a compelling web, his and the band’s aligning vocals roar to further accentuate the song’s magnetic holler.

Bleak is next up, exploding on the senses with cacophonous hunger before settling down a touch though that volatility is surface wore. Whereas the previous album bore the bands post punk instincts quite openly, Operation: Breakout relishes their punk instincts and the third track epitomises that intent though equally it just as openly shares the dexterous variety within the band’s music. Never breaking its raucous stride, the song makes way for the delicious clang of I’ll Be Waiting which just to contradict the previous statement emerges on a delicious post punk lure before exposing its contagion loaded rock ‘n’ roll. Moments spring thoughts of The Membranes and others times fellow Greeks, Three Way Plane are hinted at but essences in something unapologetically individual to SPInnERS.

As Endless Dive brings its alternative rock spiced yell to the band’s indie meets noise punk howl, the threesome unveil more of their magnetic writing and cross genre garage rock bearing imagination, the just as infectious No Exception a creative echo of that invention as it strolls with rhythmic seduction and bursts with equal zeal upon eager ears and appetite. There is something familiar to the track, though we suspect it is simply reflections of the band’s previous triumphs even if Serbian outfit Noyz? is provoked in thoughts occasionally, but that just an ingredient its contagious and wonderfully unpredictable punk ‘n’ roll.

A contender for best album moment, the song is quickly rivalled by Wash You Away with its scythes of post punk guitar within a more punk pop nurtured canter. Even so both songs are eclipsed by the following pair of the album’s title track and its successor Johann Trollmann’s Infinite Punch. The first of the two ambles in on almost ear taunting grooves amidst sonic atmospherics as Chris and Johnny cast their rhythmic incitement, the tones and guitar intimation of Panos keenly as manipulative on quickly hungry ears and imagination before the second of the two simply had us drooling. Just as Buzzcocks shaped their early albums with some truly suggestive and addictive instrumentals, so SPInnERS bless their new release. With the sax of Manolis Kisamitakis a wicked addition, the piece weaves an intimation of intrigue and shadows, danger and compulsion colouring every addictive note and haunting suggestion on offer.

With the acoustic embrace and melancholy of Who Cares? completing Operation: Breakout we can only declare the album the band’s finest moment yet and though it is ridiculously still easy to get lost and overlooked in the vast opportunities modern technology gives artists there is even more that feeling and anticipation that SPInnERS are ready to erupt upon the biggest landscapes of attention given the chance.

Operation: Breakout is available now @ https://spinnersathens.bandcamp.com/

https://www.facebook.com/spinnersathens/

Pete RingMaster 25/01/2020

Copyright RingMasterReview: MyFreeCopyright

Dead Kaczynski – Mr. Scratch

Poised to uncage their debut EP his October, British noise punks Dead Kaczynski have laid down one irresistible teaser in the shape of first single Mr. Scratch. The track is a slice of cacophonous temptation which ripples with dissonance and shrugs with indifference to the sanity of your psyche but most of all has the body bouncing to its rapacious antics and contagion.

Kent-based, Dead Kaczynski (pronounced Ka-Zin-Ski) have a sound bred from post-hardcore and driven by noise punk ferocity. The trio is another proposition emerging from the Medway scene demanding attention and on the evidence of their latest single another which rewards with body and imagination rousing incitement.

Formed from the ashes of Kent punks Wiremother, the threesome of vocalist/guitarist Shareef Dahroug, bassist/vocalist Oliver Nissen, and drummer/vocalist Liam McCann has taken little time earning a rich reputation for their live shows, one surely about to be fully escalated by their first releases, Mr. Scratch and the Yakuza Attack Dog EP, released 4th October on Skingasm Records.

There is a touch of Punching Swans to Mr. Scratch but quickly the song lays out its own breath and character as swinging rhythms and the fervid vocals grip air and ears. All the while bass and guitar grumble, intermittently adding their grouchiness before wires of guitar entangle the instinctive disharmony of the song’s heart and voice and subsequently spark a fevered roar of voracious and infectious causticity.

Brief and rabidly hungry, the track is pure noise virulence, almost carnal in its breath and ravenous in its fierce energy. Roll on the Yakuza Attack Dog.

Mr. Scratch is available@ https://deadkaczynski.bandcamp.com/track/mr-scratch-4 with the Yakuza Attack Dog EP released October 4th.

https://www.facebook.com/deadkaczynski/   https://twitter.com/dead_kaczynski

Pete RingMaster 03/10/2019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Unimagined – Friendless

Something wicked this way comes and it goes by the name of Friendless, the debut EP from US rockers Unimagined. Offering five rousing slices of the band’s “theatrical metal”, the release swiftly and increasingly had ears and imagination in the palms of its creative hands as it introduced a proposition we found rather easy to devour.

Hailing from St. Louis, Unimagined emerged in 2017 and soon earned a potent reputation and support across their local scene. Their sound is an animated mix of post hardcore and alternative metal; something akin to a n animated fusion of Pierce The Veil, My Chemical Romance, and At the Drive-In. It is a carnival of flavour and imagination honed into one melodically rousing and tempestuously seductive proposition which across Friendless never leaves a moment void of bold adventure and creative drama.

Too Dead To Dance sets the EP off and alone convinced there was something special going in within ears, its declaration subsequently echoed across its companions. The outstanding opener instantly had its hooks under the skin as the rich clean vocals of guitarist Caleb Freihaut align with the rapier swings of drummer Kai. The guitars of Jake Morgan and Nathan Simpson add to the emerging theatre with the waiting throat scathing roars of fellow vocalist Jarett Clark poised to erupt upon the already alluring mix. With every passing second the track simply escalated its captivation, the grumbling swing of Patrick Reuben’s bass adding further threat within the melodic enterprise embracing Freihaut‘s expressive dexterity.

It proved enthralling stuff and was soon matched by the imagination fuelling next up Something Borrowed, Something Blue. Its entrance is maybe less dramatic than its predecessor’s but with boisterous energy to its stroll and the crystalline caress of keys the song had little difficulty enticing attention, undisturbed focus rewarded with a tempest of aural drama and fiery invention brought with craft and imagination. The contrast of the lead vocalists works a treat in the creative maelstrom, the tenacity of the sounds crowding their magnetism simply rousing and as with all tracks every second, note, and syllable brings compelling persuasion.

The EP’s title track follows, Friendless. strolling in with a certain swagger as its theatre of sound and intimation quickly casts its narrative. Raw vocal prowess provides a scathing trespass within the swiftly thick theatre of enticement, the song almost bullying with its melodic wiring and muscular manipulation. Eventually its pressure becomes a senses harrying assault but one tempered by the melodic elegance of keys.

The final pair of She Was Scared Of Storms and Lemons & Sodomy simply escalated the bountiful character and prowess of the EP. The first of the pair is a serenade with fire in its belly, a pyre of creative animation and endeavour which had the body bouncing and appetite lusting while the second from its inescapably seductive melodic teasing erupts in a kaleidoscope of inflamed passion and resourcefulness ; both fascinating stages for the fertile craft and imagination of Unimagined.

As Friendless reaches new borders it is easy to expect and assume Unimagined will be launched into keener spotlights. The EP is a thrilling beginning to a proposition with still so much more to discover within their depths and imagination; something else to be eagerly excited over.

Friendless is out now via Standby Records; available @ https://standbyrecords.merchnow.com

https://www.facebook.com/UNimaginedBand/   http://unimagined.standbyrecords.com

Pete RingMaster 21/06/2019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

KEN mode – Loved

We cannot say that the artwork surrounding releases particularly guides or influences our thoughts going into a new encounter but it has to be admitted that the art wrapping the new KEN mode album made a striking impression whilst sparking intrigue and imagination long before a note was heard. Created by the band’s long-time collaborator Randy Ortiz, it is a piece which also inspired the band itself in regards to Loved, their seventh full-length. Vocalist/guitarist Jesse Matthewson ahead of its release revealed that “We entered writing for this album with one goal in mind – to please the smile” referring to the cover’s protagonist.

He also said “We wanted to make an album that represented a thinking person’s reaction to the political/technological climate we are existing in today. We wanted to make the perfect album to put on repeat while pushing your physical limits to their maximum, if only to silence the noise that is constantly whirring around inside of your own head, even for a brief moment.” Listening to Loved, it is not hard to feel they succeeded in both, certainly in satisfying the smile and though whether you can create perfection can be debated but it is a release which stands on the frontline of their most stirring and striking proposals yet.

From the grungier and expansive indie rock inspired endeavour of its highly enjoyable predecessor, Success, KEN mode has in many ways returned to the sonic viscera and noise punk/hardcore toxicity of the likes of Venerable (2011) and Entrench (2013) for Loved. In saying that, the album equally pushes the bold adventure hinted at in Success to far more magnetic, feral, and maybe for some divisive heights. It is unapologetically invasive, a cauldron of sonic violence, and their most invasively dark offering yet and for us more than possibly their finest moment yet.

Doesn’t Feel Pain Like He Should is the first venomous treat from Loved, the track instantly lancing the senses with a sonic incision before the fierce rapier swings of drummer Shane Matthewson descend closely aligned to the ravenous grumble of Scott Hamilton’s bass. The caustic wires cast from Jesse’s guitar equally infest song and listener making a nagging cradle for the raw throated squall of his vocals all the time rhythms breeding greater virulence in their trespass. It is a glorious nagging of sound taking swipes and bites with every elevation of animosity and twist of enterprise resulting in a deliciously corrosive start to the release.

The Illusion Of Dignity teases with its initial lure before swinging on rapacious rhythms next, Shane’s hits a bone shuddering impact matched in carnal attraction by the resonance of Scott’s bass. Post punk hues add to the noise rock antics bred within the cavernous yet threateningly intimate breath of the track, vocals a toxic animus across the revolving spiral and searing flare up of guitar. As with its predecessor, new intensities fuel and fresh ideation inspires the course of the irresistible intrusion before Feathers & Lips steps forward to prey on senses and psyche. From its first breath it is a challenging threat but quickly springing its own infectious violation as seductively flirtatious as it is menacingly inhospitable. With a web of sonic dissonance and enticement at its heart, it is another which easily got under the skin and infringed upon the senses for rich pleasure.

It there was vague concord in the last track, Learning To Be Too Cold is sheer ill-will and needs a mere breath to invade and suffocate the senses in its corrosive wash and vocal feud as beats again barely labour to punish and incite attention. The vile lure of bass is a treat whilst the sonic scathing from the guitar is a mercilessly nagging breach as magnetic as everything piercing its scarring waves. It is not a song with the same instinctive contagion of those before it but one as memorable while Not Soulmates sets another unforgettable marker with its untamed but skilfully bred cacophony led by vocal discontent.

Very Small Men rears up to share its unique character and proposal swiftly after, dancing in on nimble dynamics driven by Shane’s inimitable rhythmic dexterity. It is soon though blowing a storm of aural animation hell-bent on igniting muscles and addictiveness to flex their instincts as the song’s holler enslaves. It is a thrill of an infestation, discord increasing by every turn of sonic entanglement and emotive dissonance.

From one of the album’s momentous moments to another as the calm swing of This Is A Love Test brings its own array of creative altercation. A jazz nurtured intimating caress is brought by the sax of Kathryn Kerr, its emotive and mellow seducing aligned to vocal reflection but both soon inspiring and joining a rancorous expulsion of frictious inharmony in a schism of enterprise which further inflames ears and thoughts as rhythms permeate the body.

The final pair of Fractures In Adults and No Gentle Art are equally as riveting and argumentative. The first is a senses hassling, evolving drone of disharmony which fingers and violates psyche and self-peace, each wave of creative quarrel intensifying in weight, ferocity, and conflict to disarm and inhumanely seduce while its successor rises up from a connecting rhythmic pulsation, emerging through shadow thick, portentously drenched serenity into almost salacious sonic warfare It stalks the listener from the off, every note and breath bringing a slight elevation in threat and intensity leading to crescendos of visceral expulsions and ravenous corrosion laden discordance again with Kerr’s breath casting creative arson within the gorgeous enmity.

The track is a bewitching, at times bewildering and relentlessly breath-taking conclusion to an album proving so hard to escape and move on to new adventure from. If you are looking for life affirming calm and beauty, Loved is not for you yet in many ways it does feed those desires whilst focusing the senses and thoughts on the reality of the world we are inescapably part of. Self-harm has never been more fun and invigorating than with KEN mode’s latest monster of a gem.

Loved is available now via Season of Mist and @ https://kenmode.bandcamp.com/album/loved

Check out their website for news and dates of their Canadian dates with Shallow in September, US/Canadian tour alongside Birds In Row in October, and European tour with Coilguns and Birds In Row this Nov/Dec.

http://www.ken-mode.com    http://www.facebook.com/kenmode    http://www.twitter.com/kenmodenoise

Pete RingMaster 31/08/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Tailblock – Think Or Be

As much as instant slavery of ears goes down a treat with us offerings which take their time to blossom and accelerate their temptation are just as enjoyable. Think Or Be, the new EP from British trio Tailblock manages to be as good as both. It is a six track roar which easily grabbed the appetite from its first attack but only grew and flourished with greater and in turn keener attention play by play. High praise took to its predecessor couple years back and it is unlikely it will be a stranger this time around either.

Hailing from Dartford in Kent and emerging in 2016, Tailblock released debut EP, Burn Your Bridges, at the close of that first year. It was produced by Ian Sadler (Anavae, Roam), who returns to add his touch to Think Or Be, and as said earned numerous plaudits. Inspirations to the band include the likes of Glassjaw, Hundred Reasons, Rival Schools, and Reuben and it is the latter which most comes to mind in varying shades across the new EP. Even so, the threesome of Jak Coleman (bass guitar/backing vocals), Martyn Kingsmill (drums/percussion/backing harmonies), and Gary Ptaszek (guitar/lead vocals) hold their own individuality in a release which sees their post hardcore nurtured sound much more assured, diverse, and adventurous than in that first encounter.

The EP opens up with its title track and an immediately insistent tide of riffs and rhythms from which a delicious hook springs to quickly be joined by the strong tones of Ptaszek. In no time it is a rousing roar, even in its calmer moments a spirit sparking incitement from within which that infernal hook has ears and lust dangling.

It is a seriously infectious and muscular start to the release firmly backed up by Heavy Arms. The band’s latest single it too teases and tempts with a hook which just gets under the skin, this time the band using it from the first second to nag and tempt. There is a more controlled gait to the song and a swing which had the body moving in unison, Jamie Lenman and co an easy comparison to its opening infection. There is also an underlying volatility which does not quite ignite but definitely adds a great feral quality around the pure catchiness of the song. A mix of pop, punk, and alternative rock, the track is thick contagion with the backing vocals of Coleman and Kingsmill as potent as Ptaszek’s lead and all three’s musical prowess.

Rocket follows quickly establishing its heavier presence as the wires of the guitar and throbbing lines of the bass surround the thumping beats of Kingsmill. It too has a catchiness which cannot fail to incite feet but did miss the particular spark of its predecessor for our ears. Its emotive edge though is a strong hue, an increasingly persuasive one which leaves nothing on the table within the ferocious Blisters. A fiery attitude soaked offering as inescapably catchy as it is imposingly aggressive it soon steals favourite track honours especially with its melodically seductive climax.

The EP concludes with firstly Listen, a song rising from a rockabilly-esque temptation to another emotionally charged yet controlled saunter. Even so its melancholic elegance erupts in moments of sonic fire with its mercurial landscape a ride of heart bred turbulence and tenacious enterprise. Its successor, 100, similarly has a great unpredictable air and touch to its character, acoustic coaxing and vocal reflection leading to melodic infection and spirited release in emotion and sound.

It is a fine end to a proposition which grows and further impresses by the listen. From the start we rather liked it, now it is one we fiercely recommend. There can never be another Reuben, one of our all-time loves at The RR, but in their own distinct way that gap just might be filled by Tailblock; Think Or Be suggests so.

Think Or Be is released July 13th digitally and on CD.

https://www.facebook.com/tailblockband

Pete RingMaster 05/07/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Cancel – Dark Reveries

Dark Reveries is the new album from Swiss hardcore fury Cancel; a release which echoes its titles with tracks which savagely grab you from reality to immerse in rousingly, often carnally raucous dissonance. It makes no compromises in its assault and attitude loaded irritability but tempers the compelling causticity with flirtatious imagination whilst declaring the Luzern quintet ready to seize global attention.

Founded in 2011, Cancel has released a host of ear grabbing proposals around a richly received debut album in Circle of 2015. Their sound has evolved across each encounter and ventures a whole new plateau of enterprise and devilry within second full-length Dark Reveries. It is tagged as hardcore but freely ventures across the landscapes of noise, punk, metalcore, and post hardcore with each individual song.

It opens up with Mind Burial, instantly expressing raw vocals and sound upon the senses as rhythms closely prowl. Stalking the listener, the track soon hits a more urgent stride without losing all its restraints; captivating attention with every passing second of its Coilguns meets Red Tape like assault. An instinctive groove seizes its moment to enslave as rhythms continue to prey, all the while the band’s imagination brewing and taking a thicker hold on the album’s thrilling start.

The following Hysteria surges through ears with punk ‘n’ roll rancor, beats thumping with flirtatious violence as group shouts and urges accompany individual temptation. It is a seriously enjoyable and insatiable trespass emulated in its own way by successor Golden Rats but given a whole new web of twists and turns to become scorched by and addicted too. Both tracks reveal more of the bolder hunger and adventure in the band’s sound; exploration further stretched and exploited within the invasively mercurial Death Cab. As its punk heart bellows and ensnares like a malicious Shevils, the band’s rock ‘n’ roll instincts gains momentum, the great blend of vocals following the imaginative endeavour. Wiry grooves and the brooding growl of the bass only add to the unbridled magnetism brewed and devoured.

Poor Man’s Sermon is pure seduction from its first breath, the song slowly unwinding its unpredictable body note by note, clean syllable by alluring word until strolling through post punk/rock terrain courted by throat raw vocal toxicity. It is a fascinating affair and mix which only intensified its ire and hold by the second before the punk hostility of Chased Feelings ripped through ears. It too though embraced a mix of flavours and urgencies within its brief tenure, making way for the anthemic roar and challenging antipathy of Freedom On A Cross. As its predecessor, the track swiftly got under the skin with its predacious swing and inescapable curse of hooks and grooves.

The following minute and a half sees You`re Everything I`m Not ravage the senses, its Converge-esque punk feud colluding with rock ‘n’ roll arousal to manipulate and enslave while Human Machinery straight after sees Cancel spark the imagination more forcibly in its minute of instrumental darkness than many bands do in a ten minute plus flight of suggestion.

Dark Reveries finishes off with its title track, another song which is on the hunt from its opening seconds of sound and invention but with an eagerness which refuses a negative response. It is a swing and purpose which shuffles its attack but cores it with an infectious lure which never deviates from its intent and success.

It is a fine end to an album which just impresses further by the listen. Cancel might not grow to be one of Switzerland’s greatest exports but already they are definitely one of its most pleasurable and captivating.

Dark Reveries is available now @ https://cancel.bandcamp.com/

 http://cancelband.com/   https://www.facebook.com/CancelBandOfficial

Pete RingMaster 03/07/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright